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Chicago in Winter -- Courtesy of NASA/ESA/Samantha Cristoforetti – click to enlarge

Chicago in Winter

February 26, 2015 9:46 am | News | Comments

From the International Space Station, astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti took this photograph of Chicago and posted it to social media. Crewmembers on the space station photograph the Earth from their unique point of view located 200 miles above the surface as part of the Crew Earth Observations program. Photographs record how the planet is changing over time.

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As a flying laboratory, ESA's OPS-SAT will test and validate new techniques in mission control and on-board systems. It will be operated by ESA's European Space Operations Centre as a test and validation resource for over 100 European industrial partners

Flying Software Lab to Test Radically New Experimental Control Systems

February 26, 2015 8:35 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

ESA is developing a mini-satellite to test out radically new control systems and techniques and to demonstrate drastically improved mission control capabilities that will arise when satellites can fly more powerful on-board computers. Known as Ops-Sat, it is made up of three CubeSat units with deployable solar panels. Although only 30 cm high, it contains an experimental computer 10 times more powerful than any current spacecraft.

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On two separate occasions in March and April 2012, amateur astronomers reported definite plume-like features developing on Mars.

Mystery Mars Plume: Highest Plume ever observed Baffles Scientists

February 25, 2015 2:15 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

Plumes seen reaching high above the surface of Mars have caused a stir among scientists studying the atmosphere on the Red Planet. On two separate occasions in March and April 2012, amateur astronomers reported definite plume-like features developing on the planet. The plumes were seen rising to altitudes of over 250 kilometers on both occasions. By comparison, similar features seen in the past have not exceeded 100 kilometers.

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Professor Dimitrios Nikolopoulos from the School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Queen’s University Belfast, is principal investigator for The Scalable, Energy-Efficient, Resilient and Transparent Software Adaptation (SERT)

Developing Simulation Software to Combat Humanity’s Biggest Issues

February 25, 2015 12:36 pm | by Queen’s University Belfast | News | Comments

Researchers are creating ground-breaking computer software, which has the potential to develop some of the world’s fastest supercomputers by increasing their ability to process masses of data at higher speeds than ever before. The new software has the potential to combat major global issues, including climate change and life-threatening diseases, by simulating detailed models of natural events.

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While a member of the audience might have seen a variation on this trick before, the AI can now use psychological and mathematical principles to create lots of different versions and keep audiences guessing. Courtesy of Steven Depolo

Artificial Intelligence Performs Real Magic Tricks

February 25, 2015 11:41 am | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Researchers gave a computer program the outline of how a magic jigsaw puzzle and a mind-reading card trick work, as well the results of experiments into how humans understand magic tricks. With this information, the system created completely new variants on those tricks which can be delivered by a magician.

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Sagittal Brain Slice Showing Cell Nuclei and Purkinije Cells -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Sagittal Brain Slice Showing Cell Nuclei and Purkinije Cells

February 25, 2015 11:33 am | News | Comments

This 40x photo shows a sagittal brain slice with cell nuclei and Purkinije cells expressing EGFP. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using confocal microscopy.

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Klocwork 10.2 static code analysis software

Klocwork 10.2 Static Code Analysis Software

February 25, 2015 10:55 am | Rogue Wave Software | Product Releases | Comments

Klocwork 10.2 static code analysis software is designed to help developers write higher-quality, more secure code, faster. It integrates into desktop IDEs and into a team's natural workflow. Mirroring how code is developed, the software runs as code is being written, checking line-by-line.

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NWChem molecular modeling software takes full advantage of a wide range of parallel computing systems, including Cascade. Courtesy of PNNL

PNNL Shifts Computational Chemistry into Overdrive

February 25, 2015 8:29 am | by Karol Kowalski, Ph.D., and Edoardo Apra, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

We computational chemists are an impatient lot. Despite the fact that we routinely deal with highly complicated chemical processes running on our laboratory’s equally complex HPC clusters, we want answers in minutes or hours, not days, months or even years. In many instances, that’s just not feasible; in fact, there are times when the magnitude of the problem simply exceeds the capabilities of the HPC resources available to us.

