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Spheres from experiments have sizes like 1-euro and 10-russian rubles coins. Courtesy of Lomonosov Moscow State University

Developing Nanoscale Information Transfer via Dielectric Sphere

August 24, 2015 10:09 am | by Lomonosov Moscow State University | News | Comments

In several years — maybe in one or two decades, but maybe sooner or never — one of today’s problems will be solved in an original way: our computers, nanoantennas and other kinds of equipment will operate on the base of photons, rather than electrons. If it happens, the spheres studied by an international group of Russian, French and Spanish scientists will be able to become one of the elementary components of new photonic devices.

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Good Morning from the International Space Station -- Courtesy of NASA – Click to enlarge

Good Morning from the International Space Station

August 24, 2015 9:53 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly (@StationCDRKelly), currently on a year-long mission on the International Space Station, took this photograph of a sunrise and posted it to social media on August 10, 2015. Kelly wrote, "#GoodMorning to those in the western #USA. Looks like there's a lot going on down there. #YearInSpace"

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The technology collaboration with Intel will focus on adding increased capabilities for enterprise deployments.  Specifically the two companies will address: performance at scale, storage, network integration and support for big data.

Intel Leads $100 Million Investment into Mirantis and Cloud Infrastructure Market

August 24, 2015 8:58 am | by Mirantis | News | Comments

Mirantis announced a strategic technology and investment collaboration with Intel. The collaboration will focus on accelerating enterprise feature optimization in Mirantis’ OpenStack distribution and fueling enterprise OpenStack adoption. The technical collaboration and work with Intel is part of Intel’s recent announcement focused on creating tens of thousands of new clouds, the Cloud for All initiative.

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With a new operating model built on agile, scalable and repeatable processes, Dell states that it can now uniquely provide web tech, telecommunications service providers, hosting companies, oil and gas, and research organizations with the technology they

Dell Unveils New Line of Business: Datacenter Scalable Solutions

August 24, 2015 6:20 am | by Dell | News | Comments

Dell has introduced Datacenter Scalable Solutions (DSS), a new line of business within Dell’s Enterprise Solutions organization designed to meet the specific needs of web tech, telecommunications service providers, hosting companies, oil and gas, and research organizations. With a new operating model built on agile, scalable and repeatable processes, Dell states that it can now uniquely provide the technology they need.

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Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — August 14-20

August 21, 2015 2:31 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

Here they are — the top most-visited stories from the past week. The supercomputer is cool again; how to find bias in machine learning algorithms; a powerful new security tool detects malware uploading to cloud servers; an awesome satellite image of Las Vegas and Lake Mead; a small, modular, efficient fusion plant could bring about this long-sought power source within a decade; and an exclusive conversation with novelist Andy Weir ...

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Which Paintings were the Most Creative of their Time? An Algorithm may hold the Answers

Which Paintings were the Most Creative of their Time? An Algorithm may hold the Answers

August 21, 2015 2:11 pm | by Ahmed Elgammal, Rutgers University | News | Comments

From Picasso’s The Young Ladies of Avignon, to Munch’s The Scream, what was it about these paintings that cemented them in the canon of art history as iconic works? In many cases, the artist incorporated a technique, form or style that had never been used before. Throughout history, experts have highlighted these innovations, using them to judge relative worth. But can a painting’s level of creativity be quantified by AI?

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Robots in chains — but are they really to blame when AI does something wrong?

Who’s to Blame when Artificial Intelligence Systems Go Wrong?

August 21, 2015 1:59 pm | by Gary Lea, Australian National University | News | Comments

There has been much discussion of late of the ethics of artificial intelligence (AI), especially regarding robot weapons development and a related but more general discussion about AI as an existential threat to humanity. If Skynet of the Terminator movies is going to exterminate us, then it seems pretty tame — if not pointless — to start discussing regulation and liability.

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John Holland is rather unique in that he took ideas from evolutionary biology in order to transform search and optimization in computer science, and then he took what he discovered in computer science and allowed us to rethink evolutionary dynamics. Court

Complexity Science Giant John Holland Passes Away at 86

August 21, 2015 11:39 am | by Santa Fe Institute | News | Comments

John Holland, a pioneer in study of complex adaptive systems and leading figure in what became known as genetic algorithms, passed away August 9. Holland, 86, a longtime professor of computer science and engineering and professor of psychology at the University of Michigan (where he founded and led the Center for the Study of Complex Systems), had been interested for six decades in what are now called complex adaptive systems.

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Tracking mobile phone data is often associated with privacy issues, but these vast datasets could be the key to understanding how infectious diseases are spread seasonally, according to a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Scien

Cell Phone Data Can Track Spread of Infectious Diseases

August 21, 2015 9:48 am | by B. Rose Huber, Princeton University Woodrow Wilson School | News | Comments

Tracking mobile phone data is often associated with privacy issues, but these vast datasets could be the key to understanding how infectious diseases are spread seasonally. Researchers used anonymous mobile phone records for more than 15 million people to track the spread of rubella in Kenya and were able to quantitatively show for the first time that mobile phone data can predict seasonal disease patterns.

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Planetary Nebula ESO 378-1 – Courtesy of ESO – Click to enlarge

Ghost of a Dying Star: Planetary Nebula ESO 378-1

August 21, 2015 9:24 am | by ESO | News | Comments

This extraordinary bubble, glowing like the ghost of a star in the haunting darkness of space, may appear supernatural and mysterious, but it is a familiar astronomical object: a planetary nebula, the remnants of a dying star. This is the best view of the little-known object ESO 378-1 yet obtained and was captured by ESO's Very Large Telescope in northern Chile. Nicknamed the Southern Owl Nebula, this shimmering orb ...

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One of the highest-energy neutrino events of this study is superimposed on a view of the IceCube Lab (ICL) at the South Pole. Evidence of the neutrinos heralds a new form of astronomy. Courtesy of IceCube Collaboration

New Data Confirms Existence of Cosmic Neutrinos

August 21, 2015 8:54 am | by Terry Devitt, University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

Researchers using the IceCube Neutrino Observatory have sorted through billions of subatomic particles that zip through its frozen cubic-kilometer-sized detector each year to gather powerful new evidence in support of 2013 observations confirming the existence of cosmic neutrinos. The evidence is important because it heralds a new form of astronomy using neutrinos, nearly massless high-energy particles generated in nature’s accelerators.

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The 2015 ToTA paper’s authors will receive an award citation and a $1000 prize for the selected paper. In addition, the authors have been asked to give a presentation in a non-plenary session at SC15 in November.

SC15 Test of Time Award to Recognize Historical Impact of Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program

August 20, 2015 3:35 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

In May of this year, the SC15 Test of Time Award Committee announced that the third winner of the prestigious Test of Time Award would be the paper “The NAS Parallel Benchmarks — Summary and Preliminary Results,” published at the SC91 conference. The ToTA recognizes an outstanding paper that has appeared at the SC conference and has deeply influenced the HPC discipline.

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By bringing together more than 1,300 professionals, the Forum TERATEC illustrates the technological and industrial dynamism of HPC and the important role played by France in this field.

TERATEC Forum 2016

August 20, 2015 2:11 pm | Events

By bringing together more than 1,300 professionals, the Forum TERATEC illustrates the technological and industrial dynamism of HPC and the important role played by France in this field.

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In this July 3, 2015 photo, a person walks past a store shelf filled with fans in Marseille, southern where the temperature rose to 89.6 Fahrenheit. Federal officials said Earth in July broiled to the hottest month on record, smashing old marks. July 2015

Feeling the Heat: Earth in July was Hottest Month on Record

August 20, 2015 2:03 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Earth just keeps getting hotter. July was the planet's warmest month on record, smashing old marks, U.S. weather officials said. And it's almost a dead certain lock that this year will beat last year as the warmest year on record. The first seven months of 2015 were the hottest January-to-July span on record. The seven-month average temperature of 58.43 degrees is 1.53 degrees warmer than the 20th-century average.

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It’s all just data – how can it be prejudiced? Courtesy of Trey Guinn

Big Data Algorithms can Discriminate, and it’s Not Clear What to Do About It

August 20, 2015 12:22 pm | by Jeremy Kun, University of Illinois at Chicago | Articles | Comments

That’s what Brett Goldstein, a former policeman for the Chicago Police Department and current Urban Science Fellow at the University of Chicago’s School for Public Policy, said about a predictive policing algorithm he deployed at the CPD in 2010. His algorithm tells police where to look for criminals based on where people have been arrested previously. It’s a “heat map” of Chicago, and the CPD claims it helps them allocate resources...

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