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This November 14, 1969, photo shows Jack King in the Firing Room of the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Control Center in Cape Canaveral during the countdown for Apollo 12, the second lunar landing mission. King, the NASA public affairs official who counted

Voice of Apollo 11 Moon Shot, Jack King, Dies

June 12, 2015 4:29 pm | by Marcia Dunn, AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

Jack King, a NASA public affairs official who became the voice of the Apollo moon shots, has died. He was 84. King counted down the historic launch of Apollo 11 on July 16, 1969. He also did the countdown for hundreds of the early rocket launches, including the two-man Gemini missions and many other Apollo missions.

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Stanford Professor Charbel Farhat and his team accomplished a rare feat in computer engineering through a partnership with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory. Courtesy of Norbert von der Groeben

Now, Billions of Questions can be answered in about 3 Minutes

June 12, 2015 4:16 pm | by James Urton, | News | Comments

Stanford Professor Charbel Farhat and his research team at the Army High Performance Computing Research Center used a new, high-end, massively parallel computer to demonstrate the power of algorithms that instruct processors to work together to solve challenging problems. They directed 22,000 processors to solve billions of mathematical equations in just a few minutes, a rare feat in computer engineering.

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Computer Vision Breakthrough: Merlin taps Powerful AI to ID Birds from Photos

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — June 5-11

June 12, 2015 3:39 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

In case you missed it, here's another chance to catch this week's biggest hits. Software and “Moore’s Drumbeat,” CFD scalability at 64,000 cores, experiencing “Pluto Time,” the first LightSail images, why legendary racer John McGuinness is so fast, whether RAID is dead or alive, a computer operating on water droplets, and a breakthrough for computer vision are among the latest top stories.

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A neuroblastoma: TGen's extended partnership with Dell will help it optimize a high-performance computing infrastructure to enable researchers to analyze and store massive amounts of genetic data more quickly and reach more patients than ever before. To d

First-of-a-kind Clinical Trials Support Fight against Pediatric Cancer

June 11, 2015 5:08 pm | by TGen | News | Comments

Dell has announced an extended partnership with TGen to help clinical researchers and doctors globally expand the reach and impact of the world's first FDA-approved precision medicine trial for pediatric cancer. The renewed commitment includes an additional $3 million Dell grant to support continued collaboration with TGen and the Neuroblastoma and NMTRC expanded pediatric cancer clinical trials in EMEA.

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A hawkmoth clings to a robotic flower used to study the insect’s ability to track the moving flower under low-light conditions. The research shows that the creatures can slow their brains to improve vision under low

Infrared Cameras, Robotic Flowers Reveal Hawkmoth Secrets

June 11, 2015 4:48 pm | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

It's difficult enough to see things in the dark, but what if you also had to hover in mid-air while tracking a flower moving in the wind? That's the challenge the hummingbird-sized hawkmoth (Manduca sexta) must overcome while feeding on the nectar of its favorite flowers.

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The basic algorithm for determining how much two sequences of symbols have in common — the “edit distance” between them — is now more than 40 years old. And for more than 40 years, computer science researchers have been trying to improve upon it, without

Longstanding Problem Put to Rest: 40-year-old Algorithm can’t be solved More Efficiently

June 11, 2015 4:33 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Comparing the genomes of different species — or different members of the same species — is the basis of a great deal of modern biology. DNA sequences that are conserved across species are likely to be functionally important, while variations between members of the same species can indicate different susceptibilities to disease. The basic algorithm for determining how much two sequences of symbols have in common is more than 40 years old.

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Scientists from the California Academy of Sciences celebrated World Ocean’s Day with a slew of brand new marine discoveries — more than 100 species that are likely new to science. The Philippines is home to the most biologically diverse waters on Earth, a

Scientists discover 100+ New Marine Species in Philippines

June 11, 2015 4:25 pm | by California Academy of Sciences | News | Comments

Scientists from the California Academy of Sciences celebrated World Ocean’s Day with a slew of brand new marine discoveries — more than 100 species that are likely new to science. The Philippines is home to the most biologically diverse waters on Earth, and remains the centerpiece of the Academy’s multi-year exploration of the Coral Triangle’s biological treasures.

