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The Voyager Golden Record recordings are now available on Soundcloud, which means that anyone with an Internet connection can experience NASA’s “time capsule” for themselves, knowing that the originals are still traveling through empty space or the helios

Perhaps Aliens like Continuous Streaming, Too

July 30, 2015 | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

The Voyager Golden Records, included aboard both Voyager spacecraft launched in 1977, are phonograph records — 12-inch gold-plated copper disks — containing sounds and images selected to portray the diversity of life and culture on Earth. The recordings are now available on Soundcloud, which means that anyone with an Internet connection can experience NASA’s “time capsule” for themselves.

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Users of developerWorks Recipes can tap into IBM's platform-as-a-service, Bluemix, to implement step-by-step tutorials for embedding advanced analytics and machine learning into IoT devices and applications.

IBM Launches New Internet of Things Community for Developers

July 30, 2015 8:38 am | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM announced the launch of a new community, IBM developerWorks Recipes, designed to help developers quickly learn how to connect Internet of Things (IoT) devices to the cloud and how to use data coming from those connected devices. Users of developerWorks Recipes can tap into IBM's platform-as-a-service, Bluemix, to implement step-by-step tutorials for embedding advanced analytics and machine learning into IoT devices and applications.

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3D Xpoint technology wafers are currently running in production lines at Intel Micron Flash Technologies fab

Intel and Micron Report Breakthrough Memory Technology

July 29, 2015 11:13 am | by Intel | News | Comments

Intel and Micron Technology unveiled 3D XPoint technology, a non-volatile memory that they say has the potential to revolutionize any device, application or service that benefits from fast access to large sets of data. Now in production, Intel reports that 3D XPoint technology is a major breakthrough in memory process technology and the first new memory category since the introduction of NAND flash in 1989.

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Sea-surface temperature off the southwest coast of the UK. The data were acquired on July 20–26, 2015, by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers on NOAA-19 and MetOp-B.

Surfing for Science: Sea-surface Temperatures Collected via GPS and Ankle Leash Sensors

July 29, 2015 10:44 am | by ESA | News | Comments

Thanks to a new system developed by scientists in the UK, taking to the waves for a spot of surfing can benefit research into the health of coastal waters, and could help confirm satellite measurements of sea-surface temperature. The system allows surfers to measure the temperature of the sea every time they head for the surf. Potentially, this could provide 40 million in situ measurements per year around the UK alone.

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Directional emission of light: The figure shows the calculations of the photon emission in the new directional photon source. If the spin of the electron points up, the photon is emitted in one direction (blue). If the spin of the electron points down, th

Quantum Networks: In New Type of Photonic Channels, Back and Forth Not Equal Distances

July 29, 2015 10:26 am | by Niels Bohr Institute | News | Comments

Quantum technology based on light has great potential for radically new information technology based on photonic circuits. Up to now, photons in quantum photonic circuits have behaved in the same way, whether they moved forward or backward in a channel. This has limited ability to control the photons and to build complex circuits for photonic quantum computers. In a new type of photonic channels, back and forth are not equal distances.

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Unwrapped texture image of the Ein Gedi scroll, produced by Seales and his research team, showing letters of the Hebrew alphabet.

Biblical Text Revealed from Damaged 1,500-year-old Scroll

July 29, 2015 10:01 am | by University of Kentucky | News | Comments

For the first time, advanced technologies made it possible to read parts of a scroll that is at least 1,500 years old, which was excavated in 1970 but at some point earlier had been badly burned. High-resolution scanning and a revolutionary software prototype designed to do “virtual unwrapping” of surfaces from within volumetric scans revealed verses from the beginning of the Book of Leviticus suddenly coming back to life.

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This illustration depicts a three-dimensional (3D) computer-generated image of a cluster of paired, or diplococcal vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) bacteria. The artistic recreation was based upon scanning electron micrographic imagery.  Enterococc

Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci Bacteria Cluster

July 29, 2015 8:53 am | by CDC | News | Comments

This illustration depicts a three-dimensional (3D) computer-generated image of a cluster of paired, or diplococcal vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) bacteria. The artistic recreation was based upon scanning electron micrographic imagery. Enterococci cause a range of illnesses that include bloodstream infections, surgical site infections and urinary tract infections.

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How worried should we be about warnings that artificial intelligence could be used to build weapons with minds of their own? Courtesy of Christopher Dombres

5 Things to Know about AI and Its Use

July 29, 2015 8:21 am | by Richard Lardner, Associated Press | News | Comments

In the sci-fi thriller "Ex Machina," the wonders and dangers of AI are embodied in a beautiful, cunning android named Ava. She puts her electronic smarts to work with frightening results, manipulating and outwitting her human handlers. Just how far off in the future is a robot like the fictional Ava? And how worried should we be about warnings that artificial intelligence could be used to build weapons with minds of their own?

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Prizes totaling $45,000 can go to developers who create applications that offer new ways to access and use data from one or more of six eligible scientific data collections maintained by NIST.

NIST to Host First App Challenge to Improve Data Access

July 28, 2015 4:41 pm | by NIST | News | Comments

Researchers looking for information on the properties of methane at high temperatures or the isotopic composition of an element know they can rely on standard reference data from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). But what they really need is an app (or apps) to make the data more accessible. As a step in that direction, NIST is launching its first app challenge.

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University of Chicago

CHAMELEON: Cloud Computing Testbed Goes into Full Production

July 28, 2015 4:33 pm | by Faith Singer-Villalobos, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

The full potential of cloud computing to directly impact science, medicine, transportation and other industries has yet to be realized. To help investigate and develop this promising cloud computing future, the Computation Institute at the University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory and Texas Advanced Computing Center announced the new experimental testbed, Chameleon, is in full production for researchers across the country.

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Illustration of a cellulosomal structure. Cellulosomes are highly-efficient molecular machines that can degrade plant fibers. Red is the scafoldin of the cellulosome, where most of the Cohesins are ,and blue are the enzymatic domains where most of the Doc

Cellulosomes: One of Life’s Strongest Biomolecular Bonds Discovered with Use of Supercomputers

July 28, 2015 3:40 pm | by Linda Barney | Articles | Comments

Researchers have discovered one of nature’s strongest mechanical bonds on a protein network called cellulosomes. The cellulosome network includes bacteria that contain enzymes that can effectively dismantle cellulose and chemically catalyze it. The discovery was aided by use of supercomputers to simulate interactions at the atomic level.

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International Space Station Moon Transit – Courtesy of Dylan O’Donnell – Click to enlarge

International Space Station Moon Transit

July 28, 2015 2:25 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

This image of the Moon was taken by amateur photographer Dylan O’Donnell as the International Space Station passed by at 28,800 km/h. At such speeds, the weightless research laboratory was visible for only about a third of a second before returning to the dark skies. O’Donnell captured the moment in Byron Bay, New South Wales, the eastern-most point of Australia, where the absence of larger towns offers low levels of light pollution.

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Handling the heat: Compounds made from hafnium and carbon have some of the highest known melting points. Using computer simulations, engineers predict that a material made with hafnium, nitrogen and carbon will have a higher melting point than any known m

Material with Record-setting Melting Point Predicted

July 28, 2015 8:58 am | by Brown University | News | Comments

Using powerful computer simulations, researchers have identified a material with a higher melting point than any known substance. The computations showed that a material made with just the right amounts of hafnium, nitrogen and carbon would have a melting point of more than 4,400 kelvins (7,460 degrees Fahrenheit). That’s about two-thirds the temperature at the surface of the sun, and 200 kelvins higher than the highest melting point...

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Scientists and tech experts — including Professor Stephen Hawking and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak — warned on July 28, 2015, of a global arms race with weapons using artificial intelligence.  An open letter, signed by 700 researchers and more than 600

Say No to Skynet: Hawking, Wozniak lead AI Experts who want to Ban Killer Robots

July 28, 2015 8:35 am | by Danica Kirka, Associated Press | News | Comments

Scientists and tech experts — including Stephen Hawking and Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak — warned of a global arms race with weapons using artificial intelligence. An open letter, signed by 700 researchers and more than 600 other experts, argues that, if any major military power pushes ahead with development of autonomous weapons, "a global arms race is virtually inevitable, and the endpoint of this technological trajectory..."

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Tsinghua University Team Members: Fangrui Song, Yuxin Wu, Yang Zhang, Youwei Zhuo, Dun Liang, Miao Wang

How HPC can Influence our World: HPCAC-ISC Student Cluster Competition Highlights

July 27, 2015 2:10 pm | by Pak Lui, HPC Advisory Council | Blogs | Comments

The 4th annual HPCAC-ISC Student Cluster Competition was a joint event hosted by the HPC Advisory Council and the organizers of the International Supercomputing Conference. The SCC event was held during ISC 2015 in Frankfurt, Germany. The competition featured 11 small teams of undergraduate students from nine different countries that compete to showcase the small clusters of their own design on the ISC’15 exhibit floor.

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Asthma sufferer Elizabeth Ortiz, who uses the Asthma Health smartphone app daily to track her condition, poses for photos at her apartment. Ortiz measures her lung power each day by breathing into an inexpensive plastic device and then typing the results

Software turns Smartphones into Medical Research Tools

July 27, 2015 12:09 pm | by Brandon Bailey, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Jody Kearns doesn't like to spend time obsessing about her Parkinson's disease. The 56-year-old dietitian had to give up bicycling because the disorder affected her balance. But she still works, drives and tries to live a normal life. Yet, since she enrolled in a clinical study that uses her iPhone to gather information about her condition, Kearns has been diligently taking a series of tests three times a day.

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