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Scientists are now closer to imitating key electronic aspects of the human brain — a vital step towards creating a bionic brain.

Researchers take Vital Step toward Creating Bionic Brain

May 19, 2015 3:08 pm | by RMIT University | News | Comments

Researchers have mimicked the way the human brain processes information with the development of an electronic long-term memory cell, which mirrors the brain’s ability to simultaneously process and store multiple strands of information. The development brings them closer to imitating key electronic aspects of the human brain — a vital step toward creating a bionic brain and unlocking treatments for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

Novel Computer Intelligence System Detects Acute Strokes

May 14, 2015 12:06 pm | by Hong Kong Polytechnic University | News | Comments

PolyU has developed a novel computer-aided detection system for acute stroke using computer...

Important Step in AI: Making Computer Brains More like our Own

May 12, 2015 2:06 pm | by Sonia Fernandez, UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

In what marks a significant step forward for artificial intelligence, researchers at UC Santa...

Cognitive Control: Robots Plan Underwater Missions Autonomously

May 7, 2015 12:18 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

When developing the autonomous mission-planning system, Williams’ group took inspiration from...

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NYU has installed a new computing system for next-generation deep learning research — called “ScaLeNet” — that will allow researchers to significantly increase the size of deep learning models that can be trained and number of models that can be tested.

NYU to Advance Deep Learning Research with Multi-GPU Cluster

May 5, 2015 11:37 am | by Kimberly Powell, NVIDIA | News | Comments

Self-driving cars. Computers that detect tumors. Real-time speech translation. Just a few years ago, deep learning — training computers to identify patterns and objects, much like the way humans do — was the domain of a few artificial intelligence and data science researchers. No longer. Today, top experts use it to do amazing things. And they continue to push the bounds of what’s possible.

Subjects in the study viewed images while wearing an EEG headset. Courtesy of Neuromatters

Computer Vision, Brain-computer Interface Speed Mine Detection

May 5, 2015 9:44 am | by University of California - San Diego | News | Comments

Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, have combined sophisticated computer vision algorithms and a brain-computer interface to find mines in sonar images of the ocean floor. The study shows that the new method speeds detection considerably, when compared to existing methods — mainly visual inspection by a mine detection expert.

An FPGA board along with a custom sensor box built by the GTRI team for research purposes. Courtesy of Georgia Tech/Rob Felt

Advancing Security and Trust in Reconfigurable Devices

May 4, 2015 2:24 pm | by Rick Robinson, Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A research team at the Georgia Tech Research Institute is studying a range of security challenges involving programmable logic devices — in particular, field programmable gate arrays. FPGAs combine hardware performance and software flexibility so well that they're increasingly used in aerospace, defense, consumer devices, HPC, vehicles, medical devices and other applications. But they come with potential vulnerabilities.

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Chris Evans, left, as Captain America/Steve Rogers, and Chris Hemsworth as Thor, in a scene of the new film, "Avengers: Age Of Ultron." The movie releases in the U.S. on May 1, 2015. (Jay Maidment/Disney/Marvel via AP)

'Avengers' Stars Wary of Artificial Intelligence

April 28, 2015 2:46 pm | by Ryan Pearson, AP Entertainment Writer | News | Comments

The cast of "Avengers: Age of Ultron" may battle out-of-control artificial intelligence on-screen but, in real life, they're not so sure about cutting-edge technology. AP talked with the cast about what they embrace and fear in today's high-tech landscape: ROBERT DOWNEY, JR.: I feel you have to embrace it. You know, there's always that shadow play that goes on ... But look, it took over a while ago...

Poker is now a benchmark for artificial intelligence research, just as chess once was. It’s a game of exceeding complexity that requires a machine to make decisions based on incomplete and often misleading information, thanks to bluffing, slow play and ot

Brains vs. AI: Carnegie Mellon Computer Faces Poker Pros in Epic No-Limit Texas Hold’Em

April 24, 2015 3:30 pm | by Ken Walters, Carnegie Mellon University | News | Comments

In a contest that echoes Deep Blue’s chess victory over Garry Kasparov and Watson beating two Jeopardy! Champions, computer poker software developed at Carnegie Mellon University will challenge four of the world’s best professional poker players in a “Brains Vs. Artificial Intelligence” competition beginning April 24, 2015, at Rivers Casino.

Enterprise AI deployments will also drive additional spending on IT hardware and services including computing power, graphics processor units (GPUs), networking products, storage and cloud computing.

AI for Enterprise Applications to Reach $11.1 Billion, Deep Learning will be Breakout Technology

April 24, 2015 2:39 pm | by Tractica | News | Comments

After 60 years of false starts, the integration of artificial intelligence with probability and statistics has led to a marriage of machine learning, control theory and neuroscience that is yielding practical benefits. This shared theoretical foundation, combined with the exponential growth of processing power and the unprecedented increase in the amount of data available to analyze, has made AI systems attractive for businesses to adopt.

Researchers tracked asthma-related tweets around the world, shown in the visualization above, then zoomed in on a particular region to see how the social media posts, when analyzed alongside other data, could help them predict asthma-related emergency roo

How Twitter Can Help Predict Emergency Room Visits

April 16, 2015 12:16 pm | by Alexis Blue, University of Arizona | News | Comments

A predictive model using machine learning algorithms is able to predict with 75 percent accuracy how many asthma-related emergency room visits a hospital could expect on a given day. Twitter users who post information about their personal health online might be considered by some to be "over-sharers," but new research suggests that health-related tweets may have the potential to be helpful for hospitals.

Matt Pugh (left) and Phil Hughes on board a Friends of Cardigan Bay dingy

Computer Vision, Machine Learning give New Perspective on Seabed Videos

March 30, 2015 2:02 pm | by Aberystwyth University | News | Comments

Scientists have been working with marine conservation group to develop better techniques for studying the seabed, which is vital for marine conservation and fisheries management. Cardigan Bay is renowned for its populations of dolphins and porpoises. Until recently the work of mapping and recording the seabed had been done using the traditional “researcher and clipboard” technique, which is costly and time consuming.

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Online negotiations can be improved if computer programs take social values, such as honesty and trust into account when bargaining with human counterparts. © tatniz

Solving the Trust Equation: Socially Intelligent Computers can turn Difficult Negotiations into Win-win Situations

March 25, 2015 12:19 pm | by A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing | News | Comments

Programming fundamental social intelligence skills into software agents can make humans substantially more trusting of online negotiations, which can lead to superior outcomes in e-commerce transactions, finds a team of technology researchers, business experts and cognitive scientists. People are naturally skeptical of negotiations lacking face-to-face contact...

Pascal will offer better performance than Maxwell on key deep-learning tasks.

NVIDIA’s Next-Gen Pascal GPU Architecture to Provide 10X Speedup for Deep Learning Apps

March 18, 2015 12:24 pm | News | Comments

NVIDIA has announced that its Pascal GPU architecture, set to debut next year, will accelerate deep learning applications 10X beyond the speed of its current-generation Maxwell processors. NVIDIA CEO and co-founder Jen-Hsun Huang revealed details of Pascal and the company’s updated processor roadmap in front of a crowd of 4,000 during his keynote address at the GPU Technology Conference, in Silicon Valley.

By using the app, Citizen Scientists can examine photos from the Web and provide further context that does not typically exist with the image alone.

iPad App Game Uses Citizen Science to Track Endangered Species

March 18, 2015 11:12 am | by Aaron Mason, Wildsense, University of Surrey | News | Comments

A new app for the iPad could change the way wildlife is monitored. Wildsense, an initiative from a group of researchers at the University of Surrey, is designed to use citizen science, the concept of allowing people to get directly involved in science, to help in the conservation of rare and endangered species.

The alliance, funded by UPMC, will see its work carried out by Pitt-led and CMU-led centers, with participation from all three institutions.

University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon University, UPMC Form Alliance to Transform Healthcare through Big Data

March 17, 2015 2:19 pm | by UPMC | News | Comments

Today’s health care system generates massive amounts of data — electronic health records, diagnostic imaging, prescriptions, genomic profiles, insurance records, even data from wearable devices. Information has always been essential for guiding care, but computer tools now make it possible to use that data to provide deeper insights. Leveraging big data to revolutionize healthcare is the focus of the Pittsburgh Health Data Alliance.

Athens, Baltimore, Hong Kong, Miami: What are those people doing? A new evaluation method measures a computer’s ability to decipher movements, relationships, and implied intent from images by asking questions.

Visual Turing Test raises Bar on Computer Vision Benchmarks

March 16, 2015 12:39 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

Researchers from Brown and Johns Hopkins universities have come up with a new way to evaluate how well computers can divine information from images. The team describes its new system as a “visual Turing test,” after the legendary computer scientist Alan Turing’s test of the extent to which computers display human-like intelligence.

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Chalcogenide glass: Using conventional fiber drawing techniques, microfibers can be produced from chalcogenide (glasses based on sulphur) that possess a variety of broadband photoinduced effects, which allow the fibers to be switched on and off.

Optical Fibers Light Way for Brain-like Computing

March 11, 2015 12:36 pm | by University of Southampton | News | Comments

Computers that function like the human brain could soon become a reality thanks to new research using optical fibers made of specialty glass, which has the potential to allow faster and smarter optical computers capable of learning and evolving. Researchers have demonstrated how neural networks and synapses in the brain can be reproduced, with optical pulses as information carriers, using special fibers made from chalcogenides.

Paul Denny-Gouldson is VP of Strategic Solutions at IDBS.

AI and Robot Scientists: The Lab of the Future?

March 10, 2015 8:44 am | by Paul Denny-Gouldson, IDBS | Blogs | Comments

Pharmaceutical companies are under intense pressure. With patents expiring and cost pressures growing, the speed and productivity of drug discovery and manufacturing are under the microscope. It is timely, then, that researchers recently shared promising findings on Eve — an artificially-intelligent robot scientist. Eve discovered a compound with anti-cancer properties. Is this a glimpse of what the lab of the future might look like?

