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I’m Sorry, What’s Your Name Again?

February 28, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Understanding the biology of memory is a major goal of contemporary neuroscientists. Short-term or "working" memory is an important process that enables us to interact in meaningful ways …

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Harnessing Microbes One by One to Build a Better Nanoworld

February 28, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Taking a new approach to the painstaking assembly of nanometer-sized machines, a team of scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison has successfully used single bacterial cells to make tiny bio-electronic circuits…

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Hydrogen and Methane Sustain Unusual Life at Sea Floor's 'Lost City'

February 28, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

The hydrothermal vents at the ocean bottom were miles from any location scientists could have imagined. One massive seafloor vent was 18 stories tall. All were creamy white and gray

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Solar Tadpoles Wave at Astrophysicists

February 28, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of Warwick's Department of Physics have gained insight into the mysterious giant dark "tadpoles" that appear to swim towards the surface of the Sun …

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Widget Watch: Get Out of Bed with Clocky

February 28, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

When the alarm clock goes off and the snooze button is pressed, Clocky will roll off the bedside table and wheel away, bumping mindlessly into objects on the floor until it eventually finds a spot to rest. Minutes later, when the alarm sounds again, the sleeper must get up out of bed and search for Clocky…

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New Machines Could Turn Homes into Small Factories

February 28, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

A revolutionary machine, which can quickly and cheaply make everything from a cup to a clarinet, could be in all our homes in the next few years. Research by engineers at the University of Bath could transform the manufacture of almost all everyday household objects by allowing people to produce them in their own homes…

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Grassroots "Einstein@Home" Astrophysics Project Goes Live

February 28, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

A new grassroots computing project dubbed Einstein@Home, which will let anyone with a personal computer contribute to cutting edge astrophysics research, was officially announced at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

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Phone ET…or Send Him an Email

February 28, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

The world's first "Intergalactic Communication System," www.TalkToAliens.com, has announced that its new "E-Mail to Aliens" service is now available for the public worldwide. A user simply visits the website and selects the "E-Mail to Space" option…

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Taking the Terror Out of Terror

February 28, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Anticipating attacks from terrorists, and hardening potential targets against them, is a wearying and expensive business that could be made simpler through a broader view of the opponents' origins, fears, and ultimate objectives…

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Hubble Weighs in on the Heaviest Stars in the Galaxy

February 28, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Unlike humans, stars are born with all the weight they will ever have. A human's birth weight varies by just a few pounds, but a star's weight ranges from less than a tenth to more than 100 times the mass of our Sun…

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Almost Only Counts in Horseshoes & #151 and Computer Chips

February 28, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Computer chip manufacturers traditionally have had a single, simple standard for their product: perfection. But a USC engineer who has spent his career devising ways to have chips test themselves has found that less than perfect is sometimes good enough …

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TKSolver 5.0: Rules-Based Mathematical Solutions

February 28, 2005 7:00 pm | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

An equation solver with programming capabilities that is not only an engineering tool, but an informational management tool as well. Although this software is in its fifth version, I approach it as a novice as it is my first experience with the program. According to the company, it has been on the market since 1983, about the same time as VisiCalc, one of the first spreadsheets to be widely circulated.

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Mathematica Navigator: Mathematics, Statistics, and Graphics

February 28, 2005 7:00 pm | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

The Navigator is one of the more recent additions to the line of books that, by explanation and example, facilitate the use of one of the most popular symbolic/numeric mathematical programs. Mathematica has been reviewed many times in this and other publications and is frequently used software for advanced mathematics

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Creeping Crawlers

February 28, 2005 7:00 pm | Articles | Comments

Autonomous adaptive data mining agents Bill Weaver, Ph.D. Measurement scientists deal constantly with the problem of too much data. Faced with a large pile of ore, it is legitimate to ask how much of the desired material it contains. A reasoned sampling strategy coupled with the appropriate statistics can yield an average value that describes the entire collection

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Agilent gains exclusive access to intellectual property for ChIP-on-chip, plans collaborative research center in Cambridge, Mass.

February 28, 2005 7:00 pm | Articles | Comments

PALO ALTO , Calif. , Jan. 5, 2005 Agilent Technologies Inc. has acquired announced its acquisition of Computational Biology Corp., a biotech pioneer in ChIP-on-chip, a microarray -based technique for understanding gene regulation in disease.

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