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In this April 26, 2009 file photo, actor Leonard Nimoy poses for a portrait in Beverly Hills, CA. Nimoy, famous for playing officer Mr. Spock in “Star Trek” died Friday, February 27, 2015, in Los Angeles of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Live Long and Prosper, Mr. #Spock! Leonard Nimoy dies at 83

February 27, 2015 | by Lynn Elber, AP Television Writer | News | Comments

Leonard Nimoy, the actor known and loved by generations of Star Trek fans as the pointy-eared, purely logical science officer Mr. Spock, has died. Nimoy died Friday of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at his Los Angeles home, with family at his side, said his son, Adam Nimoy. He was 83.

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Exploring the Colors of the Small Magellanic Cloud -- Courtesy of ESA/NASA/JPL-Caltech/STScI – click to enlarge

Colors in the Cloud: Exploring the Colors of the Small Magellanic Cloud

February 27, 2015 3:02 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

Astronomical images often look like works of art. This picture of one of our nearest neighboring galaxies, the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), is certainly no exception! The scene is actually a collaboration between two cosmic artists — ESA’s Herschel space observatory and NASA’s Spitzer space telescope.

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The Hans Meuer Award has been created in memory of the late Dr. Hans Meuer, general chair of the ISC conference from 1986 through 2014, and co-founder of the TOP500 project.

ISC Introduces the Hans Meuer Award

February 27, 2015 2:53 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

ISC is introducing the Hans Meuer Award to honor the most outstanding research paper submitted to the ISC High Performance conference’s research paper committee. This annual award has been created in memory of the late Dr. Hans Meuer, general chair of the ISC conference from 1986 through 2014, and co-founder of the TOP500 project.

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A 3-D model of the new class of auxetic metamaterials that defy logic and can be used to create better skin grafts and new smart materials. Courtesy of University of Malta

Logic-defying Mathematical Model could lead to Better Skin Grafts, New Smart Materials

February 26, 2015 2:00 pm | by Cassi Camilleri, University of Malta | News | Comments

Pull on a piece of plastic at separate ends; it becomes thinner. So does a rubber band. One might assume tha,t when a force is applied along an axis, materials will always stretch and become thinner. Wrong. Thanks to their peculiar internal geometry, auxetic materials grow wider. After confounding scientists for decades, researchers are now developing mathematical models to explain the unusual behavior of these logic-defying materials

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Milorad Marinkovic holds an egg with his bionic arm. Three Austrians have replaced injured hands with bionic ones that they can control using nerves and muscles transplanted into their arms from their legs. The three men are the first to undergo what doct

Three Men First to Get Reconstructed Bionic Hands

February 26, 2015 1:18 pm | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Three Austrians have replaced injured hands with bionic ones that they can control using nerves and muscles transplanted into their arms from their legs. The men are the first to undergo what doctors refer to as "bionic reconstruction," which includes a voluntary amputation, the transplantation of nerves and muscles and learning to use faint signals from them to command the hand.

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Russia's defense ministry is establishing its own cyber command responsible for offensive activities, "including propaganda operations and inserting malware into enemy command and control systems." Courtesy of Contando Estrelas

Russian Cyber Threat more Severe than Previously Assessed

February 26, 2015 1:11 pm | by Ken Dilanian, AP Intelligence Writer | News | Comments

The U.S. has elevated its appraisal of the cyber threat from Russia, the U.S. intelligence chief said February 26, 2015, as he delivered the annual assessment by intelligence agencies of the top dangers facing the country. "While I can't go into detail here, the Russian cyber threat is more severe than we had previously assessed," James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, told the Senate Armed Services Committee.

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Cardiovascular diseases are the largest cause of death in Europe and responsible for two million deaths per year. According to WHO, they are the number one cause of death in the world, accounting for 30 percent of deaths worldwide and 42 percent in the EU

Novel 3-D Computer Model brings Insight to Cardiovascular Diseases

February 26, 2015 12:56 pm | by Lappeenranta University of Technology, LUT | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a novel three-dimensional, multiscale and multicomponent model of the endothelial cell monolayer, the inner lining of the artery, to identify the cellular mechanisms involved in cardiovascular diseases. New research based on the model is able to identify the main cellular pathways involved in the initiation and progression of the disease.

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Chicago in Winter -- Courtesy of NASA/ESA/Samantha Cristoforetti – click to enlarge

Chicago in Winter

February 26, 2015 9:46 am | News | Comments

From the International Space Station, astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti took this photograph of Chicago and posted it to social media. Crewmembers on the space station photograph the Earth from their unique point of view located 200 miles above the surface as part of the Crew Earth Observations program. Photographs record how the planet is changing over time.

