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Research has for the first time analyzed over 130,000 online news articles to find out how the 2012 US presidential election played out in the media.

Big Data Used to Understand Major Events

March 5, 2015 9:34 am | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Research has for the first time analyzed over 130,000 online news articles to find out how the 2012 US presidential election played out in the media.

Top 6 Predictions for High Performance Computing in 2015

March 2, 2015 12:41 pm | by Intersect360 Research | Blogs | Comments

The drive toward exascale computing, renewed emphasis on data-centric processing, energy...

Inaugural ISC Cloud & Big Data Conference to be Held in Frankfurt

February 19, 2015 10:36 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

The inaugural international ISC Cloud & Big Data conference is a three-day multiple-track...

Modern DNA Sequencing Requires a Modern Day Approach

February 13, 2015 2:27 pm | by Tim Cutts, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute | Blogs | Comments

The sequencing machines that run today produce data several orders of magnitude faster than the...

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Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source

Helping to Save Lives of Critically Ill Children

February 12, 2015 10:17 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Articles | Comments

For those on the front lines of treating cancer, speed and precision are key to patients’ survival. Pediatric cancer researchers have been making incredible strides in accelerating delivery of new diagnostic and treatment options. Supercomputer-powered genetic diagnosis is being used to harness the power of high throughput genomic and proteomic methods and is playing a key role in improving the outcome for children with genetic diseases.

The World Wide Lightning Location Network Web site features “an amazing new visualization of global lightning.”

World Thunderstorm Map Provides Continuous Coverage of Thunderstorms All over the Planet

February 10, 2015 12:00 pm | by Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

New research will likely be crucial to measuring the impact of climate change on thunderstorms — one of the weather occurrences most problematic for human life on the planet. The varying frequency and intensity of thunderstorms have direct repercussions for the public, agriculture and industry.

Map generated by more than 250 million public tweets Courtesy of Salathé et al.

Digital Disease Detection: Using Big Data to Detect Outbreaks

February 10, 2015 11:42 am | by PLOS | News | Comments

Personal information taken from social media, blogs, page views and so on is used to detect disease outbreaks, but does this violate our privacy, consent and trust? Dr. Effy Vayena from the University of Zurich and colleagues have mapped the numerous ethical challenges confronting digital disease detection and propose a framework to address the questions.

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Rob Farber is an independent HPC expert to startups and Fortune 100 companies, as well as government and academic organizations.

Using Profile Information for Optimization, Energy Savings and Procurements

February 9, 2015 12:11 pm | by Rob Farber | Articles | Comments

Optimization for high-performance and energy efficiency is a necessary next step after verifying that an application works correctly. In the HPC world, profiling means collecting data from hundreds to potentially many thousands of compute nodes over the length of a run. In other words, profiling is a big-data task, but one where the rewards can be significant — including potentially saving megawatts of power or reducing the time to solution

Hurricane Katrina Courtesy of NASA/Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

Comprehensive Database of Detailed Storm Surge Data Available for Download

February 6, 2015 3:03 pm | by National Oceanography Centre | News | Comments

A new online resource will help coastguards, meteorological organizations and scientific communities predict future storm surge patterns. The freely-accessible database has been compiled through the multi-partner, international eSurge project, which was launched in 2011 with the aim of making available observational data to improve the modeling and forecasting of storm surges around the world using advanced techniques and instruments.

Snow and icy conditions affect human decisions about transportation. These decisions can ripple through other infrastructure systems, causing widespread disruptions. Shown here are points of connectivity. Courtesy of Paul M. Torrens and Cheng Fu, Universi

Big Data Techniques More Accurately Model People in a Winter Wonderland

February 6, 2015 2:53 pm | by Cecile J. Gonzalez, NSF | News | Comments

For Paul Torrens, wintry weather is less about sledding and more about testing out models of human behavior. Torrens, a geographer at the University of Maryland, studies how snow and icy conditions affect human decisions about transportation. He also studies how these decisions ripple through other infrastructure systems.

In the United States, big data environments are utilizing advanced computing systems to map phenotype to underlying process and to compare those who develop disease with those who don’t. To accomplish this, the researchers are assembling publically availa

Reversing the Global Diabesity Epidemic

February 5, 2015 2:38 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

Diabesity has been identified as a major global health problem by researchers and healthcare professionals world-wide, including England’s National Health Service, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Ain Shams University Hospital in Cairo, Egypt, and a research consortium of the European Union.

When Northwestern University professor Luis Amaral set out to test LDA, he found that it was neither as accurate nor reproducible as a leading topic modeling algorithm should be.

Taking a Network Approach to Building Trustworthy Big Data Algorithms

February 2, 2015 1:08 pm | by Emily Ayshford, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Much of our reams of data sits in large databases of unstructured text. Finding insights among e-mails, text documents and Web sites is extremely difficult, unless we can search, characterize and classify their text data in a meaningful way. A leading big data algorithm for finding related topics within unstructured text is LDA. But Luis Amaral found that it was neither as accurate nor reproducible as a leading topic modeling algorithm ...

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The IBM-SUNY Poly partnership expands beyond Albany, as SUNY Poly continues its explosive growth across New York.

IBM Research to Lead Advanced Computer Chip R&D at SUNY Poly

February 2, 2015 11:47 am | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM and SUNY Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly) have announced that more than 220 engineers and scientists who lead IBM's advanced chip research and development efforts at SUNY Poly's Albany Nanotech campus will become part of IBM Research, the technology industry's largest and most influential research organization.

The Alan Turing Institute will promote the development and use of advanced mathematics, computer science, algorithms and big data for human benefit.

Alan Turing Institute Positioned to Break New Big Data, Online Security Boundaries

January 30, 2015 11:41 am | by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council | News | Comments

The five universities have been selected to lead the new Alan Turing Institute. The Institute will build on the UK's existing academic strengths and help position the country as a world leader in the analysis and application of big data and algorithm research. Its headquarters will be based at the British Library at the center of London’s Knowledge Quarter.

Clemson University associate professor of genetics and biochemistry Alex Feltus is co-principal investigator on the Tripal Gateway project award.

Researchers get $1.4 Million to Advance Big Data for Genomic Research

January 22, 2015 2:04 pm | by Brian M. Mullen, Clemson University | News | Comments

A team of scientists has received a $1.4 million grant from the National Science Foundation to help meet the growing needs of the data-driven genomic science community. The Tripal Gateway project will build on existing cyberinfrastructure to enhance the capacity of genomic databases to manage, exchange and process “big data.”

An international team of roughly 300 scientists pooled brain scans and genetic data worldwide to pinpoint genes that enhance or break down key brain regions in people from 33 countries. This is the first high-profile study since the NIH launched its Big D

Global Consortium Cracks Part of Brain’s Genetic Code

January 21, 2015 4:05 pm | by Alison Trinidad, Keck Medicine of USC | News | Comments

In the largest collaborative study of the brain to date, researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) led a global consortium of 190 institutions to identify eight common genetic mutations that appear to age the brain an average of three years. The discovery could lead to targeted therapies and interventions for Alzheimer’s disease, autism and other neurological conditions.

This live panel discussion looks at how big data and data science have fast become the next frontier for innovation, competition and productivity.

Big Data Insights: Accelerating Discovery in Medicine, Research & More

January 20, 2015 11:51 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

On Wednesday, January 21, Scientific Computing will host a live panel discussion that looks at how big data and data science have fast become the next frontier for innovation, competition and productivity. One of today’s significant advances in data science introduces us to the Next Generation Cyber Capability (NGCC) at Arizona State University (ASU)...

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The conference will focus on High-Performance Computing essentials, new developments and emerging technologies, best practices and hands-on training.

HPC Advisory Council Switzerland Conference 2015

January 20, 2015 10:10 am | by HPC Advisory Council | Events

The HPC Advisory Council and the Swiss Supercomputing Centre will host the HPC Advisory Council Switzerland Conference 2015 in the Lugano Convention Centre, Lugano, Switzerland, from March 23 - March 25, 2015. The conference will focus on High-Performance Computing essentials, new developments and emerging technologies, best practices and hands-on training.

Automated systems for isolating collected data, restricting queries that can be made against those data, and auditing usage of the data can help to enforce privacy protections and allay some civil liberty concerns.

Surveillance: NRC finds No Alternative to Bulk Data Collection

January 15, 2015 12:10 pm | by The National Academies | News | Comments

No software-based technique can fully replace bulk collection of signals intelligence, but methods can be developed to more effectively conduct targeted collection and to control usage of collected data, says the NRC. Automated systems for isolating collected data, restricting queries that can be made against those data, and auditing usage of the data can help to enforce privacy protections and allay some civil liberty concerns.

Rendering of the LSST camera. SLAC is leading the construction of the 3,200-megapixel camera, which will be the size of a small car and weigh more than 3 tons. The digital camera will be the largest ever built, allowing LSST to create an unprecedented arc

World's Most Powerful Camera Receives DOE Funding Approval

January 14, 2015 11:56 am | by Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

Plans for the construction of the world's largest digital camera at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have reached a major milestone. The 3,200-megapixel centerpiece of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, which will provide unprecedented details of the universe and help address some of its biggest mysteries, has received key "Critical Decision 2" approval from the DOE.

IBM broke the U.S. patent record in 2014, becoming the first company to exceed 7,000 patents in a single year. More than 8,500 IBM inventors around the world, including researcher Stacy Hobson (pictured), produced 7,534 patents for IBM in 2014.

IBM Breaks U.S. Patent Record

January 13, 2015 10:35 am | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM has announced that it received a record 7,534 patents in 2014 — marking the 22nd consecutive year that the company topped the annual list of U.S. patent recipients. IBM inventors earned an average of more than 20 patents per day in 2014, propelling the company to become the first to surpass more than 7,000 patents in a single year.

The results show that, by mining Facebook Likes, the computer model was able to predict a person's personality more accurately than most of their friends and family.

AI: Computers Know the Real You Better than Friends, Family

January 13, 2015 10:01 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Researchers have found that, based on enough Facebook Likes, computers can judge your personality traits better than your friends, family and even your partner. Using a new algorithm, researchers have calculated the average number of Likes artificial intelligence (AI) needs to draw personality inferences about you as accurately as your partner or parents.

Map of diffuse interstellar bands Courtesy of T.W. Lan, G. Zasowski, B. Ménard, SDSS and 2MASS/UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF

Astronomers Map Mysterious Molecules in our Galaxy

January 12, 2015 10:20 am | by Phil Sneiderman, Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

By analyzing the light of hundreds of thousands of celestial objects, astronomers have created a unique map of enigmatic molecules in our galaxy that are responsible for puzzling features in the light from stars, called diffuse interstellar bands. DIBs have been a mystery ever since they were discovered in 1922 — exactly which of the many thousands of possible molecules are responsible for these features?

Peter Boogaard is the founder of Industrial Lab Automation and chairman of the Paperless Lab Academy.

2015 Promises Major Milestones and Demands for Change

January 7, 2015 12:28 pm | by Peter J. Boogaard | Articles | Comments

Despite the fact that industries won’t change working processes unless there is a mandatory need to do so, major milestones are expected in 2015 in the battle to adopt data and standardization in our scientific community. The need for deployment of these integration standards to enable efficient sharing of knowledge across our internal and external partners is re-enforced by regulatory bodies.

The 56th HPC User Forum will take place from April 13-15, 2015, at the Marriott Norfolk Waterside in Norfolk, Virginia.

IDC HPC User Forum, Norfolk, Virginia

January 6, 2015 4:28 pm | by IDC | Events

The 56th HPC User Forum will take place from April 13-15, 2015, at the Marriott Norfolk Waterside in Norfolk, Virginia.

The Internet Archives Book Images Project was launched to catalog the imagery from half a millennium of books.

Unlocking the Imagery of 500 Years of Books

December 22, 2014 4:49 pm | by Library of Congress | Blogs | Comments

Over 14.7 million images were extracted from over 600 million pages covering an enormous variety of topics and stretching back to the year 1500. Yet, perhaps what is most remarkable about this montage is that these images come not from some newly-unearthed archive being seen for the first time, but rather from the books we have been digitizing for the past decade that have been resting in our digital libraries.

A new UCLA institute, headed by professor Alexander Hoffman, left, is intended to help scientists and physicians make sense of a deluge of medical data. Hoffman is pictured with UCLA medical professor Douglas Bell.

Institute for Quantitative and Computational Biosciences will Integrate Big Data to Solve Biomedical Problems

December 22, 2014 4:05 pm | by Eryn Brown, UCLA | News | Comments

UCLA has announced a new institute to help medical and biology researchers make sense of 'big data.' Analyzing big data might help scientists understand how genes interact with the environment to promote good health or cause disease, and provide a clearer understanding of which medical treatments work best for particular populations, or in particular circumstances.

The massive damage caused by Typhoon Haiyan to Tacloban City in the Philippines inspired the development of an open-source mapping tool to expedite relief operations. © Tigeryan

Data Mining: Finding the Quickest Way to Disaster Sites

December 22, 2014 2:41 pm | by A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing | News | Comments

A new mapping tool makes preparing for natural disasters and responding to their aftermath easier than ever. Researchers from the A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing in Singapore have developed a computer model that analyzes networks of interconnected roads to predict the speediest routes for rescuers to take using real-time data uploaded by aid workers on the ground.

Molecule and Deep Learning – Frey’s team used computational deep learning techniques to train a system that mimics the process of splicing in the cell (left panel). Features such as motifs, RNA secondary structures and nucleosome positions are computation

Deep Learning Reveals Unexpected Genetic Roots of Cancers, Autism and Other Disorders

December 18, 2014 4:23 pm | by The University of Toronto | News | Comments

In the decade since the genome was sequenced, scientists and doctors have struggled to answer an all-consuming question: Which DNA mutations cause disease? A new computational technique developed at the University of Toronto may now be able to tell us. A team has developed the first method for ‘ranking’ genetic mutations based on how living cells ‘read’ DNA, revealing how likely any given alteration is to cause disease.

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