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It's a robot unlike any other: inspired by the world's fastest land animal, controlled by video game technology and packing nifty sensors — including one used to maneuver drones, satellites and ballistic missiles. The robot, called the cheetah, is the cre

MIT Engineers Have High Hopes for Cheetah Robot

December 2, 2014 | by Rodrique Ngowi, Associated Press | Comments

It's a robot unlike any other: inspired by the world's fastest land animal, controlled by video game technology and packing nifty sensors — including one used to maneuver drones, satellites and ballistic missiles. The robot, called the cheetah, is the creation of researchers at the Massachusetts of Technology, who had to design key elements from scratch because of a lack of or shortcomings in existing technology.

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In simulations, algorithms using the new data structure continued to demonstrate performance improvement with the addition of new cores, up to a total of 80 cores. Courtesy of Christine Daniloff/MIT

Parallelizing Common Algorithms: Priority Queue Implemention Keeps Pace with New Cores

January 30, 2015 3:49 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT News Office | Comments

Every undergraduate computer-science major takes a course on data structures, which describes different ways of organizing data in a computer’s memory. Every data structure has its own advantages: Some are good for fast retrieval, some for efficient search, some for quick insertions and deletions, and so on.

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The Alan Turing Institute will promote the development and use of advanced mathematics, computer science, algorithms and big data for human benefit.

Alan Turing Institute Positioned to Break New Big Data, Online Security Boundaries

January 30, 2015 11:41 am | by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council | Comments

The five universities have been selected to lead the new Alan Turing Institute. The Institute will build on the UK's existing academic strengths and help position the country as a world leader in the analysis and application of big data and algorithm research. Its headquarters will be based at the British Library at the center of London’s Knowledge Quarter.

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Crawling Bone Cancer Cell -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Crawling Bone Cancer Cell

January 30, 2015 11:32 am | Comments

This 8,000x photo of a crawling bone cancer cell showing actin filament bundles in the lamella won 20th Placein the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using structured illumination microscopy.

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“In nanomedicine we need to understand physical phenomena on a nano scale, forming as correct a picture as possible of molecular phenomena. In this context, quantum chemical calculations are important,” says Michele Cascella. Courtesy of Hanne Utigard

Quantum Chemistry Closing in on Quantum Mechanics of Living Cells

January 30, 2015 11:19 am | by Yngve Vogt, University of Oslo | Comments

Quantum chemical calculations have been used to solve big mysteries in space. Soon the same calculations may be used to produce tomorrow’s cancer drugs. Quantum chemical calculations are needed to explain what happens to the electrons’ trajectories within a molecule, and the results of a quantum chemical calculation are often more accurate than what is achievable experimentally.

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Network Map of Influenza Correlations between HHS Regions. Nodes and ties created using GEPHI social network visualization software. Courtesy of the researchers

Forecasting the Flu: Big and Traditional Data Combo Improves Prediction

January 30, 2015 11:06 am | by Inga Kiderra, University of California, San Diego | Comments

Researchers say they can predict the spread of flu a week into the future with as much accuracy as Google Flu Trends can display levels of infection right now. The study uses social network analysis and combines the power of Google Flu Trends’ big data with traditional flu monitoring data from the CDC.

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As the Earth rotates every 24 hours, the orientation of the ions in the quantum computer/detector changes with respect to the Sun’s rest frame. If space were squeezed in one direction and not another, the energies of the electrons in the ions would have s

Quantum Computer’s Extremely Precise Measurements Show Space is Not Squeezed

January 29, 2015 3:19 pm | by Robert Sanders, UC Berkeley | Comments

Ever since Einstein proposed his special theory of relativity, physics and cosmology have been based on the assumption that space looks the same in all directions — that it’s not squeezed in one direction relative to another. A new experiment used partially entangled atoms — identical to the qubits in a quantum computer — to demonstrate more precisely than ever before that this is true, to one part in a billion billion.

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SMAP's soil moisture measurements will help with forecasts of precipitation and temperature. Courtesy of UCAR

Building a Better Weather Forecast? Fine-scale Soil Moisture Data will Soon Help

January 29, 2015 12:50 pm | by NASA | Comments

If you were trying to forecast tomorrow's weather, you would probably look up at the sky rather than down at the ground. But if you live in the U.S. Midwest or someplace with a similar climate, one key to a better weather forecast may lie beneath your feet. Better soil moisture observations lead to better land-atmosphere interaction in weather forecasting models and ultimately to a better prediction of temperature and precipitation.

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Dr. Jan Camenisch, cryptographer and data privacy scientist at IBM Research holds a piece of the IBM identity Mixer algorithm.

