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Eugenia Cheng, visiting senior lecturer in mathematics and a concert pianist, specializes in category theory, which she characterizes as 'the mathematics of mathematics.' Courtesy of Robert Kozloff

Power of Mathematics Opens New Possibilities in Music

August 27, 2014 | by Steve Koppes, University of Chicago | News | Comments

Anthony Cheung’s formal mathematical training essentially ended with high school calculus. But as a musician and composer, he has explored mathematical phenomena in new ways, especially through their influence on harmony and timbre. “Through technology and thinking about acoustics, we can change sounds on the computer in innumerable ways,” says Cheung, whose musical composition earned him a 2012 Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome.

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Simulating magnetized plasma devices requires multiple particle interaction models and highly accurate, self-consistent particle trajectory modelling in combined magnetic and space-charge modified electric fields.

3D Space Charge Parallel Processing Module

August 27, 2014 3:03 pm | Cobham Technical Services | Product Releases | Comments

The 3D Space Charge module uses code that is optimized for the shared memory architecture of standard PCs and workstations with multi-core processors. Although the speed benefit of parallel processing depends on model complexity, highly iterative and computationally-intensive analysis tasks can be greatly accelerated by the technique.

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Crocus Pollen and Stigmate -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Crocus Pollen and Stigmate

August 27, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

This 400X photo of crocus pollen and stigmate received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Frederic Labaune of Education Nationale in Auxonne, France, using episcopy and stacking.

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Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is a method of producing renewable energy from two streams of a different salinity. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Renewable Energy: The Power of Salt

August 26, 2014 4:27 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

Where the river meets the sea, there is the potential to harness a significant amount of renewable energy, according to a team of mechanical engineers at MIT. The researchers evaluated an emerging method of power generation called pressure retarded osmosis, in which two streams of different salinity are mixed to produce energy. In principle, a PRO system would take in river water and seawater on either side of a semi-permeable membrane.

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Mosaic of satellite images of Antarctica taken by RADARSAT-2. Courtesy of RADARSAT-2 Data and Products © MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd. (2008) – All Rights Reserved.  RADARSAT is an official mark of the Canadian Space Agency.

Most Complete Antarctic Map for Climate Research Publicly Available

August 26, 2014 4:18 pm | by University of Waterloo | News | Comments

The University of Waterloo has unveiled a new satellite image of Antarctica, and the imagery will help scientists all over the world gain new insight into the effects of climate change. The mosaic is free and fully accessible to the academic world and the public. Using Synthetic Aperture Radar with multiple polarization modes aboard the RADARSAT-2 satellite, the CSA collected more than 3,150 images of the continent.

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Ph.D. students Giovanni Guccione (L) and Harry Slatyer examine their gold-coated silver gallium nanowire in the Quantum Optics labs. Courtesy of Quantum Optics Group, ANU

Laser Makes Atomic-force Microscopes 20 Times More Sensitive

August 26, 2014 4:12 pm | by Australian National University | News | Comments

Laser physicists have found a way to make atomic-force microscope probes 20 times more sensitive and capable of detecting forces as small as the weight of an individual virus. The technique, developed by researchers in the Quantum Optics Group of Australian National University’s Research School of Physics and Engineering, hinges on using laser beams to cool a nanowire probe to minus 265 degrees Celsius.

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Users in analytical laboratories have more freedom of choice when selecting a chromatography data system.

Agilent and Shimadzu Enable Control of Each Other’s GC Instruments in Respective Chromatographic Data Systems

August 26, 2014 3:32 pm | by Agilent | News | Comments

Agilent Technologies and Shimadzu announced the release of each other’s GC instrument control for their respective chromatography data systems. The move provides customers in analytical laboratories with more freedom of choice when selecting a chromatography data system.

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Voyager 2 Captures Images of Neptune -- Courtesy of NASA

25 Years Ago, Voyager 2 Captures Images of Neptune

August 26, 2014 3:16 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft gave humanity its first glimpse of Neptune and its moon Triton in the summer of 1989. This picture of Neptune was produced from the last whole planet images taken through the green and orange filters on the Voyager 2 narrow angle camera. The images were taken on August  20, 1989, at a range of 4.4 million miles from the planet, 4 days and 20 hours before closest approach on August 25.

