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Technology has changed rapidly over the last few years with touch feedback, known as haptics, being used in entertainment, rehabilitation and even surgical training. New research, using ultrasound, has developed an invisible 3D haptic shape that can be se

Touchable Holograms Developed for Medical Uses and More

December 2, 2014 3:49 pm | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Technology has changed rapidly over the last few years with touch feedback, known as haptics, being used in entertainment, rehabilitation and even surgical training. New research, using ultrasound, has developed an invisible 3D haptic shape that can be seen and felt.

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It's a robot unlike any other: inspired by the world's fastest land animal, controlled by video game technology and packing nifty sensors — including one used to maneuver drones, satellites and ballistic missiles. The robot, called the cheetah, is the cre

MIT Engineers Have High Hopes for Cheetah Robot

December 2, 2014 3:27 pm | by Rodrique Ngowi, Associated Press | News | Comments

It's a robot unlike any other: inspired by the world's fastest land animal, controlled by video game technology and packing nifty sensors — including one used to maneuver drones, satellites and ballistic missiles. The robot, called the cheetah, is the creation of researchers at the Massachusetts of Technology, who had to design key elements from scratch because of a lack of or shortcomings in existing technology.

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For their calculations, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) will now, starting in 2015, have access to the World’s second-fastest computer. The Dresden scientists are hoping that the computations will yield new insights that may

Titan Calculates for HZDR Cancer Research

December 2, 2014 3:21 pm | by HZDR | News | Comments

For their calculations, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) will now, starting in 2015, have access to the World’s second-fastest computer. The Dresden scientists are hoping that the computations will yield new insights that may prove useful in proton-based cancer therapy.

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Engineers have designed and built a prism-like device that can split a beam of light into different colors and bend the light at right angles, a development that could eventually lead to computers that use optics, rather than electricity, to carry data.

Using Light Instead of Wires Inside Computers

December 2, 2014 3:01 pm | by Chris Cesare, Stanford University | News | Comments

Engineers have designed and built a prism-like device that can split a beam of light into different colors and bend the light at right angles, a development that could eventually lead to computers that use optics, rather than electricity, to carry data.

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In 1997, IBM’s Deep Blue computer beat chess wizard Garry Kasparov. This year, a computer system developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison equaled or bested scientists at the complex task of extracting data from scientific publications and placing

Computer Equal To or Better Than Humans at Cataloging Science

December 2, 2014 2:53 pm | by David Tenenbaum, University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

In 1997, IBM’s Deep Blue computer beat chess wizard Garry Kasparov. This year, a computer system developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison equaled or bested scientists at the complex task of extracting data from scientific publications and placing it in a database that catalogs the results of tens of thousands of individual studies.

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This fluorescent image shows primary rat brain astrocytes cultured in a SynVivo BBB device. Ashley M. Smith of CFD Research Corporation, Huntsville, Alabama produced the 10x photo, which received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small

Rat Brain Astrocytes

December 1, 2014 5:06 pm | Product Releases | Comments

This fluorescent image shows primary rat brain astrocytes cultured in a SynVivo BBB device. Ashley M. Smith of CFD Research Corporation, Huntsville, Alabama produced the 10x photo, which received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

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El Niño is not a contemporary phenomenon; it’s long been the Earth’s dominant source of year-to-year climate fluctuation. But as the climate warms and the feedbacks that drive the cycle change, researchers want to know how El Niño will respond.

Modeling the Growing Strength of El Niño

December 1, 2014 4:27 pm | by Kelly April Tyrrell, University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

El Niño is not a contemporary phenomenon; it’s long been the Earth’s dominant source of year-to-year climate fluctuation. But as the climate warms and the feedbacks that drive the cycle change, researchers want to know how El Niño will respond.

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Scientists have discovered an invisible shield roughly 7,200 miles above Earth that blocks so-called “killer electrons,” which can fry satellites and degrade space systems during intense solar storms. Illustration by Andy Kale, University of Alberta.

Star Trek-like Invisible Shield Discovered Thousands of Miles above Earth

November 26, 2014 2:47 pm | by University of Colorado Boulder | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered an invisible shield some 7,200 miles above Earth that blocks so-called killer electrons, which whip around the planet at near-light speed and have been known to threaten astronauts, fry satellites and degrade space systems during intense solar storms. The barrier to the particle motion was discovered in the Van Allen radiation belts, two doughnut-shaped rings above Earth filled with high-energy electrons and...

