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As supercomputing — also known as high performance computing or HPC — becomes central to the work and progress of researchers in all fields, from genomics and ecology to medicine and education, new kinds of computing resources and more inclusive modes of

NSF Commits $16M to Build Cloud-based, Data-intensive Computing Systems for Open Science

November 25, 2014 | by NSF | News | Comments

Tens of thousands of researchers urrently harness the power of supercomputers to solve research problems that cannot be answered in the lab. However, this represents only a fraction of the potential users of such resources. As high performance computing becomes central to the work and progress of researchers in all fields, from genomics and ecology to medicine and education, new kinds of computing resources are required.

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This year’s team from The University of Texas – Austin won in the SC14 Student Cluster Competition overall category. Courtesy of TACC

Showcasing Student Expertise

November 25, 2014 2:55 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

After 48-hours of real-time, spirited competition, two triumphant winners emerged in this year’s SC14 Student Cluster Competition. The annual challenge is designed to introduce the next generation of students to the high-performance computing community. Over the last few years, it has drawn teams of undergraduate and/or high school students from around the world, including Australia, Canada, China, Costa Rica, Germany, Russia and Taiwan.

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Clusterstor Engineered Solution for Lustre

Clusterstor Engineered Solution for Lustre

November 25, 2014 11:28 am | by Seagate Technology | Product Releases | Comments

ClusterStor Engineered Solution for Lustre offers improved metadata performance and scalability by implementing the Distributed Namespace (DNE) features in the Lustre 2.5 parallel file system. In addition to the Base Metadata Management Server capability, ClusterStor users have the option to add up to 16 Lustre Distributed Namespace metadata servers per single file system, providing client metadata performance improvement of up to 700 percent.

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Fossilized Horsetail Plant -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Fossilized Horsetail Plant

November 25, 2014 9:51 am | News | Comments

This 100X photo shows a polished section of a fossilized permocarbonian horsetail, a family of vascular plants that reproduces by spores. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken by using reflected light.

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Ohio State's Adaptive Suspension Vehicle (AVS), nicknamed the "Walker." Developed by electrical engineer Robert McGhee and mechanical engineer Kenneth Waldron, along with a 60-member team of students and technical assistants, the 'Walker' was designed to

NSF Celebrates More than 40 Years Supporting US Robotics Research

November 24, 2014 4:14 pm | by Aaron Dubrow, NSF | News | Comments

The fundamental research in computing and engineering that enabled robotics to develop in the U.S. has been supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) since its inception. Yet despite these early investments in sensors, machine movement and computer vision, it wasn't until 1972 that the first grant with "robot" in the title was funded.

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Wireless communication and consumption of digital media might profit from freely accessible transmission frequencies in the UHF range. Courtesy of KIT

New Frequency Ranges May Make Free Super WiFi Possible

November 24, 2014 4:03 pm | by KIT – University of the State of Baden-Wuerttemberg and National Research Center of the Helmholtz Association | News | Comments

Wireless data transmission largely takes place via WLAN networks, such as WiFi. However, these networks are currently limited to high frequency ranges at 2 GHz and above and, hence, have a limited range. The authors of the study propose to extend the frequencies for free communication to include lower ranges and even increased transmission power.

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PowerEdge C4130 Server

PowerEdge C4130 Server

November 24, 2014 2:56 pm | Dell Computer Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

The PowerEdge C4130 is an accelerator-optimized, GPU-dense, HPC-focused rack server purpose-built to accelerate the most demanding HPC workloads. It is the only Intel Xeon E5-2600v3 1U server to offer up to four GPUs/accelerators and can achieve over 7.2 Teraflops on a single 1U server, with a performance/watt ratio of up to 4.17 Gigaflops per watt.

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Young Juniper Shoot Cross-section -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Young Juniper Shoot Cross-section

November 24, 2014 2:33 pm | News | Comments

This 250X photo shows a cross-section of a young juniper shoot. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using confocal microscopy.

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The L-CSC cluster was the first and only supercomputer on the list to surpass 5 gigaflops/watt.

