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This simulation, which models a rheometer with particles, can help determine how well a rheometer design works at characterizing a fluid. The NIST team is performing a number of simulations like this one, varying the shape and number of blades to better i

Predicting Concrete Flow Properties from Simple Measurements

January 23, 2015 2:44 pm | by NIST | News | Comments

Just because concrete is the most widely used building material in human history doesn’t mean it can’t be improved. A recent study using DOE Office of Science supercomputers has led to a new way to predict concrete’s flow properties from simple measurements. The results should help accelerate the design of a new generation of high-performance and eco-friendly cement-based materials by reducing time and costs associated with R&D.

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This sequence of graphs illustrates the application of the researchers' technique to a real-world computer vision problem. The solution to each successive problem (red balls) is used to initialize (green arrows) the search for a solution to the next. Cour

Optimizing Optimization Algorithms: How to Get the Best Results

January 23, 2015 2:36 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Optimization algorithms, which try to find the minimum values of mathematical functions, are everywhere in engineering. Among other things, they’re used to evaluate design tradeoffs, to assess control systems, and to find patterns in data. One way to solve a difficult optimization problem is to first reduce it to a related but much simpler problem, then gradually add complexity back in ...

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OnSight uses real rover data to create a 3-D simulation of the Martian environment where mission scientists can "meet" to discuss rover operations. Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

Holographic Computing will allow Scientists to Work on Mars

January 23, 2015 2:24 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA and Microsoft have teamed up to develop software called OnSight, a new technology that will enable scientists to work virtually on Mars using wearable technology called Microsoft HoloLens. Developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, OnSight will give scientists a means to plan and, along with the Mars Curiosity rover, conduct science operations on the Red Planet.

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Dream it. Code it. Win it. is different from traditional competitions or hackathons, which focus on coding. The contest is judged on the quality of the problem being tackled, as well as the solution.

Dream it. Code it. Win it. Programming Competition Launches

January 23, 2015 2:15 pm | by TradingScreen | News | Comments

The MIT Enterprise Forum of New York and TradingScreen have announced the launch of the second annual award-winning “ Dream it. Code it. Win it. “ contest. The $50,000 student coding competition rewards and promotes creativity, diversity and literacy in the field of computer science.

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The Brightest Comet in Earth's Sky -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

The Brightest Comet in Earth's Sky

January 23, 2015 1:55 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) is one of more than 32 comets imaged by NASA's NEOWISE mission from December 2013 to December 2014. This image combines a series of observations made in November 2013, when Lovejoy was 1.7 astronomical units from the sun. The image spans half of one degree. It shows the comet moving in a mostly west and slightly south direction.

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In April 2014, researchers flew over a site in southwest Greenland to find that a sub-glacial lake had drained away. This photo shows the crater left behind, as well as a deep crack in the ice. Photo by Stephen Price, Los Alamos National Lab, courtesy of

Two Mysterious Lakes beneath Greenland Ice Sheet Gone within Weeks

January 22, 2015 2:38 pm | by Pam Frost Gorder, The Ohio State University | News | Comments

Researchers who are building the highest-resolution map of the Greenland Ice Sheet to date have made a surprising discovery: two lakes of meltwater that pooled beneath the ice and rapidly drained away. One lake once held billions of gallons of water and emptied to form a mile-wide crater in just a few weeks. The other lake has filled and emptied twice in the last two years.

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This puzzle of a material which seems solid to any observer while appearing fluid under the microscope is an old one. And, even with the help of today's supercomputers, it seems impossible to verify in simulations whether a glass ever stops flowing. Court

Puzzle: Does Glass Ever Stop Flowing?

January 22, 2015 2:15 pm | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Is glass a true solid? Researchers have combined computer simulation and information theory, originally invented for telephone communication and cryptography, to answer this puzzling question. This puzzle of a material which seems solid to any observer while appearing fluid under the microscope is an old one. And, even with the help of today's supercomputers, it seems impossible to verify in simulations whether a glass ever stops flowing.

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Micro Algae -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Micro Algae

January 22, 2015 2:08 pm | News | Comments

This 40x photo of micro algae won 17th Place in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Rogelio Moreno of Panama using polarized light and lambda plate.

