Advertisement
The Essential Resource for the Medical Design Engineering Community
Subscribe to Scientific Computing All
According to Chief Research Officer Christopher Willard, Ph.D. “2015 will see increased architectural experimentation. Users will test both low-cost nodes and new technology strategies in an effort to find a balance between these options that delivers the

Top 6 Predictions for High Performance Computing in 2015

March 2, 2015 12:41 pm | by Intersect360 Research | Blogs | Comments

The drive toward exascale computing, renewed emphasis on data-centric processing, energy efficiency concerns, and limitations of memory and I/O performance are all working to reshape HPC platforms, according to Intersect360 Research’s Top Six Predictions for HPC in 2015. The report cites many-core accelerators, flash storage, 3-D memory, integrated networking, and optical interconnects as just some of the technologies propelling future...

TOPICS:
Living Green Algae (Micrasterias) -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Close–up: Living Green Algae

March 2, 2015 12:20 pm | News | Comments

This 100x photo of living green algae in interference phase contrast received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using a light microscope and Interphako contrast.

TOPICS:
A representation of a 9-nanometer azotosome, about the size of a virus, with a piece of the membrane cut away to show the hollow interior. Courtesy of James Stevenson

Life 'Not as We Know It' Possible on Saturn's Moon Titan

March 2, 2015 11:31 am | by Anne Ju, Cornell University | News | Comments

Liquid water is a requirement for life on Earth. But in other, much colder worlds, life might exist beyond the bounds of water-based chemistry. Taking a simultaneously imaginative and rigidly scientific view, chemical engineers and astronomers offer a template for life that could thrive in a harsh, cold world — specifically Titan, the giant moon of Saturn.

TOPICS:
Advertisement
A 3.15 mm QR code storing an encrypted and compressed image shown placed on an integrated circuit and an image of the QR code placed next to a dime. Courtesy of Adam Markman/Brhram Javidi

Ordinary QR Code Transformed into High-End Cybersecurity Application

March 2, 2015 11:21 am | by Colin Poitras, University of Connecticut | News | Comments

QR codes have been used to convey information about everything from cereals to cars and new homes. But researchers think the codes have a greater potential: protecting national security. Using advanced 3-D optical imaging and extremely low light photon counting encryption, researchers have taken the ordinary QR code and transformed it into a high-end cybersecurity application to protect the integrity of computer microchips.

TOPICS:
Future applications of the optical lattice clock: Measuring the different time delays produced by varied driving routes for a motor vehicle carrying an optical lattice clock allows gravitational potential to be mapped. Anomalies in gravitational potential

Cryogenically Cooled Clocks Keep Time for 16 Billion Years

March 2, 2015 11:01 am | by RIKEN | News | Comments

We all like to know our watches keep the time well, but researchers are taking precision to an entirely new dimension. The group demonstrated two cryogenically cooled optical lattice clocks that can be synchronized to a tremendous one part in 2.0 x 10-18 — meaning that they would only go out of synch by a second in 16 billion years. This is nearly 1,000 times more precise than the current international standard cesium atomic clock.

TOPICS:
The University of Chicago’s Research Computing Center is helping linguists visualize the grammar of a given word in bodies of language containing millions or billions of words. Courtesy of Ricardo Aguilera/Research Computing Center

Billions of Words: Visualizing Natural Language

February 27, 2015 3:14 pm | by Benjamin Recchie, University of Chicago | News | Comments

Children don’t have to be told that “cat” and “cats” are variants of the same word — they pick it up just by listening. To a computer, though, they’re as different as, well, cats and dogs. Yet it’s computers that are assumed to be superior in detecting patterns and rules, not four-year-olds. Researchers are trying to, if not to solve that puzzle definitively, at least provide the tools to do so.

TOPICS:
Exploring the Colors of the Small Magellanic Cloud -- Courtesy of ESA/NASA/JPL-Caltech/STScI – click to enlarge

Colors in the Cloud: Exploring the Colors of the Small Magellanic Cloud

February 27, 2015 3:02 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

Astronomical images often look like works of art. This picture of one of our nearest neighboring galaxies, the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), is certainly no exception! The scene is actually a collaboration between two cosmic artists — ESA’s Herschel space observatory and NASA’s Spitzer space telescope.

TOPICS:
The Hans Meuer Award has been created in memory of the late Dr. Hans Meuer, general chair of the ISC conference from 1986 through 2014, and co-founder of the TOP500 project.

ISC Introduces the Hans Meuer Award

February 27, 2015 2:53 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

ISC is introducing the Hans Meuer Award to honor the most outstanding research paper submitted to the ISC High Performance conference’s research paper committee. This annual award has been created in memory of the late Dr. Hans Meuer, general chair of the ISC conference from 1986 through 2014, and co-founder of the TOP500 project.

