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Visualization 2005 Products of the Year Winner: ENVI

November 30, 2005 7:00 pm | Itt Visual Information Solutions | Product Releases | Comments

ENVI software is used for the visualization, analysis and presentation of all types of digital imagery.

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Data Acquisition Products of the Year Winner: DAPstudio

November 30, 2005 7:00 pm | Product Releases | Comments

DAP Measurement Studio (DAPstudio) software facilitates the development of data acquisition and control systems with a real-time component or with a high channel count.

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Data Acquisition Products of the Year Winner: WinWedge Pro

November 30, 2005 7:00 pm | Product Releases | Comments

WinWedge Pro is a data collection program designed for interfacing RS232 and TCP/IP devices such

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Data Acquisition Products of the Year Winner: LabVIEW

November 30, 2005 7:00 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The LabVIEW graphical development platform aids scientists and engineers in designing test, measurement and control systems.

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Data Acquisition Products of the Year Winner: Econseries USB Modules

November 30, 2005 7:00 pm | Data Translation, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

The Econseries of mini instruments plug into a PC’s USB port without an external power supply. Signals connect directly to the modules’ built-in screw terminals. To support the boards, the GO! application software package provides an instrument-panel interface.

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DAPstudio 2.00

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | Product Releases | Comments

DAP Measurement Studio (DAPstudio) software version 2.00 facilitates the development of data acquisition and control systems with a real-time component or with a high channel count. Version 2.00 adds display types

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AUTOSTRUCTURE

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | Bruker Axs Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

AUTOSTRUCTURE is a program suite for fully automatic determination of 3-D crystal structures of organic, mineralogical and inorganic molecules from X-ray data. Its algorithms allow for solving and refining structural parameters routinely

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What Made London’s Millennium Bridge Wobble?

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Steve Strogatz has a penchant for things that happen in unison. So when the Cornell University professor of theoretical and applied mechanics heard that thousands of pedestrians had caused London's Millennium Bridge to rock from side to side on its opening day, he was intrigued…

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The Impossible Is Possible: Laser Light from Silicon

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Since the creation of the first working laser — a ruby model made in 1960 — scientists have fashioned these light sources from substances ranging from neon to sapphire. Silicon, however, was not considered a candidate. Its structure would not allow for the proper…

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Chemistry Meets Computer, Data and Networking Technologies

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has announced the first round of grants in "cyber-enabled chemistry," a program developed by its chemistry division to explore how researchers and educators in that field can fully exploit the potential of cyberinfrastructure…

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Scientists Engineer Bacteria to Create Living Photographs

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

The photos were created by projecting light on "biological film" — billions of genetically engineered E. coli growing in dishes of agar, a standard jello-like growth medium for bacteria…

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Largest Computational Biology Simulation Mimics Life's Most Essential Nanomachine

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have set a new world's record by performing the first million-atom computer simulation in biology. Using the "Q Machine" supercomputer, Los Alamos computer scientists have created a molecular simulation of the cell's protein-making structure, the ribosome…

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Surprise! Computer Scientists Model the Exclamation Point

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Two Southern California engineers have created a mathematical theory of surprise, working from first principles of probability theory applied to a digital environment — and the results of experiments recording eye movements of volunteers watching video seem to confirm it…

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Holiday Gifting Smorgasbord: An eclectic “techie” assortment for the upcoming season

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | by John R. Joyce, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

As I write this, it is September 23, 2005, the first full day of Autumn and a record 98°F outside. Hopefully, things will be a bit more seasonal by the time you are reading this. However, despite the incongruity of the weather, I’ve still managed to gather an impressive assortment of eclectic gifts for the upcoming holiday season. To de-stress a bit, so that we can get into more of a gift-giving mood, let’s take a chance

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The Small World is a Smash Hit

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | by Jennifer A. Miller, Managing Editor | Articles | Comments

Winning photomicrographs take their bows at Hudson Theatre Jennifer A. Miller, Managing Editor What do a Titanic casualty, The Tonight Show and a common housefly all have in common? They have all at one time or another taken center stage at the Hudson Theatre in New York City's Times Square. The theater was built by Henry B. Harris over 100 years ago, before Harris' tragic death aboard the Titanic in 1912. Over the years, it changed hands several times, became the home of the original "Tonight Show" with Steve Allen in the 1950s

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