L-CSC Cluster Awarded Top Spot on Green500 List

November 24, 2014 1:39 pm | by Green500 | News | Comments

A new supercomputer, L-CSC from the GSI Helmholtz Center, emerged as the most energy-efficient supercomputer in the world, according to the 16th edition of the twice-yearly Green500 list of the world’s most energy-efficient supercomputers. The cluster was the first and only supercomputer on the list to surpass 5 gigaflops/watt. It was powered by Intel Ivy Bridge CPUs and a FDR Infiniband network and accelerated by AMD FirePro S9150 GPUs.

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Supercomputing 2014 Recognizes Outstanding Achievements in HPC

Supercomputing 2014 Recognizes Outstanding Achievements in HPC

November 24, 2014 7:13 am | by SC14 | News | Comments

SC14, the international conference for high performance computing, networking, storage and analysis, celebrated the contributions of researchers, from those just starting their careers to those whose contributions have made lasting impacts, in a special awards session. The conference drew over 10,160 attendees who attended a technical program spanning six days and viewed the offerings of 356 exhibitors.

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Quantum physicist Andrei Derevianko, a professor in the College of Science, has contributed to the development of several novel classes of atomic clocks and now is proposing using networks of synchronized atomic clocks to detect dark matter. His paper on

Hiding in Plain Sight: Detecting Elusive Dark Matter with GPS

November 21, 2014 5:21 pm | by Mike Wolterbeek, University of Nevada, Reno | News | Comments

The everyday use of a GPS device might be to find your way around town or even navigate a hiking trail; but for two physicists, the Global Positioning System might be a tool in directly detecting and measuring dark matter, so far an elusive but ubiquitous form of matter responsible for the formation of galaxies.

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In the cat and mouse game, a Pac-Man-shaped cat must eat scurrying mice (disks) that have lines oriented in the same way as the cat.

Pac-Man Replaces Patch: Video Games Help Improve Lazy Eye, Depth Perception

November 21, 2014 5:11 pm | by Emily Caldwell, Ohio State University | News | Comments

Scientists have created video games that add an important element of fun to the repetitive training needed to improve vision in people — including adults — with a lazy eye and poor depth perception. The training tools, including a Pac-Man-style “cat and mouse” game and a “search for oddball” game, have produced results in pilot testing: Weak-eye vision improved to 20/20 and 20/50 in two adult research participants.

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The Turing Test — originally called the Imitation Game — was proposed by computing pioneer Alan Turing in 1950. Courtesy of Juan Alberto Sánchez Margallo

Alternative to Turing Test Proposed

November 21, 2014 4:39 pm | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A Georgia Tech professor recently offered an alternative to the celebrated “Turing Test” to determine whether a machine or computer program exhibits human-level intelligence. The Turing Test — originally called the Imitation Game — was proposed by computing pioneer Alan Turing in 1950. In practice, some applications of the test require a machine to engage in dialogue and convince a human judge that it is an actual person.

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In the latest issue of HPC Source, “A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to the Enterprise,” we look at how small- to-medium-sized manufacturers can realize major benefits from adoption of high performance computing in areas such as modeling, simulation and analysis.

HPC for All

November 21, 2014 4:32 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

In the latest issue of HPC Source, “A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to the Enterprise,” we look at how small- to-medium-sized manufacturers can realize major benefits from adoption of high performance computing in areas such as modeling, simulation and analysis.

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The company will award two complete high performance compute clusters to two institutions of higher education and research.

Silicon Mechanics Announces Research Cluster Grant Program Expansion

November 21, 2014 4:17 pm | by Silicon Mechanics | News | Comments

Silicon Mechanics has announced that it is launching the 4th Annual Research Cluster Grant program, in which the company will award two complete high performance compute clusters to two institutions of higher education and research. The competition is open to all U.S. and Canadian qualified post-secondary institutions, university-affiliated research institutions, non-profit research institutions, and researchers at federal labs.

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flower stamen -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Flower Stamen

November 21, 2014 3:43 pm | News | Comments

This photo shows a flower stamen magnified 40X. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using reflected light.

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