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JMSL 3.0

October 31, 2004 7:00 pm | Rogue Wave Software | Product Releases | Comments

JMSL Numerical Library Version 3.0 for Java applications offers a broad collection of mathematical, statistical,

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Distributed Computing Toolbox

October 31, 2004 7:00 pm | The Mathworks, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

The Distributed Computing Toolbox enables engineers and scientists to execute MATLAB algorithms and Simulink models in a cluster of computers.

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PCIe-1429

October 31, 2004 7:00 pm | National Instruments | Product Releases | Comments

With the PCIe-1429 image acquisition board, engineers and scientists can acquire images at high speeds, resolutions and bit depths available for Camera Link cameras

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Silicon Graphics Prism

October 31, 2004 7:00 pm | Sgi | Product Releases | Comments

Real-world applications such as cancer research, disaster preparedness, oil exploration, and car safety analysis involve enormous amounts of data.

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MosaiX

October 31, 2004 7:00 pm | Carl Zeiss Microimaging, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

The MosaiX module of the proprietary AxioVision 4.2 imaging software completely controls the digital camera and motorized stage to automatically record, analyze and archive digital images and image series.

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DaqLab-2000

October 31, 2004 7:00 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The Ethernet-based DaqLab/2000 Series provides a high-speed data acquisition capability for benchtop applications. Built into the system is a 16-bit/200-kHz A/D converter coupled with an Ethernet engine which allows acquired data to stream continuously into a PC

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Mach 10: NASA’s X-34A Scramjet Breaks Speed Record

October 31, 2004 7:00 pm | News | Comments

NASA's X-43A research vehicle screamed into the record books again, demonstrating that an air-breathing engine can fly at nearly 10 times the speed of sound. Preliminary data from the scramjet-powered research vehicle show its revolutionary engine worked successfully at nearly Mach 9.

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Green, Leafy Spinach May Soon Power More Than Popeye's Biceps

October 31, 2004 7:00 pm | News | Comments

For the first time, MIT researchers have incorporated a plant's ability to convert sunlight to energy into a solid-state electronic "spinach sandwich" device that may one day power laptops and cell phones.

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Student"s Winning Invention Enables "Animal on a Chip"

October 31, 2004 7:00 pm | News | Comments

As a boy, Wei Gu taught himself to write computer software for the electronic games he liked to play.

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NASA Advances Water Recycling for Space Travel and Earth Use

October 31, 2004 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Would Columbus have reached the New World if his ships could not carry enough water for their crews?

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As the World Turns, it Drags Space and Time

October 31, 2004 7:00 pm | News | Comments

An international team of NASA and university researchers has dramatically improved the accuracy of the first direct evidence that the Earth drags space and time around itself as it rotates.

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Agilent Technologies Completes Acquisition of Silicon Genetics, Provider of Life Science Informatics

October 31, 2004 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Agilent Technologies Inc. (NYSE: A) today announced the completion of its acquisition of Silicon Genetics, a provider of software solutions for life science discovery.

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Mother Always Said to Eat Your Carrots

October 31, 2004 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Researchers with the Agricultural Research Service may have found the best way to entice consumers to eat their veggies: surprise them. They're breeding carrots that come in a palette of totally unexpected colors including yellow, dark orange, bright red -- even purple

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How Running Made Us Human: Endurance Running Let Us Evolve to Look the Way We Do

October 31, 2004 7:00 pm | News | Comments

Humans evolved from ape-like ancestors because they needed to run long distances, perhaps to hunt animals or scavenge carcasses on Africa’s vast savannah, and the ability to run shaped our anatomy, making us look like we do today

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Not Finding Life? Dig Deeper!

October 31, 2004 7:00 pm | News | Comments

A place so barren that NASA uses it as a model for the Martian environment, Chile's Atacama Desert gets rain maybe once a decade. In 2003, scientists reported that the driest Atacama soils were sterile. Not so, reports a team of Arizona scientists. Bleak though it may be, microbial life lurks beneath the arid surface of the Atacama's absolute desert

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