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Hydraulic connections of the Fast Cycle Magnet cable to allow the cooling of the magnet’s conductor (cable in conduit type) with supercritical helium. Courtesy of Maximilien Brice

What to Expect Next from the World’s Largest Particle Accelerator

February 24, 2015 2:37 pm | by Kate Greene, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory | News | Comments

In March, when researchers flip the switch to the world’s largest, most powerful particle accelerator, scientists from all over the world will be watching. Physicists expect the refurbished, higher-energy Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will build on the 2012 discovery of the Higgs particle and crack open even more mysteries of the universe

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Illustration of the orbit of Kepler-432b (inner, red) in comparison to the orbit of Mercury around the Sun (outer, orange). The red dot in the middle indicates the position of the star around which the planet is orbiting. The size of the star is shown to

Astronomers Discover Massive Celestial Body with Extreme Seasons

February 24, 2015 2:03 pm | by Heidelberg University | News | Comments

Two groups of astronomers have independently discovered a rare planet. The celestial body, called Kepler-432b, is one of the most dense and massive planets known so far. The teams report that the planet has six times the mass of Jupiter, but about the same size.

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A mathematical will give researchers an opportunity to discover the earliest words and languages spoken to date, with the potential to go back thousands of years. Courtesy of woodleywonderworks

Statistical Technique Traces Languages Back to Oldest Spoken Words

February 24, 2015 12:42 pm | by Current Biology | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a statistical technique that sorts out when changes to words’ pronunciations most likely occurred in the evolutionary history of related languages. Their model gives researchers a renewed opportunity to trace words and languages back to their earliest common ancestor or ancestors — potentially thousands of years further into prehistory than previous techniques.

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Tsunami impact map provides more precise estimates of the areas that might face tsunami-induced flooding.

Study Maps Major Tsunami Impact on Columbia River

February 24, 2015 12:19 pm | by Oregon State University | News | Comments

Engineers at Oregon State University have completed one of the most precise evaluations yet done about the impact of a major tsunami event on the Columbia River, what forces are most important in controlling water flow and what areas might be inundated.

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Astronaut Barry Wilmore -- Courtesy of NASA – click to enlarge

Astronaut Barry Wilmore on First of Three Spacewalks

February 24, 2015 12:09 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA astronaut Barry Wilmore works outside the International Space Station on the first of three spacewalks preparing the station for future arrivals by U.S. commercial crew spacecraft, on February 21, 2015. Fellow spacewalker Terry Virts, seen reflected in the visor, shared this photograph on social media.

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Rube did not build the machines he drew, but his cartoons have become an inspiration to aspiring engineers and scientists across the world. Courtesy of Jeff Kubina

A Comically Involved, Complicated Invention, Laboriously Contrived to Perform a Simple Operation

February 24, 2015 10:34 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

Of course, I’m talking about the Rube Goldberg Machine Contest! This annual international competition challenges teams of students from middle school to college-age to build the most elaborate and hilarious contraption that successfully achieves the task at hand. This year’s contest is already off and running. The 2015 Task: Erase a Chalkboard.

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Rather than using clear text, HTTP/2 is now a binary protocol which is quicker to parse and more compact in transmission. Courtesy of Rock1997

Upgrade to Core HTTP Protocol Promises Speedier, Easier Web

February 23, 2015 4:13 pm | by Peter Maynard, Queen's University Belfast | News | Comments

Hypertext Transfer Protocol, HTTP, is a key component of the World Wide Web. It is the communications layer through which Web browsers request Web pages from Web servers and with which Web servers respond with the contents of the page. Like much of the internet it’s been around for decades, but a recent announcement reveals that HTTP/2, the first major update in 15 years, is about to arrive.

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