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Intelligent Light, in collaboration with scalable solver developers at Georgia Tech and HPC experts at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has announced that it is achieving breakthrough CFD scalability running the AVF-Leslie combustion simulation code

Researchers Achieve Breakthrough CFD Scalability at 64,000 Cores

June 5, 2015 4:00 pm | by Intelligent Light | News | Comments

Intelligent Light, in collaboration with scalable solver developers at Georgia Tech and HPC experts at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has announced that it is achieving breakthrough CFD scalability running the AVF-Leslie combustion simulation code on up to 64,000 cores on supercomputers at the Department of Energy’s National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center.

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Nature’s Kaleidoscope: Beach Oak Twig with Scale Leaves -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Nature’s Kaleidoscope: Beach Oak Twig with Scale Leaves

June 5, 2015 3:39 pm | News | Comments

This 125x photo shows a transverse section of beach oak (Casuarina equisetifolia) twigs with scale leaves. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photograph was taken using brightfield and image stacking techniques.

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Earthquakes Reveal Deep Secrets beneath East Asia

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — May 29-June 4

June 5, 2015 3:23 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

Here they are — the top most-visited stories from the past week. A 10-engine battery-powered plane that can take off like a helicopter, fascinating facts about USB OTG, a flexible computing prototype for electronic skin, a detailed look at the "Prostate Cancer Jungle," free Windows 10 upgrades, and an experiment that proves reality does not exist — at least until it is measured — are all among the top hits.

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With keynote speakers from industry and international big-science projects, the two and one-half day New York Scientific Data Summit is organized into five sessions with topics including scientific image analysis, data fusion, environmental and urban scie

Accelerating Data-driven Discovery and Innovation: New York Scientific Data Summit

June 5, 2015 9:00 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

New York Scientific Data Summit is a no-fee annual meeting that aims to accelerate data-driven discovery and innovation by bringing together researchers, developers and end-users from academia, industry, utilities and state and federal governments. Jointly organized by Brookhaven National Laboratory, Stony Brook University and New York University, this year’s conference will take place from August 2 to 5, 2015, at NYU.

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Rose had a "formidable intellect and unwavering curiosity about fundamental biological and chemical processes that are the foundation for life,"

2004 Nobel Chemistry Winner Irwin Rose Dies at 88

June 4, 2015 3:54 pm | by AP | News | Comments

Irwin Rose, a biochemist who shared the 2004 Nobel Prize in chemistry for discovering a way that cells destroy unwanted proteins — the basis for developing new therapies for diseases such as cervical cancer and cystic fibrosis — has died. He was 88. He had a "formidable intellect and unwavering curiosity about fundamental biological and chemical processes that are the foundation for life."

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This illustration provided by NASA/JPL/Mark Showalter, SETI Institute depicts Pluto and its five moons from a perspective looking away from the sun. It is adapted from a classic Voyager I montage of Jupiterís Galilean moons, and is intended to highlight s

Solar System's Weirdest Dance Scene: The Moons around Pluto

June 4, 2015 3:45 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

There's a chaotic dance going on at the far end of our solar system, involving Pluto and five of its closest friends, a new study finds. Hubble Space Telescope images of Pluto, its largest moon Charon, and tinier moons Styx, Nix, Hydra and Kerberos show the odd rhythmic gyrations of the six distant objects in a dance unlike anything in our solar system. What makes it so odd is that there's a double set of dances going on.

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The North launched its first and only satellite in 2012. The claim that it is working on another, made in an interview last week with an AP Television crew in Pyongyang, comes amid a flurry of attention to the country's fledgling space agency,

North Korea Developing New Satellite, Defends Space Program

June 4, 2015 3:33 pm | by Eric Talmadge, Associated Press | News | Comments

North Korean space agency officials say the country is developing a more advanced Earth observation satellite and are defending their right to conduct rocket launches whenever they see fit, despite protests that the launches are aimed primarily at honing military technologies. The North launched its first and only satellite in 2012. The claim  it is working on another comes amid a flurry of attention to its fledgling space agency.

