Advertisement
Biotechnology
Subscribe to Biotechnology

The Lead

An artist's rendition of a previously unknown species of crocodile-like "super salamander" that roamed the Earth more than 200 million years ago. University of Edinburgh researchers say the species discovered in Portugal was among the Earth's top predator

Car-sized Ancient Salamanders found in Portugal

March 25, 2015 11:45 am | by AP | News | Comments

Fossil remains of a previously unknown species of a crocodile-like "super salamander" that grew as long as a small car and was a top predator more than 200 million years ago have been found in southern Portugal, researchers announced on March 24, 2015. The prehistoric species, which looked like giant salamanders, grew up to six feet in length and lived in lakes and rivers.

Turning Buckyballs into Buckybombs: Nanoscale Explosives could Eliminate Cancer Cells

March 19, 2015 2:44 pm | by University of Southern California | News | Comments

In 1996, a trio of scientists won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for their discovery of...

Remote-controlled Cyborg Beetle Flies, Turns and Hovers

March 19, 2015 2:40 pm | by Nanyang Technological University | News | Comments

Breaking new grounds in the future of remote-controlled drone technology, researchers have...

Solving Puzzle-Like Bond for Biofuels: First Look at One of Nature's Strongest Biomolecular Interactions

March 17, 2015 3:02 pm | by Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

One of life's strongest bonds has been discovered by a science team researching biofuels with...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Monocytes are immune cells present in the blood. They are consequently also found in tumors. In this setting, monocytes are known to promote the development of the tumoral blood vessels and to suppress the immune response directed at the tumor. Courtesy o

Mathematics Yields New Possibilities for Reprogramming Immune Response to Breast Cancer

March 17, 2015 2:55 pm | by Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics | News | Comments

A means of reprogramming a flawed immune response into an efficient anti-tumoral one was brought to light by the results of a translational trial relating to breast cancer. Thanks to the innovative combination of mathematical modeling and experimentation, only 20 tests were necessary, whereas traditional experimentation would have required 596 tests to obtain the same results.

The alliance, funded by UPMC, will see its work carried out by Pitt-led and CMU-led centers, with participation from all three institutions.

University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon University, UPMC Form Alliance to Transform Healthcare through Big Data

March 17, 2015 2:19 pm | by UPMC | News | Comments

Today’s health care system generates massive amounts of data — electronic health records, diagnostic imaging, prescriptions, genomic profiles, insurance records, even data from wearable devices. Information has always been essential for guiding care, but computer tools now make it possible to use that data to provide deeper insights. Leveraging big data to revolutionize healthcare is the focus of the Pittsburgh Health Data Alliance.

Image of a section of the brain shows the fusion of microscopy (pink area) and mass spectrometry (pixelated colors at bottom) to produce a detailed “map” of the distribution of proteins, lipids and other molecules within sharply delineated brain structure

Mass Spectrometry and Microscopy Blended with Regression Analysis

March 16, 2015 12:28 pm | by Bill Snyder, Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

Researchers have achieved the first “image fusion” of mass spectrometry and microscopy — a technical tour de force that could, among other things, dramatically improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Using a mathematical approach called regression analysis, they mapped each pixel of mass spectrometry data onto the corresponding spot on the microscopy image to produce a new, “predicted” image.

Advertisement
The appearance of fractal patterns on the surface of cancer cells. Courtesy of M. Dokukin and I. Sokolov

Fractal Patterns Offer New Line of Attack on Cancer

March 11, 2015 2:19 pm | by Institute of Physics | News | Comments

Studying the intricate fractal patterns on the surface of cells could give researchers a new insight into the physical nature of cancer, and provide new ways of preventing the disease from developing. This is according to scientists who have, for the first time, shown how physical fractal patterns emerge on the surface of human cancer cells at a specific point of progression towards cancer.

Proba-V’s ability to see the unseeable is helping doctors to look deeper into human tissues and detect skin diseases earlier.

