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The HPCAC-ISC Student Cluster Competition is designed to introduce the next generation to the international high performance computing (HPC) community. This is an excellent educational opportunity for students around the world to showcase their knowledge

HPCAC-ISC 2015 Student Cluster Competition Accepting Undergraduate Applications

October 20, 2014 11:11 am | by ISC | News | Comments

The HPC Advisory Council and ISC High Performance call on undergraduate students from around the world to submit their application for partaking in the 2015 Student Cluster Competition (SCC). The 11 teams selected will receive the opportunity to build a small cluster of their design and run a series of benchmarks and applications in real time for four days, on the ISC 2015 exhibition floor.

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An IBM logo displayed in Berlin, VT. IBM is paying $1.5 billion to Globalfoundries in order to shed its costly chip division. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

IBM to Pay $1.5B to Shed Costly Chip Division

October 20, 2014 10:54 am | by Michelle Chapman, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

IBM will pay $1.5 billion to Globalfoundries in order to shed its costly chip division. IBM Director of Research John E. Kelly III said in an interview on October 20, 2104, that handing over control of the semiconductor operations will allow it to grow faster, while IBM continues to invest in and expand its chip research.

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ESnet installed its first European network node at CERN (the major laboratory outside Geneva that houses the LHC) in mid-September, and is now deploying other equipment necessary to bring the first link online by October. The plan is for all links to be c

DOE’s High-Speed Network to Boost Big Data Transfers by Extending 100G Connectivity across Atlantic

October 20, 2014 10:44 am | by ESnet | News | Comments

The DOE’s Energy Sciences Network, or ESnet, is deploying four new high-speed transatlantic links, giving researchers at America’s national laboratories and universities ultra-fast access to scientific data from the Large Hadron Collider and other research sites in Europe. ESnet’s transatlantic extension will deliver a total capacity of 340 gigabits-per-second, and serve dozens of scientific collaborations.

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DOE’s High-Speed Network to Boost Big Data Transfers by Extending 100G Connectivity across Atlantic

Meeting the Technical Challenges of Transatlantic Connectivity

October 20, 2014 10:39 am | by ESnet | News | Comments

When ESnet engineers began to study the idea of building a new 100 Gbps network between the US and Europe, a primary concern was ensuring the service would be robust and built from multiple underlying links — so that if one went down, researchers could still rely on sufficient bandwidth. Based on data collected by Caltech physicist and networking pioneer Harvey Newman, the team understood multiple cables are sometimes cut simultaneously.

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Bathymetry image of Lake George: In 2014, a bathymetric and topographic survey conducted by boat and plane mapped the lake bed, shoreline and watershed. Now, within the data visualization center, scientists will be able to zoom in as close as half a meter

State-of-the-Art Visualization Lab to Display Streaming Data in Real-Time

October 20, 2014 10:00 am | by IBM | News | Comments

The Jefferson Project announced new milestones in a multimillion-dollar collaboration that seeks to understand and manage complex factors impacting Lake George. A new data visualization laboratory features advanced computing and graphics systems that allow researchers to visualize sophisticated models and incoming data on weather, runoff and circulation patterns. The lab will display streaming data from various sensors in real-time.

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Hurricane Gonzalo -- Courtesy of Alexander Gerst/ESA/NASA

Major Hurricane Gonzalo Approaches Bermuda

October 20, 2014 9:19 am | by NASA | News | Comments

This image of Hurricane Gonzalo was taken from the International Space Station by European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst on October 16, 2014. In addition to the crew Earth observations from the space station, NASA and NOAA satellites provided continuous coverage of Hurricane Gonzalo as it moved toward Bermuda.

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A sketch (not to scale) showing axions (blue) streaming out from the Sun, converting in the Earth's magnetic field (red) into X-rays (orange), which are then detected by the XMM-Newton observatory.  Copyright: University of Leicester

Dark Matter: Inexplicable Signal from Unseen Universe Provides Tantalizing Clue

October 17, 2014 12:08 pm | by University of Leicester | News | Comments

A cutting-edge paper has provided the first potential indication of direct detection of Dark Matter — something that has been a mystery in physics for over 30 years. Space scientists at the University of Leicester have detected a curious signal in the X-ray sky — one that provides a tantalizing insight into the nature of mysterious Dark Matter.

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A carbapenem molecule, a last resort antibiotic, enters the carbapenemase enzyme (blue arrow), where the crucial beta-lactam structure gets broken down. The ineffective molecule then leaves (orange arrow)

Nobel Prize-winning Technique Helps Design Antibiotics of Future

October 17, 2014 11:52 am | by Bristol University | News | Comments

Scientists have used computer simulations to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics — a breakthrough that will help develop drugs which can effectively tackle infections in the future. Researchers at the University of Bristol focused on the role of enzymes in the bacteria, which split the structure of the antibiotic and stop it from working, making the bacteria resistant.

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This image provided by Oculus shows a new prototype of its virtual reality headset. The hew headset features a higher resolution and refresh rate, 360-degree head tracking and integrated headphones. (AP Photo/Oculus)

Smithsonian Honors Founder of Virtual Reality Firm Oculus

October 17, 2014 11:03 am | by AP | News | Comments

The founder of virtual reality firm Oculus and singer Rosanne Cash and are among those who were honored with American Ingenuity Awards at the Smithsonian Institution, along with eight other scientists and scholars for their groundbreaking work. Washingtonian magazine has described the event as the “Golden Globes of Intellect.”

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Shown here is a square-centimeter chip containing the nTron adder, which performed the first computation using the researchers' new superconducting circuit. Courtesy of Adam N. McCaughan

Nanocryotron could Unlock Power of Superconducting Computer Chips

October 17, 2014 10:43 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Computer chips with superconducting circuits — circuits with zero electrical resistance — would be 50 to 100 times as energy-efficient as today’s chips, an attractive trait given the increasing power consumption of the massive data centers that power the Internet’s most popular sites. Superconducting chips also promise greater processing power.

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SGI UV for SAP HANA

SGI UV for SAP HANA

October 17, 2014 10:30 am | Sgi | Product Releases | Comments

SGI UV for SAP HANA is a purpose-built, in-memory computing appliance for growing environments running the SAP HANA platform. SAP-certified and available as a 4- or 8-socket single-node system with up to 6 TBs of in-memory computing, the appliance is designed to enable the largest enterprises to achieve real-time operations and business breakthroughs with SAP HANA at extreme scale

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IceBridge DMS L0 Raw Courtesy of the Digital Mapping System (DMS) team/NASA DAAC at the National Snow and Ice Data Center

Operation IceBridge Turns Five

October 17, 2014 9:45 am | by Kathryn Hansen, NASA | News | Comments

In May 2014, two new studies concluded that a section of the land-based West Antarctic ice sheet had reached a point of inevitable collapse. Meanwhile, fresh observations from September 2014 showed sea ice around Antarctica had reached its greatest extent since the late 1970s. To better understand such dynamic and dramatic differences in the region's land and sea ice, researchers are travelling south to Antarctica.

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Prescribed oceanic patterns are useful for predicting large weather anomalies. Prolonged dry or wet spells over certain regions can reliably tell you whether, for instance, North America will undergo an oceanic weather pattern such as the El Nino or La Ni

Time Machine Reveals Global Precipitation Role in Major Weather Events

October 16, 2014 2:53 pm | by Michael Price, San Diego State University | News | Comments

During the 1930s, North America endured the Dust Bowl, a prolonged era of dryness that withered crops and dramatically altered where the population settled. Land-based precipitation records from the years leading up to the Dust Bowl are consistent with the telltale drying-out period associated with a persistent dry weather pattern, but they can’t explain why the drought was so pronounced and long-lasting.

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A 500-million-year-old fossil used by Australian researchers to make their discovery about vetulicolians. These marine creatures had a rod through their tail similar to a backbone, which places them as distant cousins of vertebrate animals. Courtesy of Un

Bizarre Ancient Fossils Confirmed as Strange Human Cousins

October 16, 2014 2:50 pm | by University of Adelaide | News | Comments

More than 100 years since they were first discovered, some of the world's most bizarre fossils have been identified as distant relatives of humans. The fossils belong to 500-million-year-old blind water creatures, known to scientists as "vetulicolians" (pronounced: ve-TOO-lee-coal-ee-ans).

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Patient mockup of surgical robot designed to treat epilepsy by entering the brain through the cheek. (Laboratory for the Design and Control of Energetic Systems / Vanderbilt)

Minimally Invasive Brain Surgery Performed by Pneumatic Robot

October 16, 2014 2:38 pm | by David Salisbury, Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

For those most severely affected, treating epilepsy means drilling through the skull deep into the brain to destroy the small area where the seizures originate — invasive, dangerous and with a long recovery period. Five years ago, a team of Vanderbilt engineers wondered: Is it possible to address epileptic seizures in a less invasive way?

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