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Exemplar 7.0 LIMS

Exemplar 7.0 LIMS

June 10, 2015 11:44 am | Product Releases | Comments

Exemplar LIMS 7.0 goes beyond traditional laboratory information management (LIMS) systems by combining biology electronic laboratory notebook (ELN) and scientific data management system (SDMS) capabilities with searching tools, robust collaboration and high scalability. Features include full indexing of unstructured data, so all relevant content becomes searchable.

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Fusion of Melted Nylon and Polyester Fibers -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Fusion of Melted Nylon and Polyester Fibers

June 10, 2015 11:16 am | News | Comments

This 400x photo shows the fusion of melted nylon and polyester fibers, recovered from the hood of a vehicle that was in a motor vehicle versus pedestrian collision. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

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John McGuinness, a.k.a 'Morecambe Missile,' with EMC CMO Jonathan Martin.

Why Legendary Motorcycle Racer John McGuinness is so Fast

June 10, 2015 10:44 am | by EMC | News | Comments

At the Isle of Man TT races, EMC is announcing the results of a new data analytics competition designed to unlock the secret of what makes John McGuinness, the 'Morecambe Missile,' so fast. At the Circuit Monteblanco in Spain, EMC captured over 700,000 rows of performance, biometric and mechanical data from sensors fitted on the racing suits and bikes of both John and a control subject.

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Manu Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford, and his students have developed a synchronous computer that operates using the unique physics of moving water droplets. Their goal is to design a new class of computers that can precisely

Computer Operates on Water Droplets

June 9, 2015 10:30 am | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford University | News | Comments

Stanford bioengineer Manu Prakash and his students have developed a synchronous computer that operates using the unique physics of moving water droplets. Computers and water typically don't mix, but in Manu Prakash's lab, the two are one and the same. Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford, and his students have built a synchronous computer that operates using the unique physics of moving water droplets.

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The near-to-eye display with see-through functionality facilitates a small, unobtrusive design. © Fraunhofer IOF

Small, Discreet Data Glasses also Correct for Farsightedness

June 9, 2015 9:56 am | by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft | News | Comments

Data glasses tend to be chunky, unstylish objects, so it’s no wonder they haven’t caught on among general consumers. Researchers have now developed a technology that allows specs to be made in small, unobtrusive designs. The new glasses also correct for farsightedness. While commercially available data glasses often project the image on the edge of the field of view, users of the new model see information precisely where context dictates.

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Scanning electron microscope images of single crystal structures fabricated using template-assisted selective epitaxy. For better visibility, the silicon is colored in green, and the compound semiconductor in red. Courtesy of H. Schmid/IBM

Futuristic Components on Silicon Chips, Fabricated Successfully

June 9, 2015 9:44 am | by Jason Bardi, American Institute of Physics (AIP) | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a relatively simple, robust and versatile process for growing crystals made from compound semiconductor materials that will allow them be integrated onto silicon wafers — an important step toward making future computer chips that will allow integrated circuits to continue shrinking in size and cost even as they increase in performance. The work may allow an extension to Moore's Law.

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In this May 26, 2015, photo a boat is paddled down a flooded street in Houston. Feeling soggy? Federal officials calculate that last month was the wettest on record for the contiguous U.S. On average 4.36 inches of rain and snow fell over the Lower 48 in

May was Wettest Month in US Records

June 9, 2015 9:26 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Feeling soggy? Last month was the wettest on record for the contiguous United States, according to federal meteorologists. On average 4.36 inches of rain and snow — mostly rain — fell over the Lower 48 in May, sloshing past October 2009, which had been the wettest month in U.S. records with 4.29 inches. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration records go back to 1895.

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So many choices: Choosing from a universe of possible actions is a daunting task for a robot. Humans do it effortlessly. Researchers have found that video games — particularly Minecraft — can help robots learn how to tell which objects and actions might b

Using Minecraft to Unboggle the Robot Mind

June 9, 2015 9:13 am | by Brown University | News | Comments

A human can make intuitive choices about what actions to take in order to achieve a goal. Robots have a far more difficult time choosing from of a universe of possible actions. Researchers at Brown University are developing a new algorithm that can learn that skill from a video game environment. They are developing the algorithm to help robots better plan their actions in complex environments.

