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While our understanding of how the aurora's shimmering curtains of colour are formed, scientists have struggled to explain the black patches between the bright beams. Now Swedish and British scientists have discovered what happens at the heart of these so

How Do 'Black' Auroras Do That

April 15, 2015 4:23 pm | by David Callahan, KTH The Royal Institute of Technology | News | Comments

While our understanding of how the aurora's shimmering curtains of color are formed, scientists have struggled to explain the black patches between the bright beams. Now Swedish and British scientists have discovered what happens at the heart of these so-called "black aurora."

Internet of Things Threatens Aviation Safety

April 15, 2015 2:55 pm | News | Comments

Cybersecurity strategist George M. Schu says the emerging Internet of Things (IoT) will expose...

Dark Energy Survey Creates Detailed Guide to Spotting Dark Matter

April 14, 2015 3:20 pm | by Fermilab | News | Comments

Scientists on the Dark Energy Survey have released the first in a series of dark matter maps of...

Two Lakes and an Ice Field

April 14, 2015 2:39 pm | News | Comments

Part of the Southern Patagonian Ice Field – the world's second largest contiguous extrapolar ice...

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Lenore Rasmussen’s dream of developing a synthetic muscle that could be used to make better prosthetic limbs and more responsive robots will literally become airborne when her experiment rockets off to the International Space Station from Cape Canaveral i

Synthetic Space Robot Muscle Ready for Testing on ISS

April 13, 2015 4:25 pm | by Jeanne Jackson DeVoe, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory | News | Comments

Lenore Rasmussen’s dream of developing a synthetic muscle that could be used to make better prosthetic limbs and more responsive robots will literally become airborne when her experiment rockets off to the International Space Station from Cape Canaveral in Florida.

One of the new drones of the UZH research group Courtesy of UZH

New Technology Making Drones Safer and Smarter

April 8, 2015 3:27 pm | by University of Zurich | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of Zurich have unveiled new technology enabling drones to recover stable flight from any position and land autonomously in failure situations. It will even be possible to launch drones by simply tossing them into the air like a baseball or recover stable flight after a system failure. Drones will be safer and smarter, with the ability to identify safe landing sites and land automatically when necessary.

Over the past several decades, astronomers have come to realize that the sky is filled with magnifying glasses that allow the study of very distant and faint objects barely visible with even the largest telescopes. An astronomer has now found that one of

Distant Supernova Split Four Ways by Gravitational Lens

March 6, 2015 4:57 pm | by Robert Sanders, UC Berkeley | News | Comments

Over the past several decades, astronomers have come to realize that the sky is filled with magnifying glasses that allow the study of very distant and faint objects barely visible with even the largest telescopes. An astronomer has now found that one of these lenses – called an “Einstein cross”– has created four separate images of a distant supernova.

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ESA’s Proba-V minisatellite captures the rare sight of standing water in the arid south Australian outback. Lake Frome, one of the whitest salt lakes in the southern hemisphere is visible to the right. Unusually, this 12 February image shows it filled wit

Salt Lake Australia

March 6, 2015 3:13 pm | News | Comments

ESA’s Proba-V minisatellite captures the rare sight of standing water in the arid south Australian outback. Lake Frome, one of the whitest salt lakes in the southern hemisphere is visible to the right. Unusually, this 12 February image shows it filled with brackish water that has flowed down the creeks in the area, which are typically dry.

In 1976 several elongated comet-like objects were discovered on pictures taken with the UK Schmidt Telescope in Australia. Because of their appearance, they became known as cometary globules even though they have nothing in common with comets. The object

Mouth of the Beast

March 5, 2015 9:24 am | News | Comments

In 1976 several elongated comet-like objects were discovered on pictures taken with the UK Schmidt Telescope in Australia. Because of their appearance, they became known as cometary globules even though they have nothing in common with comets. The object shown in this new picture, CG4, which is also sometimes referred to as God’s Hand, is one of these cometary globules. 

A new approach to atomic timekeeping may enable more stable and accurate portable atomic clocks. Courtesy of Christine Daniloff/MIT

Atomic Timekeeping: Enabling more Accurate Portable Clocks

January 2, 2015 11:54 am | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

What time is it? The answer, no matter what your initial reference may be, will always trace back to the atomic clock. The international standard for time is set by atomic clocks — room-sized apparatuses that keep time by measuring natural vibration of atoms in a vacuum. Researchers have come up with a new approach to atomic timekeeping that may enable more stable and accurate portable atomic clocks, potentially the size of a Rubik’s cube.

For customers sending a package by MoonMail, there's no need for a return address. The items will remain on the moon in a pod that will be attached to the moon rover. Courtesy of Gregory H. Revera

Bang, Zoom ... Going Straight to the Moon!