TOPICS:
Advertisement
In this April 26, 2009 file photo, actor Leonard Nimoy poses for a portrait in Beverly Hills, CA. Nimoy, famous for playing officer Mr. Spock in “Star Trek” died Friday, February 27, 2015, in Los Angeles of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Live Long and Prosper, Mr. #Spock! Leonard Nimoy dies at 83

February 27, 2015 2:31 pm | by Lynn Elber, AP Television Writer | News | Comments

Leonard Nimoy, the actor known and loved by generations of Star Trek fans as the pointy-eared, purely logical science officer Mr. Spock, has died. Nimoy died Friday of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at his Los Angeles home, with family at his side, said his son, Adam Nimoy. He was 83.

TOPICS:
An artist's impression of a quasar with a supermassive black hole in the distant universe. Courtesy of Zhaoyu Li/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Misti Mountain Observatory

Supermassive Black Hole Discovered with Mass of 12 Billion Suns

February 27, 2015 11:46 am | by Christian Veillet and Daniel Stolte, Large Binocular Telescope Observatory, University of Arizona | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered the brightest quasar in the early universe, powered by the most massive black hole yet known at that time. The discovery of this quasar, named SDSS J0100+2802, marks an important step in understanding how quasars, the most powerful objects in the universe, have evolved from the earliest epoch, only 900 million years after the Big Bang, which is thought to have happened 13.7 billion years ago.

TOPICS:
In this January 22, 2015, photo, Gentoo penguins stand on rocks near the Chilean station Bernardo O'Higgins, Antarctica. Here on the Antarctic peninsula, where the continent is warming the fastest because the land sticks out in the warmer ocean, 49 billio

The Big Melt: Antarctica's Retreating Ice May Re-shape Earth

February 27, 2015 10:48 am | by Luis Andres Henao and Seth Borenstein, Associated Press | News | Comments

From the ground in this extreme northern part of Antarctica, spectacularly white and blinding ice seems to extend forever. What can't be seen is the battle raging underfoot to re-shape Earth. Water is eating away at the Antarctic ice, melting it where it hits the oceans. As the ice sheets slowly thaw, water pours into the sea — 130 billion tons per year for the past decade. That's the weight of more than 356,000 Empire State Buildings.

TOPICS:
A 3-D model of the new class of auxetic metamaterials that defy logic and can be used to create better skin grafts and new smart materials. Courtesy of University of Malta

Logic-defying Mathematical Model could lead to Better Skin Grafts, New Smart Materials

February 26, 2015 2:00 pm | by Cassi Camilleri, University of Malta | News | Comments

Pull on a piece of plastic at separate ends; it becomes thinner. So does a rubber band. One might assume tha,t when a force is applied along an axis, materials will always stretch and become thinner. Wrong. Thanks to their peculiar internal geometry, auxetic materials grow wider. After confounding scientists for decades, researchers are now developing mathematical models to explain the unusual behavior of these logic-defying materials

TOPICS:
Milorad Marinkovic holds an egg with his bionic arm. Three Austrians have replaced injured hands with bionic ones that they can control using nerves and muscles transplanted into their arms from their legs. The three men are the first to undergo what doct

Three Men First to Get Reconstructed Bionic Hands

February 26, 2015 1:18 pm | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Three Austrians have replaced injured hands with bionic ones that they can control using nerves and muscles transplanted into their arms from their legs. The men are the first to undergo what doctors refer to as "bionic reconstruction," which includes a voluntary amputation, the transplantation of nerves and muscles and learning to use faint signals from them to command the hand.

TOPICS:
Russia's defense ministry is establishing its own cyber command responsible for offensive activities, "including propaganda operations and inserting malware into enemy command and control systems." Courtesy of Contando Estrelas

Russian Cyber Threat more Severe than Previously Assessed

February 26, 2015 1:11 pm | by Ken Dilanian, AP Intelligence Writer | News | Comments

The U.S. has elevated its appraisal of the cyber threat from Russia, the U.S. intelligence chief said February 26, 2015, as he delivered the annual assessment by intelligence agencies of the top dangers facing the country. "While I can't go into detail here, the Russian cyber threat is more severe than we had previously assessed," James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, told the Senate Armed Services Committee.

TOPICS:
Cardiovascular diseases are the largest cause of death in Europe and responsible for two million deaths per year. According to WHO, they are the number one cause of death in the world, accounting for 30 percent of deaths worldwide and 42 percent in the EU

Novel 3-D Computer Model brings Insight to Cardiovascular Diseases

February 26, 2015 12:56 pm | by Lappeenranta University of Technology, LUT | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a novel three-dimensional, multiscale and multicomponent model of the endothelial cell monolayer, the inner lining of the artery, to identify the cellular mechanisms involved in cardiovascular diseases. New research based on the model is able to identify the main cellular pathways involved in the initiation and progression of the disease.

TOPICS:

Pages

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading