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It's a robot unlike any other: inspired by the world's fastest land animal, controlled by video game technology and packing nifty sensors — including one used to maneuver drones, satellites and ballistic missiles. The robot, called the cheetah, is the cre

MIT Engineers Have High Hopes for Cheetah Robot

December 2, 2014 | by Rodrique Ngowi, Associated Press | Comments

It's a robot unlike any other: inspired by the world's fastest land animal, controlled by video game technology and packing nifty sensors — including one used to maneuver drones, satellites and ballistic missiles. The robot, called the cheetah, is the creation of researchers at the Massachusetts of Technology, who had to design key elements from scratch because of a lack of or shortcomings in existing technology.

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Yin-yang haplotypes arise when a stretch of DNA evolves to present two divergent forms. A group of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis showed a massive yin-yang haplotype pair encompassing the gene gephyrin on human chromosome 14. This image s

Mining Public Big Data yields Genetic Clues in Complex Human Diseases

March 27, 2015 11:35 am | by Beth Miller, Washington University in St. Louis | Comments

Big data: It’s a term we read and hear about often, but is hard to grasp. Computer scientists tackled some big data about an important protein and discovered its connection in human history as well as clues about its role in complex neurological diseases. Through a novel method of analyzing these big data, they discovered a region encompassing the gephyrin gene on chromosome 14 that underwent rapid evolution after splitting in two...

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Hamlin, left, and Webb with a book about breaking the Nazi Enigma code, which was also the subject of the recent film, The Imitation Game. Courtesy of Rebecca Phillips, WSU

Mathematicians adapt Knapsack Code to take on Quantum-level Cyber Attacks

March 27, 2015 11:24 am | by Rebecca Phillips, Washington State University | Comments

Mathematicians have designed an encryption code capable of fending off the phenomenal hacking power of a quantum computer. Using high-level number theory and cryptography, the researchers reworked an infamous old cipher called the knapsack code to create an online security system better prepared for future demands.

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Kettering University students participating in a community cleanup along University Avenue in front of Atwood Stadium in Flint, MI. Technologies made possible through US Ignite partnership will benefit many institutions along Flint's University Avenue Cor

Igniting Change in Vehicle City: High-speed Networking brings Game-changing Capabilities

March 27, 2015 11:09 am | by NSF | Comments

Flint, MI, the former home of General Motors, is on the rebound these days. Leaders there believe they have hit on a winning formula — connecting the city's institutions to high-speed networks that support new, game-changing capabilities. Through grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ), Flint is beginning to lay the groundwork for an information technology-driven transformation.

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Pine Island, the Largest Glacier in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet -- Courtesy of Hogg/University of Leeds, Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM) Copernicus data (2015)/ESA/A – click to enlarge

Pine Island, the Largest Glacier in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

March 27, 2015 10:45 am | by ESA | Comments

This image combining two scans by Sentinel-1A’s radar shows that parts of the Pine Island glacier flowed about 100 meters (in pink) between March 3 and March 15, 2015. Light blue represents stable ice on either side of the stream.

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Testing the reins in a smoke filled area Courtesy of Sheffield Hallam University

Robot Guide Dogs could be Firefighters’ Eyes

March 26, 2015 10:59 am | by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) | Comments

Firefighters moving through smoke-filled buildings could save vital seconds and find it easier to identify objects and obstacles, thanks to revolutionary reins that enable robots to act like guide dogs. The small mobile robot — equipped with tactile sensors — would lead the way, with the firefighter following a meter or so behind holding a rein. The robot would help the firefighter move swiftly in ‘blind’ conditions.

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Integer overflows occur when a computer tries to store too large a number in the memory space reserved for it. The leading digits are discarded — much as they are when a car odometer turns over. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Better Debugger: Algorithm Automatically Finds Integer-overflow Bugs

March 26, 2015 9:52 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | Comments

Integer overflows are one of the most common bugs in computer programs — not only causing programs to crash but, even worse, potentially offering points of attack for malicious hackers. A new algorithm for identifying integer-overflow bugs was tested on five common open-source programs, in which previous analyses had found three bugs. The new algorithm found all three known bugs — and 11 new ones.

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Expedition 43 Soyuz Rolls Out for Launch -- Courtesy of NASA/Bill Ingalls – click to enlarge

Expedition 43 Soyuz Rolls Out for Launch

March 26, 2015 9:12 am | by NASA | Comments

The Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft is rolled out by train to the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, on March 25, 2015. NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly, and Russian Cosmonauts Mikhail Kornienko, and Gennady Padalka of the Russian Federal Space Agency are scheduled to launch to the International Space Station in the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on March 28.

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Nash and Nirenberg are two mathematical giants of the twentieth century. They are being recognized for their contributions to the field of partial differential equations (PDEs), which are equations involving rates of change that originally arose to descri

Two Mathematical Giants Share 2015 Abel Prize

March 26, 2015 9:03 am | by The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters | Comments

The Norwegian Academy of Sciences and Letters has decided to award the Abel Prize for 2015 to the American mathematicians John F. Nash Jr. and Louis Nirenberg “for striking and seminal contributions to the theory of nonlinear partial differential equations and its applications to geometric analysis.” They will receive the Abel Prize from His Majesty King Harald on May 19, 2015. The Abel Prize carries a cash award of about 1 million USD.

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Mouse Heart Muscle Cells -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Mouse Heart Muscle Cells

March 25, 2015 2:02 pm | Comments

This 400x photo of mouse cardiac ventricular myocytes (isolated heart muscle cells) received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using confocal microscopy.

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The 2015 Ethernet Roadmap provides practical guidance to the development of Ethernet, and offers an in-depth look at Ethernet’s accelerating evolution and expansion in four key areas: consumer and residential; enterprise and campus; hyperscale data center

Ethernet Alliance Unveils Detailed Roadmap

March 25, 2015 1:57 pm | by Ethernet Alliance | Comments

The Ethernet Alliance, a global consortium dedicated to the continued success and advancement of Ethernet technologies, has released the 2015 Ethernet Roadmap. The first-ever publicly available industry roadmap will outline the ongoing development and evolution of Ethernet through the end of the decade. Ethernet, the world’s most widely adopted networking technology, saw a period of rapid change and diversification in 2014.

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Michael Stonebraker invented many of the concepts that are used in almost all modern database systems. Courtesy of Dcoetzee

“Nobel Prize in Computing” goes to MIT Database Systems Architecture Pioneer

March 25, 2015 1:44 pm | by Association for Computing Machinery | Comments

The Association for Computing Machinery has named Michael Stonebraker of MIT recipient of the 2014 ACM A.M. Turing Award for fundamental contributions to the concepts and practices underlying modern database systems. Database systems are critical applications of computing and preserve much of the world's important data. Stonebraker invented many of the concepts that are used in almost all modern database systems.

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Online negotiations can be improved if computer programs take social values, such as honesty and trust into account when bargaining with human counterparts. © tatniz

Solving the Trust Equation: Socially Intelligent Computers can turn Difficult Negotiations into Win-win Situations

March 25, 2015 12:19 pm | by A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing | Comments

Programming fundamental social intelligence skills into software agents can make humans substantially more trusting of online negotiations, which can lead to superior outcomes in e-commerce transactions, finds a team of technology researchers, business experts and cognitive scientists. People are naturally skeptical of negotiations lacking face-to-face contact...

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"The Web of Space" sculpture by John Safer. A miniature version of this sculpture is given to the National Air and Space Museum Trophy Award winners every year. Courtesy of Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

Kepler Wins National Air and Space Museum Trophy

March 25, 2015 11:55 am | by NASA | Comments

The team in charge of NASA's Kepler mission, responsible for history's first detection of Earth-sized planets orbiting other suns in their temperate "habitable zone," received the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum's highest group honor at a ceremony in Washington on March 25. Kepler was awarded the 2015 Trophy for Current Achievement, which honors outstanding endeavors in the fields of aerospace science and technology.

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n artist's rendition of a previously unknown species of crocodile-like "super salamander" that roamed the Earth more than 200 million years ago. University of Edinburgh researchers say the species discovered in Portugal was among the Earth's top predators

Car-sized Ancient Salamanders found in Portugal

March 25, 2015 11:45 am | by AP | Comments

Fossil remains of a previously unknown species of a crocodile-like "super salamander" that grew as long as a small car and was a top predator more than 200 million years ago have been found in southern Portugal, researchers announced on March 24, 2015. The prehistoric species, which looked like giant salamanders, grew up to six feet in length and lived in lakes and rivers.

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Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi helped to outline the first-ever computer simulation for research purposes — of a one-dimensional vibrating nonlinear string. Courtesy of Department of Energy

Mathematicians Solve 60-year-old Fermi-Pasta-Ulam Problem

March 24, 2015 3:05 pm | by University of East Anglia | Comments

A 60-year-old math problem first put forward by Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi has been solved. In 1955, a team of scientists led by Fermi used a computer for the first time to try to solve a numerical experiment. The outcome wasn’t what they were expecting, and the complexity of the problem underpinned the then-new field of non-linear physics and paved the way for six decades of new thinking. Chaos theory is just one of the theories...  

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