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Taming Magnetic Vortices: A Unified Theory for Skyrmion-materials

Taming Magnetic Vortices: A Unified Theory for Skyrmion-materials

March 4, 2015 | by University of Cologne | News | Comments

In the future, magnetic vortex structures — so-called skyrmions — have the potential to store and process information very efficiently. They could also be the basis for high-frequency components. For the first time, physicists have succeeded in characterizing the electromagnetic properties of insulating, semiconducting and conducting skyrmion-materials and have developed a unified theoretical description of their behavior.

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Researchers have gained new insights into dark energy and the theory of gravitation by analyzing data from the “Planck” satellite mission of the European Space Agency. Their results demonstrate that the standard model of cosmology remains an excellent des

Satellite Mission Puts Einstein to the Test

March 5, 2015 12:24 pm | by Heidelberg University | News | Comments

Researchers have gained new insights into dark energy and the theory of gravitation by analyzing data from the “Planck” satellite mission of the European Space Agency. Their results demonstrate that the standard model of cosmology remains an excellent description of the universe. Yet when the Planck data is combined with other astronomical observations, several deviations emerge.

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An international team of researchers have developed a new way to measure the forces inside materials such as sand, soil or snow under pressure.

3D Imaging Exposes Clogs, Jams, Avalanches, Earthquakes

March 5, 2015 11:23 am | by Robin A. Smith, Duke University | News | Comments

An international team of researchers have developed a new way to measure the forces inside materials such as sand, soil or snow under pressure.

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Researchers have assembled the largest and most accurate tree of life calibrated to time. Surprisingly, it reveals that life has been expanding at a constant rate, not slowing down.

Tree of Life Shows Clocklike Emergence of New Species

March 5, 2015 10:04 am | by Joseph Caspermeyer, Temple University | News | Comments

Researchers have assembled the largest and most accurate tree of life calibrated to time. Surprisingly, it reveals that life has been expanding at a constant rate, not slowing down.

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Research has for the first time analyzed over 130,000 online news articles to find out how the 2012 US presidential election played out in the media.

Big Data Used to Understand Major Events

March 5, 2015 9:34 am | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Research has for the first time analyzed over 130,000 online news articles to find out how the 2012 US presidential election played out in the media.

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Before scientists develop a full quantum computer, quantum physicists will have to create circuitry that takes advantage of the marvelous computing prowess promised by the quantum bit (“qubit”), while compensating for its high vulnerability to environment

Quantum Device Detects and Corrects Own Errors

March 5, 2015 9:24 am | by Sonia Fernandez, UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

Before scientists develop a full quantum computer, quantum physicists will have to create circuitry that takes advantage of the marvelous computing prowess promised by the quantum bit (“qubit”), while compensating for its high vulnerability to environmentally-induced error.

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In 1976 several elongated comet-like objects were discovered on pictures taken with the UK Schmidt Telescope in Australia. Because of their appearance, they became known as cometary globules even though they have nothing in common with comets. The object

Mouth of the Beast

March 5, 2015 9:24 am | News | Comments

In 1976 several elongated comet-like objects were discovered on pictures taken with the UK Schmidt Telescope in Australia. Because of their appearance, they became known as cometary globules even though they have nothing in common with comets. The object shown in this new picture, CG4, which is also sometimes referred to as God’s Hand, is one of these cometary globules. 

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Micro-drones at Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt Courtesy of AAU/Lakeside Labs

Micro-drone Networks Present Unique Communications Challenges

March 4, 2015 10:39 am | by Alpen-Adria-Universität | News | Comments

Micro-drones are being put to use in a large number of areas, where these small aircraft face extensive requirements while performing aerial observation tasks or when deployed in the field of disaster management. A newly developed concept summarizes some of these challenges.

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An Ant’s Eye -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

An Ant’s Eye

March 3, 2015 3:00 pm | News | Comments

This 20x photo of an ant eye received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Noah Fram-Schwartz of Greenwich, CT, using reflected light.

