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The Gecko has good sticking power thanks to the van der Waals force.

Van der Waals Force Re-measured, may Help Improve Fundamental Simulation Methods

November 26, 2014 | by Forschungszentrum Jülich | News | Comments

Van der Waals forces act like a sort of quantum glue on all types of matter. Using a new measuring technique, scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich experimentally determined for the first time all of the key details of how strongly the single molecules bind to a surface. With an atomic force microscope, they demonstrated that the forces do not just increase with molecular size, but that they even grow disproportionately fast.

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Scientists have discovered an invisible shield roughly 7,200 miles above Earth that blocks so-called “killer electrons,” which can fry satellites and degrade space systems during intense solar storms. Illustration by Andy Kale, University of Alberta.

Star Trek-like Invisible Shield Discovered Thousands of Miles above Earth

November 26, 2014 2:47 pm | by University of Colorado Boulder | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered an invisible shield some 7,200 miles above Earth that blocks so-called killer electrons, which whip around the planet at near-light speed and have been known to threaten astronauts, fry satellites and degrade space systems during intense solar storms. The barrier to the particle motion was discovered in the Van Allen radiation belts, two doughnut-shaped rings above Earth filled with high-energy electrons and...

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Left to right: Ron Weiss, professor of biological engineering; Domitilla Del Vecchio, associate professor of mechanical engineering; and Deepak Mishra, MIT graduate student in biological engineering. Courtesy of Brian Teague

New Device could make Large Biological Circuits Practical

November 26, 2014 1:49 pm | by David L. Chandler, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers have made great progress in recent years in the design and creation of biological circuits — systems that, like electronic circuits, can take a number of different inputs and deliver a particular kind of output. But, while individual components of such biological circuits can have precise and predictable responses, those outcomes become less predictable as more such elements are combined.

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An atomic memory (glowing green), made at the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw, can be used to store quantum information in telecomunication purposes. From left to right: Michał Dąbrowski, Radek Chrapkiewicz and Wojciech Wasilewski. Courtesy

Global Quantum Communications No Longer the Stuff of Fiction

November 26, 2014 1:40 pm | by University of Warsaw | News | Comments

Following years of tests in physics laboratories, the first quantum technologies are slowly emerging into wider applications. One example is quantum cryptography — an encryption method providing an almost full guarantee of secure data transmission, currently being introduced by military forces and banking institutions.

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NAG Compiler 6.0

NAG Compiler 6.0

November 26, 2014 9:06 am | Nag Ltd | Product Releases | Comments

NAG Compiler 6.0 accurately follows Fortran and OpenMP programming language standards, supporting OpenMP 3.1 and Fortran 2008, 2003 and 95. Because the code is correct; applications that are developed with and checked by the NAG Compiler are ready to be run on a wide range of current and future computer processors.

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Microscopic Marine Waterbear -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Closeup: Microscopic Marine Waterbear

November 26, 2014 8:44 am | News | Comments

This 40X photo shows autofluorescence of the cuticle of a microscopic marine waterbear, or tardigrade (Actinarctus doryphorus). It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using confocal microscopy.

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This year’s team from The University of Texas – Austin won in the SC14 Student Cluster Competition overall category. Courtesy of TACC

Showcasing Student Expertise

November 25, 2014 2:55 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

After 48-hours of real-time, spirited competition, two triumphant winners emerged in this year’s SC14 Student Cluster Competition. The annual challenge is designed to introduce the next generation of students to the high-performance computing community. Over the last few years, it has drawn teams of undergraduate and/or high school students from around the world, including Australia, Canada, China, Costa Rica, Germany, Russia and Taiwan.

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The National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation medals ready to be presented to awardees. Courtesy of Sandy Schaeffer, NSF

National Medals of Science, Technology and Innovation Presented

November 25, 2014 12:00 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

At a White House ceremony on November 20, 2014, President Obama presented the National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation to individuals who have made outstanding contributions to science and engineering. The awards are the nation's highest honors for achievement and leadership in advancing the fields of science and technology.