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Clemson University associate professor of genetics and biochemistry Alex Feltus is co-principal investigator on the Tripal Gateway project award.

Researchers get $1.4 Million to Advance Big Data for Genomic Research

January 22, 2015 2:04 pm | by Brian M. Mullen, Clemson University | News | Comments

A team of scientists has received a $1.4 million grant from the National Science Foundation to help meet the growing needs of the data-driven genomic science community. The Tripal Gateway project will build on existing cyberinfrastructure to enhance the capacity of genomic databases to manage, exchange and process “big data.”

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Partek Flow 4.0 for NGS Analysis

Partek Flow 4.0 for NGS Analysis

January 22, 2015 1:51 pm | Partek Incorporated | Product Releases | Comments

Partek Flow 4.0 is designed specifically for the analysis needs of next-generation sequencing applications including RNA, small RNA and DNA sequencing. With the ability to either build custom analysis pipelines or download pre-built pipelines, users can perform alignment, quantification, quality control, statistics and visualization.

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Mark Anawis is a Principal Scientist and ASQ Six Sigma Black Belt at Abbott.

The Power of Regular Expressions

January 22, 2015 10:49 am | by Mark A. Anawis | Blogs | Comments

A.J. Jacobs wrote: “I think there's something to the idea that the divine dwells more easily in text than in images.” Since there has been an explosion in the amount of text, sacred and secular, available to anyone with an Internet connection, the need for processing tools has grown. Regular expressions can be used to extract specific text from documents due to their ability to replace many lines of code with as little as one line.

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An international team of roughly 300 scientists pooled brain scans and genetic data worldwide to pinpoint genes that enhance or break down key brain regions in people from 33 countries. This is the first high-profile study since the NIH launched its Big D

Global Consortium Cracks Part of Brain’s Genetic Code

January 21, 2015 4:05 pm | by Alison Trinidad, Keck Medicine of USC | News | Comments

In the largest collaborative study of the brain to date, researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) led a global consortium of 190 institutions to identify eight common genetic mutations that appear to age the brain an average of three years. The discovery could lead to targeted therapies and interventions for Alzheimer’s disease, autism and other neurological conditions.

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Princeton University researchers have built a rice grain-sized microwave laser, or "maser," powered by single electrons that demonstrates the fundamental interactions between light and moving electrons, and is a major step toward building quantum-computin

Rice-sized Laser, Powered One Electron at a Time, Bodes Well for Quantum Computing

January 21, 2015 1:19 pm | by Catherine Zandonella, Princeton University | News | Comments

Researchers have built a rice-grain-sized laser powered by single electrons tunneling through artificial atoms known as quantum dots. The tiny microwave laser, or "maser," is a demonstration of the fundamental interactions between light and moving electrons. The researchers built the device — which uses about one-billionth the electric current needed to power a hair dryer — while exploring how to use quantum dots.

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The Repository of Industrial Security Incidents is a database of incidents of a cybersecurity nature that have (or could have) affected process control, industrial automation or Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems.

Cybersecurity Expert Warns Not Enough Being Done to Prevent Highly Destructive Cyberattacks on Critical Infrastructure

January 21, 2015 1:13 pm | by International Society of Automation | News | Comments

Inadequate training and a culture of complacency among many owners and operators of critical infrastructure are significantly raising the risks of highly damaging cyberattack throughout the world. That’s the viewpoint expressed by Steve Mustard, an industrial cybersecurity subject-matter expert and consultant with extensive development and management experience in real-time embedded equipment and automation systems.

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Shubham Banerjee works on his lego robotics braille printer. Banerjee launched a company to develop a low-cost machine to print Braille materials for the blind based on a prototype he built with his Lego robotics kit. Last month, Intel invested in his sta

Eighth-grader Builds Braille Printer with Legos, Launches Company

January 21, 2015 1:02 pm | by Terence Chea, Associated Press | News | Comments

In Silicon Valley, it's never too early to become an entrepreneur. Just ask 13-year-old Shubham Banerjee. The California eighth-grader has launched a company to develop low-cost machines to print Braille, the tactile writing system for the visually impaired. Tech giant Intel recently invested in his startup, Braigo Labs.

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