High-speed Space Camera helping to Save Lives

March 10, 2015 10:37 am | by ESA | News | Comments

A high-speed camera for monitoring vegetation from space and combating famine in Africa is being adapted to spot changes in human skin cells, invisible to the naked eye, to help diagnose skin diseases like cancer. In fact, the extraordinary digital infrared sensor from ESA’s Proba-V vegetation-scanning satellite is being adapted for several non-space applications.

This computerized rendering shows a cutaway view of a collection of about 200 X-ray patterns, produced in an experiment at SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser. The images were combined to produce a 3-D rendering of an intact Mimivirus, a giant

Fantastic 3-D Images of Intact Infectious Virus Revealed

March 4, 2015 12:00 pm | by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory | News | Comments

For the first time, researchers have produced a 3-D image revealing part of the inner structure of an intact, infectious virus, using a unique X-ray laser. The virus, called Mimivirus, is in a curious class of “giant viruses” discovered just over a decade ago. The experiment establishes a new technique for reconstructing the 3-D structure of many types of biological samples from a series of X-ray laser snapshots.

At their heart, the simulations are akin to modeling chemical reactions taking place between different elements and, in this case, we have four states a person can be in — human, infected, zombie or dead zombie — with approximately 300 million people. Cou

Statistical Mechanics Reveal Ideal Hideout to Save your Brains from the Undead

March 2, 2015 2:26 pm | by American Physical Society | News | Comments

Researchers focusing on a fictional zombie outbreak as an approach to disease modeling suggest heading for the hills, in the Rockies, to save your brains from the undead. Reading World War Z: An Oral History of the First Zombie War, and taking a graduate statistical mechanics class inspired a group of Cornell University researchers to explore how an "actual" zombie outbreak might play out in the U.S.

A 3-D model of the new class of auxetic metamaterials that defy logic and can be used to create better skin grafts and new smart materials. Courtesy of University of Malta

Logic-defying Mathematical Model could lead to Better Skin Grafts, New Smart Materials

February 26, 2015 2:00 pm | by Cassi Camilleri, University of Malta | News | Comments

Pull on a piece of plastic at separate ends; it becomes thinner. So does a rubber band. One might assume tha,t when a force is applied along an axis, materials will always stretch and become thinner. Wrong. Thanks to their peculiar internal geometry, auxetic materials grow wider. After confounding scientists for decades, researchers are now developing mathematical models to explain the unusual behavior of these logic-defying materials

Advertisement
Milorad Marinkovic holds an egg with his bionic arm. Three Austrians have replaced injured hands with bionic ones that they can control using nerves and muscles transplanted into their arms from their legs. The three men are the first to undergo what doct

Three Men First to Get Reconstructed Bionic Hands

February 26, 2015 1:18 pm | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Three Austrians have replaced injured hands with bionic ones that they can control using nerves and muscles transplanted into their arms from their legs. The men are the first to undergo what doctors refer to as "bionic reconstruction," which includes a voluntary amputation, the transplantation of nerves and muscles and learning to use faint signals from them to command the hand.

Cardiovascular diseases are the largest cause of death in Europe and responsible for two million deaths per year. According to WHO, they are the number one cause of death in the world, accounting for 30 percent of deaths worldwide and 42 percent in the EU

Novel 3-D Computer Model brings Insight to Cardiovascular Diseases

February 26, 2015 12:56 pm | by Lappeenranta University of Technology, LUT | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a novel three-dimensional, multiscale and multicomponent model of the endothelial cell monolayer, the inner lining of the artery, to identify the cellular mechanisms involved in cardiovascular diseases. New research based on the model is able to identify the main cellular pathways involved in the initiation and progression of the disease.

Scientists at the University of Valencia have developed a research methodology called Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), based on network analysis mathematical tools for studying anatomy. Courtesy of Asociación RUVID

Modular Anatomical Structure of Human Head Described for First Time

February 18, 2015 10:03 am | by Asociación RUVID | News | Comments

A new mathematical analysis tool has allowed a deeper understanding of the anatomy of the human head, describing the skull as an extended network structured in 10 modules. Researchers have developed a research methodology called Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), based on network analysis mathematical tools for studying anatomy.

