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For customers sending a package by MoonMail, there's no need for a return address. The items will remain on the moon in a pod that will be attached to the moon rover. Courtesy of Gregory H. Revera

Bang, Zoom ... Going Straight to the Moon!

December 16, 2014 12:47 pm | by AP | News | Comments

An outer-space delivery firm that is working with Carnegie Mellon University to put a privately-owned lunar rover on the moon is offering to "mail" personal keepsakes to the moon as a way to help fund the partnership's rocket launch. Astrobotic has launched a Web site where people can sign up to send their keepsakes in tiny MoonMail packages to the moon.

NORAD Ready to Track Santa’s Flight

December 16, 2014 11:19 am | by North American Aerospace Defense Command | News | Comments

The North American Aerospace Defense Command is once again ready to track Santa’s yuletide...

NASA Software May Help Increase Flight Efficiency, Decrease Aircraft Noise

December 16, 2014 11:03 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA researchers began flight tests of computer software that shows promise in improving flight...

New Research Will Help Robots Know Their Limits

December 8, 2014 6:05 pm | by University of Sheffield | News | Comments

A team of researchers is embarking on a collaborative project to ensure that the autonomous...

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Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, is a peculiar place. Unlike any other moon, it has   a dense atmosphere. It has rivers and lakes made up of components of natural   gas, such as ethane and methane. It also has windswept dunes that are hundreds   of yards hig

Titan's Dune Mystery Solved

December 8, 2014 4:55 pm | by University of Tennessee | News | Comments

Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, is a peculiar place. Unlike any other moon, it has a dense atmosphere. It has rivers and lakes made up of components of natural gas, such as ethane and methane. It also has windswept dunes that are hundreds of yards high, more than a mile wide and hundreds of miles long — despite data suggesting the body to have only light breezes.

NASA's new Orion spacecraft made a "bull's-eye" Pacific splashdown following a dramatic journey 3,604 miles beyond Earth. The achievement opens a new era of human exploration to put people on Mars.

Orion Mission Flies Hightest in a Long Time

December 5, 2014 3:03 pm | by Marcia Dunn, Associated Press | News | Comments

NASA's new Orion spacecraft made a "bull's-eye" Pacific splashdown following a dramatic journey 3,604 miles beyond Earth. The achievement opens a new era of human exploration to put people on Mars.               

A study of "MY Camelopardalis" binary system shows that the most massive stars are made up by merging with other smaller stars, as predicted by theoretical models.

Merger of Two Stars is Supermassive

December 5, 2014 2:22 pm | by AlphaGalileo | News | Comments

A study of "MY Camelopardalis" binary system shows that the most massive stars are made up by merging with other smaller stars, as predicted by theoretical models.                         

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The results of four years of observations from the ESA's Planck satellite reveals relic radiation (the most ancient light in the Universe). This light has been measured precisely across the entire sky for the first time, in both intensity and polarization

New Revelations on Dark Matter and Relic Neutrinos

December 4, 2014 4:40 pm | News | Comments

The results of four years of observations from the ESA's Planck satellite reveals relic radiation (the most ancient light in the Universe). This light has been measured precisely across the entire sky for the first time, in both intensity and polarization, thereby producing the oldest image of the Universe. This primordial light lets us "see" some of the most elusive particles in the Universe: dark matter and relic neutrinos.

New observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile have revealed alignments over the largest structures ever discovered in the Universe. A European research team has found that the rotation axes of the central supermassive black holes in a sample o

Spooky Alignment of Quasars Crosses Billions of Light-years

November 20, 2014 3:39 pm | by ESO | News | Comments

New observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile have revealed alignments over the largest structures ever discovered in the Universe. A European research team has found that the rotation axes of the central supermassive black holes in a sample of quasars are parallel to each other over distances of billions of light-years.

The Soyuz TMA-13M crew, European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Alexander Gerst, Roscosmos cosmonaut Max Suraev, and NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, in their Soyuz spacecraft that will fly them back to Earth after almost six months on the International Space S

Snug Ride Home from ISS

November 19, 2014 2:32 pm | News | Comments

The Soyuz TMA-13M crew, European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Alexander Gerst, Roscosmos cosmonaut Max Suraev, and NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman, in their Soyuz spacecraft that will fly them back to Earth after almost six months on the International Space Station.

Nexio simulation is a French SME located in Toulouse and specialized in electromagnetic simulation software for marine, space, defense and aeronautics domains applications.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Nexio

November 17, 2014 6:19 pm | Award Winners

Nexio simulation is a French SME located in Toulouse and specialized in electromagnetic simulation software for marine, space, defense and aeronautics domains applications.

New data obtained by NASA’s GRAIL mission reveals that the Procellarum region on the near side of the moon — a giant basin often referred to as the “man in the moon” — likely arose not from a massive asteroid strike, but from a large plume of magma deep w

True Origin of the Man in the Moon

October 3, 2014 2:41 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

New data obtained by NASA’s GRAIL mission reveals that the Procellarum region on the near side of the moon — a giant basin often referred to as the “man in the moon” — likely arose not from a massive asteroid strike, but from a large plume of magma deep within the moon’s interior. 

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Scientists are to turn the Moon into a giant particle detector to help understand the origin of Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) cosmic rays — the most energetic particles in the Universe.

Cosmic Particles Detected by the Moon

October 2, 2014 4:00 pm | by University of Southhampton | News | Comments

Scientists are to turn the Moon into a giant particle detector to help understand the origin of Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) cosmic rays — the most energetic particles in the Universe.                    

Looking for Comets in a Sea of Stars

October 1, 2014 3:11 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

On a July night this summer, a 5,200-pound balloon gondola hangs from a crane and moves toward the open doors of a building at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab in Laurel, Md. The telescopes and instruments carried by the gondola, which are part of NASA’s Balloon Observation Platform for Planetary Science (BOPPS), are calibrated by taking a long look at the stars and other objects in the sky.

Hunting from a distance of 27,000 light years, astronomers have discovered an unusual carbon-based molecule – one with a branched structure – contained within a giant gas cloud in interstellar space. Like finding a molecular needle in a cosmic haystack, a

Space Molecule Leads to Life's Interstellar Origins

September 30, 2014 4:08 pm | by Blaine Friedlander, Cornell university | News | Comments

Hunting from a distance of 27,000 light years, astronomers have discovered an unusual carbon-based molecule – one with a branched structure – contained within a giant gas cloud in interstellar space. Like finding a molecular needle in a cosmic haystack, astronomers have detected radio waves emitted by isopropyl cyanide. The discovery suggests that the complex molecules needed for life may have their origins in interstellar space.

The Soyuz TMA-14M rocket is launched with Expedition 41 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos, and Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, Friday, September 26, 2014

Expedition 41 Crew is ISS Bound

September 29, 2014 2:59 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The Soyuz TMA-14M rocket is launched with Expedition 41 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos, and Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, Friday, September 26, 2014 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Observations from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope reveal new information about the structure of 2011 MD, a small asteroid being considered by NASA for its proposed Asteroid Redirect Mission, or ARM. Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA Inspector Blasts Asteroid Protection Program

September 15, 2014 3:24 pm | by Marcia Dunn, AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

NASA's effort to identify potentially dangerous space rocks has taken a hit. On September 15, 2014, the space agency's inspector general released a report blasting NASA's Near Earth Objects program, which is meant to hunt and catalog comets, asteroids and relatively large fragments of these objects that pass within 28 million miles of Earth. The purpose is to protect the planet against their potential dangers.

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The sun emits a mid-level solar flare. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured images of the flare, which erupted on the left side of the sun. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the grou

Late Summer Flare-Up … Ouch!

September 8, 2014 8:20 am | News | Comments

The sun emits a mid-level solar flare. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory captured images of the flare, which erupted on the left side of the sun. Harmful radiation from a flare cannot pass through Earth's atmosphere to physically affect humans on the ground, however—when intense enough—they can disturb the atmosphere in the layer where GPS and communications signals travel.

Future asteroid mining operations and how we deal with an impending strike could be influenced by research on a potential NASA mission that's being done by team that includes a University of Alabama in Huntsville scientist.

What’s Inside an Asteroid

September 5, 2014 10:22 am | by Michael Mercier, University of Alabama in Huntsville | News | Comments

Future asteroid mining operations and how we deal with an impending strike could be influenced by research on a potential NASA mission that's being done by team that includes a University of Alabama in Huntsville scientist.       

The Apollo 11 Lunar Module Eagle, in a landing configuration was photographed in lunar orbit from the Command and Service Module Columbia. Inside the module were Commander Neil A. Armstrong and Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin. The long rod-like protrusions

The Eagle Has Prepared to Land

September 3, 2014 9:41 am | News | Comments

The Apollo 11 Lunar Module Eagle, in a landing configuration was photographed in lunar orbit from the Command and Service Module Columbia. Inside the module were Commander Neil A. Armstrong and Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin. The long rod-like protrusions under the landing pods are lunar surface sensing probes. Upon contact with the lunar surface, the probes sent a signal to the crew to shut down the descent engine.

Computing Paths to Future Asteroid Exploration

July 2, 2014 10:05 am | by NASA | News | Comments

As left over building blocks of the solar system's formation, asteroids are of significant interest to scientists. Resources, especially water, embedded within asteroids could be of use to astronauts traveling through deep space. Likewise, asteroids could continue to be destinations for robotic and human missions as NASA pioneers deeper into the solar system, to Mars and beyond.

Grand Dorado Swirl

July 1, 2014 9:59 am | News | Comments

This new Hubble image shows NGC 1566, a beautiful galaxy located approximately 40 million light-years away in the constellation of Dorado (The Dolphinfish). NGC 1566 is an intermediate spiral galaxy, meaning that while it does not have a well-defined bar-shaped region of stars at its center — like barred spirals — it is not quite an unbarred spiral either.

A saucer-shaped test vehicle holding equipment for landing large payloads on Mars is shown in the Missile Assembly Building at the US Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kaua’i, Hawaii.

Saucer-Shaped Test Vehicle Pre-Flight

June 27, 2014 9:13 am | News | Comments

A saucer-shaped test vehicle holding equipment for landing large payloads on Mars is shown in the Missile Assembly Building at the US Navy's Pacific Missile Range Facility in Kaua’i, Hawaii. The vehicle, part of the Low-Density Supersonic Decelerator project, will test an inflatable decelerator and a parachute at high altitudes and speeds over the Pacific Missile Range.

ISS Solar Array

March 31, 2014 4:18 pm | News | Comments

The sun shines through a truss-based radiator panel and a primary solar array panel on the Earth-orbiting International Space Station (ISS) in this photograph taken by an Expedition 38 crew member on January 2, 2014. The crew on the ISS awaits the first commercial resupply mission to the ISS by Orbital Sciences, Orbital-1.

Newfound Pink World Lurks at Solar System Fringes

March 28, 2014 2:45 pm | by Alicia Chang, Associated Press | News | Comments

Peering into the far reaches of the solar system, astronomers have spied a pink frozen world 7½ billion miles from the sun. It's the second such object to be discovered in a region of space beyond Pluto long considered a celestial wasteland.   

Antares Rocket Ready for Launch

March 27, 2014 3:53 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

An Orbital Sciences Corporation Antares rocket is seen on launch Pad-0A at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility. The Antares will launch a Cygnus spacecraft on a cargo resupply mission to the International Space Station.          

NASA Spots Tropical Cyclone Gillian's Eye Closing

March 26, 2014 7:27 pm | by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

At 06:45 UTC on March 23, NASA's Aqua satellite flew overhead and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument captured a visible image of the storm. In the image, Gillian's eye had already started to fill in with clouds and was surrounded by a thick band of thunderstorms wrapping around the center of circulation.

Soyuz Rocket Ready to Deliver Olympic Torch

January 23, 2014 9:57 am | by NASA | News | Comments

The Soyuz TMA-11M rocket, adorned with the logo of the Sochi Olympic Organizing Committee and other related artwork, is seen in this long exposure photograph, as the service structure arms are raised into position at the launch pad on Tuesday, November 5, 2013, Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

NASA Center Renamed in Honor of Neil A. Armstrong

January 20, 2014 9:32 am | by NASA | News | Comments

This photograph shows Neil Armstrong next to the X-15 rocket-powered aircraft after a research flight. President Barack Obama has signed HR 667, the congressional resolution that redesignates NASA's Hugh L. Dryden Flight Research Center as the Neil A. Armstrong Flight Research Center, into law. The resolution also names Dryden's Western Aeronautical Test Range as the Hugh L. Dryden Aeronautical Test Range.

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