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Data Management 2005 Products of the Year Winner: Cerity Enterprise Content Manager (ECM)

November 30, 2005 7:00 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Formerly available as Scientific Software’s CyberLAB ECMS, Cerity ECM is a Web-based electronic

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Imaging 2005 Products of the Year Winner: LSM 5 LIVE

November 30, 2005 7:00 pm | Carl Zeiss Microimaging, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

The LSM 5 LIVE laser scanning microscope captures up to 120 confocal images per second at a resolution of 512 X 512 pixels, and attains 505 or 1,010 frames per second at reduced formats of 512 X 100 pixels or 512 X 50 pixels.

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Imaging 2005 Products of the Year Winner: PL-A686

November 30, 2005 7:00 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The PL-A686 digital dedicated camera offers 6.6 megapixel resolution, and is suited for brightfield microscopy. A 1-inch CMOS sensor with 3.5 m square pixels provides a resolution of 2208 X 3000 pixels in both color and monochrome versions.

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DAPstudio 2.00

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | Product Releases | Comments

DAP Measurement Studio (DAPstudio) software version 2.00 facilitates the development of data acquisition and control systems with a real-time component or with a high channel count. Version 2.00 adds display types

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AUTOSTRUCTURE

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | Bruker Axs Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

AUTOSTRUCTURE is a program suite for fully automatic determination of 3-D crystal structures of organic, mineralogical and inorganic molecules from X-ray data. Its algorithms allow for solving and refining structural parameters routinely

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The Impossible Is Possible: Laser Light from Silicon

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Since the creation of the first working laser — a ruby model made in 1960 — scientists have fashioned these light sources from substances ranging from neon to sapphire. Silicon, however, was not considered a candidate. Its structure would not allow for the proper…

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What Made London’s Millennium Bridge Wobble?

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Steve Strogatz has a penchant for things that happen in unison. So when the Cornell University professor of theoretical and applied mechanics heard that thousands of pedestrians had caused London's Millennium Bridge to rock from side to side on its opening day, he was intrigued…

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Scientists Engineer Bacteria to Create Living Photographs

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

The photos were created by projecting light on "biological film" — billions of genetically engineered E. coli growing in dishes of agar, a standard jello-like growth medium for bacteria…

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Chemistry Meets Computer, Data and Networking Technologies

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has announced the first round of grants in "cyber-enabled chemistry," a program developed by its chemistry division to explore how researchers and educators in that field can fully exploit the potential of cyberinfrastructure…

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Largest Computational Biology Simulation Mimics Life's Most Essential Nanomachine

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory have set a new world's record by performing the first million-atom computer simulation in biology. Using the "Q Machine" supercomputer, Los Alamos computer scientists have created a molecular simulation of the cell's protein-making structure, the ribosome…

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Surprise! Computer Scientists Model the Exclamation Point

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Two Southern California engineers have created a mathematical theory of surprise, working from first principles of probability theory applied to a digital environment — and the results of experiments recording eye movements of volunteers watching video seem to confirm it…

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Holiday Gifting Smorgasbord: An eclectic “techie” assortment for the upcoming season

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | by John R. Joyce, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

As I write this, it is September 23, 2005, the first full day of Autumn and a record 98°F outside. Hopefully, things will be a bit more seasonal by the time you are reading this. However, despite the incongruity of the weather, I’ve still managed to gather an impressive assortment of eclectic gifts for the upcoming holiday season. To de-stress a bit, so that we can get into more of a gift-giving mood, let’s take a chance

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The Small World is a Smash Hit

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | by Jennifer A. Miller, Managing Editor | Articles | Comments

Winning photomicrographs take their bows at Hudson Theatre Jennifer A. Miller, Managing Editor What do a Titanic casualty, The Tonight Show and a common housefly all have in common? They have all at one time or another taken center stage at the Hudson Theatre in New York City's Times Square. The theater was built by Henry B. Harris over 100 years ago, before Harris' tragic death aboard the Titanic in 1912. Over the years, it changed hands several times, became the home of the original "Tonight Show" with Steve Allen in the 1950s

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Applying W3C Semantic Web Standards to LIMS

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | by Matthew R. Shanahan | Articles | Comments

Emerging applications embrace the decentralized nature of R&D Matthew R. Shanahan In science-based industries, R&D is distributed, decentralized and ever-changing, and so is its data. Driven by automation and informatics, scientists are faced with an unprecedented challenge of accessing data across a fluid and virtual landscape of experimental methods, diverse applications and databases. The fragmentation and scale of data makes integration of laboratory results and efforts difficult to achieve with traditional technologies

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Building a Business Case for LIMS Implementations

October 31, 2005 7:00 pm | by Mark Fish | Articles | Comments

A sound case requires a detailed review of processes and practices Mark Fish Implementing a laboratory information management system (LIMS) or upgrading an existing one can require a significant investment and must compete with other IT initiatives for funding. To gain approval for such a major project requires a compelling proposal that both justifies the costs and demonstrates the value of LIMS to the organization.

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