Omics Explorer 3.1 Advanced Data Analysis Software

Omics Explorer 3.1 Advanced Data Analysis Software

February 12, 2015 1:32 pm | Qlucore AB | Product Releases | Comments

Qlucore Omics Explorer 3.1 advanced data analysis software features a well-defined open interface to R. The interface allows users to utilize a broad range of statistical tests, to use existing tests in R, and to write new ones. The inbuilt statistical functions of the bioinformatics program are extended with the R interface to include the full suite of statistical methods available in R.

Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source

Helping to Save Lives of Critically Ill Children

February 12, 2015 10:17 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Articles | Comments

For those on the front lines of treating cancer, speed and precision are key to patients’ survival. Pediatric cancer researchers have been making incredible strides in accelerating delivery of new diagnostic and treatment options. Supercomputer-powered genetic diagnosis is being used to harness the power of high throughput genomic and proteomic methods and is playing a key role in improving the outcome for children with genetic diseases.

Advertisement
Map generated by more than 250 million public tweets Courtesy of Salathé et al.

Digital Disease Detection: Using Big Data to Detect Outbreaks

February 10, 2015 11:42 am | by PLOS | News | Comments

Personal information taken from social media, blogs, page views and so on is used to detect disease outbreaks, but does this violate our privacy, consent and trust? Dr. Effy Vayena from the University of Zurich and colleagues have mapped the numerous ethical challenges confronting digital disease detection and propose a framework to address the questions.

John Wass is a statistician based in Chicago, IL.

Explorations of Mathematical Models in Biology with Maple

February 10, 2015 9:29 am | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

The author of this wonderful text delivers a brief, easy-to-absorb, yet very comprehensive text on modeling real-world data with Maple. Maple is software for performing mathematics, with a none-too-steep learning curve. In the introduction, the author is quick to point out that this is neither a detailed textbook of mathematical modeling, nor Maple. It is, however, a very well-written manual of introductory modeling and use of Maple.

ENIGMA cipher machine  Rotor Set Courtesy of Andy L.

Similar Statistics Play Role in Decision Making and World War II Code Breaking

February 9, 2015 11:22 am | by Cell Press | News | Comments

Statistical decision making resembles a process Alan Turning's team did in Bletchley Park to work out the settings of German enigma machines. In order to make use of the large clicking machine, Turing's team analyzed pairs of randomly intercepted German messages, aligned them one above the other to accumulate evidence from letter pairs until they reach a threshold level of certainty that the messages were sent on identical enigma machine.

Heatmap of the Pseudomonas genus, the most abundant genus found across the city. Hotspots are found in areas of high station density and traffic (i.e. lower Manhattan and parts of Brooklyn). Courtesy of Ebrahim Afshinnekoo

Researchers Produce 1st Map of NYC Subway System Microbes

February 9, 2015 10:52 am | by Weill Cornell Medical College | News | Comments

The microbes that call the New York City subway system home are mostly harmless, but include samples of disease-causing bacteria that are resistant to drugs — and even DNA fragments associated with anthrax and Bubonic plague. A pathogen map of a city provides a baseline assessment. Repeated sampling could be used for long-term, accurate disease surveillance, bioterrorism threat mitigation, and large-scale health management.

Smartphone dongles performed a point-of-care HIV and syphilis test in Rwanda from finger prick whole blood in 15 minutes, operated by health care workers trained on a software app. Courtesy of Samiksha Nayak, Columbia Engineering

Smartphone, Finger Prick, 15 Minutes — Diagnosis!

February 6, 2015 3:20 pm | by Holly Evarts, Columbia University | News | Comments

A team of researchers has developed a low-cost smartphone accessory that can perform a point-of-care test that simultaneously detects three HIV and syphilis infectious disease markers from a finger prick of blood in just 15 minutes. The device replicates, for the first time, all mechanical, optical and electronic functions of a lab-based blood test. Specifically, it performs an ELISA assay.

