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Tiny Computers Go Where No Computer Has Gone Before

August 31, 2005 8:00 pm | News | Comments

A major breakthrough in the use of molecules as information processors was announced at this year's BA Festival of Science in Dublin. Nanotechnology experts are exploring the capabilities of molecules that act like conventional computers but can operate in tiny places where no silicon-based chip or semiconductor can go…

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What Time is it…Really?

August 31, 2005 8:00 pm | News | Comments

The world's best clock, NIST-F1, has been improved over the past few years and now measures time and frequency more than twice as accurately as it did in 1999 when first used as a national standard, physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) report…

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Dartmouth Researchers Build World's Smallest Mobile Robot

August 31, 2005 8:00 pm | News | Comments

In a world where "supersize" has entered the lexicon, there are some things getting smaller, like cell phones and laptops. Dartmouth researchers have contributed to the miniaturizing trend by creating the world's smallest, untethered controllable robot. Their extremely tiny machine is about as wide as a strand of human hair…

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A Cosmic Baby-Boom

August 31, 2005 8:00 pm | News | Comments

The Universe was a more fertile place soon after it was formed than has previously been suspected. A team of French and Italian astronomers made indeed the surprising discovery of a large and unknown population of distant galaxies observed when the Universe was only 10 to 30% its present age

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How Will Our Solar System Die?

August 31, 2005 8:00 pm | News | Comments

Astronomers have glimpsed dusty debris around an essentially dead star where gravity and radiation should have long ago removed any sign of dust — a discovery that may provide insights into our own solar system's eventual demise several billion years from now…

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Supersizing Supercomputers: What’s Next?

August 31, 2005 8:00 pm | News | Comments

Supercomputers excel at highly calculation-intensive tasks, such as molecular modeling and large-scale simulations, and have enabled significant scientific breakthroughs. Yet supercomputers themselves are subject to technological advancements and redesigns that allow them to keep pace with the science they support…

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High Performance Computing May Improve Combustion Efficiency

August 31, 2005 8:00 pm | News | Comments

Rising oil prices have revved momentum to develop more efficient combustion systems. But instrumental to this goal is a need to achieve greater understanding of the complex chemical reactions involved in combustion processes…

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Information Security & #151 The Cold-Hard Truth

August 31, 2005 8:00 pm | by Robert Bulger | Articles | Comments

Meeting the IT infrastructure challenges of Alaska’s North Slope Robert Bulger Conducting research on Alaska’s North Slope and adjacent portions of the Arctic Ocean presents researchers with greater challenges than just frostbite. For researchers making the trek north to the Barrow Arctic Science Consortium’s (BASC) research facilities, information security plays a critical role. During peak research seasons, hundreds of scientists brave the cold of Barrow, Alaska, and converge at this not-for-profit organization dedicated to the encouragement of research and educational activities

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Mathematica 5.1: Speed with Large Data Sets

August 31, 2005 8:00 pm | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

While not a major upgrade for this established mathematical software, there are enough new features in Mathematica 5.1 to make the change worthwhile. With the launch of version 5.0, this package gained algorithmic efficiencies that lead to noticeable speed increments for larger and more complex computations.

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Simulating Satellite Solar Arrays

August 31, 2005 8:00 pm | by Bill Brandenburg and Robert Jackson | Articles | Comments

APL automates spacecraft power tests with LabVIEW Bill Brandenburg and Robert Jackson At the Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), a not-for-profit research and development division of The Johns Hopkins University, researchers contribute both scientific expertise and engineering design skills to the U.S. space program. The laboratory has designed spacecraft satellites from conception to launch for NASA.

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Pixel Perfect

August 31, 2005 8:00 pm | by Kenneth Perrine, Derek Hopkins, Brian LaMarche, Scott Budge, Ph.D. and Marianne Sowa, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

A real-time image processing system for biology Kenneth Perrine, Derek Hopkins, Brian LaMarche, Scott Budge, Ph.D. and Marianne Sowa, Ph.D. Scientific visioning systems often rely upon pixel-perfect precision to produce meaningful data. Cutting-edge equipment used in the study of cell signaling is no exception; proper image alignment is critical for successful experiments. Biologists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) put together a special multi-spectral confocal microscope that was capable of acquiring live images of cells and proteins using two simultaneous spectral channels. But there was a problem

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No Spam for You!!!

August 31, 2005 8:00 pm | Articles | Comments

Unified e-mail filtering technology Bill Weaver, Ph.D. My e-mail to our magazine staff containing installments of this contributed column stopped being delivered a while back. There was no returned mail or out-of-the-office notification, just — well, just nothing. It took some time to realize our line of communication had been broken, and we had to regress to the good old handshaking technique of phone calls to make sure they got through. After a bit of snooping, it was discovered that I, or rather my exuberance, was to blame. Considering e-mail as a less formal mode of communication

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The Goddess of Grout: Fighting the Siren’s Song

August 31, 2005 8:00 pm | by Randy C. Hice | Blogs | Comments

A mission-critical informatics project will not plan, build and support itself Randy C. Hice I confess to being intoxicated by the aura of Robin Hartl on the home improvement show, Hometime . I could have just witnessed a meteor scream through my roof, and pile drive into my basement, and if I turned on Hometime and a host other than Robin was demonstrating roof repair, I would callously dismiss him or her. “Ah, come on, that’s a rip saw, not a crosscut saw. What are you trying to hand me?”

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Why Doesn’t a Traditional Electronic Laboratory Notebook Work in a QA-QC Lab?

August 31, 2005 8:00 pm | by Robert Pavlis | Articles | Comments

ELN requirements for quality assurance and quality control Robert Pavlis Historically, electronic laboratory notebooks (ELN) have been designed to accommodate research laboratories. Little, if any, consideration has been given to the needs of quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC) labs. However, the requirements of QA/QC labs are significantly different from research labs. This article will discuss these differences and identify the requirements of an ELN for the QA/QC lab

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ActiveScale Storage Cluster

August 31, 2005 8:00 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The ActiveScale Storage Cluster accelerates time to results with clustered storage for Linux. By combining a parallel file system with object-based storage, the cluster delivers scalable bandwidth and random I/O to accelerate application throughput

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