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Researchers found that people who played violent video games in 3-D showed more evidence of anger afterward than did people who played using traditional 2-D systems — even those with large screens. © lassedesignen / Fotolia

Violent 3-D Gaming Provokes More Anger

October 24, 2014 | by Jeff Grabmeier, The Ohio State University | News | Comments

Playing violent video games in 3-D makes everything seem more real — and that may have troubling consequences for players, a new study reveals. Researchers found that people who played violent video games in 3-D showed more evidence of anger afterward than did people who played using traditional 2-D systems — even those with large screens.

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Spectronaut Software

Spectronaut Software

October 24, 2014 4:35 pm | by Biognosys | Product Releases | Comments

Spectronaut is softwarefor analysis of hyper reaction monitoring, HRM-MS (SWATH, DIA) data. HRM-MS is a targeted proteomics technology based on data-independent acquisition (DIA) performed on new generation mass spectrometric systems. Spectral library generation capability based on MaxQuant search results is incorporated into the software.

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The sun emitted a significant solar flare on October 19, 2014-- Courtesy of NASA/Solar Dynamics Observatory

Significant Solar Flare in Extreme Ultraviolet

October 24, 2014 3:35 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The sun emitted a significant solar flare on October 19, 2014, peaking at 1:01 a.m. EDT. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which is always observing the sun, captured this image of the event in extreme ultraviolet wavelength of 131 Angstroms — a wavelength that can see the intense heat of a flare and that is typically colorized in teal.

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Researchers used the Pancam on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity to capture this 10-second-exposure view of comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring as it flew near Mars on October 19, 2014. Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./ASU/TAMU

NASA Rover Opportunity Captured Images of Comet Siding Spring

October 23, 2014 3:56 pm | by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory | News | Comments

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured images of a comet passing much closer to Mars than any previous known comet flyby of Earth or Mars. The images of comet Siding Spring were taken against a backdrop of the pre-dawn Martian sky on October 19, 2014. Images of comet A1 Siding Spring from the rover's panoramic camera (Pancam) are online.

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Researchers are expanding the applicability of biological circuits. Background: Microscopic image of human kidney cells with fluorescent proteins in cell culture.

Constructing Precisely Functioning, Programmable Bio-computers

October 23, 2014 3:40 pm | by Fabio Bergamin, ETH | News | Comments

Bio-engineers are working on the development of biological computers with the aim of designing small circuits made from biological material that can be integrated into cells to change their functions. In the future, such developments could enable cancer cells to be reprogrammed, thereby preventing them from dividing at an uncontrollable rate. Stem cells could likewise be reprogrammed into differentiated organ cells.

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NIST Cloud Computing Roadmap Details Research Requirements, Action Plans  Courtesy of Irvine/NIST and ©magann/Fotolia

NIST Cloud Computing Roadmap Reflects Worldwide Input

October 23, 2014 3:23 pm | by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) | News | Comments

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has published the final version of the US Government Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap, Volumes I and II. The roadmap focuses on strategic and tactical objectives to support the federal government’s accelerated adoption of cloud computing. This final document reflects the input from more than 200 comments on the initial draft received from around the world.

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To carry out their work, the team was awarded resources on two world-class supercomputers — HeCTOR at the University of Edinburgh and Abel at the University of Oslo — which were made available through PRACE.

Imaging Extremely Distant Galaxies to Create New Window on Early Universe

October 23, 2014 3:18 pm | by University of Bonn | News | Comments

Scientists at the Universities of Bonn and Cardiff see good times approaching for astrophysicists after hatching a new observational strategy to distill detailed information from galaxies at the edge of the Universe. Using two world-class supercomputers, the researchers were able to demonstrate the effectiveness of their approach by simulating the formation of a massive galaxy at the dawn of cosmic time.

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Found near the ocean floor and beneath Arctic permafrost, methane hydrate is an icy substance that burns when lit and holds vast amounts of potential energy. Courtesy of USGS

$58 Million Effort to Study Potential New Energy Source, Fire and Ice

October 23, 2014 3:10 pm | by The University of Texas at Austin | News | Comments

A research team has been awarded approximately $58 million to analyze deposits of frozen methane under the Gulf of Mexico that hold enormous potential to increase the world’s energy supply. The grant, one of the largest ever awarded to the university, will allow researchers to advance scientific understanding of methane hydrate, a substance found in abundance beneath the ocean floor and under Arctic permafrost.

