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The team recently took the MIT cheetah-bot for a test run, where it bounded across the grass at a steady clip.  Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Algorithm Enables Untethered Cheetah Robot to Run and Jump

September 16, 2014 | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

MIT researchers have developed an algorithm for bounding that they’ve successfully implemented in a robotic cheetah — a sleek, four-legged assemblage of gears, batteries and electric motors that weighs about as much as its feline counterpart. The team recently took the robot for a test run, where it bounded across the grass at a steady clip. The researchers estimate the robot may eventually reach speeds of up to 30 mph.

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StarDrop 5.5 Software Suite

StarDrop 5.5 Software Suite

September 16, 2014 3:15 pm | Optibrium Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

StarDrop 5.5 is a suite of software for guiding decisions in drug discovery, helping project teams quickly identify high-quality compounds. It works by evaluating complex data, which is often uncertain because of experimental variability or predictive error.

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On September 20, early-bird pricing for the ISC Cloud and ISC Big Data registrations will be replaced with regular registration fees.

Early Bird Rate for ISC Cloud and Big Data Conferences to End Soon

September 16, 2014 3:03 pm | by ISC | News | Comments

On September 20, early-bird pricing for the ISC Cloud and ISC Big Data registrations will be replaced with regular registration fees. With the regular rates, the passes will cost 100 Euro more for each conference, and the combined conference ticket, which allows attendees to participate in both events, will cost 150 Euro more. Thus, ISC is encouraging attendees to register this week in order to benefit from the current savings.

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Flying through an Aurora  -- Courtesy of NASA/ESA/Alexander Gerst

Flying through an Aurora

September 16, 2014 2:40 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst posted this photograph taken from the International Space Station to social media on August 29, 2014, writing, "words can't describe how it feels flying through an #aurora. I wouldn't even know where to begin…." Crewmembers on the space station photograph the Earth from their unique point of view located 200 miles above the surface.

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Dr. Austin Lund (left) and Dr. Anthony Laing, co-authors of the research

New Way to run Quantum Algorithm uses Much Simpler Methods

September 15, 2014 3:49 pm | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

A new way to run a quantum algorithm using much simpler methods than previously thought has been discovered by a team of researchers at the University of Bristol. These findings could dramatically bring forward the development of a 'quantum computer' capable of beating a conventional computer.

Close-ups of an experiment conducted by John Bush and his student Daniel Harris, in which a bouncing droplet of fluid was propelled across a fluid bath by waves it generated. Courtesy of Dan Harris

Fluid Mechanics: New Math Suggests Alternative to Quantum Orthodoxy

September 15, 2014 3:43 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

The central mystery of quantum mechanics is that small chunks of matter sometimes seem to behave like particles, sometimes like waves. For most of the past century, the prevailing explanation of this conundrum has been what’s called the “Copenhagen interpretation” — which holds that, in some sense, a single particle really is a wave, smeared out across the universe, which collapses into a determinate location only when observed.

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Researchers tested the robot in snow, submerged it in water, walked it through flames, and even ran it over with a car. After each experiment, it emerged unscathed.

From Harvard Engineers, a Machine that Can Walk through Flames

September 15, 2014 3:32 pm | by Peter Reuell, Harvard University | News | Comments

When it comes to soft robots, researchers have finally managed to cut the cord. Developers from Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have produced the first untethered soft robot — a quadruped that can stand up and walk away from its designers.

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Tobacco Leaf Epidermal Cells -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Tobacco Leaf Epidermal Cells

September 15, 2014 3:10 pm | News | Comments

This 63X photo shows an expression of a fluorescently labeled protein in Tobacco leaf epidermal cells. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

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The new Watson system is being trained to analyze patient records and clinical trial criteria in order to determine appropriate matches for patients.

Mayo Clinic Partners with IBM Watson for Clinical Trials

September 15, 2014 3:00 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

Mayo Clinic and IBM have announced plans to pilot Watson, the IBM cognitive computer, to match patients more quickly with appropriate clinical trials. A proof-of-concept phase is currently underway, with the intent to introduce it into clinical use in early 2015. Researchers hope the increased speed also will speed new discoveries.

