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Tianhe-2, a supercomputer developed by China’s National University of Defense Technology, has retained its position as the world’s No. 1 system, according to the June 2015 edition.

A Look Back at Top #1 Systems on the TOP500 List

July 23, 2015 11:23 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Articles | Comments

The TOP500 list provides international rankings of general-purpose HPC systems that are in common use for high-end applications. Twice a year, in June and November, a new list featuring the sites operating the 500 most powerful computer systems is assembled and released. The project was started in 1993 to provide a reliable basis for tracking and detecting trends in high-performance computing.

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Next year, ISC High Performance will be held from June 19 to 23 in Frankfurt under the leadership of general co-chairs, Martin and Thomas Meuer and program chair, Prof. Dr. Satoshi Matsuoka of Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan. Courtesy of Kiefer

ISC 2015 Caps 30th Anniversary with Record-breaking Attendance in Frankfurt

July 23, 2015 10:18 am | by ISC | News | Comments

The 2015 ISC High Performance Conference concluded its 30th meeting last week drawing 2,846 attendees, exceeding its own expectations. The organizers had initially expected around 2,600 to attend this year’s conference and exhibition, held in Frankfurt Germany from July 12 to 16. Also at the event were 153 leading high performance computing vendors and research organizations from around the world, who exhibited from July 13 to 15.

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Arlon Martin is Senior Director of Marketing at Mellanox.

Silicon Photonics: Enabling the Transition to 100Gb/s Networks

July 23, 2015 8:51 am | by Arlon Martin, Mellanox | Blogs | Comments

Last week, at the ISC High Performance conference, there was one announcement that might have escaped your attention. For the first time, EDR 100Gb/s solutions appeared on the TOP500 list. This is significant because it marks the transition from networks constructed around 40 and 56Gb/s fabrics to ones of 100Gb/s. Likewise, in the Ethernet market, hyper-scale data centers are also making the transition from 40Gb/s to 100Gb/s networks.

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The final seconds in the life of a very massive star are captured in 3-D. This is the first time a 3-D model of such a star has been developed and could lead to a better understanding of why these stars blow up as supernovae. Courtesy of S.M. Couch

Seeing Triple: 3-D Model could solve Supernova Core Collapse Mystery

July 22, 2015 9:43 am | by Michigan State University | News | Comments

Giant stars die a violent death. After a life of several million years, they collapse into themselves and then explode in what is known as a supernova. How these stars explode remains a mystery. However, recent work led by Michigan State University may bring some answers to this astronomical question, detailing development of a three-dimensional model of a giant star’s last moments.

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This image was taken July 6, 2015, showing North and Central America. The central turquoise areas are shallow seas around the Caribbean islands. Click to enlarge

EPIC Selfie: Entire Sunlit Side of Earth from a Million Miles Away

July 22, 2015 9:21 am | by NASA | News | Comments

A NASA camera on the Deep Space Climate Observatory satellite has returned its first view of the entire sunlit side of Earth from one million miles away. This color image was generated by combining three separate images to create a photographic-quality image. The camera takes a series of 10 images using different narrowband filters to produce a variety of science products. Red, green and blue channel images are used.

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A new model predicts wind speeds more accurately with three months of data than others do with 12. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares

New Statistical Technique Yields Better Wind-speed Predictions

July 21, 2015 4:40 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

When a power company wants to build a new wind farm, it generally hires a consultant to make wind speed measurements at the proposed site for eight to 12 months. Those measurements are correlated with historical data and used to assess the site’s power-generation capacity. MIT researchers will present a new statistical technique that yields better wind-speed predictions, even when it uses only three months’ worth of data.

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that public cloud computing will reach almost $70 billion in 2015 worldwide

Public Cloud Spending to Reach Nearly $70B Worldwide in 2015

July 21, 2015 4:08 pm | by IDC | News | Comments

Cloud, as one of the substantial transformative forces, is impacting all areas of IT supply, composition and consumption, and provides the basis for many big data, mobile and social solutions. In fact, International Data Corporation (IDC) predicts the number of new cloud-based solutions will triple in the next four to five years and that public cloud computing will reach almost $70 billion in 2015 worldwide.

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Surfer 13 Gridding and Contour Mapping Software

Surfer 13 Gridding and Contour Mapping Software

July 21, 2015 2:47 pm | Golden Software, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Surfer 13, scientific graphics software accurately transforms XYZ data into presentation-ready maps. The gridding and contour mapping software, used by geologists, hydrologists and engineers, offers 13 different gridding methods, including Kriging with variograms, to convert irregularly spaced XYZ data into a uniform grid.

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The research, which was accepted at the British Machine Vision Conference, also showed that the program performed better at determining finer details in sketches. For example, it was able to successfully distinguish the specific bird variants

Deep Neural Network Recognizes Hand-drawn Sketches More Accurately than Humans

July 21, 2015 11:56 am | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Sketch-a-Net is capable of correctly identifying the subject of sketches 74.9 percent of the time, compared to humans' 73.1 percent. As sketching becomes more relevant with the increase in use of touchscreens, it could provide a foundation for new ways to interact with computers. The research also showed the program performed better at determining finer details, such as specific bird variants.

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http://www.scientificcomputing.com/sites/scientificcomputing.com/files/19_Chris_Henstridge_Golden_Glia.jpg

Golden Glia: Mouse Brain

July 21, 2015 9:44 am | News | Comments

The 20X image shows a brain slice of a mouse, cut through the hippocampus, which is a region critical for memory. Neuronal dendrites receive signals from other neurons and here they are labeled in blue forming an incredibly dense network. The supporting glial cells intertwine within this dendritic network in an equally complex manner and here are labeled in yellow.

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Using New Horizons closest-approach images, NASA has created a simulated flyover of Pluto’s icy Norgay Montes (Norgay Mountains) and Sputnik Planum (Sputnik Plain), which make up the dwarf planet’s equatorial Tombaugh Regio (Tombaugh Region), named for Cl

NASA Releases Animated Flyover of Pluto’s Icy Mountains and Plains

July 21, 2015 9:01 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

Using New Horizons closest-approach images, NASA has created a simulated flyover of Pluto’s icy Norgay Mountains and Sputnik Plain, which make up the dwarf planet’s equatorial Tombaugh Region. After a decade-long, three-billion-mile journey, the images were acquired on July 14, 2015, during New Horizon’s closest approach at a distance of 48,000 miles. Features as small as a half-mile across are visible.

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Marking 46 years since the 1969 moon landing, the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum has launched a crowdsourcing project that would help to conserve and digitize the famous Apollo 11 spacesuit Neil Armstrong wore when he first set foot on the moon

Reboot the Suit: Bring Back Neil Armstrong’s Spacesuit

July 20, 2015 2:48 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

Marking 46 years since the 1969 moon landing, the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum has launched a crowdsourcing project that would help to conserve and digitize the famous Apollo 11 spacesuit Neil Armstrong wore when he first set foot on the moon in time for the 50th anniversary of the Apollo Moon landing.

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This artist rendering shows "Spread Your Wings," part of a new high-tech interactive exhibition, "Above and Beyond: The Ultimate Interactive Flight Exhibition," about the future of flight opening soon at the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in

High-tech Aerospace Exhibit Starts World Tour at Smithsonian

July 20, 2015 11:58 am | by Brett Zongker, Associated Press | News | Comments

With space shuttles now housed in museums, innovators in aerospace are thinking of newer, better ways humans could reach space. One idea: What about a space elevator? This real idea is one simulation that's part of a high-tech interactive exhibition about the future of flight opening at the National Air and Space Museum. Designers have been developing "The Ultimate Interactive Flight Exhibition" with Boeing, NASA and the Smithsonian.

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Artist's impression of Gaia14aae. Courtesy of Marisa Grove/Institute of Astronomy

Amateur Astronomers Spot One-in-a-billion Star

July 20, 2015 11:48 am | by Heather Campbell, University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Researchers and amateur astronomers have discovered a very rare type of binary star system: the first known such system where one star completely eclipses the other. In the two-star system, a Cataclysmic Variable, a super dense white dwarf is stealing gas from its companion star, and both stars have lost all of their hydrogen. The highly-unusual system could be an important laboratory for studying ultra-bright supernova explosions.

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Ionized Buckminsterfullerene (C60+) is present at the gas-phase in space.

Solving an Old Astronomic Riddle: Buckminsterfullerene Absorbs Starlight in Space

July 20, 2015 11:34 am | by University of Basel | News | Comments

Almost 100 years ago, astronomers discovered that the spectrum of starlight arrived on earth with dark gaps, so-called interstellar bands. Ever since, researchers have been trying to find out which type of matter in space absorbs the light and is responsible for these “diffuse interstellar bands” (DIB) of which over 400 are known today.

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