Brain Researcher Marianne Fyhn receives computation help from, among others, Gaute Einevoll and Anders Malthe-Sørenssen to acquire an understanding of how the brain Works.

Mathematics to Reveal Secrets of the Brain

February 5, 2015 4:33 pm | by Yngve Vogt, University of Oslo | News | Comments

Top researchers are using mathematical modelling and heavy computations to understand how the brain can both remember and learn. Ten years ago, when the team of Marianne Fyhn and Torkel Hafting Fyhn cooperated with the Nobel Prize winning team of May-Britt and Edvard Moser at NTNU, they discovered the sense of orientation in the brain.

Researchers found that the link between having a faster-running biological clock and early death held true even after accounting for other factors such as smoking, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Courtesy of Elliott Brown

DNA Clock Helps Predict Individual Lifespans

February 5, 2015 4:14 pm | by University of Edinburgh | News | Comments

Scientists have identified a biological clock that provides vital clues about how long a person is likely to live. Researchers studied chemical changes to DNA that take place over a lifetime, and can help them predict an individual's age. By comparing individuals’ actual ages with their predicted biological clock age, scientists saw a pattern emerging.

Microscopic image of senile plaques seen in the cerebral cortex of a person with Alzheimer's disease of presenile onset. Courtesy of KGH

Blue Waters Project helps Uncover Alzheimer's Complex Genetic Networks

February 5, 2015 4:06 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

The release of the film, Still Alice, in September 2014 placed a much-needed light on Alzheimer's disease, a debilitating neurological disease that affects a growing number of Americans each year. More than 5.2 million people in the U.S. are currently living with Alzheimer's. One out of nine Americans over 65 has Alzheimer's, and one out of three over 85 has the disease. For those over 65, it is the fifth leading cause of death.

In the United States, big data environments are utilizing advanced computing systems to map phenotype to underlying process and to compare those who develop disease with those who don’t. To accomplish this, the researchers are assembling publically availa

Reversing the Global Diabesity Epidemic

February 5, 2015 2:38 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

Diabesity has been identified as a major global health problem by researchers and healthcare professionals world-wide, including England’s National Health Service, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Ain Shams University Hospital in Cairo, Egypt, and a research consortium of the European Union.

American leafminer moth Coptodisca lucifluella has been invading Italian walnut orchards since 2010. Interestingly, the moth lives on pecan trees in the United States, but invaded a new host plant in Europe: the walnut tree.

Leafminer Moth Invades Italy

February 3, 2015 4:14 pm | News | Comments

American leafminer moth Coptodisca lucifluella has been invading Italian walnut orchards since 2010. Interestingly, the moth lives on pecan trees in the United States, but invaded a new host plant in Europe: the walnut tree.       

“In nanomedicine we need to understand physical phenomena on a nano scale, forming as correct a picture as possible of molecular phenomena. In this context, quantum chemical calculations are important,” says Michele Cascella. Courtesy of Hanne Utigard

Quantum Chemistry Closing in on Quantum Mechanics of Living Cells

January 30, 2015 11:19 am | by Yngve Vogt, University of Oslo | News | Comments

Quantum chemical calculations have been used to solve big mysteries in space. Soon the same calculations may be used to produce tomorrow’s cancer drugs. Quantum chemical calculations are needed to explain what happens to the electrons’ trajectories within a molecule, and the results of a quantum chemical calculation are often more accurate than what is achievable experimentally.

ACD/Labs 2015 Cheminformatics Software

ACD/Labs 2015 Cheminformatics Software

January 29, 2015 10:38 am | Advanced Chemistry Development, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

ACD/Labs 2015 cheminformatics software builds upon the capabilities of the ACD/Spectrus and ACD/Percepta platforms. The ACD/Spectrus Platform is designed to make it easier for organizations to handle unified analytical data from multiple techniques and instruments. The ACD/Percepta Platform features improvements in the speed of calculation of physicochemical and ADME-Tox properties and expanded capabilities to leverage organizational knowledge.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading