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Stardust Nears End of Epic Journey, Researchers Await its Treasure

December 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Donald Brownlee's heart skipped a beat seven years ago when the launch of the Stardust spacecraft didn't happen as planned. The University of Washington astronomy professor has experienced many other tense times since the historic mission blasted off a day late, and its return to Earth on January 15 will be…

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Her Majesty The Queen Honors Jonathan Ive, Designer of IPOD, IMAC

December 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Jonathan Ive, senior vice president of Design at Apple, has been awarded a Commander of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire (CBE) by Her Majesty The Queen in the New Year's Honors. The award recognizes Jonathan's international achievement in the field of industrial design, having led the team responsible for the design of groundbreaking products…

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Scientists Sequence DNA of Woolly Mammoth

December 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

A team of genome researchers at Penn State University and experts in ancient DNA at McMaster University in Canada has obtained the first genomic sequences from a woolly mammoth, a mammal that roamed grassy plains of the Northern Hemisphere…

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Biologists and Computer Scientists Join Forces to Lead Biology Revolution

December 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Just as computers assist detectives in finding people by comparing fingerprints from crime scenes with millions in databases, Argonne scientists are using computers to mine genetic information from pathogens, people and plants. This information is essential to progress in medical science and biotechnology…

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One-way Evolution

December 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

By tracing the 30-million year history of variation in a gene found in plants such as tomatoes and tobacco, biologists at the University of California, San Diego have found new evidence to support an old idea — that some evolutionary changes are irreversible. Their study, offers new support for the idea that the loss of complex traits, like eyes, wings or in this case a reproductive mechanism, is often irreversible

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In Grids We Trust

December 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

An object’s history and how it arose, in other words its provenance, grant it status. Translating this to computing will allow the information generated and managed within distributed networks to be proven and trusted. Laying the foundations for this translation…

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Another World-record Achievement for National High Magnetic Field Laboratory

December 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is ending its year with another achievement of international importance as engineers and technicians have completed testing of a world-record magnet…

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Physicists Describe Strange New Fluid-like State of Matter

November 30, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

University of Chicago physicists have created a novel state of matter using nothing more than a container of loosely packed sand and a falling marble. They have found that the impacting marble produces a jet of sand grains that briefly behaves like a special type of dense fluid…

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Getting Ready for the 'Big One'

November 30, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Researchers have completed the most meticulous survey ever made of the San Andreas Fault, and they've found detailed features that nobody could have seen before. Michael Bevis, Ohio Eminent Scholar in geodynamics and professor of civil and environmental engineering and geodetic science at Ohio State University, unveiled the first images…

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Galactic Mergers and Acquisitions

November 30, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

More than half of the largest galaxies in the nearby universe have collided and merged with another galaxy in the past two billion years, according to a Yale astronomer in a study using hundreds of images from two of the deepest sky surveys ever conducted…

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The Fabulous Konfabulator: What can it really do?

November 30, 2005 7:00 pm | by John R. Joyce, Ph.D. | Blogs | Comments

 Sometime in 1998, Arlo Rose started speculating about creating an application that could skin any type of data you wanted to display on your computer's desktop. Working with Perry Clarke, this concept found concrete expression as Konfabulator 1.0 for the Macintosh in 2003. They continued to work on expanding the concept until, working with Ed Voas, they released Konfabulator 1.8, which could run the same micro-applications

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The Essence of Piracy

November 30, 2005 7:00 pm | by Randy C. Hice | Blogs | Comments

Hostile takeover without the paperwork Randy C. Hice The plan was hatched out of boredom, pure and simple, and we pondered the legal ramifications warily. Two conspirators and I crouched under the grandstands. A few feet above, 1,000 spectators huddled, eyeing the pool where, years earlier, the 1960 U.S. Olympic Trials had been conducted. Since those days, the pool had fallen on harsh times. Leaks caused fresh water to be required at such a rate

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On the Cusp: Addictive Technologies are Lurking

November 30, 2005 7:00 pm | by Randy C. Hice | Blogs | Comments

A look at new tools that may catalyze lab informatics Randy C. Hice New technology is a narcotic to me, and every few months I get the shakes if some glistening new toy isn’t rolling around in my sweaty palms. Lately, I’ve been lusting after GPS units that can travel with me to stem the withdrawal symptoms I experience when leaving my car at the airport and having to resort to the car rental maps that compress entire cities into six-inch squares, and generate weird nervousness from my fellow highway drivers as I hold the map up to the windshield at 90 MPH, occasionally swerving

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GrapherSix: Graphics for Scientists and Engineers

November 30, 2005 7:00 pm | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

The GrapherSix developers’ aim was to allow the user to produce quick and easy graphs by merely opening a file and having the program select reasonable values for the axes, spacing and plot symbols, and then automatically produce a graph. This they have done. Most of the choices can be modified at the user’s discretion. Advanced automation features are available through a built-in scripter, and the results exported in a variety of formats.

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Calling All Mathematica Enthusiasts!

November 30, 2005 7:00 pm | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

Normally, I would avoid use of the word "programming" in a title for fear of immediately losing my audience but, as my readers seem to be mostly chemists and engineers, I may not have so much to fear (I think). This month's column is a review of a really nice introductory text on programming with the Mathematica language.

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