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As a flying laboratory, ESA's OPS-SAT will test and validate new techniques in mission control and on-board systems. It will be operated by ESA's European Space Operations Centre as a test and validation resource for over 100 European industrial partners

Flying Software Lab to Test Radically New Experimental Control Systems

February 26, 2015 8:35 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

ESA is developing a mini-satellite to test out radically new control systems and techniques and to demonstrate drastically improved mission control capabilities that will arise when satellites can fly more powerful on-board computers. Known as Ops-Sat, it is made up of three CubeSat units with deployable solar panels. Although only 30 cm high, it contains an experimental computer 10 times more powerful than any current spacecraft.

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On two separate occasions in March and April 2012, amateur astronomers reported definite plume-like features developing on Mars.

Mystery Mars Plume: Highest Plume ever observed Baffles Scientists

February 25, 2015 2:15 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

Plumes seen reaching high above the surface of Mars have caused a stir among scientists studying the atmosphere on the Red Planet. On two separate occasions in March and April 2012, amateur astronomers reported definite plume-like features developing on the planet. The plumes were seen rising to altitudes of over 250 kilometers on both occasions. By comparison, similar features seen in the past have not exceeded 100 kilometers.

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Professor Dimitrios Nikolopoulos from the School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Queen’s University Belfast, is principal investigator for The Scalable, Energy-Efficient, Resilient and Transparent Software Adaptation (SERT)

Developing Simulation Software to Combat Humanity’s Biggest Issues

February 25, 2015 12:36 pm | by Queen’s University Belfast | News | Comments

Researchers are creating ground-breaking computer software, which has the potential to develop some of the world’s fastest supercomputers by increasing their ability to process masses of data at higher speeds than ever before. The new software has the potential to combat major global issues, including climate change and life-threatening diseases, by simulating detailed models of natural events.

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While a member of the audience might have seen a variation on this trick before, the AI can now use psychological and mathematical principles to create lots of different versions and keep audiences guessing. Courtesy of Steven Depolo

Artificial Intelligence Performs Real Magic Tricks

February 25, 2015 11:41 am | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Researchers gave a computer program the outline of how a magic jigsaw puzzle and a mind-reading card trick work, as well the results of experiments into how humans understand magic tricks. With this information, the system created completely new variants on those tricks which can be delivered by a magician.

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Sagittal Brain Slice Showing Cell Nuclei and Purkinije Cells -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Sagittal Brain Slice Showing Cell Nuclei and Purkinije Cells

February 25, 2015 11:33 am | News | Comments

This 40x photo shows a sagittal brain slice with cell nuclei and Purkinije cells expressing EGFP. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using confocal microscopy.

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Klocwork 10.2 static code analysis software

Klocwork 10.2 Static Code Analysis Software

February 25, 2015 10:55 am | Rogue Wave Software | Product Releases | Comments

Klocwork 10.2 static code analysis software is designed to help developers write higher-quality, more secure code, faster. It integrates into desktop IDEs and into a team's natural workflow. Mirroring how code is developed, the software runs as code is being written, checking line-by-line.

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NWChem molecular modeling software takes full advantage of a wide range of parallel computing systems, including Cascade. Courtesy of PNNL

PNNL Shifts Computational Chemistry into Overdrive

February 25, 2015 8:29 am | by Karol Kowalski, Ph.D., and Edoardo Apra, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

We computational chemists are an impatient lot. Despite the fact that we routinely deal with highly complicated chemical processes running on our laboratory’s equally complex HPC clusters, we want answers in minutes or hours, not days, months or even years. In many instances, that’s just not feasible; in fact, there are times when the magnitude of the problem simply exceeds the capabilities of the HPC resources available to us.

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Hydraulic connections of the Fast Cycle Magnet cable to allow the cooling of the magnet’s conductor (cable in conduit type) with supercritical helium. Courtesy of Maximilien Brice

What to Expect Next from the World’s Largest Particle Accelerator

February 24, 2015 2:37 pm | by Kate Greene, Lawrence Berkley National Laboratory | News | Comments

In March, when researchers flip the switch to the world’s largest, most powerful particle accelerator, scientists from all over the world will be watching. Physicists expect the refurbished, higher-energy Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will build on the 2012 discovery of the Higgs particle and crack open even more mysteries of the universe

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