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Soyuz TMA-15M Spacecraft – courtesy of ESA/NASA – click to enlarge

Soyuz TMA-15M Spacecraft to Head Home this Week

June 9, 2015 8:52 am | by ESA | News | Comments

Soyuz TMA-15M launched successfully aboard a Soyuz-FG rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan November 23, 2014. The spacecraft reached low Earth orbit approximately nine minutes after lift-off. After executing rendezvous maneuvers, it docked with the International Space Station on November 24. Soyuz TMA-15M has remained docked to the ISS, serving as an emergency escape vehicle and  waiting for its return flight to Earth.

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It’s always Pluto Time somewhere, and NASA wants to see your view, using a new interactive widget that provides the approximate time, based on your location.

NASA Lets You Experience “Pluto Time” with New Interactive Widget

June 8, 2015 2:24 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Just how dim is the sunlight on Pluto, some three billion miles away?  While sunlight is much weaker than it is here on Earth, it isn’t as dark as you might expect. In fact, for just a moment during dawn and dusk each day, the illumination on Earth matches that of high noon on Pluto. We call this “Pluto Time”. If you go outside at this time on a clear day, the world around you will be as dim as the surface of Pluto.

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Infrared light enters this silicon structure from the left. The cut-out patterns, determined by an algorithm, route two different frequencies of this light into the pathways on the right. This is a greatly magnified image of a working device that is about

Bringing Optical Data Transport Closer to Replacing Wires

June 8, 2015 2:20 pm | by Tom Abate, Stanford University | News | Comments

Stanford engineer Jelena Vuckovic wants to make computers faster and more efficient by reinventing how they send data back and forth between chips, where the work is done. A new process could revolutionize computing by making it practical to use light instead of electricity to carry data inside computers, miniaturizing the proven technology of the Internet, which moves data by beaming photons of light through fiber optic threads.

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In a breakthrough for computer vision and for bird-watching, researchers and bird enthusiasts have enabled computers to achieve a task that stumps most humans: identifying hundreds of bird species pictured in photos. The bird photo identifier, developed b

Computer Vision Breakthrough: Merlin taps Powerful AI to ID Birds from Photos

June 8, 2015 2:03 pm | by Miyoko Chu, Cornell Lab of Ornithology | News | Comments

In a breakthrough for computer vision and for bird-watching, researchers and bird enthusiasts have enabled computers to achieve a task that stumps most humans: identifying hundreds of bird species pictured in photos. The bird photo identifier, developed by the Visipedia research project in collaboration with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, is available for free.

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Maysak Becomes a Super Typhoon -- Courtesy of NASA Goddard MODIS Rapid Response Team – click to enlarge

Maysak Becomes a Super Typhoon

June 8, 2015 12:26 pm | by Rob Gutro, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

NASA's Aqua satellite captured an image of Typhoon Maysak as it strengthened into a super typhoon on March 31, 2015, reaching Category 5 hurricane status on the Saffir-Simpson Wind Scale. The TRMM and GPM satellites, both satellites are co-managed by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency captured rainfall and cloud data that revealed heavy rainfall and high thunderstorms in the strengthening storm.

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This year, the conference will be held in a world-class conference destination — Frankfurt, Germany. The ISC 2015 Conference and Exhibition anticipates an attendance of 2,600 participants from around the world.

Still Time to Save on ISC 2015 Registration — Early-bird Rates Expire on June 10

June 8, 2015 11:25 am | by ISC | News | Comments

The early-bird registration period for the 30th annual ISC High Performance conference will close on Wednesday, June 10, thus bringing the opportunity for attendees to save over 30 percent off the on-site registration rates to an end. The organizers are encouraging participants not to wait until the last minute to register. This year, the conference will be held in Frankfurt, Germany, and organizers are anticipating attendance of 2,600.

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Geoffrey Noer is Senior Director of Product Marketing at Panasas.

RAID: Alive or Dead?

June 8, 2015 8:12 am | by Geoffrey Noer, Panasas | Blogs | Comments

Is RAID dead or alive? Are erasure codes replacing RAID for data protection? We present these questions, because some storage vendors promote RAID, while others promote erasure codes. Looking at how vendors are marketing data protection in their products, it almost appears that there is a battle between RAID and erasure code technology and that everyone will agree on a winner at some point.

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