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Cat’s Lip Cross Section

June 18, 2015 2:21 pm | News | Comments

This 6.25x image is an antique slide featuring cat lip section, showing capillary bed of hairs, whiskers and musculature. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photograph was taken using transmitted light with partially crossed polars and a retarder.

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Network scientists have developed a new computational method that can leverage any body of knowledge to aid in the complex human task of fact-checking. In multiple experiments, the automated system consistently matched the assessment of human fact-checker

Computational Algorithm Checks the Facts

June 17, 2015 3:59 pm | by Indiana University | News | Comments

Network scientists have developed a new computational method that can leverage any body of knowledge to aid in the complex human task of fact-checking. In multiple experiments, the automated system consistently matched the assessment of human fact-checkers in terms of their certitude about the accuracy of these statements.

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Black Hole Surface is No Deadly Firewall

Black Hole Surface is No Deadly Firewall

June 17, 2015 3:13 pm | by Pam Frost Gorder, Ohio State University | News | Comments

Are black holes the ruthless killers we’ve made them out to be? According to one professor of physics, the recently proposed idea that black holes have “firewalls” that destroy all they touch has a loophole.

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An international team of researchers has discovered traces of methane in Martian meteorites, a possible clue in the search for life on the Red Planet.

Methane Found on Martian Meteorites

June 17, 2015 2:44 pm | by Jim Shelton, Yale University | News | Comments

An international team of researchers has discovered traces of methane in Martian meteorites, a possible clue in the search for life on the Red Planet.

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What the Blank Makes Quantum Dots Blink?

What the Blank Makes Quantum Dots Blink?

June 17, 2015 2:18 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Quantum dots are nanoparticles of semiconductor that can be tuned to glow in a rainbow of colors. Since their discovery in the 1980s, these remarkable nanoparticles have held out tantalizing prospects for all kinds of new technologies. But there’s a problem: Quantum dots often blink.

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For several years now, researchers have been investigating techniques for amplifying movements captured by video but indiscernible to the human eye. Earlier this month, they presented a new version of the algorithm that can amplify small motions even when

Video-Processing Algorithm Amplifies Small Motions in Large Motions

June 17, 2015 1:49 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

For several years now, researchers have been investigating techniques for amplifying movements captured by video but indiscernible to the human eye. Earlier this month, they presented a new version of the algorithm that can amplify small motions even when they’re contained within objects executing large motions.

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On the Red Planet, strong winds whip dust and sand from the surface into a frenzy, moving it across the planet at high speeds. These winds can hit 100 km/h, enough to create giant dust storms that settle across huge swathes of Mars, lasting for many days

Winds of Mars Whip Dust and Sand Into a Frenzy

June 17, 2015 12:45 pm | News | Comments

On the Red Planet, strong winds whip dust and sand from the surface into a frenzy, moving it across the planet at high speeds. These winds can hit 100 km/h, enough to create giant dust storms that settle across huge swathes of Mars, lasting for many days or even weeks.

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Complex models that let you look at the combined action of many different variants have, until now, involved so much computation that it would take a year to run a single complex query.

Complex, Large-scale Genome Analysis made Easier

June 16, 2015 12:45 pm | by European Molecular Biology Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new approach to studying the effect of multiple genetic variations on different traits. The new algorithm makes it possible to perform genetic analysis of up to 500,000 individuals — and many traits at the same time. Complex models that let you look at the combined action of many different variants have, until now, involved so much computation that it would take a year to run a single complex query.

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Illustration of a molecule in the presence of gravitational time dilation. The molecule is in a quantum superposition of being in several places at the same time, but time dilation destroys this quantum phenomenon Copyright: Igor Pikovski, Harvard-Smithso

Einstein saves the Quantum Cat: Relativity Theory Applicable in other Research Areas

June 16, 2015 12:27 pm | by University of Vienna | News | Comments

Einstein’s theory of time and space will celebrate its 100th anniversary this year. Even today it captures the imagination of scientists. In an international collaboration, researchers have discovered that this world-famous theory can explain yet another puzzling phenomenon: the transition from quantum behavior to our classical, everyday world.