While a member of the audience might have seen a variation on this trick before, the AI can now use psychological and mathematical principles to create lots of different versions and keep audiences guessing. Courtesy of Steven Depolo

Artificial Intelligence Performs Real Magic Tricks

February 25, 2015 11:41 am | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Researchers gave a computer program the outline of how a magic jigsaw puzzle and a mind-reading card trick work, as well the results of experiments into how humans understand magic tricks. With this information, the system created completely new variants on those tricks which can be delivered by a magician.

Stephen Jones is Product Manager, Strategic Alliances at NVIDIA.

Powering a New Era of Deep Learning

February 20, 2015 12:42 pm | by Stephen Jones, NVIDIA | Blogs | Comments

GPU-accelerated applications have become ubiquitous in scientific supercomputing. Now, we are seeing increased adoption of GPU technology in other computationally demanding disciplines, including deep learning, one of the fastest growing areas in the machine learning and data science fields

Eve, the Robot Scientist Courtesy of University of Manchester

AI Robot Scientist ‘Eve’ could Boost Search for New Drugs

February 4, 2015 2:46 pm | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Eve, an artificially-intelligent ‘robot scientist’ could make drug discovery faster and much cheaper, say researchers. The team has demonstrated the success of the approach, as Eve discovered that a compound shown to have anti-cancer properties might also be used in the fight against malaria.

This sequence of graphs illustrates the application of the researchers' technique to a real-world computer vision problem. The solution to each successive problem (red balls) is used to initialize (green arrows) the search for a solution to the next. Cour

Optimizing Optimization Algorithms: How to Get the Best Results

January 23, 2015 2:36 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Optimization algorithms, which try to find the minimum values of mathematical functions, are everywhere in engineering. Among other things, they’re used to evaluate design tradeoffs, to assess control systems, and to find patterns in data. One way to solve a difficult optimization problem is to first reduce it to a related but much simpler problem, then gradually add complexity back in ...

The University of Texas at Austin took home top honors with a new app called CallScout, designed to give Texas residents fast and easy access to information about social services in their area.

IBM Watson Group Awards UT Austin $100K to Bring Social Services App to Residents

January 16, 2015 2:08 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM has announced the first winner of its Watson University Competition, part of the company's partnership with top universities through its cognitive computing academic initiative. The winning team of student entrepreneurs from the University of Texas at Austin will receive $100,000 in total in seed funding to help launch a business based on their Watson app, which offers the promise of improved citizen services.

Developing a more efficient vision system for household robots. Courtesy of Christine Daniloff and Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

MIT Algorithm Helps Household Robots Identify Items Concealed in Clutter

January 15, 2015 9:49 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

For household robots to be practical, they need to be able to recognize the objects they’re supposed to manipulate. While object recognition is one of the most widely studied topics in AI, even the best detectors still fail much of the time. Researchers believe the robots should take advantage of their mobility, imaging objects from multiple perspectives. Matching up objects in the different images, however, poses computational challenges.

IBM broke the U.S. patent record in 2014, becoming the first company to exceed 7,000 patents in a single year. More than 8,500 IBM inventors around the world, including researcher Stacy Hobson (pictured), produced 7,534 patents for IBM in 2014.

IBM Breaks U.S. Patent Record

January 13, 2015 10:35 am | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM has announced that it received a record 7,534 patents in 2014 — marking the 22nd consecutive year that the company topped the annual list of U.S. patent recipients. IBM inventors earned an average of more than 20 patents per day in 2014, propelling the company to become the first to surpass more than 7,000 patents in a single year.

The results show that, by mining Facebook Likes, the computer model was able to predict a person's personality more accurately than most of their friends and family.

AI: Computers Know the Real You Better than Friends, Family

January 13, 2015 10:01 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Researchers have found that, based on enough Facebook Likes, computers can judge your personality traits better than your friends, family and even your partner. Using a new algorithm, researchers have calculated the average number of Likes artificial intelligence (AI) needs to draw personality inferences about you as accurately as your partner or parents.

The all-electric Nissan Leaf fitted with autonomous drive equipment allowed to park at NASA's Ames Research Center. Courtesy of Business Wire

NASA, Nissan Partner to Deploy Autonomous Drive Vehicles by Year End

January 9, 2015 11:28 am | by Nissan | News | Comments

NASA and Nissan have announced the formation of a five-year research and development partnership to advance autonomous vehicle systems and prepare for commercial application of the technology. Researchers from NASA’s Ames Research Center and Nissan’s U.S. Silicon Valley Research Center will focus on autonomous drive systems, human-machine interface solutions, network-enabled applications, and software analysis and verification.

A heat map of a home captured by one of Essess' thermal-imaging cars. Courtesy of Essess

Drive-by Heat Mapping: Thermal Imaging Tracks Energy Leaks in Thousands of Homes

January 6, 2015 12:04 pm | by Rob Matheson, MIT | News | Comments

In 2007, Google unleashed a fleet of cars with roof-mounted cameras to provide street-level images of roads around the world. Now, an MIT spinout is bringing similar drive-by innovations to energy efficiency by deploying cars with thermal-imaging rooftop rigs that create heat maps of thousands of homes and buildings per hour, detecting fixable leaks in building envelopes — windows, doors, walls and foundations — to help curb energy loss.

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