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A combination of the day-night band and high resolution infrared imagery from the NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed the historic blizzard near peak intensity as it moves over the New York through Boston Metropolitan areas at 06:45Z (1:45 a.m. EST) on

NASA Nighttime and Daytime Views of the Blizzard of 2015

January 28, 2015 2:07 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA and NOAA have provided nighttime and daytime views of the Blizzard of 2015. A combination of the day-night band and high-resolution infrared imagery showed the historic blizzard near peak intensity as it moves over the New York through Boston Metropolitan areas at 1:45 a.m. EST on January 27, 2015. Nighttime lights of the region were blurred by high cloud tops associated with the most intense parts of the storm.

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Astronaut Buzz Aldrin in the Apollo 11 Lunar Module -- Courtesy of NASA

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin in the Apollo 11 Lunar Module

January 28, 2015 8:33 am | by NASA | News | Comments

This July 20, 1969, photograph of the interior view of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module shows astronaut Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin, Jr. during the lunar landing mission. The picture was taken by astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, prior to the landing. Aldrin was the second American to set foot on the lunar surface.

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The intelligent keyboard records each letter touched, but also captures information about the amount of force applied to the key and the length of time between one keystroke and the next. Such typing style is unique to individuals, and so could provide a

Self-powered Intelligent Keyboard could Provide New Layer of Biometric Security

January 27, 2015 10:12 am | by John Toon, Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

By analyzing such parameters as the force applied by key presses and the time interval between them, a new self-powered non-mechanical intelligent keyboard could provide a stronger layer of security for computer users. The self-powered device generates electricity when a user’s fingertips contact the multi-layer plastic materials that make up the device.

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The Software Sustainability Institute, a collaboration between the Universities of Southampton, Oxford, Edinburgh and Manchester, is spreading the word about its work in promoting greater use of software in research with an Android phone app, which is ava

New App Helping to Share World-class Software-enabled Research

January 27, 2015 10:04 am | by University of Southampton | News | Comments

Electronics and computer science researchers have helped to develop a new app to share world-class research and to receive the latest research news through a phone or tablet. The Software Sustainability Institute, a collaboration between the Universities of Southampton, Oxford, Edinburgh and Manchester, aims to spread the word about its work in promoting greater use of software in research.

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Daisy Petal with Fungal Infection and Pollen Grains -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Daisy Petal with Fungal Infection and Pollen Grains

January 27, 2015 8:50 am | News | Comments

This 10x photo shows a daisy petal with fungal infection and pollen grains, whole mount, unstained. It won 10th Place in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope and was taken using confocal autofluorescence.

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In his doctoral thesis, Baaij describes the world-wide production of microchips through the years.

Massive Chip Design Savings on the Horizon

January 26, 2015 4:35 pm | by University of Twente | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a programming language making the massive costs associated with designing hardware more manageable. Chip manufacturers have been using the same chip design techniques for 20 years. The current process calls for extensive testing after each design step. The newly developed, functional programming language makes it possible to prove, in advance, that a design transformation is 100-percent error-free.

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Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) quantum mechanics paradox

Extending Einstein's Spooky Actions for Use in Quantum Networks

January 26, 2015 4:18 pm | by Swinburne University of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers have demonstrated that the 1935 Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen quantum mechanics paradox may be extended to more than two optical systems, paving the way for exploration of larger quantum networks. The experiment also identified properties that may be useful in establishing secure quantum communication networks where shared sequences of numbers created between two parties need to be kept secret from a third party.

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Researchers have developed 3-D maps of the age of the ice within the Greenland Ice Sheet. The new research will help scientists determine what may happen to the ice sheet as the climate changes.

3-D View of Greenland Ice Sheet Opens Window on History

January 26, 2015 3:53 pm | by Jackson School of Geosciences | News | Comments

Scientists using ice-penetrating radar data collected by NASA’s Operation IceBridge and earlier airborne campaigns have built the first comprehensive map of layers deep inside the Greenland Ice Sheet, opening a window on past climate conditions and the ice sheet’s potentially perilous future. This allows scientists to determine the age of large swaths of the second largest mass of ice on Earth.

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The researchers determined the networks of the active genes and — like a dragnet — looked for the "main perpetrators" using a computer model. Courtesy of Atramos

Computer Model Creates Dragnet for Epilepsy Genes

January 26, 2015 3:07 pm | by University of Bonn | News | Comments

Scientists have taken a new path in the research into causes of epilepsy: They determined the networks of the active genes and — like a dragnet — looked for the "main perpetrators" using a computer model. In doing so, they discovered the molecule sestrin-3 as a central switch. In animal models, the scientists were able to demonstrate that inhibition of sestrin-3 leads to a reduction in seizures.

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Scroll being prepared for scanning in its container at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. Courtesy of Brent Seales

First-of-its-kind Software Enables Major Breakthrough in Reading Ancient Scrolls

January 26, 2015 2:39 pm | by University of Kentucky | News | Comments

After working for more than 10 years on unlocking an ancient piece of history, what lies inside damaged Herculaneum scrolls, UK Department of Computer Science Chair and Professor Brent Seales will accomplish the next step in allowing the world to read the scrolls, which cannot be physically opened. A major development in the venture, Seales is building software that will visualize the scrolls' writings as they would be if unrolled.

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LE-OFETs are being used to develop flexible, transparent computer screens. Copyright RDECOM/CC

Transistor Improvements on Track to make Flexible Plastic Computers a Reality

January 26, 2015 2:03 pm | by National Institute for Materials Science | News | Comments

Researchers at Japan’s National Institute for Materials Science revealed that improvements should soon be expected in the manufacture of transistors that can be used to make flexible, paper-thin computer screens.The scientists reviewed the latest developments in research on photoactive organic field-effect transistors; devices that incorporate organic semi-conductors, amplify weak electronic signals, and either emit or receive light.

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Actor John Heffernan poses with old photographs and a signature of Robert Oppenheimer, at a rehearsal studio in London. Heffernan is playing the part of Robert Oppenheimer in a new play the Royal Shakespeare Company is doing about the physicist, who led t

Science Fact Holds its Own with Even the Wildest Sci-fi Scenarios

January 26, 2015 1:45 pm | by Jill Lawless, Associated Press | News | Comments

Suddenly, scientists are sexy. With Benedict Cumberbatch nominated for multiple trophies as Alan Turing and Eddie Redmayne turning heads as Stephen Hawking, young British actors playing scientists are all the rage this season. So, it's good timing for the Royal Shakespeare Company, whose new play, Oppenheimer, features John Heffernan as American scientist J. Robert Oppenheimer, leader of the team that developed the first nuclear weapon.

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A notebook by Alan Turing, the World War II code-breaking genius depicted by Benedict Cumberbatch in the Oscar-nominated "The Imitation Game," is shown in a special preview at Bonhams auctioneers. The 56-page manuscript, containing Turing's complex mathem

British Code Breaker Alan Turing's Notebook Goes to Auction

January 26, 2015 1:33 pm | by AP | News | Comments

A handwritten notebook by Alan Turing, the World War II code-breaking genius depicted by Benedict Cumberbatch in the Oscar-nominated The Imitation Game, is going on the auction block. The 56-page manuscript was written at the time the British mathematician and computer science pioneer was working to break the seemingly unbreakable Enigma codes used by the Germans throughout World War II. It is expected to bring at least $1 million.

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Jupiter’s Cratered Moon Callisto -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL/DLR

Jupiter’s Cratered Moon Callisto

January 26, 2015 11:08 am | by European Space Agency (ESA) | News | Comments

The speckled object depicted here is Callisto, Jupiter’s second largest moon. This image was taken in May 2001 by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft, which studied Jupiter and its moons from 1995 until 2003. Similar in appearance to a golf ball, Callisto is covered almost uniformly with pockmarks and craters across its surface, evidence of relentless collisions.

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Kennette Benedict, executive director, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, stands beside the old Doomsday Clock which showed five minutes until midnight during a news conference to announce the new clock reads three minutes until midnight. The clock advanc

We're Two Minutes Closer to Doomsday

January 23, 2015 2:49 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists says Earth is now closer to human-caused doomsday than it has been in more than 30 years because of global warming and nuclear weaponry. But other experts say that's way too gloomy. The advocacy group, founded by the creators of the atomic bomb, moved their famed "Doomsday Clock" ahead two minutes on January 22, 2015. It said the world is now three minutes from a catastrophic midnight.

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