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Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Director Katherine Archuleta testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, June 16, 2015, before the before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing on the OPM data breach. In the cyberattack targeting fe

Fed Personnel Agency Admits History of Security Problems

June 16, 2015 11:52 am | by Ken Dilanian, AP Intelligence Writer | News | Comments

An OPM official says the agency entrusted with millions of personnel records has a history of failing to meet basic computer network security requirements. Michael Esser, assistant inspector general for audit, said that, for years, many of the people running the agency's information technology had no IT background. He also said the agency had not disciplined any employees for the agency's failure to pass numerous cyber security audits.

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This year’s winning research poster

ISC Announces 2015 PRACE, GAUSS and Poster Winners

June 16, 2015 11:28 am | by ISC | News | Comments

ISC has announced that the 2015 PRACE ISC Award and Gauss Award will be given to two deserving European researchers reporting on their work focused on the development of energy-efficient supercomputers. These two research papers were selected by the respective award committees from the 37 submissions accepted for presentation at the 2015 ISC High Performance Research Paper Session. This year’s winning research poster...

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Iridescent Mercury: An Ethereal, Colorful View of Our Innermost Planet -- Courtesy of NASA / JHU Applied Physics Lab / Carnegie Inst. Washington – click to enlarge

Iridescent Mercury: An Ethereal, Colorful View of Our Innermost Planet

June 16, 2015 8:56 am | by ESA | News | Comments

To the human eye, Mercury may resemble a dull, grey orb but this enhanced-color image from NASA’s Messenger probe, tells a completely different story. Swathes of iridescent blue, sandy-colored plains and delicate strands of greyish white, create an ethereal and colorful view of our Solar System’s innermost planet. These contrasting colors have been chosen to emphasize the differences in the composition of the landscape across the planet.

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Roger Smith is the Chief Technology Officer for Florida Hospital's Nicholson Center.

Robotic Surgery Advances the Future of Medicine

June 16, 2015 8:28 am | by Roger Smith, Ph.D., Florida Hospital Nicholson Center | Blogs | Comments

As robotic surgery technology continues to advance, so does the need for medical research around the standard of care and true capabilities of the technology in a surgical setting. Many industry leaders, including Fortune 500 companies and the Florida Hospital Nicholson Center, are interested in taking robotic surgery to the next step to allow for telesurgery, or remote surgery.

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The plight of Malaysia Airlines flight 370 (MH370) is one of the biggest mysteries in aviation history, but an interdisciplinary research team led by a Texas A&M University at Qatar math professor has theorized the ill-fated plane plunged vertically into

Applied Mathematician Theorizes what Happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370

June 15, 2015 4:35 pm | by Texas A&M at Qatar | News | Comments

The plight of Malaysia Airlines flight 370 (MH370) is one of the biggest mysteries in aviation history, but an interdisciplinary research team led by a Texas A&M University at Qatar math professor has theorized the ill-fated plane plunged vertically into the southern Indian Ocean in March 2014.

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Writer-director Pete Docter wanted to deeply understand the science behind such intellectual concepts as personality and memory before visually interpreting them on screen. He studied scientific papers and cross-checked story ideas with Keltner and other

Neuroscience Inspires Cartoon Action in Pixar's Inside Out

June 15, 2015 4:30 pm | by Sandy Cohen, AP Entertainment Writer | News | Comments

Drawing on real neuroscience and the latest psychological research, Inside Out goes where no animated film has gone before: Deep inside the workings of a young girl's mind. It centers on 11-year-old Riley, a happy, hockey-loving kid. Most of the action, though, takes place inside her head, where her staff of personified emotions — Joy, Anger, Sadness, Fear and Disgust — is in charge of operations.

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