Advertisement
The Essential Resource for the Medical Design Engineering Community
Subscribe to Scientific Computing All
Life reconstruction of Carnufex carolinensis. Copyright Jorge Gonzales

Before Dinosaurs, Carolina Butcher was Top Beast of Prey

March 20, 2015 10:26 am | by North Carolina State University | News | Comments

A newly discovered crocodilian ancestor may have filled one of North America's top predator roles before dinosaurs arrived on the continent. The "Carolina Butcher" was a nine-foot-long, land-dwelling crocodylomorph that walked on its hind legs and likely preyed upon smaller inhabitants of North Carolina ecosystems, such as armored reptiles and early mammal relatives.

TOPICS:
John Renick is Director of Partner Solutions at Meridium.

3 Key Function Areas for Improved Asset Management and Industrial Success

March 19, 2015 5:18 pm | by John Renick, Director of Partner Solutions, Meridium | Blogs | Comments

Having a strategy in place for effective asset performance management (APM) is critical in today’s zero downtime world. To guarantee that you are fully utilizing your assets, you should consider implementing the three “M” strategy: Measure, Monitor and Manage. This allows you to best gauge the state and quality of your assets, make changes where needed before a problem arises and strategically plan for future production.

TOPICS:
The OpenPOWER Foundation which is a collaboration of technologists encouraging the adoption of an open server architecture for computer data centers has grown to more than 110 businesses, organizations and individuals across 22 countries.

10 New OpenPOWER Foundation Solutions Unveiled

March 19, 2015 3:19 pm | by OpenPOWER Foundation | News | Comments

The OpenPOWER Foundation has announced more than 10 hardware solutions — spanning systems, boards and cards, and a new microprocessor customized for China. Built collaboratively by OpenPOWER members, the new solutions exploit the POWER architecture to provide more choice, customization and performance to customers, including hyperscale data centers. 

TOPICS:
Advertisement
Leafy Liverwort Gametophyte -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Leafy Liverwort Gametophyte

March 19, 2015 3:04 pm | News | Comments

This 125x photo of a leafy liverwort (Nowellia curvifolia) gametophyte that is berberine stained received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

TOPICS:
Buckybombs could one day be used for demolition of cancer cells. Courtesy of USC/Holly Wilder

Turning Buckyballs into Buckybombs: Nanoscale Explosives could Eliminate Cancer Cells

March 19, 2015 2:44 pm | by University of Southern California | News | Comments

In 1996, a trio of scientists won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for their discovery of Buckminsterfullerene — soccer-ball-shaped spheres of 60 joined carbon atoms that exhibit special physical properties. Now, 20 years later, scientists have figured out how to turn them into Buckybombs. These nanoscale explosives show potential for use in fighting cancer, with the hope that they could target and eliminate cancer at the cellular level.

TOPICS:
Giant beetles present a potential alternative to remote-controlled drones

Remote-controlled Cyborg Beetle Flies, Turns and Hovers

March 19, 2015 2:40 pm | by Nanyang Technological University | News | Comments

Breaking new grounds in the future of remote-controlled drone technology, researchers have developed a living machine whose flight can be wirelessly controlled with minimal human intervention. Mounted on top of a giant flower beetle, a tiny, electronic backpack with a built-in wireless receiver and transmitter converts radio signals received remotely into a variety of actions in the beetle.

TOPICS:
Nonlinear metamaterials, which possess physical capabilities not found in nature, may be the building blocks that allow major companies like IBM and Intel to move from electronic to optical computing.

Novel Nanoscale Metamaterial is Breaking Digital Connectivity Barriers

March 19, 2015 2:26 pm | by American Friends of Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

From computers, tablets and smartphones to cars, homes and public transportation, our world is more digitally connected every day. The technology required to support the exchange of massive quantities of data is critical. That's why scientists are intent on developing faster computing units capable of supporting much larger amounts of data transfer and data processing. New optical materials could serve as the nuts and bolts of future ...