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Left to right: Ron Weiss, professor of biological engineering; Domitilla Del Vecchio, associate professor of mechanical engineering; and Deepak Mishra, MIT graduate student in biological engineering. Courtesy of Brian Teague

New Device Could Make Large Biological Circuits Practical

November 26, 2014 1:49 pm | by David L. Chandler, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers have made great progress in recent years in the design and creation of biological circuits — systems that, like electronic circuits, can take a number of different inputs and deliver a particular kind of output. But, while individual components of such biological circuits can have precise and predictable responses, those outcomes become less predictable as more such elements are combined.

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An atomic memory (glowing green), made at the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw, can be used to store quantum information in telecomunication purposes. From left to right: Michał Dąbrowski, Radek Chrapkiewicz and Wojciech Wasilewski. Courtesy

Global Quantum Communications No Longer the Stuff of Fiction

November 26, 2014 1:40 pm | by University of Warsaw | News | Comments

Following years of tests in physics laboratories, the first quantum technologies are slowly emerging into wider applications. One example is quantum cryptography — an encryption method providing an almost full guarantee of secure data transmission, currently being introduced by military forces and banking institutions.

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The program showed "mind-blowing" sophistication by penetrating several different computer networks in an unnamed Middle Eastern country. Rather than communicate with each target, the malware was able to avoid detection by using one network to relay comma

Mind-blowingly Sophisticated Hacking Program is Groundbreaking, Almost Peerless

November 26, 2014 12:15 pm | by Brandon Bailey, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Cyber-security researchers say they've identified a highly sophisticated computer hacking program that appears to have been used to spy on banks, telecommunications companies, official agencies and other organizations around the world. The malicious software known as "Regin" is designed to collect data from its targets for periods of months or years, penetrating deep into computer networks while covering its tracks to avoid detection.

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The Saudi Arabian computer SANAM, also developed in Frankfurt and Darmstadt, reached second place on the "Green500" list in 2012. Courtesy of GSI

Green500: German Supercomputer a World Champion in Saving Energy

November 26, 2014 10:51 am | by Goethe-Universität Frankfurt am Main | News | Comments

The new L-CSC supercomputer at the GSI Helmholtz Centre for Heavy Ion Research is ranked as the world's most energy-efficient supercomputer. The new system reached first place on the "Green500" list published on November 20, 2014, comparing the energy efficiency of the fastest supercomputers around the world. With a computing power of 5.27 gigaflops per watt, the L-CSC has also set a new world record for energy efficiency.

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The Gecko has good sticking power thanks to the van der Waals force.

Van der Waals Force Re-measured, may Help Improve Fundamental Simulation Methods

November 26, 2014 10:16 am | by Forschungszentrum Jülich | News | Comments

Van der Waals forces act like a sort of quantum glue on all types of matter. Using a new measuring technique, scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich experimentally determined for the first time all of the key details of how strongly the single molecules bind to a surface. With an atomic force microscope, they demonstrated that the forces do not just increase with molecular size, but that they even grow disproportionately fast.

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IBM is investing in Pathway to position both companies on the cutting edge of offering truly personalized wellness information.

Evidence-based Medicine: Bringing Big Data to Healthcare Consumers

November 26, 2014 9:31 am | by Kalorama Information | News | Comments

The IBM Watson Group's investment in Pathway Genomics is a model for the types of partnerships that are bringing Big Data to the healthcare consumer marketplace. IBM hopes to use Watson, their cognitive technology, and Big Data — enormous medical datasets — to transform the quality and speed of care delivered to individuals through individualized, evidence-based medicine.

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NAG Compiler 6.0

NAG Compiler 6.0

November 26, 2014 9:06 am | Nag Ltd | Product Releases | Comments

NAG Compiler 6.0 accurately follows Fortran and OpenMP programming language standards, supporting OpenMP 3.1 and Fortran 2008, 2003 and 95. Because the code is correct; applications that are developed with and checked by the NAG Compiler are ready to be run on a wide range of current and future computer processors.

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