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New data obtained by NASA’s GRAIL mission reveals that the Procellarum region on the near side of the moon — a giant basin often referred to as the “man in the moon” — likely arose not from a massive asteroid strike, but from a large plume of magma deep w

True Origin of the Man in the Moon

October 3, 2014 | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | Comments

New data obtained by NASA’s GRAIL mission reveals that the Procellarum region on the near side of the moon — a giant basin often referred to as the “man in the moon” — likely arose not from a massive asteroid strike, but from a large plume of magma deep within the moon’s interior. 

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New software algorithms reduce the time and material needed to produce objects with 3-D printers. Here, the wheel on the left was produced with conventional software and the one on the right with the new algorithms. Courtesy of Purdue University/Bedrich B

New Software Algorithms Speed 3-D Printing, Reduce Waste

October 22, 2014 12:40 pm | by Emil Venere, Purdue University | Comments

New software algorithms have been shown to significantly reduce the time and material needed to produce objects with 3-D printers. The algorithms have been created to address the problem. Researchers from Purdue University have demonstrated one approach that has been shown to reduce printing time by up to 30 percent and the quantity of support material by as much as 65 percent.

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Set up of the experiment showing the orthogonal side illumination  © Vetlugin et al.

Quantum Holograms could become Quantum Information Memory

October 22, 2014 12:22 pm | by Springer | Comments

Russian scientists have developed a theoretical model of quantum memory for light, adapting the concept of a hologram to a quantum system. The authors demonstrate for the first time that it is theoretically possible to retrieve, on demand, a given portion of the stored quantized light signal of a holographic image — set in a given direction in a given position in time sequence.

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Testing the new mathematical model in an animal during experimental ODP was necessary, so the teams decided to collaborate. The theory and experimental findings showed that fast Hebbian and slow homeostatic plasticity work together during learning, but on

Mathematical Model Solves Decades-old Question: How Brain Remains Stable during Learning

October 22, 2014 11:06 am | by RIKEN | Comments

Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the brain in balance during learning, according to scientists who report on a six-year quest by a collaborative team from the three institutions to solve a decades-old question and open the door to a more general understanding of how the brain learns and consolidates new experiences on dramatically different timescales.

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Freshwater Flea -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Freshwater Flea Close-up

October 22, 2014 10:58 am | Comments

This 200X photo shows the freshwater flea Daphnia magna. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using differential interference contrast and image stacking.

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Companies can log on, cost-free, at http://cyberchain.rhsmith.umd.edu and track developing threats, plus map their IT supply chains and anonymously measure themselves against industry peers and NIST standards.

Counter-measure Offers Cyber Protection for Supply Chains

October 22, 2014 10:14 am | by University of Maryland | Comments

The supply chain is ground zero for several recent cyber breaches. Hackers, for example, prey on vendors that have remote access to a larger company's global IT systems, software and networks. In the 2013 Target breach, the attacker infiltrated a vulnerable link: a refrigeration system supplier connected to the retailer's IT system. A counter-measure, via a user-ready online portal, has been developed at the Supply Chain Management Center.

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Light-enabled wi-fi, or Li-Fi, was first developed by Professor Harald Haas, Chair of Mobile Communication with the University of Edinburgh. Haas is co-founder of the spin-out company pureLiFi.  Courtesy of LaurenceWinram

Light-enabled Wi-fi could Tackle Global Data Crunch

October 22, 2014 9:50 am | by University of Edinburgh | Comments

High-speed bi-directional wireless technology that uses light to send information securely offers faster, safer transfer of data than conventional wi-fi. Because it does not rely on the radio spectrum, it provides 10,000 times more bandwidth. Light-enabled wi-fi, or Li-Fi, was first developed by Professor Harald Haas, Chair of Mobile Communication with the University of Edinburgh. Haas is co-founder of the spin-out company pureLiFi.

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Beach goers cooling off during the 2014 Southern California heat wave, in Huntington Beach, CA. It sounds like a broken record, but last month again set a new mark for global heat. And meteorologists say Earth is now on pace to tie the hottest year ever

Warming Earth Heading for Hottest Year on Record

October 21, 2014 11:35 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | Comments

Earth is on pace to tie or even break the mark for the hottest year on record, federal meteorologists say. That's because global heat records have kept falling in 2014, with September the latest example. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced October 20, 2014, that last month the globe averaged 60.3 degrees Fahrenheit (15.72 degrees Celsius). That was the hottest September in 135 years of record keeping.

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One Euro Coin -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: One Euro Coin

October 21, 2014 10:43 am | Comments

This 10X photo shows the surface details of a one euro coin. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using confocal reflection microscopy, Z-stacking and maximum intensity projection.

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LLNL researcher Monte LaBute was part of a Lab team that recently published an article in PLOS ONE detailing the use of supercomputers to link proteins to drug side effects. Courtesy of Julie Russell/LLNL

Supercomputers Link Proteins to Adverse Drug Reactions

October 21, 2014 10:40 am | by Kenneth K Ma, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | Comments

The drug creation process often misses many side effects that kill at least 100,000 patients a year. LLNL researchers have discovered a high-tech method of using supercomputers to identify proteins that cause medications to have certain adverse drug reactions, using high-performance computers to process proteins and drug compounds in an algorithm that produces reliable data outside of a laboratory setting for drug discovery.

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The robot has a friction crawler-based drive system (such as the one in war tanks), ideal for all types of terrain. It also has motion sensors, cameras, a laser and an infrared system, allowing it to rebuild the environment and, thereby, find paths or cre

Robot Scans Rubble, Recognizes Humans in Disaster Situations

October 21, 2014 9:35 am | by Investigación y Desarrollo | Comments

Through a computational algorithm, researchers have developed a neural network that allows a small robot to detect different patterns, such as images, fingerprints, handwriting, faces, bodies, voice frequencies and DNA sequences. Nancy Guadalupe Arana Daniel focused on the recognition of human silhouettes in disaster situations.

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Diver collecting microbial samples from Australian seaweeds for Uncovering Genome Mysteries

Crowdsourced Supercomputing Examines Big Genomic Data

October 21, 2014 9:31 am | by IBM | Comments

What do the DNA in Australian seaweed, Amazon River water, tropical plants, and forest soil all have in common? Lots, say scientists. And understanding the genetic similarities of disparate life forms could enable researchers to produce compounds for new medicines, eco-friendly materials, more resilient crops, and cleaner air, water and energy.

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The first act of copulation in our distant ancestors, Microbrachius dicki

Planet’s First Sex Act: Ancient Armored Fish did it Sideways

October 20, 2014 12:11 pm | by Flinders University | Comments

A profound new discovery reveals how the intimate act of sexual intercourse first evolved in our deep distant ancestors. In one of the biggest discoveries in the evolutionary history of sexual reproduction, Flinders University Professor John Long has found that internal fertilization and copulation was invented by ancient armored fishes, called placoderms, about 385 million years ago in Scotland.

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The HPCAC-ISC Student Cluster Competition is designed to introduce the next generation to the international high performance computing (HPC) community. This is an excellent educational opportunity for students around the world to showcase their knowledge

HPCAC-ISC 2015 Student Cluster Competition Accepting Undergraduate Applications

October 20, 2014 11:11 am | by ISC | Comments

The HPC Advisory Council and ISC High Performance call on undergraduate students from around the world to submit their application for partaking in the 2015 Student Cluster Competition (SCC). The 11 teams selected will receive the opportunity to build a small cluster of their design and run a series of benchmarks and applications in real time for four days, on the ISC 2015 exhibition floor.

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An IBM logo displayed in Berlin, VT. IBM is paying $1.5 billion to Globalfoundries in order to shed its costly chip division. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

IBM to Pay $1.5B to Shed Costly Chip Division

October 20, 2014 10:54 am | by Michelle Chapman, AP Business Writer | Comments

IBM will pay $1.5 billion to Globalfoundries in order to shed its costly chip division. IBM Director of Research John E. Kelly III said in an interview on October 20, 2104, that handing over control of the semiconductor operations will allow it to grow faster, while IBM continues to invest in and expand its chip research.

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ESnet installed its first European network node at CERN (the major laboratory outside Geneva that houses the LHC) in mid-September, and is now deploying other equipment necessary to bring the first link online by October. The plan is for all links to be c

DOE’s High-Speed Network to Boost Big Data Transfers by Extending 100G Connectivity across Atlantic

October 20, 2014 10:44 am | by ESnet | Comments

The DOE’s Energy Sciences Network, or ESnet, is deploying four new high-speed transatlantic links, giving researchers at America’s national laboratories and universities ultra-fast access to scientific data from the Large Hadron Collider and other research sites in Europe. ESnet’s transatlantic extension will deliver a total capacity of 340 gigabits-per-second, and serve dozens of scientific collaborations.

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