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Clusterstor Engineered Solution for Lustre

Clusterstor Engineered Solution for Lustre

November 25, 2014 11:28 am | by Seagate Technology | Product Releases | Comments

ClusterStor Engineered Solution for Lustre offers improved metadata performance and scalability by implementing the Distributed Namespace (DNE) features in the Lustre 2.5 parallel file system. In addition to the Base Metadata Management Server capability, ClusterStor users have the option to add up to 16 Lustre Distributed Namespace metadata servers per single file system, providing client metadata performance improvement of up to 700 percent.

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Schematic of nanoparticle construction. Courtesy of Andrew Dunn

Inside job: Designer Nanoparticles Infiltrate Cancer Cells from Within

November 25, 2014 10:34 am | by Melanie Titanic-Schefft, University of Cincinnati | News | Comments

Conventional treatment seeks to eradicate cancer cells by drugs and therapy delivered from outside the cell, which may also affect — and potentially harm — nearby normal cells. In contrast, a research team has developed several novel designs for iron-oxide based nanoparticles that detect, diagnose and destroy cancer cells using photo-thermal therapy, using nanoparticles to focus light-induced heat energy only within the tumor

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As supercomputing — also known as high performance computing or HPC — becomes central to the work and progress of researchers in all fields, from genomics and ecology to medicine and education, new kinds of computing resources and more inclusive modes of

NSF Commits $16M to Build Cloud-based, Data-intensive Computing Systems for Open Science

November 25, 2014 10:01 am | by NSF | News | Comments

Tens of thousands of researchers currently harness the power of supercomputers to solve research problems that cannot be answered in the lab. However, this represents only a fraction of the potential users of such resources. As high performance computing becomes central to the work and progress of researchers in all fields, from genomics and ecology to medicine and education, new kinds of computing resources are required.

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Fossilized Horsetail Plant -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Fossilized Horsetail Plant

November 25, 2014 9:51 am | News | Comments

This 100X photo shows a polished section of a fossilized permocarbonian horsetail, a family of vascular plants that reproduces by spores. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken by using reflected light.

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Ohio State's Adaptive Suspension Vehicle (AVS), nicknamed the "Walker." Developed by electrical engineer Robert McGhee and mechanical engineer Kenneth Waldron, along with a 60-member team of students and technical assistants, the 'Walker' was designed to

NSF Celebrates More than 40 Years Supporting US Robotics Research

November 24, 2014 4:14 pm | by Aaron Dubrow, NSF | News | Comments

The fundamental research in computing and engineering that enabled robotics to develop in the U.S. has been supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) since its inception. Yet despite these early investments in sensors, machine movement and computer vision, it wasn't until 1972 that the first grant with "robot" in the title was funded.

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Wireless communication and consumption of digital media might profit from freely accessible transmission frequencies in the UHF range. Courtesy of KIT

New Frequency Ranges May Make Free Super WiFi Possible

November 24, 2014 4:03 pm | by KIT – University of the State of Baden-Wuerttemberg and National Research Center of the Helmholtz Association | News | Comments

Wireless data transmission largely takes place via WLAN networks, such as WiFi. However, these networks are currently limited to high frequency ranges at 2 GHz and above and, hence, have a limited range. The authors of the study propose to extend the frequencies for free communication to include lower ranges and even increased transmission power.

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PowerEdge C4130 Server

PowerEdge C4130 Server

November 24, 2014 2:56 pm | Dell Computer Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

The PowerEdge C4130 is an accelerator-optimized, GPU-dense, HPC-focused rack server purpose-built to accelerate the most demanding HPC workloads. It is the only Intel Xeon E5-2600v3 1U server to offer up to four GPUs/accelerators and can achieve over 7.2 Teraflops on a single 1U server, with a performance/watt ratio of up to 4.17 Gigaflops per watt.

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Young Juniper Shoot Cross-section -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Young Juniper Shoot Cross-section

November 24, 2014 2:33 pm | News | Comments

This 250X photo shows a cross-section of a young juniper shoot. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using confocal microscopy.

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