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The Living Heart Project’s goal is to enable creation of a customized 3-D heart.

Highly Realistic Human Heart Simulations Transforming Medical Care

March 26, 2015 | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Articles | Comments

The World Health Organization reports that cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death globally. Working to address this imperative public health problem, researchers world-wide are seeking new ways to accelerate research, raise the accuracy of diagnoses and improve patient outcomes. Several initiatives have utilized ground-breaking new simulations to advance research into aspects such as rhythm disturbances and ...

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Cushion Starfish Gills -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Cushion Starfish Gills

March 30, 2015 3:00 pm | News | Comments

This 50x photo shows a side view of cushion starfish (Asterina gibbosa) gills (ampullae). It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photograph was taken under water with a prism in a small tank ...

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Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using Mira to study the magnetic state of iron selenide, a known high-temperature superconductor, at varying levels of pressure. Courtesy of Lucas Wagner, University of Illinois at Urbana

Mira sheds Light on Mysterious Nature of High-temperature Superconductors

March 30, 2015 2:52 pm | by Jim Collins | News | Comments

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using supercomputing resources at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, to shed light on the mysterious nature of high-temperature superconductors. With critical temperatures ranging from 30 Kelvin to 130 Kelvin, this relatively new class of superconductors is high-temperature in name only.

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The fact that the neutron is slightly more massive than the proton is the reason why atomic nuclei have exactly those properties that make our world and ultimately our existence possible. Courtesy of Bergische Universität Wuppertal

Supercomputer Calculates Mass Difference between Neutron and Proton, confirms Theory of Strong Interaction

March 30, 2015 2:45 pm | by Forschungszentrum Jülich | News | Comments

The fact that the neutron is slightly more massive than the proton is the reason why atomic nuclei have exactly those properties that make our world and ultimately our existence possible. Eighty years after the discovery of the neutron, a team of physicists has finally calculated the tiny neutron-proton mass difference. The findings confirm the theory of the strong interaction.

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Matt Pugh (left) and Phil Hughes on board a Friends of Cardigan Bay dingy

Computer Vision, Machine Learning give New Perspective on Seabed Videos

March 30, 2015 2:02 pm | by Aberystwyth University | News | Comments

Scientists have been working with marine conservation group to develop better techniques for studying the seabed, which is vital for marine conservation and fisheries management. Cardigan Bay is renowned for its populations of dolphins and porpoises. Until recently the work of mapping and recording the seabed had been done using the traditional “researcher and clipboard” technique, which is costly and time consuming.

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“The things I do for my housemates' downloading habit…” Maths by Sergey Nivens

How a Long-dead Mathematician called Maxwell can Speed up your Internet

March 30, 2015 1:48 pm | by Jason Cole, Imperial College London | Articles | Comments

Electromagnetic radiation – it might sound like something that you’d be better off avoiding, but electromagnetic waves of various kinds underpin our senses and how we interact with the world – from the light emissions through which your eyes perceive these words, to the microwaves that carry the Wi-Fi signal to your laptop or phone on which you’re reading it.

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MOVIA Big Data Analytics Platform

MOVIA Big Data Analytics Platform

March 30, 2015 1:38 pm | by Modus Operandi, Inc. | Modus Operandi, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

MOVIA Big Data Analytics Platform is designed to help organizations watch for important patterns in their data and generate instant alerts to users or other systems. The software enables improved prediction of trends through advanced data modeling that captures situational context, so decisions are not ‘made in a vacuum.’

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Pine Island, the Largest Glacier in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet -- Courtesy of Hogg/University of Leeds, Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM) Copernicus data (2015)/ESA/A – click to enlarge

Pine Island, the Largest Glacier in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

March 27, 2015 10:45 am | by ESA | News | Comments

This image combining two scans by Sentinel-1A’s radar shows that parts of the Pine Island glacier flowed about 100 meters (in pink) between March 3 and March 15, 2015. Light blue represents stable ice on either side of the stream.

