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This 4x image of Aphaenogaster senilis (ant worker) received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photo was compose

Ant at Work

November 18, 2014 3:33 pm | News | Comments

This 4x image of Aphaenogaster senilis (ant worker) received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photo was composed using image stacking by Dimitri Seeboruth of Paris, France.

What’s On a Fern

November 17, 2014 3:46 pm | News | Comments

This 100x image of Polypodium virginianum (fern) sorus...

Big Data Takes Root in the World of Plant Research

November 12, 2014 3:47 pm | by Trinity College Dublin | News | Comments

Botanists have launched a database with information that documents significant ‘life events’ for...

Symbion QT 2.5 Chemometrics Software

November 6, 2014 3:27 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Symbion QT 2.5. chemometrics software provides Parametric Data Cleaning, a technique that...

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Professor Robert Sinclair illustrates one of his examples of a biological system (the fruit fly eye) which exhibits tendencies towards both deterministic and stochastic development, where the number of cells is uniform, but the way in which they determine

Back to Basics: Where Supercomputers Dominate Analysis, Classical Thinking Still Holds Relevance

November 5, 2014 4:25 pm | by Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology | News | Comments

Sinclair suggests that there still is a place in science in modern times for the interpretation of results using rational numbers or simple ratios. In a time where supercomputers dominate analysis, he argues that there is not enough attention being paid to the basic approaches to science of the past, which were able to profoundly illuminate our understanding of the natural world through the simplification of very complex topics and systems.

Understanding cell transformation can help clinical researchers tackle medical problems. The images show how a growth factor caused cells to change forms and regroup from tight packs of epithelial cells to more mobile, loose arrays of mesenchymal cells —

Modeling Cancer: Researchers Prove Mathematical Models Can Predict Cellular Processes

October 30, 2014 5:08 pm | by Virginia Tech | News | Comments

How does a normal cellular process derail and become unhealthy? A multi-institutional, international team led by Virginia Tech researchers studied cells found in breast and other types of connective tissue and discovered new information about cell transitions that take place during wound healing and cancer.

Indiana University received one of the largest individual awards from the NSF’s $31 million Data Infrastructure Building Blocks program this year. Researchers will use the $5 million in funding to help boost the nation’s big data efforts. Courtesy of NSF

NSF Awards $5M to Empower Researchers with New Data Analysis Tools

October 29, 2014 10:15 am | by Indiana University Bloomington | News | Comments

A team of computer scientists working to improve how researchers across the sciences empower big data to solve problems have been awarded $5 million by the National Science Foundation. The team will address one of the leading challenges in tackling some of the world’s most pressing issues in science: the ability to analyze and compute large amounts of data.

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High in the atmosphere of Titan, large patches of two trace gases glow near the north pole, on the dusk side of the moon, and near the south pole, on the dawn side. Brighter colors indicate stronger signals from the two gases, HNC (left) and HC3N (right);

Astrochemists Discover Titan Glows at Dusk and Dawn

October 24, 2014 3:49 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

New maps of Saturn’s moon Titan reveal large patches of trace gases shining brightly near the north and south poles. These regions are curiously shifted off the poles, to the east or west, so that dawn is breaking over the southern region while dusk is falling over the northern one.

Researchers are expanding the applicability of biological circuits. Background: Microscopic image of human kidney cells with fluorescent proteins in cell culture.

Constructing Precisely Functioning, Programmable Bio-computers

October 23, 2014 3:40 pm | by Fabio Bergamin, ETH | News | Comments

Bio-engineers are working on the development of biological computers with the aim of designing small circuits made from biological material that can be integrated into cells to change their functions. In the future, such developments could enable cancer cells to be reprogrammed, thereby preventing them from dividing at an uncontrollable rate. Stem cells could likewise be reprogrammed into differentiated organ cells.

A carbapenem molecule, a last resort antibiotic, enters the carbapenemase enzyme (blue arrow), where the crucial beta-lactam structure gets broken down. The ineffective molecule then leaves (orange arrow)

Nobel Prize-winning Technique Helps Design Antibiotics of Future

October 17, 2014 11:52 am | by Bristol University | News | Comments

Scientists have used computer simulations to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics — a breakthrough that will help develop drugs which can effectively tackle infections in the future. Researchers at the University of Bristol focused on the role of enzymes in the bacteria, which split the structure of the antibiotic and stop it from working, making the bacteria resistant.

This image provided by Oculus shows a new prototype of its virtual reality headset. The hew headset features a higher resolution and refresh rate, 360-degree head tracking and integrated headphones. (AP Photo/Oculus)

Smithsonian Honors Founder of Virtual Reality Firm Oculus

October 17, 2014 11:03 am | by AP | News | Comments

The founder of virtual reality firm Oculus and singer Rosanne Cash and are among those who were honored with American Ingenuity Awards at the Smithsonian Institution, along with eight other scientists and scholars for their groundbreaking work. Washingtonian magazine has described the event as the “Golden Globes of Intellect.”

“The collective expertise of NeuroLINCS investigators provides a unique opportunity to increase our knowledge of what makes brain cells unique and what happens during neurodegenerative diseases," said UC Irvine's Leslie M. Thompson.

Novel NIH Program will Create Database of Human Brain Cell Activity

October 10, 2014 12:08 pm | by UC Irvine | News | Comments

UC Irvine will receive $8 million from the NIH to establish one of six national centers dedicated to creating a database of human cellular responses that will accelerate efforts to develop new therapies for many diseases. The center will partner with researchers from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center’s Regenerative Medicine Institute, the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease, UC San Francisco, Johns Hopkins University and MIT.