December 16, 2014 12:47 pm | by AP | News | Comments

An outer-space delivery firm that is working with Carnegie Mellon University to put a privately-owned lunar rover on the moon is offering to "mail" personal keepsakes to the moon as a way to help fund the partnership's rocket launch. Astrobotic has launched a Web site where people can sign up to send their keepsakes in tiny MoonMail packages to the moon.

The NORAD Tracks Santa Web site features a mobile version, a holiday countdown, and new games and daily activities.

NORAD Ready to Track Santa’s Flight

December 16, 2014 11:19 am | by North American Aerospace Defense Command | News | Comments

The North American Aerospace Defense Command is once again ready to track Santa’s yuletide journey. It all started in 1955 when a local media advertisement directed children to call Santa direct — only the number was misprinted. Instead of reaching Santa, the phone rang through to the Crew Commander on duty at the Continental Air Defense Command Operations Center. Thus began the tradition, which NORAD has carried on since 1958.

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NASA flight engineer Roy Roper (left) reviews laptop displays showing the ASTAR data with Boeing principal investigator Gabe Brewer during a ground simulation. Courtesy of Boeing

NASA Software May Help Increase Flight Efficiency, Decrease Aircraft Noise

December 16, 2014 11:03 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA researchers began flight tests of computer software that shows promise in improving flight efficiency and reducing environmental impacts of aircraft, especially on communities around airports. Known as ASTAR, or Airborne Spacing for Terminal Arrival Routes, the software is designed to give pilots specific speed information and guidance so that planes can be more precisely spaced, enabling pilots to fly a "follow the leader" approach.

A team of researchers is embarking on a collaborative project to ensure that the autonomous robots we build in the future will be safer, making decisions that are ethical and follow legislation on robotics.

New Research Will Help Robots Know Their Limits

December 8, 2014 6:05 pm | by University of Sheffield | News | Comments

A team of researchers is embarking on a collaborative project to ensure that the autonomous robots we build in the future will be safer, making decisions that are ethical and follow legislation on robotics.             

Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, is a peculiar place. Unlike any other moon, it has   a dense atmosphere. It has rivers and lakes made up of components of natural   gas, such as ethane and methane. It also has windswept dunes that are hundreds   of yards hig

Titan's Dune Mystery Solved

December 8, 2014 4:55 pm | by University of Tennessee | News | Comments

Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, is a peculiar place. Unlike any other moon, it has a dense atmosphere. It has rivers and lakes made up of components of natural gas, such as ethane and methane. It also has windswept dunes that are hundreds of yards high, more than a mile wide and hundreds of miles long — despite data suggesting the body to have only light breezes.

NASA's new Orion spacecraft made a "bull's-eye" Pacific splashdown following a dramatic journey 3,604 miles beyond Earth. The achievement opens a new era of human exploration to put people on Mars.

Orion Mission Flies Hightest in a Long Time

December 5, 2014 3:03 pm | by Marcia Dunn, Associated Press | News | Comments

NASA's new Orion spacecraft made a "bull's-eye" Pacific splashdown following a dramatic journey 3,604 miles beyond Earth. The achievement opens a new era of human exploration to put people on Mars.               

A study of "MY Camelopardalis" binary system shows that the most massive stars are made up by merging with other smaller stars, as predicted by theoretical models.

Merger of Two Stars is Supermassive

December 5, 2014 2:22 pm | by AlphaGalileo | News | Comments

A study of "MY Camelopardalis" binary system shows that the most massive stars are made up by merging with other smaller stars, as predicted by theoretical models.                         

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The results of four years of observations from the ESA's Planck satellite reveals relic radiation (the most ancient light in the Universe). This light has been measured precisely across the entire sky for the first time, in both intensity and polarization

New Revelations on Dark Matter and Relic Neutrinos

December 4, 2014 4:40 pm | News | Comments

The results of four years of observations from the ESA's Planck satellite reveals relic radiation (the most ancient light in the Universe). This light has been measured precisely across the entire sky for the first time, in both intensity and polarization, thereby producing the oldest image of the Universe. This primordial light lets us "see" some of the most elusive particles in the Universe: dark matter and relic neutrinos.

New observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile have revealed alignments over the largest structures ever discovered in the Universe. A European research team has found that the rotation axes of the central supermassive black holes in a sample o

Spooky Alignment of Quasars Crosses Billions of Light-years

November 20, 2014 3:39 pm | by ESO | News | Comments

New observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile have revealed alignments over the largest structures ever discovered in the Universe. A European research team has found that the rotation axes of the central supermassive black holes in a sample of quasars are parallel to each other over distances of billions of light-years.

The Soyuz TMA-13M crew, European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Alexander Gerst, Roscosmos cosmonaut Max Suraev, and NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, in their Soyuz spacecraft that will fly them back to Earth after almost six months on the International Space S

Snug Ride Home from ISS

November 19, 2014 2:32 pm | News | Comments

The Soyuz TMA-13M crew, European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Alexander Gerst, Roscosmos cosmonaut Max Suraev, and NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, in their Soyuz spacecraft that will fly them back to Earth after almost six months on the International Space Station.

Nexio simulation is a French SME located in Toulouse and specialized in electromagnetic simulation software for marine, space, defense and aeronautics domains applications.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Nexio

November 17, 2014 6:19 pm | Award Winners

Nexio simulation is a French SME located in Toulouse and specialized in electromagnetic simulation software for marine, space, defense and aeronautics domains applications.

New data obtained by NASA’s GRAIL mission reveals that the Procellarum region on the near side of the moon — a giant basin often referred to as the “man in the moon” — likely arose not from a massive asteroid strike, but from a large plume of magma deep w

True Origin of the Man in the Moon

October 3, 2014 2:41 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

New data obtained by NASA’s GRAIL mission reveals that the Procellarum region on the near side of the moon — a giant basin often referred to as the “man in the moon” — likely arose not from a massive asteroid strike, but from a large plume of magma deep within the moon’s interior. 

Scientists are to turn the Moon into a giant particle detector to help understand the origin of Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) cosmic rays — the most energetic particles in the Universe.

Cosmic Particles Detected by the Moon

October 2, 2014 4:00 pm | by University of Southhampton | News | Comments

Scientists are to turn the Moon into a giant particle detector to help understand the origin of Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) cosmic rays — the most energetic particles in the Universe.                    

Looking for Comets in a Sea of Stars

October 1, 2014 3:11 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

On a July night this summer, a 5,200-pound balloon gondola hangs from a crane and moves toward the open doors of a building at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Md. The telescopes and instruments carried by the gondola, which are part of NASA’s Balloon Observation Platform for Planetary Science (BOPPS), are calibrated by taking a long look at the stars and other objects in the sky.

Hunting from a distance of 27,000 light years, astronomers have discovered an unusual carbon-based molecule – one with a branched structure – contained within a giant gas cloud in interstellar space. Like finding a molecular needle in a cosmic haystack, a

Space Molecule Leads to Life's Interstellar Origins

September 30, 2014 4:08 pm | by Blaine Friedlander, Cornell university | News | Comments

Hunting from a distance of 27,000 light years, astronomers have discovered an unusual carbon-based molecule – one with a branched structure – contained within a giant gas cloud in interstellar space. Like finding a molecular needle in a cosmic haystack, astronomers have detected radio waves emitted by isopropyl cyanide. The discovery suggests that the complex molecules needed for life may have their origins in interstellar space.

The Soyuz TMA-14M rocket is launched with Expedition 41 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos, and Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, Friday, September 26, 2014

Expedition 41 Crew is ISS Bound

September 29, 2014 2:59 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The Soyuz TMA-14M rocket is launched with Expedition 41 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos, and Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, Friday, September 26, 2014 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope reveal new information about the structure of 2011 MD, a small asteroid being considered by NASA for its proposed Asteroid Redirect Mission, or ARM. Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA Inspector Blasts Asteroid Protection Program

September 15, 2014 3:24 pm | by Marcia Dunn, AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

NASA's effort to identify potentially dangerous space rocks has taken a hit. On September 15, 2014, the space agency's inspector general released a report blasting NASA's Near Earth Objects program, which is meant to hunt and catalog comets, asteroids and relatively large fragments of these objects that pass within 28 million miles of Earth. The purpose is to protect the planet against their potential dangers.

The sun emits a mid-level solar flare. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured images of the flare, which erupted on the left side of the sun. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the grou

Late Summer Flare-Up … Ouch!

September 8, 2014 8:20 am | News | Comments

The sun emits a mid-level solar flare. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured images of the flare, which erupted on the left side of the sun. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however—when intense enough—they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.

Future asteroid mining operations and how we deal with an impending strike could be influenced by research on a potential NASA mission that's being done by team that includes a University of Alabama in Huntsville scientist.

What’s Inside an Asteroid

September 5, 2014 10:22 am | by Michael Mercier, University of Alabama in Huntsville | News | Comments

Future asteroid mining operations and how we deal with an impending strike could be influenced by research on a potential NASA mission that's being done by team that includes a University of Alabama in Huntsville scientist.       

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