Sophisticated Cryptographic Algorithm Prevents Unwanted Sharing of Personal Data

January 29, 2015 9:23 am | by IBM | Comments

IBM researchers have announced a cloud-based technology that holds potential to help consumers better protect online personal data, including date of birth, home address and credit card numbers. The technology, called Identity Mixer, uses a cryptographic algorithm to encrypt the certified identity attributes of a user in a way that allows the user to reveal only selected pieces to third parties.

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In this January 25, 1955, photo, Charles Hard Townes, Columbia University professor and Nobel laureate, explains his invention the maser during a news conference in New York City. Townes, who did most of the work that would make him one of three scientist

Laser Co-creator and Nobel Laureate Charles Townes dies at 99

January 29, 2015 8:37 am | by Lisa Leff, Associated Press | Comments

Charles H. Townes' inspiration for the predecessor of the laser came to him while sitting on a park bench, waiting for a restaurant to open for breakfast. On the tranquil morning of April 26, 1951, Townes scribbled a theory on scrap paper that would lead to the laser, the invention he's known for and which transformed everyday life and led to other scientific discoveries. The 99-year-old Nobel Prize-winning physicist died January 27, 2015.

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SciNet displays a range of keywords and topics in a topic radar. With the help of the directions on the radar, the engine displays how these topics are related to each other. The relevance of each keyword is displayed as its distance from the center point

SciNet Search Engine Helps Find Relevant, Diverse Results Faster

January 28, 2015 2:52 pm | by Alto University | Comments

A new search engine outperforms current ones, and helps people to do searches more efficiently. The SciNet search engine is different because it changes Internet searches into recognition tasks, by showing keywords related to the user’s search in topic radar. People using SciNet can get relevant and diverse search results faster, especially when they do not know exactly what they are looking for or how to formulate a query to find it.

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Arabidopsis thaliana, a model flowering plant studied by biologists, has climate-sensitive genes whose expression was found to evolve. Courtesy of Penn State

Needle in a Haystack: Finding the Right Genes in Tens of Thousands

January 28, 2015 2:45 pm | by TACC | Comments

Scientists using supercomputers found genes sensitive to cold and drought in a plant help it survive climate change. The computational challenges were daunting, involving thousands of individual strains of the plant with hundreds of thousands of markers across the genome and testing for a dozen environmental variables. Their findings increase basic understanding of plant adaptation and can be applied to improve crops.

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Production of growth factors (IGF-II) as public goods game network: this microscopic image shows how cancer cells (colorless cells) that do not produce IGF-II but need it for their growth reproduce in a population of cancer cells that produces and consume

Game Theory Explains Social Interactions of Cancer Cells

January 28, 2015 2:33 pm | by University of Basel | Comments

Researchers were able to predict the interactions of cancer cells using a part of game theory known as the public goods game, suggesting that work on the social interactions among cancer cells may provide insight into the dynamics of cancer. Researchers applied this model to the cooperation between producing and non-producing members of a cancer cell population, in order to examine if the model is also applicable to biological processes.

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The Biosurveillance Gateway site offers a variety of Los Alamos-developed biosurveillance tools that can be used for decision support in disease surveillance.

Biosurveillance Gateway Supports Centralized Global Disease Response

January 28, 2015 2:21 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | Comments

A new online resource, called the Biosurveillance Gateway, is in place at Los Alamos National Laboratory, providing a centralized portal for all news, information, resources and research related to biosurveillance at the laboratory. The goal of the site is to support global disease surveillance, providing useful tools for professionals around the world to reference from a single location.

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A combination of the day-night band and high resolution infrared imagery from the NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed the historic blizzard near peak intensity as it moves over the New York through Boston Metropolitan areas at 06:45Z (1:45 a.m. EST) on

NASA Nighttime and Daytime Views of the Blizzard of 2015

January 28, 2015 2:07 pm | by NASA | Comments

NASA and NOAA have provided nighttime and daytime views of the Blizzard of 2015. A combination of the day-night band and high-resolution infrared imagery showed the historic blizzard near peak intensity as it moves over the New York through Boston Metropolitan areas at 1:45 a.m. EST on January 27, 2015. Nighttime lights of the region were blurred by high cloud tops associated with the most intense parts of the storm.

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Astronaut Buzz Aldrin in the Apollo 11 Lunar Module -- Courtesy of NASA

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin in the Apollo 11 Lunar Module

January 28, 2015 8:33 am | by NASA | Comments

This July 20, 1969, photograph of the interior view of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module shows astronaut Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin, Jr. during the lunar landing mission. The picture was taken by astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, prior to the landing. Aldrin was the second American to set foot on the lunar surface.

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