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Global warming has not stopped or even slowed in the past 18 years, according to a new federal study that rebuts doubters who've claimed that that heating trends have paused.  Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration readjusted th

New Fed Data Shows No Stopping or Slowing of Global Warming

June 4, 2015 2:20 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Global warming has not stopped or even slowed in the past 18 years, according to a new federal study that rebuts doubters who've claimed that that heating trends have paused. Scientists at NOAA readjusted thousands of weather data points to account for different measuring techniques through the decades. Their calculations show that, since 1998, the rate of warming is about the same as it has been since 1950.

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Researchers are retrofitting the 4-meter Mayall telescope at Kitt Peak in Arizona, adding enormous lenses that give a huge field of view. A set of 5000 optical fibers are used to pick off light from up to 5000 galaxies at a time. The fibers direct light t

Next-gen Experiment will Create Largest 3-D Map of Universe, Help Test Dark Energy Theories

June 4, 2015 9:21 am | by Kate Greene, Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences | News | Comments

For the past several years, scientists at Berkeley Lab have been planning the construction of and developing technologies for a very special instrument that will create the most extensive three-dimensional map of the universe to date. Called DESI for Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument, this project will trace the growth history of the universe. Unprecedented in its size and scope, it will allow scientists to test dark energy theories.

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The Advance of Hubbard Glacier -- Courtesy of NASA/Earth Observatory – Click to enlarge

The Advance of Hubbard Glacier

June 4, 2015 8:42 am | by NASA | News | Comments

Since measurements began in 1895, Alaska’s Hubbard Glacier has been thickening and steadily advancing into Disenchantment Bay. The advance runs counter to many thinning and retreating glaciers nearby in Alaska and around the world. This image shows the glacier on July 22, 2014. Twice in the past hundred years, the moraine has made contact with Gilbert Point and blocked the entrance to Russell Fjord, causing the water level to rise rapidly

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The researchers found that changing the vaccine study design from the approach used originally proposed by the CDC would lead to better information about the effectiveness of the vaccine.

Lonestar4 aids Ebola Vaccine Trial Simulation and Analysis

June 3, 2015 12:50 pm | by Faith Singer-Villalobos, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

As the current Ebola outbreak wanes, scientists have to make the most of every opportunity to prepare for future outbreaks. One such opportunity involves the identification of a safe and effective Ebola vaccine. Supercomputers have aided researchers in modeling which types of clinical trials will provide the best information. They found that changing the study design would lead to better information about the effectiveness of the vaccine.

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Type Ia supernovae are famous for their consistency. Ironically, new observations suggest that their origins may not be uniform at all. Using a “roadmap” of theoretical calculations and supercomputer simulations, astronomers observed for the first time a

Supernova Hunting with Supercomputers

June 3, 2015 12:36 pm | by Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences | News | Comments

Type Ia supernovae are famous for their consistency. Ironically, new observations suggest that their origins may not be uniform at all. Using a “roadmap” of theoretical calculations and supercomputer simulations, astronomers observed for the first time a flash of light caused by a supernova slamming into a nearby star, allowing them to determine the stellar system from which the supernova was born.

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On June 3, 2015, CERN1’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC) started delivering physics data for the first time in 27 months. After an almost two-year shutdown and several months re-commissioning, the LHC is now providing collisions to all of its experiments at t

Stable Beams: LHC Experiments Back in Business at Unprecedented Energy of 13 TeV

June 3, 2015 10:13 am | by CERN | News | Comments

On June 3, 2015, CERN’s Large Hadron Collider started delivering physics data for the first time in 27 months. After an almost two-year shutdown and several months re-commissioning, the LHC is now providing collisions to all of its experiments at the unprecedented energy of 13 TeV, almost double the collision energy of its first run. This marks the start of season 2. The LHC will now run round the clock for the next three years.

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Decentralized partially observable Markov decision processes are a way to model autonomous robots’ behavior in circumstances where neither their communication with each other nor their judgments about the outside world are perfect. The problem with Dec-PO

Autonomous Multirobot Collaboration Algorithm makes Complex Models Practical

June 3, 2015 9:58 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Decentralized partially observable Markov decision processes are a way to model autonomous robots’ behavior in circumstances where neither their communication with each other nor their judgments about the outside world are perfect. The problem is that they’re as complicated as their name. They provide the most rigorous mathematical models of multiagent systems — not just robots, but any autonomous networked devices — under uncertainty.

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Paramecium division -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Paramecium Division

June 3, 2015 9:52 am | News | Comments

This 250x photo of paramecium division received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photograph was taken using differential interference contrast.

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