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Jewel Beetle Carapace -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlargeThis 450x photo shows a jewel beetle (Chrysochroa buqueti) carapace, near the eye. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Sma

Jewel Beetle Carapace

June 11, 2015 4:13 pm | News | Comments

This 450x photo shows a jewel beetle (Chrysochroa buqueti) carapace, near the eye. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photograph was taken using diffused, reflected illumination.

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The Ubimet Weather Cockpit allows golf courses, race venues and other clients to access site specific weather information unique to their topography.

Weather Matters: Enabling Precise, Real-time Forecasts

June 11, 2015 3:47 pm | by Ken Strandberg | Articles | Comments

Much of the world’s industries are affected by weather. UBIMET is one of the world’s leading private weather service providers. The company offers a range of precise, real-time micro-climate forecasting and alerts, historical weather data, and other services to several million customers around the globe. UBIMET’s competitive advantage lies in the complex character of their solutions and depth of their science and technology.

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A still from a video of MIT's first DARPA Robotics Challenge run, where they scored seven points. Courtesy of the MITDRC team

Competition Generates Cutting-edge Robotics Control Algorithms

June 11, 2015 12:16 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Last weekend was the final round of DARPA's contest to design control systems for a humanoid robot that could climb a ladder, remove debris, drive a utility vehicle and perform several other tasks related to a hypothetical disaster. When a bipedal robot takes a step, its foot strikes the ground at a number of different points. MIT researchers found a way to generalize the approach to more complex motions in 3-D.

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The Wilkinson Prize was established to honor the outstanding contributions of Dr. James Hardy Wilkinson to the field of numerical software. It is awarded every four years to the entry that best addresses all phases of the preparation of numerical software

Partial Differential Equations ‘Dolfin-adjoint’ wins 2015 Wilkinson Prize for Numerical Software

June 11, 2015 11:06 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

NAG, Argonne and the National Physical Laboratory have announced awarding of the 2015 Wilkinson Prize for “dolfin-adjoint,” which automatically derives and solves adjoint and tangent linear equations from high-level mathematical specifications of finite element discretizations of partial differential equations. The prize is awarded every four years to the entry that best addresses all phases of the preparation of numerical software.

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A property known as 3-D negative electronic compressibility, observed for the first time in research conducted, in part, at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, could potentially be used in components for computer chips, like the one pictured here, to re

Exotic Material’s 3-D Property could help Beat Heat in Computer Chips

June 11, 2015 9:29 am | by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory | News | Comments

The heat that builds up in the shuttling of current in electronics is an important obstacle to packing more computing power into ever-smaller devices: Excess heat can cause them to fail or sap their efficiency. Now, X-ray studies at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have for the first time observed an exotic property that could warp the electronic structure of a material in a way that reduces heat buildup.

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This 20x photo shows chlorophyll fluorescence of the symbiotic zooxanthellae (dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium) living inside the cells of a sea anemone (Aiptasia pallida). It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photo

Symbiotic Algae Living inside the Cells of a Sea Anemone

June 11, 2015 8:50 am | News | Comments

This 20x photo shows chlorophyll fluorescence of the symbiotic zooxanthellae (dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium) living inside the cells of a sea anemone (Aiptasia pallida). It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

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researchers describe how the learnings from both insects and humans can be applied in a model virtual reality simulation, enabling an artificial intelligence system to 'pursue' an object.

Insect Vision benefits Bio-inspired, Autonomous Robot Eyes

June 11, 2015 8:43 am | by University of Adelaide | News | Comments

The way insects see and track their prey is being applied to a new robot in the hopes of improving robot visual systems. The project — which crosses the boundaries of neuroscience, mechanical engineering and computer science — builds on years of research into insect vision. The learnings from both insects and humans can be applied in a model virtual reality simulation, enabling an artificial intelligence system to 'pursue' an object.

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 When he wasn't busy scribbling out the theory of relativity, Albert Einstein seems to have spent a fair amount of time writing letters involving topics such as God, his son's geometry studies, even a little toy steam engine an uncle gave him when he was

27 Einstein Personal Letters on Auction Block

June 11, 2015 8:32 am | by John Rogers, Associated Press | News | Comments

When he wasn't busy scribbling out the theory of relativity, Albert Einstein seems to have spent a fair amount of time writing letters involving topics such as God, his son's geometry studies, even a little toy steam engine an uncle gave him when he was a boy. The Einstein Letters, which include more than two dozen missives, went up for sale at a California-based auction house. Some were in English and others in German.

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