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Cray CS-Storm High Density Cluster

Cray CS-Storm High Density Cluster

August 26, 2014 3:11 pm | Cray Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Cray CS-Storm is a high-density accelerator compute system based on the Cray CS300 cluster supercomputer. Featuring up to eight NVIDIA Tesla GPU accelerators and a peak performance of more than 11 teraflops per node, the Cray CS-Storm system is a powerful single-node cluster.

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Akselos' software running in a Web browser for 2.01x. This app shows the stresses in the landing gear for a solar-powered airplane. Courtesy of Akselos

Simulation Software Drastically Increases Speed of 3-D Engineering Simulations

August 25, 2014 12:40 pm | by Rob Matheson, MIT | News | Comments

MIT spinout Akselos has developed novel software, based on years of research at the Institute, which uses precalculated supercomputer data for structural components — like simulated “Legos” — to solve FEA models in seconds. Hundreds of engineers in the mining, power-generation, and oil and gas industries are now using Akselos software.

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Sandia National Laboratories managers Alex Roesler, left, and Luke Purvis, center, and systems analyst Jarret Lafleur shown inside a Bank of Italy vault in a historic Livermore, California, building, studied 23 high-value heists that occurred in the last

National Security: Lessons Learned Drawn from Perfect Heists

August 25, 2014 12:00 pm | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

The Antwerp Diamond Center theft and other sophisticated, high-value heists show that motivated criminals can find ways to overcome every obstacle between them and their targets. Can the Energy and Defense departments, responsible for analyzing, designing and implementing complex systems to protect vital national security assets, learn from security failures in the banking, art and jewelry worlds? Sandia Labs set out to answer that question

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The study combined two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Does your Computer Know How You’re Feeling?

August 25, 2014 11:16 am | by Taylor & Francis | News | Comments

Researchers in Bangladesh have designed a computer program that can accurately recognize users’ emotional states as much as 87 percent of the time, depending on the emotion. Writing in the journal Behaviour & Information Technology, A.F.M. Nazmul Haque Nahin and his colleagues describe how their study combined — for the first time — two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

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Researchers from Argonne, in collaboration with Caterpillar Inc. and Convergent Science, carried out large internal combustion engine simulations involving fine spatial and temporal resolutions; high fidelity; and robust two-phase flow, spray, turbulence,

Argonne wins HPC Innovation Excellence Award

August 25, 2014 10:47 am | by Argonne National Laboratory | News | Comments

Argonne National Laboratory was one of seven new winners of the HPC Innovation Excellence Award. Announced by International Data Corporation at the ISC '14 supercomputer industry conference in Leipzig, Germany, the award recognizes noteworthy achievements by users of high-performance computing (HPC) technologies.

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Mizapin -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Mizapin Antidepressant Drug Crystals

August 25, 2014 10:41 am | News | Comments

This 160X photo of Mizapin antidepressant drug crystals received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Robert Markus of Stockholm University using polarized light and differential interference contrast.

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Ramasany Gowthami participated in the creation of an Android app by means of which users get together to crack a modern cryptographic code.

Smartphones Set Out to Decipher Cryptographic System

August 25, 2014 4:33 am | by Sébastien Corthésy, EPFL | News | Comments

An Android app has been created that allows users to get together to crack a modern cryptographic code. All encryption types, among which we can find the widely used RSA, can theoretically be broken. If so, how to ensure that our data remains protected? The answer lies in the time and effort required to break the code.

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Once installed, the sensors would provide information about the condition of bridges that cannot be obtained by visual inspection alone and would allow authorities to identify and focus on bridges that need immediate attention. Courtesy of USchick

Wireless Sensors and Flying Robots Monitor Deteriorating Bridges

August 22, 2014 12:45 pm | by Tufts School of Engineering | News | Comments

As a report from the Obama administration warns that one in four bridges in the United States needs significant repair or cannot handle automobile traffic, Tufts University engineers are employing wireless sensors and flying robots that could have the potential to help authorities monitor the condition of bridges in real time.

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