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The Internet contains a vast trove of information -- sometimes called the "Deep Web" -- that isn't indexed by search engines: information that would be useful for tracking criminals, terrorist activities, sex trafficking and the spread of diseases. Scient

'Deep Web' Searching in the Name of Science

May 26, 2015 | by Elizabeth Landau, NASA | Comments

The Internet contains a vast trove of information - sometimes called the "Deep Web" - that isn't indexed by search engines: information that would be useful for tracking criminals, terrorist activities, sex trafficking and the spread of diseases. Scientists could also use it to search for images and data from spacecraft. 

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Three-dimensional high velocity structures beneath East Asia from 50 km to 1000 km depth viewed from the southeast. Surface topography with vertical exaggeration is superimposed for geographic references. Isosurfaces of high velocity anomalies in percent

Earthquakes Reveal Deep Secrets beneath East Asia

May 29, 2015 3:50 pm | by Jorge Salazar, Texas Advanced Computing Center | Comments

A new work based on 3-D supercomputer simulations of earthquake data has found hidden rock structures deep under East Asia. Researchers used seismic data from 227 East Asia earthquakes during 2007-2011, which they used to image depths to about 900 kilometers, or about 560 miles below ground. Notable structures include a high velocity colossus beneath the Tibetan plateau, and a deep mantle upwelling beneath the Hangai Dome in Mongolia.

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The Legacy of John Nash and His Equilibrium Theory

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — May 22-28

May 29, 2015 3:10 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Comments

Despite a holiday week in the US, there were several top stories you won’t want to miss. A hacked Kinect controller becomes a game-changer for Parkinson’s; insight into unification of General Relativity and quantum mechanics; deep web searching in the name of science; how infections affect your IQ; the legacy of John Nash; Pope Francis on moral justification to fight global warming; how a robot revolution is creating a visionary world...

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 	http://www.scientificcomputing.com/sites/scientificcomputing.com/files/16_Christian_Gautier_diatoms.jpg

Close-up: Diatoms

May 29, 2015 2:33 pm | Comments

This 100x photo of diatoms received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photograph was taken using darkfield, polarized light and Rheinberg illumination.

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Baxter, a versatile robot that is designed to work in industry alongside people, is one of about 40 robots featured in Robot Revolution.

Robot Revolution Explores Visionary World through Cutting-edge Robots

May 29, 2015 9:44 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Comments

“They’re here … to help and improve our lives,” The Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago announces on its Web site. MSI is hosting a new national touring exhibit, Robot Revolution, which explores how robots, created by human ingenuity, will ultimately be our companions and colleagues, changing how we play, live and work together. It allows guests to step into a visionary world where robots are not just a curiosity, but a vital asset.

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When AIA images are sharpened a bit, such as this AIA 171Å channel image, the magnetic field can be readily visualized through the bright, thin strands that are called "coronal loops."

Coronal Loops over a Sunspot Group

May 28, 2015 3:47 pm | by NASA | Comments

The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument aboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory images the solar atmosphere in multiple wavelengths to link changes in the surface to interior changes. Its data includes images of the sun in 10 wavelengths every 10 seconds. When AIA images are sharpened a bit, such as this channel image, the magnetic field can be readily visualized through the bright, thin strands that are called "coronal loops."

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ISC Events is excited to announce that registration is now open for the inaugural ISC Cloud & Big Data event, which will be held this fall in Frankfurt, Germany. The entire conference will take place at the Frankfurt Marriott hotel, located in the city ce

Registration Opens for ISC Cloud & Big Data

May 28, 2015 3:40 pm | by ISC | Comments

ISC Events has announced that registration is now open for the inaugural ISC Cloud & Big Data event, which will be held this fall in Frankfurt, Germany. The entire conference will take place at the Frankfurt Marriott hotel, located in the city center. The three-day event will kick off with a full-day workshop on September 28, followed by the main program on September 29 and 30.

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One of the robots introduced in the paper 'Robots that can adapt like animals.' Courtesy of Antoine Cully

Robots Automatically Recover from Damage in Minutes

May 28, 2015 3:37 pm | by University of Wyoming | Comments

Robots will one day provide tremendous benefits to society, such as in search and rescue — but not until they can learn to keep working when damaged. A paper shows robots automatically recover from injury in less than two minutes. A video of the work shows a six-legged robot adapt to keep walking even if two of its legs are broken. It also shows a robotic arm that learned how to correctly place an object even with several broken motors.