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Southern Tip of Phlegra Montes on Mars -- Courtesy of ESA/DLR/FU Berlin, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO – click to enlarge

Southern Tip of Phlegra Montes on Mars

March 3, 2015 11:21 am | News | Comments

This color image shows the southernmost portion of Phlegra Montes on Mars, a complex system of isolated hills, ridges and small basins that spans over 1400 kilometers from the Elysium volcanic region at about 30ºN and deep into the northern lowlands at about 50°N.

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Familiar crowd patterns emerged from the new simulations: people walking on an on-coming collision course veer well in advance, but people traveling in the same direction tend to walk close together. Courtesy of Yoshikazu Takada

Predicting Human Crowds with Statistical Physics

March 3, 2015 10:36 am | by American Physical Society | News | Comments

For the first time, researchers have directly measured a general law of how pedestrians interact in a crowd. This law can be used to create realistic crowds in virtual reality games and to make public spaces safer. People intuitively know how to navigate through crowds in a way that both minimizes distance traveled and avoids collisions. But the 'force' that governs human interactions has been previously unknown.

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A NASA spacecraft is about to reach the end of a nearly eight-year journey and make the first rendezvous with a dwarf planet.  The Dawn craft will slip into orbit around Ceres, a dwarf planet the size of Texas, on March 6, 2015. Unlike robotic landings or

NASA Spacecraft Making First Visit to Dwarf Planet Ceres

March 3, 2015 10:26 am | by Alicia Chang, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

A NASA spacecraft is about to reach the end of a nearly eight-year journey and make the first rendezvous with a dwarf planet. The Dawn craft will slip into orbit around Ceres, a dwarf planet the size of Texas, on March 6, 2015. Unlike robotic landings or other orbit captures, the arrival won't be a nail-biter. Still, Dawn had to travel some three billion miles to reach the largest object in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

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Using a two-camera system, the researchers can capture images in stereo. That is, if you look at the center of the image and unfocus your eyes, the two images merge into one, creating the illusion of a three dimensional ice crystal. Courtesy of Cale Fallg

Incredible Snowflake Imaging Technology may Help Improve Road Safety

March 3, 2015 10:18 am | by National Science Foundation | News | Comments

The technology behind the camera that revealed the intricate, imperfect beauty of snowflakes is now able to expose their potential danger. About three years ago, a new high-speed camera captured free-falling ice crystals so well it might as well be yelling "freeze!" Now, a less expensive, hardier version with the same incredible capability has been designed for use by departments of transportation to anticipate road conditions.

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives for a press conference at the Mobile World Congress, the world's largest mobile phone trade show in Barcelona, Spain, March 2, 2015. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)

Google, Facebook Update Contrasting Plans to Connect World

March 3, 2015 9:25 am | by Joseph Wilson, Associated Press | News | Comments

Sci-fi solutions or making friends one at a time? Google and Facebook are taking different routes to expanding Internet use and access among the unconnected in developing countries. The two Internet giants gave updates on their efforts — and differing approaches — at the Mobile World Congress wireless show in Barcelona on March 2, 2015.

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Colorized scanning electron micrograph of filamentous Ebola virus particles (green) attached to and budding from a chronically infected VERO E6 cell (blue) (25,000x magnification). Courtesy of NIAID

Combatting the World’s Deadliest Ebola Outbreak

March 2, 2015 4:37 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that the 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest in history, affecting multiple countries in West Africa. As of February 26, 2015, the CDC had tracked 23,816 cases, and Ebola had already claimed nearly 10,000 lives. 

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At their heart, the simulations are akin to modeling chemical reactions taking place between different elements and, in this case, we have four states a person can be in — human, infected, zombie or dead zombie — with approximately 300 million people. Cou

Statistical Mechanics Reveal Ideal Hideout to Save your Brains from the Undead

March 2, 2015 2:26 pm | by American Physical Society | News | Comments

Researchers focusing on a fictional zombie outbreak as an approach to disease modeling suggest heading for the hills, in the Rockies, to save your brains from the undead. Reading World War Z: An Oral History of the First Zombie War, and taking a graduate statistical mechanics class inspired a group of Cornell University researchers to explore how an "actual" zombie outbreak might play out in the U.S.

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