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SLIM: Stability Lab Information Manager

SLIM: Stability Lab Information Manager

March 26, 2015 11:36 am | H&A Scientific Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

SLIM (Stability Lab Information Manager) is a fully validated LIMS designed for complete management of drug stability programs — from the design of stability study protocols to statistical analyses and presentation of final data for regulatory, e.g., FDA, submission. The software can manage thousands of stability studies operating on a stand-alone PC, a local area network (LAN), or wide area networks (WAN) such as a terminal server or Citrix.

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Testing the reins in a smoke filled area Courtesy of Sheffield Hallam University

Robot Guide Dogs could be Firefighters’ Eyes

March 26, 2015 10:59 am | by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) | News | Comments

Firefighters moving through smoke-filled buildings could save vital seconds and find it easier to identify objects and obstacles, thanks to revolutionary reins that enable robots to act like guide dogs. The small mobile robot — equipped with tactile sensors — would lead the way, with the firefighter following a meter or so behind holding a rein. The robot would help the firefighter move swiftly in ‘blind’ conditions.

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Integer overflows occur when a computer tries to store too large a number in the memory space reserved for it. The leading digits are discarded — much as they are when a car odometer turns over. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Better Debugger: Algorithm Automatically Finds Integer-overflow Bugs

March 26, 2015 9:52 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Integer overflows are one of the most common bugs in computer programs — not only causing programs to crash but, even worse, potentially offering points of attack for malicious hackers. A new algorithm for identifying integer-overflow bugs was tested on five common open-source programs, in which previous analyses had found three bugs. The new algorithm found all three known bugs — and 11 new ones.

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Wolfram SystemModeler 4.1

Wolfram SystemModeler 4.1

March 26, 2015 9:27 am | Wolfram Research, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Wolfram SystemModeler 4.1 is a modeling and simulation environment for cyber-physical systems used in industries such as aerospace, automotive, pharmaceuticals, systems biology and electrical engineering. Key features include integration of Mathematica's complete suite for reliability analysis; import from tools such as Simulink, Flowmaster and IBM Rational Rhapsody enabled based on the FMI standard; and import of subsystems.

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Expedition 43 Soyuz Rolls Out for Launch -- Courtesy of NASA/Bill Ingalls – click to enlarge

Expedition 43 Soyuz Rolls Out for Launch

March 26, 2015 9:12 am | by NASA | News | Comments

The Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft is rolled out by train to the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, on March 25, 2015. NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly, and Russian Cosmonauts Mikhail Kornienko, and Gennady Padalka of the Russian Federal Space Agency are scheduled to launch to the International Space Station in the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on March 28.

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Nash and Nirenberg are two mathematical giants of the twentieth century. They are being recognized for their contributions to the field of partial differential equations (PDEs), which are equations involving rates of change that originally arose to descri

Two Mathematical Giants Share 2015 Abel Prize

March 26, 2015 9:03 am | by The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters | News | Comments

The Norwegian Academy of Sciences and Letters has decided to award the Abel Prize for 2015 to the American mathematicians John F. Nash Jr. and Louis Nirenberg “for striking and seminal contributions to the theory of nonlinear partial differential equations and its applications to geometric analysis.” They will receive the Abel Prize from His Majesty King Harald on May 19, 2015. The Abel Prize carries a cash award of about 1 million USD.

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Lights go out at Singapore’s 2014 flagship Earth Hour event

Lights in Over 7,000 Cities will go out for Earth Hour this Saturday

March 25, 2015 5:26 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

The World Wildlife Fund’s ninth annual Earth Hour is set to roll across the globe at 8:30 pm local time on Saturday, March 28, 2015. The world’s largest grassroots movement will range across six continents and the world’s 24 time zones in order to unify a global community bound by individual actions on climate. As in past years, many of the world's most famous landmarks and other non-essential lights will go dark for one hour.

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Mouse Heart Muscle Cells -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Mouse Heart Muscle Cells

March 25, 2015 2:02 pm | News | Comments

This 400x photo of mouse cardiac ventricular myocytes (isolated heart muscle cells) received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using confocal microscopy.

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