TOPICS:
TeleGeography’s Submarine Cable Map has been updated for 2015. The latest edition depicts 299 cable systems that are currently active, under construction, or expected to be fully-funded by the end of 2015. Courtesy of TeleGeography

Whimsical Map Depicts All Undersea Telecommunication Cables Currently Crossing World’s Oceans

March 18, 2015 3:27 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

This year’s Submarine Cable Map pays tribute to pioneering mapmakers of the Age of Discovery, incorporating elements of medieval and renaissance cartography. In addition to serving as navigational aids, maps from this era were works of art, often adorned with fanciful illustrations of real and imagined dangers. TeleGeography’s 2015 map brings back the lost design aesthetic to provide a view of the network through the lens of a bygone era.

TOPICS:
Advertisement
Pascal will offer better performance than Maxwell on key deep-learning tasks.

NVIDIA’s Next-Gen Pascal GPU Architecture to Provide 10X Speedup for Deep Learning Apps

March 18, 2015 12:24 pm | News | Comments

NVIDIA has announced that its Pascal GPU architecture, set to debut next year, will accelerate deep learning applications 10X beyond the speed of its current-generation Maxwell processors. NVIDIA CEO and co-founder Jen-Hsun Huang revealed details of Pascal and the company’s updated processor roadmap in front of a crowd of 4,000 during his keynote address at the GPU Technology Conference, in Silicon Valley.

TOPICS:
Physicist Chien-Shiung Wu in 1963 at Columbia University, where she was a professor. Known as the First Lady of Physics, Wu worked on the Manhattan Project and helped disprove a widely-accepted law of theoretical physics. Later in her life, Wu researched

Paving the Way: 28 Amazing Women, Trailblazing Science

March 18, 2015 12:16 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Breakthrough science requires pioneers. People who combine brilliance with courage, even in the face of daunting opposition. The women who paved the way for modern scientific exploration exemplify this spirit; grappling not only with fundamental questions of the universe, but with discrimination and societal constraints that often stripped them of scientific credit.

TOPICS:
Nano piano concept: Arrays of gold, pillar-supported bowtie nanoantennas (bottom left) can be used to record distinct musical notes, as shown in the experimentally obtained dark-field microscopy images (bottom right). These particular notes were used to c

Nano Piano's Lullaby could mean Nanotech Storage Breakthrough

March 18, 2015 11:39 am | by William Bowman | News | Comments

Researchers have demonstrated the first-ever recording of optically encoded audio onto a non-magnetic plasmonic nanostructure, opening the door to multiple uses in informational processing and archival storage.

TOPICS:
By using the app, Citizen Scientists can examine photos from the Web and provide further context that does not typically exist with the image alone.

iPad App Game Uses Citizen Science to Track Endangered Species

March 18, 2015 11:12 am | by Aaron Mason, Wildsense, University of Surrey | News | Comments

A new app for the iPad could change the way wildlife is monitored. Wildsense, an initiative from a group of researchers at the University of Surrey, is designed to use citizen science, the concept of allowing people to get directly involved in science, to help in the conservation of rare and endangered species.

TOPICS:
Groovy Rings of Saturn -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute – click to enlarge

Groovy Rings of Saturn

March 18, 2015 10:53 am | by NASA | News | Comments

From afar, Saturn's rings look like a solid, homogenous disk of material. But, upon closer examination from Cassini, we see that there are varied structures in the rings at almost every scale imaginable.

TOPICS:
TITAN Laboratory Information Management System

TITAN Laboratory Information Management System

March 18, 2015 10:41 am | Product Releases | Comments

TITAN is a Web-based enterprise resource planning (ERP)/laboratory information management system (LIMS) with integrated Report Designer, Workflow and Artifact Designer tools. It features three layers: a Laboratory Layer for management of laboratory functions from sample tracking to final disposition, facilitation of ISO 17025 compliance, e-sigs for custom workflows ...

TOPICS:
Like a Chinese Finger Puzzle Trap, the bond between scaffolding proteins in the cellulosome strengthens when force is exerted on it and becomes one of the strongest found in living systems.

Solving Puzzle-Like Bond for Biofuels: First Look at One of Nature's Strongest Biomolecular Interactions

March 17, 2015 3:02 pm | by Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

One of life's strongest bonds has been discovered by a science team researching biofuels with the help of supercomputers. Their find could boost efforts to develop catalysts for biofuel production from non-food waste plants. Renowned computational biologist Klaus Schulten of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign led the analysis and modeling of the bond, which behaves like a Chinese Finger Trap puzzle.

TOPICS:

Pages

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading