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The Internet contains a vast trove of information -- sometimes called the "Deep Web" -- that isn't indexed by search engines: information that would be useful for tracking criminals, terrorist activities, sex trafficking and the spread of diseases. Scient

'Deep Web' Searching in the Name of Science

May 26, 2015 | by Elizabeth Landau, NASA | Comments

The Internet contains a vast trove of information - sometimes called the "Deep Web" - that isn't indexed by search engines: information that would be useful for tracking criminals, terrorist activities, sex trafficking and the spread of diseases. Scientists could also use it to search for images and data from spacecraft. 

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IBM in collaboration with NVIDIA and Mellanox announced the establishment of a POWER Acceleration and Design Center in Monpellier, France, to advance the development of data-intensive research, industrial and commercial applications.   Born out of the col

IBM, NVIDIA and Mellanox Launch Design Center for Big Data and HPC

July 2, 2015 2:21 pm | by IBM | Comments

IBM in collaboration with NVIDIA and Mellanox announced the establishment of a POWER Acceleration and Design Center in Monpellier, France, to advance the development of data-intensive research, industrial and commercial applications. Born out of the collaborative of the OpenPOWER Foundation, the new Center provides commercial and open-source software developers with technical assistance to enable them to develop HPC applications.

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Renee James, who has worked at the chipmaker for 28 years, plans to leave the company early next year to seek a CEO role elsewhere.

Intel President Renee James to leave Chipmaker

July 2, 2015 12:31 pm | by AP | Comments

Intel said July 2, 2015, that President Renee James, who has worked at the chipmaker for 28 years, plans to leave the company early next year to seek a CEO role elsewhere. James has agreed to stay with Intel until January to oversee the transition of her responsibilities and will be paid $4 million to do so, according to a filling with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

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What your Clothes may say about You

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — June 26-July 2

July 2, 2015 11:55 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Comments

Heading into the Independence Day weekend, materials that compute — what your clothes may say about you; Sandia’s Z machine solving an 80-year-old puzzle; an amazing satellite view of the San Francisco Bay area; a monster black hole waking after 26 years; a tactical toss camera that sends panoramic images back to a smartphone; and breaking key barriers that limit the distance information can travel in fiber optic cables, are all top hits.

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Unlike other parts of the United States, summer thunderstorms across the Great Plains are most common after sunset.

NASA Takes to the Skies to Study Nighttime Thunderstorms

July 2, 2015 9:16 am | by NASA | Comments

NASA has joined a multi-agency field campaign studying summer storm systems in the U.S. Great Plains to find out why they often form after the sun goes down instead of during the heat of the day. Participants from eight research laboratories and 14 universities are collecting storm data to find out how and why they form. NASA’s DC-8 airborne laboratory began research flights June 30, 2015, from the Salina Regional Airport, Salina, KS.

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The UCLA patient is the first person in California to receive the smaller Total Artificial Heart, and the first patient in the world with the device to be bridged to a successful heart transplant

1st Heart Transplant a Success after using Experimental 50cc Artificial Heart

July 2, 2015 9:07 am | by UCLA | Comments

A petite 44-year-old woman has received a successful heart transplant thanks to an experimental Total Artificial Heart designed for smaller patients. The UCLA patient is the first person in the world with the device to be bridged to a successful heart transplant — that is, to go from needing a transplant to receiving one. The 50cc SynCardia temporary Total Artificial Heart is a smaller investigational version of the larger 70cc SynCardia.

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Galactic Pyrotechnics on Display -- Courtesy of NASA/CXC/JPL-Caltech/STScI/NSF/NRAO/VLA – Click to enlarge

Galactic Pyrotechnics on Display

July 2, 2015 8:59 am | by NASA | Comments

A galaxy 23 million light-years away is the site of impressive, ongoing, fireworks. Rather than paper, powder and fire, this galactic light show involves a giant black hole, shock waves and vast reservoirs of gas. This galactic fireworks display is taking place in a spiral galaxy like the Milky Way. The galaxy is famous, however, for something our galaxy doesn't have — two extra spiral arms that glow in X-ray, optical and radio light.

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The software generates fictional mini-narratives or storylines, using natural language processing techniques and a database of facts mined from the Web. It then inverts or twists the facts to create ‘what-ifs’. The result is often incongruous, “What if th

Can Computers be Creative?

July 2, 2015 8:24 am | by European Commission | Comments

The EU-funded What-if Machine (WHIM) project not only generates fictional storylines, but also judges their potential usefulness and appeal. It represents a major advance in the field of computational creativity. Science rarely looks at the whimsical, but that is changing as a result of the aptly named WHIM project. The ambitious project is building a software system able to invent and evaluate fictional ideas.

