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President Barack Obama speaks at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center in Arlington, VA, January 13, 2015. Obama renewed his call for Congress to pass cybersecurity legislation, including a proposal that encourages companies to

Obama Unveils Cybersecurity Proposals in Advance of State of the Union Address

January 14, 2015 11:46 am | by Jack Gillum, Associated Press | News | Comments

President Barack Obama has said that recent cyberthreats to Sony and the military's U.S. Central Command are reminders of the serious threats facing the nation. Obama laid out plans on January 13, 2015, as part of a push for new cybersecurity legislation that increases government information-sharing and protects businesses from lawsuits for revealing cyberthreats.

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Measuring side-channel signals2: Georgia Tech researcher Alenka Zajic measures electromagnetic emissions from various components of a desktop computer. The researchers have studied emissions from desktop and laptop computers, as well as cellphones.

Countering Side-channel Hacker Attacks

January 14, 2015 11:35 am | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

If you’re sitting in a coffee shop, tapping away on your laptop, feeling safe from hackers because you didn’t connect to the shop’s Wi-Fi, think again. The bad guys may be able to see what you’re doing just by analyzing the low-power electronic signals your laptop emits, even when it’s not connected to the Internet. Side-channel signals could provide hackers with another way to see what the devices are doing.

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DVD Reader Circuitry -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

DVD Reader Circuitry

January 14, 2015 11:21 am | News | Comments

This 100x photo shows the circuitry in a DVD reader. It won 7th Place in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using cross-polarized microscopy.

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NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory has created a fictional Exoplanet Travel Bureau that is sure to add fuel to your daydreams. A new exoplanet travel series, posted on the PlanetQuest Web site, features “travel posters” of several planets

The Grass is always Redder on the Other Side

January 14, 2015 10:18 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

Have you ever dreamed about vacationing on another planet? Or wondered what it would be like to explore “strange new worlds”? If so, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory has created a fictional Exoplanet Travel Bureau that is sure to add fuel to your daydreams. A new exoplanet travel series features travel posters of several planets that the folks at NASA’s Exoplanet Exploration Program think you just might want to check out...

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Terence Tao, a professor of mathematics at UCLA, is very interested in solving the Navier-Stokes equations, which are among the most difficult tackled by mathematicians. Understanding them could help with modeling weather, ocean currents, the flow of wate

Can Wave Equations Explode? Computer Algorithms may Provide the Answer

January 13, 2015 1:43 pm | by Marlene Cimons, National Science Foundation | News | Comments

Wave equations help describe waves of light, sound and water as they occur in physics. Also known as partial differential equations, they have valuable potential for predicting weather or earthquakes, or certain types of natural disasters. Tao is interested in the theoretical side of these equations, seeking to discover with computer algorithms whether they can behave in a way that typically is the opposite of what occurs in the real world.

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Jumping Spider Eyes -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Jumping Spider Eyes

January 13, 2015 11:29 am | News | Comments

This 20x photo shows jumping spider eyes. It won 3rd Placein the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken by Noah Fram-Schwartz of Greenwich, CT, using reflected light.

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The Chern-number measurement using an external force

Magic Numbers of Quantum Matter Revealed by Cold Atoms

January 13, 2015 11:19 am | by Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics | News | Comments

Topology, a branch of mathematics classifying geometric objects, has been exploited by physicists to predict and describe unusual quantum phases: the topological states of matter. These intriguing phases, generally accessible at very low temperature, exhibit unique conductivity properties, which are particularly robust against external perturbations, suggesting promising technological applications.

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IBM broke the U.S. patent record in 2014, becoming the first company to exceed 7,000 patents in a single year. More than 8,500 IBM inventors around the world, including researcher Stacy Hobson (pictured), produced 7,534 patents for IBM in 2014.