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Holographic Mapping Discovered by Ooguri and Collaborators: The mathematical formula derived by Ooguri and his collaborators relates local data in the extra dimensions of the gravitational theory, depicted by the red point, are expressed in terms of quant

Quantum Entanglement provides Insight into Unification of General Relativity, Quantum Mechanics

May 28, 2015 3:31 pm | by Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe | Comments

A collaboration of physicists and a mathematician has made a significant step toward unifying general relativity and quantum mechanics by explaining how spacetime emerges from quantum entanglement in a more fundamental theory. Physicists and mathematicians have long sought a Theory of Everything (ToE) that unifies general relativity and quantum mechanics...

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The software structure (subroutine) of CLM. Each circle represents an individual subroutine with the area of circle showing the time spent on the subroutine with linear representation. Courtesy of Wang, D. et al.

Global Climate Model Helps Untangle Complex Webs of Cause and Effect

May 28, 2015 3:26 pm | by Christie Thiessen, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | Comments

Every few years, unusual weather brings torrential rainfall and warm, nutrient-poor water to the coasts of Peru and Ecuador, devastating the fishing economies. Although this might seem like a local storm, the system — known as the El Niño–Southern Oscillation — has global effects. Typically, the next winter is much warmer in western North America, wetter in the southeastern United States, and drier in the Pacific Northwest.

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The project developed autonomous robots that interact with each other and exchange information, resulting in a cognitive system that is aware of its environment. © COCORO

Autonomous Robot Swarms Use Collective Cognition, are Aware of their Environment

May 28, 2015 3:20 pm | by European Commission, CORDIS | Comments

Scientists have created underwater robot swarms that function like schools of fish, exchanging information to monitor the environment, searching, maintaining, exploring and harvesting resources in underwater habitats. The EU supported COCORO project explored and developed collective cognition in autonomous robots in a rich set of 10 experimental demonstrators, which are shown in 52 videos.

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With that complicated history looming, Pope Francis, once a chemist, will soon issue an authoritative church document laying out the moral justification for fighting global warming, especially for the world's poorest billions.

Pope Francis, Once a Chemist, to Issue Document Laying out Moral Justification to Fight Global Warming

May 27, 2015 2:47 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | Comments

From Galileo to genetics, the Roman Catholic Church has danced with science, sometimes in a high-tension tango but more often in a supportive waltz. Pope Francis is about to introduce a new twist: global warming. Pope Francis, once a chemist, will soon issue an authoritative church document laying out the moral justification for fighting global warming, especially for the world's poorest billions.

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MIT researchers tested the viability of their algorithm by using it to guide a crew of three robots in the assembly of a chair. Courtesy of Dominick Reuter

New Algorithm lets Autonomous Robots Divvy up Assembly Tasks on the Fly

May 27, 2015 2:33 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | Comments

Today’s industrial robots are remarkably efficient — as long as they’re in a controlled environment where everything is exactly where they expect it to be. But put them in an unfamiliar setting, where they have to think for themselves, and their efficiency plummets. And the difficulty of on-the-fly motion planning increases exponentially with the number of robots involved. For even a simple collaborative task...

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And the winner is… ‘Colouring water’ -- Courtesy of M.A. Richardson – click to enlarge

And the Winner is… Colouring Water

May 27, 2015 2:26 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Comments

‘Colouring Water’ — a photograph by Michael Angelo Richardson from the Netherlands — has won the top prize in the Sentinel-2 Colour Vision photo competition. Richardson will receive a trip to the European Space Operations Centre (ESOC), the European Space Agency (ESA)’s operations center in Darmstadt, Germany, as a guest at the VIP event on the night of the Sentinel-2A launch. The satellite is scheduled for liftoff on a Vega rocket...

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The EYR-Global program, sponsored by 12 leading national research and education networks representing the Americas, Asia-Pacific and Europe, was patterned after SURFnet’s successful national Enlighten Your Research competition in the Netherlands and repre

Enhancing Global Network Connectivity: EYR-Global International Data Project Submissions due June 7

May 27, 2015 12:28 pm | by SC15 | Comments

Scientists whose research projects would significantly benefit from enhanced global network connectivity are invited to submit a project proposal to 2015 Enlighten Your Research Program Global (EYR-Global). The deadline is June 7. The EYR-Global program represents an important step forward in helping researchers in all fields to incorporate advanced global research networks to significantly improve discoveries and collaboration.

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Cai's group addressed two key barriers to using wood-derived materials in an electronics setting: surface smoothness and thermal expansion.

New Kind of Computer Chip uses Flexible, Biodegradable Cellulose Nanofibril Substrate

May 27, 2015 10:25 am | by John Steeno, University of Wisconsin-Madison | Comments

Portable electronics — typically made of non-renewable, non-biodegradable, potentially toxic materials — are discarded at an alarming rate in consumers' pursuit of the next best electronic gadget. In an effort to alleviate the environmental burden of electronic devices, researchers developed a surprising solution: a semiconductor chip made almost entirely of wood. They addressed two key barriers: surface smoothness and thermal expansion.

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