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Composite Cross-cut -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Composite Cross-cut

October 23, 2014 9:42 am | News | Comments

This 50X photo shows cross-cut through an assembly of two dark-brown fiber-reinforced composite pieces, which are bonded together with gray adhesive and back-filled with a blue mass of composite material. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using reflected light and darkfield.

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New software algorithms reduce the time and material needed to produce objects with 3-D printers. Here, the wheel on the left was produced with conventional software and the one on the right with the new algorithms. Courtesy of Purdue University/Bedrich B

New Software Algorithms Speed 3-D Printing, Reduce Waste

October 22, 2014 12:40 pm | by Emil Venere, Purdue University | News | Comments

New software algorithms have been shown to significantly reduce the time and material needed to produce objects with 3-D printers. The algorithms have been created to address the problem. Researchers from Purdue University have demonstrated one approach that has been shown to reduce printing time by up to 30 percent and the quantity of support material by as much as 65 percent.

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Set up of the experiment showing the orthogonal side illumination  © Vetlugin et al.

Quantum Holograms could become Quantum Information Memory

October 22, 2014 12:22 pm | by Springer | News | Comments

Russian scientists have developed a theoretical model of quantum memory for light, adapting the concept of a hologram to a quantum system. The authors demonstrate for the first time that it is theoretically possible to retrieve, on demand, a given portion of the stored quantized light signal of a holographic image — set in a given direction in a given position in time sequence.

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Testing the new mathematical model in an animal during experimental ODP was necessary, so the teams decided to collaborate. The theory and experimental findings showed that fast Hebbian and slow homeostatic plasticity work together during learning, but on

Mathematical Model Solves Decades-old Question: How Brain Remains Stable during Learning

October 22, 2014 11:06 am | by RIKEN | News | Comments

Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the brain in balance during learning, according to scientists who report on a six-year quest by a collaborative team from the three institutions to solve a decades-old question and open the door to a more general understanding of how the brain learns and consolidates new experiences on dramatically different timescales.

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Freshwater Flea -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Freshwater Flea Close-up

October 22, 2014 10:58 am | News | Comments

This 200X photo shows the freshwater flea Daphnia magna. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using differential interference contrast and image stacking.

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Companies can log on, cost-free, at http://cyberchain.rhsmith.umd.edu and track developing threats, plus map their IT supply chains and anonymously measure themselves against industry peers and NIST standards.

Counter-measure Offers Cyber Protection for Supply Chains

October 22, 2014 10:14 am | by University of Maryland | News | Comments

The supply chain is ground zero for several recent cyber breaches. Hackers, for example, prey on vendors that have remote access to a larger company's global IT systems, software and networks. In the 2013 Target breach, the attacker infiltrated a vulnerable link: a refrigeration system supplier connected to the retailer's IT system. A counter-measure, via a user-ready online portal, has been developed at the Supply Chain Management Center.

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Light-enabled wi-fi, or Li-Fi, was first developed by Professor Harald Haas, Chair of Mobile Communication with the University of Edinburgh. Haas is co-founder of the spin-out company pureLiFi.  Courtesy of LaurenceWinram

Light-enabled Wi-fi could Tackle Global Data Crunch

October 22, 2014 9:50 am | by University of Edinburgh | News | Comments

High-speed bi-directional wireless technology that uses light to send information securely offers faster, safer transfer of data than conventional wi-fi. Because it does not rely on the radio spectrum, it provides 10,000 times more bandwidth. Light-enabled wi-fi, or Li-Fi, was first developed by Professor Harald Haas, Chair of Mobile Communication with the University of Edinburgh. Haas is co-founder of the spin-out company pureLiFi.

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Beach goers cooling off during the 2014 Southern California heat wave, in Huntington Beach, CA. It sounds like a broken record, but last month again set a new mark for global heat. And meteorologists say Earth is now on pace to tie the hottest year ever

Warming Earth Heading for Hottest Year on Record

October 21, 2014 11:35 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Earth is on pace to tie or even break the mark for the hottest year on record, federal meteorologists say. That's because global heat records have kept falling in 2014, with September the latest example. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced October 20, 2014, that last month the globe averaged 60.3 degrees Fahrenheit (15.72 degrees Celsius). That was the hottest September in 135 years of record keeping.

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