IBM Breaks U.S. Patent Record

January 13, 2015 10:35 am | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM has announced that it received a record 7,534 patents in 2014 — marking the 22nd consecutive year that the company topped the annual list of U.S. patent recipients. IBM inventors earned an average of more than 20 patents per day in 2014, propelling the company to become the first to surpass more than 7,000 patents in a single year.

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The results show that, by mining Facebook Likes, the computer model was able to predict a person's personality more accurately than most of their friends and family.

AI: Computers Know the Real You Better than Friends, Family

January 13, 2015 10:01 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Researchers have found that, based on enough Facebook Likes, computers can judge your personality traits better than your friends, family and even your partner. Using a new algorithm, researchers have calculated the average number of Likes artificial intelligence (AI) needs to draw personality inferences about you as accurately as your partner or parents.

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John Wass is a statistician based in Chicago, IL.

Book Review: Applied Bayesian Modelling, 2nd Edition

January 13, 2015 8:59 am | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

This is not a text for the novice. However, for those math/statistics aficionados, there is much to be had. The book’s great strength lies in two areas: the first is Peter Congdon’s generation of an excellent bibliography of the most modern techniques available, and the other is his (slightly) more straightforward explanations of the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques and suggestions for optimizing the results.

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IEEE Computer Society has announced the top 10 most important technology trends for 2015 and explores how these technologies will be integrated into daily life.

IEEE Unveils Top 10 Technology Trends for 2015

January 12, 2015 12:10 pm | by IEEE | News | Comments

In the coming year, while consumers will be treated to a dizzying array of augmented reality, wearables, and low-cost 3-D printers, computer researchers will be tackling the underlying technology issues that make such cutting-edge consumer electronics products possible. IEEE Computer Society has announced the top 10 most important technology trends for 2015 and explores how these technologies will be integrated into daily life.

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Experiment and theory by comparison: the PSI researchers’ Dutch colleagues were able to illustrate the magnetic structures generated by laser beams effectively in computer simulations.

Bat Signal Lights Way to Extremely Fast, Precise Data Storage

January 12, 2015 11:58 am | by Laura Hennemann, Paul Scherrer Institute | News | Comments

Researchers have succeeded in switching tiny, magnetic structures using laser light and tracking the change over time. In the process, a nanometer-sized area bizarrely reminiscent of the Batman logo appeared. The research results could render data storage on hard drives faster, more compact and more efficient.

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Map of diffuse interstellar bands Courtesy of T.W. Lan, G. Zasowski, B. Ménard, SDSS and 2MASS/UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF

Astronomers Map Mysterious Molecules in our Galaxy

January 12, 2015 10:20 am | by Phil Sneiderman, Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

By analyzing the light of hundreds of thousands of celestial objects, astronomers have created a unique map of enigmatic molecules in our galaxy that are responsible for puzzling features in the light from stars, called diffuse interstellar bands. DIBs have been a mystery ever since they were discovered in 1922 — exactly which of the many thousands of possible molecules are responsible for these features?

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Montana Dryhead Agate -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Montana Dryhead Agate

January 12, 2015 9:21 am | News | Comments

This 50x photo shows an unpolished Montana Dryhead agate, found in southern Montana between the Big Horn and Pryor Mountain ranges and just to the west of the Big Horn River. It won 12th Placein the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using axial lighting provided by Leeds fiberoptic illuminators.

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The MHL Specification, created and maintained by the MHL Consortium, defines a high-definition video and digital audio interface intended for connecting mobile smart devices, such as tablets and cell phones, with high-definition televisions and other pers

Understanding Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL) Technology

January 12, 2015 9:00 am | by John R. Joyce, Ph.D. | Blogs | Comments

Okay, for today's pop-quiz, what is Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL) technology and what can it do? Is it a new NASA deep space communication protocol? Is it an upgrade to Google's street cams? Have you even heard of it? It turns out that many of you are equipped with devices that incorporate this technology. Specifically, many, though not all, of the current crop of smart phones and tablets support MHL.

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