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On the right, an artificial atom generates sound waves consisting of ripples on the surface of a solid. The sound, known as a surface acoustic wave (SAW) is picked up on the left by a "microphone" composed of interlaced metal fingers. According to theory,

Sound of an Atom Captured

September 12, 2014 3:16 pm | by Johanna Wilde and Martin Gustafsson, Chalmers University of Technology | News | Comments

The interaction between atoms and light is well-known and has been studied extensively in the field of quantum optics. However, to achieve the same kind of interaction with sound waves has been a more challenging undertaking. In collaboration between experimental and theoretical physicists, Chalmers University of Technology researchers have succeeded in making acoustic waves couple to an artificial atom.

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The team's solution is to develop new algorithms that divide the data among the processors, allowing each to handle a certain region, and then stitch the image back together at the end.

Multicore Computing helps Fight Lung Cancer, Speeds CT Image Processing

September 12, 2014 3:08 pm | by University of Michigan | News | Comments

A new $1.9 million study at the University of Michigan seeks to make low-dose computed tomography scans a viable screening technique by speeding up the image reconstruction from half an hour or more to just five minutes. The advance could be particularly important for fighting lung cancers, as symptoms often appear too late for effective treatment.

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Associate Professor Federico Lauro (left) and his wife Rachelle Jensen holding a sample cartridge

Building a Global Network of Citizen Oceanographers

September 12, 2014 3:00 pm | by Nanyang Technological University (NTU) | News | Comments

NTU is working with other international universities to build a global network of ‘citizen scientists’ on a free-to-access database for oceanographic data. To gain a better understanding of marine microbes that support the nutrient cycle and form the foundation of the food web, NTU scientists have embarked on a pilot project to crowd-source the collection of oceanographic data globally.

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Initial research focused on optimization of the PMEMD classical molecular dynamics code, part of the widely used AMBER Molecular Dynamics software, on multi-core Intel Xeon processors and “manycore” Intel Xeon Phi processors.

SDSC Joins Intel Parallel Computing Centers Program with Focus on Molecular Dynamics, Neuroscience and Life Sciences

September 12, 2014 2:44 pm | by San Diego Supercomputer Center | News | Comments

The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California, San Diego, is working with semiconductor chipmaker Intel to further optimize research software to improve the parallelism, efficiency, and scalability of widely used molecular and neurological simulation technologies.

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Sentira Data Visualization Software

Sentira Data Visualization Software

September 12, 2014 2:36 pm | Optibrium Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

Sentira is a desktop application designed to provide elegant and dynamic visualization for compound data. The software is applicable across many fields of chemistry, enabling users to quickly find patterns in compound data, visualize structure-activity relationships and present and report results.

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Supernova Remains -- Courtesy of  NASA/CXC/IAFE/G.Dubner et al & ESA/XMM-Newton

Unprecedented X-ray View of Supernova Remains

September 12, 2014 11:50 am | by NASA | News | Comments

The destructive results of a powerful supernova explosion reveal themselves in a delicate tapestry of X-ray light, as seen in this image from NASA’s Chandra X-Ray Observatory and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton. The image shows the remains of a supernova that would have been witnessed on Earth about 3,700 years ago. The remnant is called Puppis A and is around 7,000 light years away and about 10 light years across.

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Scaffolded DNA origami utilizes numerous chemically synthesized, short DNA strands (staple strands) to direct the folding of a larger, biologically derived strand of DNA (scaffold strand). Molecular recognition (base pairing, i.e., A binds to T and G bind

Researchers Create World’s Largest DNA Origami

September 11, 2014 4:48 pm | by North Carolina State University | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University, Duke University and the University of Copenhagen have created the world’s largest DNA origami, which are nanoscale constructions with applications ranging from biomedical research to nanoelectronics. The standard for DNA origami has long been limited to a scaffold strand that is made up of 7,249 bases. The research team has now created DNA origami consisting of 51,466 bases

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