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The software generates fictional mini-narratives or storylines, using natural language processing techniques and a database of facts mined from the Web. It then inverts or twists the facts to create ‘what-ifs’. The result is often incongruous, “What if th

Can Computers be Creative?

July 2, 2015 8:24 am | by European Commission | News | Comments

The EU-funded What-if Machine (WHIM) project not only generates fictional storylines, but also judges their potential usefulness and appeal. It represents a major advance in the field of computational creativity. Science rarely looks at the whimsical, but that is changing as a result of the aptly named WHIM project. The ambitious project is building a software system able to invent and evaluate fictional ideas.

What your Clothes may say about You

June 25, 2015 9:44 am | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

Moving closer to the possibility of "materials that compute" and wearing your computer on your...

Cognitive Computing App Taps 10,000 Bon Appétit Recipes, Suggests Creative Flavor Combinations

June 24, 2015 11:12 am | by IBM Watson | News | Comments

IBM and Bon Appétit have introduced a one-of-a-kind Chef Watson cognitive computing cooking app...

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — June 5-11

June 12, 2015 3:39 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

In case you missed it, here's another chance to catch this week's biggest hits. Software and “...

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researchers describe how the learnings from both insects and humans can be applied in a model virtual reality simulation, enabling an artificial intelligence system to 'pursue' an object.

Insect Vision benefits Bio-inspired, Autonomous Robot Eyes

June 11, 2015 8:43 am | by University of Adelaide | News | Comments

The way insects see and track their prey is being applied to a new robot in the hopes of improving robot visual systems. The project — which crosses the boundaries of neuroscience, mechanical engineering and computer science — builds on years of research into insect vision. The learnings from both insects and humans can be applied in a model virtual reality simulation, enabling an artificial intelligence system to 'pursue' an object.

Axel Tidemann, [self.] and Øyvind Brandtsegg. Courtesy of Ole Morten Melgård, NTNU

Robot learns Everything from Scratch

June 10, 2015 12:10 pm | by Steinar Brandslet, Norwegian University of Science and Technology | News | Comments

Imagine that everything in your mind had been erased, and you had to learn everything all over again. What would that process be like? Two researchers at NTNU have made a robot that learns like a young child. At least, that’s the idea. The machine starts with nothing — it has to learn everything from scratch. The machine is called [self.]. It analyzes sound through a system based on the human ear, and learns to recognize images.

So many choices: Choosing from a universe of possible actions is a daunting task for a robot. Humans do it effortlessly. Researchers have found that video games — particularly Minecraft — can help robots learn how to tell which objects and actions might b

Using Minecraft to Unboggle the Robot Mind

June 9, 2015 9:13 am | by Brown University | News | Comments

A human can make intuitive choices about what actions to take in order to achieve a goal. Robots have a far more difficult time choosing from of a universe of possible actions. Researchers at Brown University are developing a new algorithm that can learn that skill from a video game environment. They are developing the algorithm to help robots better plan their actions in complex environments.

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In a breakthrough for computer vision and for bird-watching, researchers and bird enthusiasts have enabled computers to achieve a task that stumps most humans: identifying hundreds of bird species pictured in photos. The bird photo identifier, developed b

Computer Vision Breakthrough: Merlin taps Powerful AI to ID Birds from Photos

June 8, 2015 2:03 pm | by Miyoko Chu, Cornell Lab of Ornithology | News | Comments

In a breakthrough for computer vision and for bird-watching, researchers and bird enthusiasts have enabled computers to achieve a task that stumps most humans: identifying hundreds of bird species pictured in photos. The bird photo identifier, developed by the Visipedia research project in collaboration with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, is available for free.

The Los Angeles team Survey's robot is seen as it conducts a demonstration of the level two challenge during the 2014 NASA Centennial Challenges Sample Return Robot Challenge, June 12, 2014, at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) in Worcester, MA. C

Robotics Teams Prepare to Compete for $1.5 Million in NASA Challenge

June 5, 2015 4:36 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Twenty robotics teams, ranging from university students to small businesses, are preparing to compete June 8 to 13 in the fourth running of the NASA Sample Return Robot Challenge for a prize purse of $1.5 million. At the autonomous robot competition held at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, teams must demonstrate their robot can locate and collect geologic samples from a large and varied landscape, without human control.

Decentralized partially observable Markov decision processes are a way to model autonomous robots’ behavior in circumstances where neither their communication with each other nor their judgments about the outside world are perfect. The problem with Dec-PO

Autonomous Multirobot Collaboration Algorithm makes Complex Models Practical

June 3, 2015 9:58 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Decentralized partially observable Markov decision processes are a way to model autonomous robots’ behavior in circumstances where neither their communication with each other nor their judgments about the outside world are perfect. The problem is that they’re as complicated as their name. They provide the most rigorous mathematical models of multiagent systems — not just robots, but any autonomous networked devices — under uncertainty.

Baxter, a versatile robot that is designed to work in industry alongside people, is one of about 40 robots featured in Robot Revolution.

Robot Revolution Explores Visionary World through Cutting-edge Robots

May 29, 2015 9:44 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

“They’re here … to help and improve our lives,” The Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago announces on its Web site. MSI is hosting a new national touring exhibit, Robot Revolution, which explores how robots, created by human ingenuity, will ultimately be our companions and colleagues, changing how we play, live and work together. It allows guests to step into a visionary world where robots are not just a curiosity, but a vital asset.

One of the robots introduced in the paper 'Robots that can adapt like animals.' Courtesy of Antoine Cully

Robots Automatically Recover from Damage in Minutes

May 28, 2015 3:37 pm | by University of Wyoming | News | Comments

Robots will one day provide tremendous benefits to society, such as in search and rescue — but not until they can learn to keep working when damaged. A paper shows robots automatically recover from injury in less than two minutes. A video of the work shows a six-legged robot adapt to keep walking even if two of its legs are broken. It also shows a robotic arm that learned how to correctly place an object even with several broken motors.

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The project developed autonomous robots that interact with each other and exchange information, resulting in a cognitive system that is aware of its environment. © COCORO

Autonomous Robot Swarms Use Collective Cognition, are Aware of their Environment

May 28, 2015 3:20 pm | by European Commission, CORDIS | News | Comments

Scientists have created underwater robot swarms that function like schools of fish, exchanging information to monitor the environment, searching, maintaining, exploring and harvesting resources in underwater habitats. The EU supported COCORO project explored and developed collective cognition in autonomous robots in a rich set of 10 experimental demonstrators, which are shown in 52 videos.

MIT researchers tested the viability of their algorithm by using it to guide a crew of three robots in the assembly of a chair. Courtesy of Dominick Reuter

New Algorithm lets Autonomous Robots Divvy up Assembly Tasks on the Fly

May 27, 2015 2:33 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Today’s industrial robots are remarkably efficient — as long as they’re in a controlled environment where everything is exactly where they expect it to be. But put them in an unfamiliar setting, where they have to think for themselves, and their efficiency plummets. And the difficulty of on-the-fly motion planning increases exponentially with the number of robots involved. For even a simple collaborative task...

Scientists are now closer to imitating key electronic aspects of the human brain — a vital step towards creating a bionic brain.

Researchers take Vital Step toward Creating Bionic Brain

May 19, 2015 3:08 pm | by RMIT University | News | Comments

Researchers have mimicked the way the human brain processes information with the development of an electronic long-term memory cell, which mirrors the brain’s ability to simultaneously process and store multiple strands of information. The development brings them closer to imitating key electronic aspects of the human brain — a vital step toward creating a bionic brain and unlocking treatments for Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases.

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a novel computer-aided detection system for acute stroke using computer intelligence technology. Reading 80 to 100 computer images, the system is able to detect whether the patient was struck by i

Novel Computer Intelligence System Detects Acute Strokes

May 14, 2015 12:06 pm | by Hong Kong Polytechnic University | News | Comments

PolyU has developed a novel computer-aided detection system for acute stroke using computer intelligence technology. Reading 80 to 100 computer images, the system is able to detect whether the patient was struck by ischemic stroke or haemorrhagic stroke. The detection accuracy is 90 percent, which is as high as that conducted by specialists, but at a much reduced time from 10 to 15 minutes to just three minutes.

In what marks a significant step forward for artificial intelligence, researchers at UC Santa Barbara have demonstrated the functionality of a simple artificial neural circuit. For the first time, a circuit of about 100 artificial synapses was proved to p

Important Step in AI: Making Computer Brains More like our Own

May 12, 2015 2:06 pm | by Sonia Fernandez, UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

In what marks a significant step forward for artificial intelligence, researchers at UC Santa Barbara have demonstrated the functionality of a simple artificial neural circuit. For the first time, a circuit of about 100 artificial synapses was proved to perform a simple version of a typical human task: image classification.

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The system is similar to one that Williams developed for NASA following the loss of the Mars Observer

Cognitive Control: Robots Plan Underwater Missions Autonomously

May 7, 2015 12:18 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

When developing the autonomous mission-planning system, Williams’ group took inspiration from the Star Trek franchise and the top-down command center of the fictional starship Enterprise, after which he modeled and named the system. Just as a hierarchical crew runs the fictional starship, the Enterprise system incorporates levels of decision-makers and similar to one that Williams developed for NASA following the loss of Mars Observer.

NYU has installed a new computing system for next-generation deep learning research — called “ScaLeNet” — that will allow researchers to significantly increase the size of deep learning models that can be trained and number of models that can be tested.

NYU to Advance Deep Learning Research with Multi-GPU Cluster

May 5, 2015 11:37 am | by Kimberly Powell, NVIDIA | News | Comments

Self-driving cars. Computers that detect tumors. Real-time speech translation. Just a few years ago, deep learning — training computers to identify patterns and objects, much like the way humans do — was the domain of a few artificial intelligence and data science researchers. No longer. Today, top experts use it to do amazing things. And they continue to push the bounds of what’s possible.

Subjects in the study viewed images while wearing an EEG headset. Courtesy of Neuromatters

Computer Vision, Brain-computer Interface Speed Mine Detection

May 5, 2015 9:44 am | by University of California - San Diego | News | Comments

Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, have combined sophisticated computer vision algorithms and a brain-computer interface to find mines in sonar images of the ocean floor. The study shows that the new method speeds detection considerably, when compared to existing methods — mainly visual inspection by a mine detection expert.

An FPGA board along with a custom sensor box built by the GTRI team for research purposes. Courtesy of Georgia Tech/Rob Felt

Advancing Security and Trust in Reconfigurable Devices

May 4, 2015 2:24 pm | by Rick Robinson, Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A research team at the Georgia Tech Research Institute is studying a range of security challenges involving programmable logic devices — in particular, field programmable gate arrays. FPGAs combine hardware performance and software flexibility so well that they're increasingly used in aerospace, defense, consumer devices, HPC, vehicles, medical devices and other applications. But they come with potential vulnerabilities.

Chris Evans, left, as Captain America/Steve Rogers, and Chris Hemsworth as Thor, in a scene of the new film, "Avengers: Age Of Ultron." The movie releases in the U.S. on May 1, 2015. (Jay Maidment/Disney/Marvel via AP)

'Avengers' Stars Wary of Artificial Intelligence

April 28, 2015 2:46 pm | by Ryan Pearson, AP Entertainment Writer | News | Comments

The cast of "Avengers: Age of Ultron" may battle out-of-control artificial intelligence on-screen but, in real life, they're not so sure about cutting-edge technology. AP talked with the cast about what they embrace and fear in today's high-tech landscape: ROBERT DOWNEY, JR.: I feel you have to embrace it. You know, there's always that shadow play that goes on ... But look, it took over a while ago...

Poker is now a benchmark for artificial intelligence research, just as chess once was. It’s a game of exceeding complexity that requires a machine to make decisions based on incomplete and often misleading information, thanks to bluffing, slow play and ot

Brains vs. AI: Carnegie Mellon Computer Faces Poker Pros in Epic No-Limit Texas Hold’Em

April 24, 2015 3:30 pm | by Ken Walters, Carnegie Mellon University | News | Comments

In a contest that echoes Deep Blue’s chess victory over Garry Kasparov and Watson beating two Jeopardy! Champions, computer poker software developed at Carnegie Mellon University will challenge four of the world’s best professional poker players in a “Brains Vs. Artificial Intelligence” competition beginning April 24, 2015, at Rivers Casino.

Enterprise AI deployments will also drive additional spending on IT hardware and services including computing power, graphics processor units (GPUs), networking products, storage and cloud computing.

AI for Enterprise Applications to Reach $11.1 Billion, Deep Learning will be Breakout Technology

April 24, 2015 2:39 pm | by Tractica | News | Comments

After 60 years of false starts, the integration of artificial intelligence with probability and statistics has led to a marriage of machine learning, control theory and neuroscience that is yielding practical benefits. This shared theoretical foundation, combined with the exponential growth of processing power and the unprecedented increase in the amount of data available to analyze, has made AI systems attractive for businesses to adopt.

Researchers tracked asthma-related tweets around the world, shown in the visualization above, then zoomed in on a particular region to see how the social media posts, when analyzed alongside other data, could help them predict asthma-related emergency roo

How Twitter Can Help Predict Emergency Room Visits

April 16, 2015 12:16 pm | by Alexis Blue, University of Arizona | News | Comments

A predictive model using machine learning algorithms is able to predict with 75 percent accuracy how many asthma-related emergency room visits a hospital could expect on a given day. Twitter users who post information about their personal health online might be considered by some to be "over-sharers," but new research suggests that health-related tweets may have the potential to be helpful for hospitals.

Matt Pugh (left) and Phil Hughes on board a Friends of Cardigan Bay dingy

Computer Vision, Machine Learning give New Perspective on Seabed Videos

March 30, 2015 2:02 pm | by Aberystwyth University | News | Comments

Scientists have been working with marine conservation group to develop better techniques for studying the seabed, which is vital for marine conservation and fisheries management. Cardigan Bay is renowned for its populations of dolphins and porpoises. Until recently the work of mapping and recording the seabed had been done using the traditional “researcher and clipboard” technique, which is costly and time consuming.

Online negotiations can be improved if computer programs take social values, such as honesty and trust into account when bargaining with human counterparts. © tatniz

Solving the Trust Equation: Socially Intelligent Computers can turn Difficult Negotiations into Win-win Situations

March 25, 2015 12:19 pm | by A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing | News | Comments

Programming fundamental social intelligence skills into software agents can make humans substantially more trusting of online negotiations, which can lead to superior outcomes in e-commerce transactions, finds a team of technology researchers, business experts and cognitive scientists. People are naturally skeptical of negotiations lacking face-to-face contact...

Pascal will offer better performance than Maxwell on key deep-learning tasks.

NVIDIA’s Next-Gen Pascal GPU Architecture to Provide 10X Speedup for Deep Learning Apps

March 18, 2015 12:24 pm | News | Comments

NVIDIA has announced that its Pascal GPU architecture, set to debut next year, will accelerate deep learning applications 10X beyond the speed of its current-generation Maxwell processors. NVIDIA CEO and co-founder Jen-Hsun Huang revealed details of Pascal and the company’s updated processor roadmap in front of a crowd of 4,000 during his keynote address at the GPU Technology Conference, in Silicon Valley.

By using the app, Citizen Scientists can examine photos from the Web and provide further context that does not typically exist with the image alone.

iPad App Game Uses Citizen Science to Track Endangered Species

March 18, 2015 11:12 am | by Aaron Mason, Wildsense, University of Surrey | News | Comments

A new app for the iPad could change the way wildlife is monitored. Wildsense, an initiative from a group of researchers at the University of Surrey, is designed to use citizen science, the concept of allowing people to get directly involved in science, to help in the conservation of rare and endangered species.

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