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A robot developed by Toshiba is demonstrated at its laboratory in Yokohama, near Tokyo. As Japan struggles in the early stages of decades-long cleanup of the Fukushima nuclear crisis, Toshiba has developed the robot that raises its tail like a scorpion an

Nuclear Scorpion Robot will look into Fukushima Reactor, Collect Data

July 1, 2015 4:07 pm | by Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press | Comments

A new robot that raises its tail like a scorpion is scheduled to look at melted nuclear fuel inside one of the three wrecked Fukushima reactors in Japan. Toshiba, co-developer of the "scorpion" crawler, said the robot will venture into the Unit 2 reactor's primary containment vessel in August after a month of training for its handlers. Officials hope the robot can see the fuel in the pressure vessel in the middle of the reactor.

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Carolyn Bark holds up protest signs outside the Major Economies Meeting on Energy Security and Climate Change Agenda conference held at the East West Center in Honolulu. Age divides U.S. public opinion about science issues as much as political ideology, a

Survey: US Political and Generation Gaps on Science Issues

July 1, 2015 3:58 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | Comments

Age divides Americans on science issues just as much as political ideology, a new analysis of recent polling shows. There are dramatic generation gaps in opinions on global warming, offshore drilling, nuclear power, childhood vaccines, gene modification to reduce a baby's disease risk, untested medicine use, lab tests on animals and evolution, according to the Pew Research Center.

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Professor Peter V. Coveney holds a chair in Physical Chemistry, is an Honorary Professor in Computer Science at University College London (UCL), and is Professor Adjunct at Yale University School of Medicine (USA). He is Director of the Centre for Computa

Leading Computational Scientist Peter Coveney Keynotes at ISC Cloud & Big Data

July 1, 2015 3:45 pm | by ISC | Comments

ISC Events, the organizer of the inaugural ISC Cloud & Big Data conference has announced Professor Peter V. Coveney of University College London (UCL) as the conference keynoter. Coveney will be talking about the current state-of-the-art in the development of personalized medicine in a presentation titled “The Virtual Human: In Silico Methods for Personalised Medicine.”

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A 24-minute, high-resolution science documentary narrated Benedict Cumberbatch about the dynamics of the sun that features data-driven visualizations produced by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at U

Solar Superstorms show Highlights Extremely Powerful Computer Simulation, Visualization

July 1, 2015 3:35 pm | by NSF | Comments

A 24-minute, high-resolution science documentary narrated Benedict Cumberbatch about the dynamics of the sun that features data-driven visualizations produced by NCSA at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign debuted on June 30, 2015, at the Louisiana Art & Science Museum in Baton Rouge before rolling out to more than a dozen planetariums and science centers around the world.

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Artist’s conception of a quantum frequency comb. Courtesy of Nicoletta Barolini

Quantum Entanglement Method Vastly Increases How Much Data can be carried in a Photon

July 1, 2015 3:03 pm | by Matthew Chin, UCLA | Comments

A team of researchers led by UCLA electrical engineers has demonstrated a new way to harness light particles, or photons, that are connected to each other and act in unison no matter how far apart they are — a phenomenon known as quantum entanglement. In previous studies, photons have typically been entangled by one dimension of their quantum properties — usually the direction of their polarization.

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Flying over an Aurora -- Courtesy of NASA – Click to enlarge

Flying over an Aurora

July 1, 2015 2:32 pm | by NASA | Comments

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly (@StationCDRKelly) captured photographs and video of auroras from the International Space Station on June 22, 2015. Kelly wrote, "Yesterday's aurora was an impressive show from 250 miles up. Good morning from the International Space Station! #YearInSpace

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Live Human Mesothelial Cell -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlargeThis 600X image shows a live cultured human mesothelial cell activated to produce hyaluronan. It received an honorable mention in t

Live Human Mesothelial Cell

June 30, 2015 12:33 pm | Comments

This 600X image shows a live cultured human mesothelial cell activated to produce hyaluronan. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope and was taken using confocal microscopy.

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Human chromosomes. Courtesy of Jane Ades, NHGRI

Speeding Up Genome Assembly, from Months to Minutes

June 30, 2015 12:23 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Computing Sciences | Comments

By applying some novel algorithms, computational techniques and the innovative programming language Unified Parallel C (UPC) to the cutting-edge de novo genome assembly tool Meraculous, a team of scientists simplified and sped up genome assembly, reducing a months-long process to mere minutes. This was primarily achieved by “parallelizing” the code to harness the processing power of supercomputers.

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