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A notebook by Alan Turing, the World War II code-breaking genius depicted by Benedict Cumberbatch in the Oscar-nominated "The Imitation Game," is shown in a special preview at Bonhams auctioneers. The 56-page manuscript, containing Turing's complex mathem

British Code Breaker Alan Turing's Notebook Goes to Auction

January 26, 2015 | by AP | News | Comments

A handwritten notebook by Alan Turing, the World War II code-breaking genius depicted by Benedict Cumberbatch in the Oscar-nominated The Imitation Game, is going on the auction block. The 56-page manuscript was written at the time the British mathematician and computer science pioneer was working to break the seemingly unbreakable Enigma codes used by the Germans throughout World War II. It is expected to bring at least $1 million.

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The intelligent keyboard records each letter touched, but also captures information about the amount of force applied to the key and the length of time between one keystroke and the next. Such typing style is unique to individuals, and so could provide a

Self-powered Intelligent Keyboard could Provide New Layer of Biometric Security

January 27, 2015 10:12 am | by John Toon, Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

By analyzing such parameters as the force applied by key presses and the time interval between them, a new self-powered non-mechanical intelligent keyboard could provide a stronger layer of security for computer users. The self-powered device generates electricity when a user’s fingertips contact the multi-layer plastic materials that make up the device.

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The Software Sustainability Institute, a collaboration between the Universities of Southampton, Oxford, Edinburgh and Manchester, is spreading the word about its work in promoting greater use of software in research with an Android phone app, which is ava

New App Helping to Share World-class Software-enabled Research

January 27, 2015 10:04 am | by University of Southampton | News | Comments

Electronics and computer science researchers have helped to develop a new app to share world-class research and to receive the latest research news through a phone or tablet. The Software Sustainability Institute, a collaboration between the Universities of Southampton, Oxford, Edinburgh and Manchester, aims to spread the word about its work in promoting greater use of software in research.

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Daisy Petal with Fungal Infection and Pollen Grains -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Daisy Petal with Fungal Infection and Pollen Grains

January 27, 2015 8:50 am | News | Comments

This 10x photo shows a daisy petal with fungal infection and pollen grains, whole mount, unstained. It won 10th Place in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope and was taken using confocal autofluorescence.

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In his doctoral thesis, Baaij describes the world-wide production of microchips through the years.

Massive Chip Design Savings on the Horizon

January 26, 2015 4:35 pm | by University of Twente | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a programming language making the massive costs associated with designing hardware more manageable. Chip manufacturers have been using the same chip design techniques for 20 years. The current process calls for extensive testing after each design step. The newly developed, functional programming language makes it possible to prove, in advance, that a design transformation is 100-percent error-free.

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Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) quantum mechanics paradox

Extending Einstein's Spooky Actions for Use in Quantum Networks

January 26, 2015 4:18 pm | by Swinburne University of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers have demonstrated that the 1935 Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen quantum mechanics paradox may be extended to more than two optical systems, paving the way for exploration of larger quantum networks. The experiment also identified properties that may be useful in establishing secure quantum communication networks where shared sequences of numbers created between two parties need to be kept secret from a third party.

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Researchers have developed 3-D maps of the age of the ice within the Greenland Ice Sheet. The new research will help scientists determine what may happen to the ice sheet as the climate changes.

3-D View of Greenland Ice Sheet Opens Window on History

January 26, 2015 3:53 pm | by Jackson School of Geosciences | News | Comments

Scientists using ice-penetrating radar data collected by NASA’s Operation IceBridge and earlier airborne campaigns have built the first comprehensive map of layers deep inside the Greenland Ice Sheet, opening a window on past climate conditions and the ice sheet’s potentially perilous future. This allows scientists to determine the age of large swaths of the second largest mass of ice on Earth.

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The researchers determined the networks of the active genes and — like a dragnet — looked for the "main perpetrators" using a computer model. Courtesy of Atramos

Computer Model Creates Dragnet for Epilepsy Genes

January 26, 2015 3:07 pm | by University of Bonn | News | Comments

Scientists have taken a new path in the research into causes of epilepsy: They determined the networks of the active genes and — like a dragnet — looked for the "main perpetrators" using a computer model. In doing so, they discovered the molecule sestrin-3 as a central switch. In animal models, the scientists were able to demonstrate that inhibition of sestrin-3 leads to a reduction in seizures.

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Jupiter’s Cratered Moon Callisto -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL/DLR

Jupiter’s Cratered Moon Callisto

January 26, 2015 11:08 am | by European Space Agency (ESA) | News | Comments

The speckled object depicted here is Callisto, Jupiter’s second largest moon. This image was taken in May 2001 by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft, which studied Jupiter and its moons from 1995 until 2003. Similar in appearance to a golf ball, Callisto is covered almost uniformly with pockmarks and craters across its surface, evidence of relentless collisions.

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Kennette Benedict, executive director, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, stands beside the old Doomsday Clock which showed five minutes until midnight during a news conference to announce the new clock reads three minutes until midnight. The clock advanc

We're Two Minutes Closer to Doomsday

January 23, 2015 2:49 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists says Earth is now closer to human-caused doomsday than it has been in more than 30 years because of global warming and nuclear weaponry. But other experts say that's way too gloomy. The advocacy group, founded by the creators of the atomic bomb, moved their famed "Doomsday Clock" ahead two minutes on January 22, 2015. It said the world is now three minutes from a catastrophic midnight.

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This simulation, which models a rheometer with particles, can help determine how well a rheometer design works at characterizing a fluid. The NIST team is performing a number of simulations like this one, varying the shape and number of blades to better i

Predicting Concrete Flow Properties from Simple Measurements

January 23, 2015 2:44 pm | by NIST | News | Comments

Just because concrete is the most widely used building material in human history doesn’t mean it can’t be improved. A recent study using DOE Office of Science supercomputers has led to a new way to predict concrete’s flow properties from simple measurements. The results should help accelerate the design of a new generation of high-performance and eco-friendly cement-based materials by reducing time and costs associated with R&D.

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This sequence of graphs illustrates the application of the researchers' technique to a real-world computer vision problem. The solution to each successive problem (red balls) is used to initialize (green arrows) the search for a solution to the next. Cour

Optimizing Optimization Algorithms: How to Get the Best Results

January 23, 2015 2:36 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Optimization algorithms, which try to find the minimum values of mathematical functions, are everywhere in engineering. Among other things, they’re used to evaluate design tradeoffs, to assess control systems, and to find patterns in data. One way to solve a difficult optimization problem is to first reduce it to a related but much simpler problem, then gradually add complexity back in ...

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OnSight uses real rover data to create a 3-D simulation of the Martian environment where mission scientists can "meet" to discuss rover operations. Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

Holographic Computing will allow Scientists to Work on Mars

January 23, 2015 2:24 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA and Microsoft have teamed up to develop software called OnSight, a new technology that will enable scientists to work virtually on Mars using wearable technology called Microsoft HoloLens. Developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, OnSight will give scientists a means to plan and, along with the Mars Curiosity rover, conduct science operations on the Red Planet.

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Dream it. Code it. Win it. is different from traditional competitions or hackathons, which focus on coding. The contest is judged on the quality of the problem being tackled, as well as the solution.

Dream it. Code it. Win it. Programming Competition Launches

January 23, 2015 2:15 pm | by TradingScreen | News | Comments

The MIT Enterprise Forum of New York and TradingScreen have announced the launch of the second annual award-winning “ Dream it. Code it. Win it. “ contest. The $50,000 student coding competition rewards and promotes creativity, diversity and literacy in the field of computer science.

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The Brightest Comet in Earth's Sky -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

The Brightest Comet in Earth's Sky

January 23, 2015 1:55 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) is one of more than 32 comets imaged by NASA's NEOWISE mission from December 2013 to December 2014. This image combines a series of observations made in November 2013, when Lovejoy was 1.7 astronomical units from the sun. The image spans half of one degree. It shows the comet moving in a mostly west and slightly south direction.

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In April 2014, researchers flew over a site in southwest Greenland to find that a sub-glacial lake had drained away. This photo shows the crater left behind, as well as a deep crack in the ice. Photo by Stephen Price, Los Alamos National Lab, courtesy of

Two Mysterious Lakes beneath Greenland Ice Sheet Gone within Weeks

January 22, 2015 2:38 pm | by Pam Frost Gorder, The Ohio State University | News | Comments

Researchers who are building the highest-resolution map of the Greenland Ice Sheet to date have made a surprising discovery: two lakes of meltwater that pooled beneath the ice and rapidly drained away. One lake once held billions of gallons of water and emptied to form a mile-wide crater in just a few weeks. The other lake has filled and emptied twice in the last two years.

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