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The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 was awarded jointly to Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell and William E. Moerner "for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy."

Americans, German Awarded 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

October 8, 2014 9:43 am | by Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences | News | Comments

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Eric Betzig of Janelia Farm Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stefan W. Hell of the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Göttingen and German Cancer Research Center, and William E. Moerner of Stanford University “for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy.”

The big-headed ant (Pheidole megacephala) is considered one of the world’s worst invasive ant species. Their giant, muscle-bound noggins power their biting parts, the mandibles, which they use to attack other ants and cut up prey. In a new study, research

Big-headed Ants Grow Bigger when Faced with Fierce Competitors

October 2, 2014 4:26 pm | by Diana Yates, University of Illinois | News | Comments

The big-headed ant (Pheidole megacephala) is considered one of the world’s worst invasive ant species. Their giant, muscle-bound noggins power their biting parts, the mandibles, which they use to attack other ants and cut up prey. In a new study, researchers report that big-headed ant colonies produce larger soldiers when they encounter other ants that know how to fight back.

Researchers have brought ultra-fast, nano-scale data storage within striking reach, using technology that mimics the human brain. They have built a novel nano-structure that offers a new platform for the development of highly stable and reliable nanoscale

Nano-scale Data Storage Mimics Brain Cells to Boost Memory Power

October 1, 2014 3:56 pm | by RMIT University | News | Comments

Researchers have brought ultra-fast, nano-scale data storage within striking reach, using technology that mimics the human brain. They have built a novel nano-structure that offers a new platform for the development of highly stable and reliable nanoscale memory devices.

An illustration of water in our Solar System through time from before the Sun’s birth through the creation of the planets. Courtesy of Bill Saxton, NSF/AUI/NRAO

Earth’s Water is Older than the Sun

September 25, 2014 4:00 pm | by Carnegie Institution of Washington | News | Comments

Water was crucial to the rise of life on Earth and is also important to evaluating the possibility of life on other planets. Identifying the original source of Earth’s water is key to understanding how life-fostering environments come into being and how likely they are to be found elsewhere. New work has found that much of our Solar System’s water likely originated as ices that formed in interstellar space.

Bernie Spang is Vice President of Software Defined Strategy at IBM.

Scientific Research and Big Data: It Starts with Storage

September 24, 2014 11:52 am | by Bernie Spang, IBM | Blogs | Comments

For centuries, scientific research has been about data, and as data in research continues to grow exponentially, so does the importance of how it’s stored. A key example of how the scientific field can tackle Big Data storage is DESY, a scientific research organization dedicated to providing scientists worldwide faster access to insights into samples, making optimal data management in a high-volume environment extremely critical.

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This protein model represents an NMDA receptor, which juts halfway out of the surface of cells of the nervous system that include the brain and spinal cord. It relays signals between nerve cells. Researchers found that a mechanical coupling was needed bet

Stampede used to Perform Modeling to Advance Potential Drug Targets for Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Schizophrenia

September 23, 2014 3:59 pm | by Jorge Salazar, TACC | News | Comments

It all begins in the brain as a flood, tens of millions of neurotransmitters handed off from one neuron to another in just a fraction of a second. Memories, dreams and learning share a common thread in this exchange of electrical and chemical signals by the nearly 100 billion spindly neurons of the brain, each cell networked to 10,000 others.

Researchers have developed a math model that can predict the progression from nephritis — kidney inflammation — to interstitial fibrosis, scarring in the kidney that current treatments cannot reverse. Courtesy of Piotr Michał Jaworski

Math Model Replaces Invasive Kidney Biopsy for Lupus Patients

September 18, 2014 2:11 pm | by Emily Caldwell, Ohio State University | News | Comments

Mathematics might be able to reduce the need for invasive biopsies in patients suffering kidney damage related to the autoimmune disease lupus. Researchers have developed a math model that can predict the progression from kidney inflammation to scarring in the kidney that current treatments cannot reverse.

Is there life on Mars? Researchers say that life as we know it, in the form of bacteria, for example, could be there, although we haven’t found it yet. Courtesy of NASA/JPL/MSSS

Martian Meteorite Yields More Evidence of the Possibility of Life on Mars

September 18, 2014 2:05 pm | by University of Manchester | News | Comments

A tiny fragment of Martian meteorite 1.3 billion years old is helping to make the case for the possibility of life on Mars, say scientists. The finding of a ‘cell-like’ structure, which investigators now know once held water, came about as a result of collaboration between scientists in the UK and Greece. These findings are significant because they add to increasing evidence that Mars does provide all the conditions for life to have formed.

StarDrop 5.5 Software Suite

StarDrop 5.5 Software Suite

September 16, 2014 3:15 pm | Optibrium Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

StarDrop 5.5 is a suite of software for guiding decisions in drug discovery, helping project teams quickly identify high-quality compounds. It works by evaluating complex data, which is often uncertain because of experimental variability or predictive error.

Associate Professor Federico Lauro (left) and his wife Rachelle Jensen holding a sample cartridge

Building a Global Network of Citizen Oceanographers

September 12, 2014 3:00 pm | by Nanyang Technological University (NTU) | News | Comments

NTU is working with other international universities to build a global network of ‘citizen scientists’ on a free-to-access database for oceanographic data. To gain a better understanding of marine microbes that support the nutrient cycle and form the foundation of the food web, NTU scientists have embarked on a pilot project to crowd-source the collection of oceanographic data globally.

Initial research focused on optimization of the PMEMD classical molecular dynamics code, part of the widely used AMBER Molecular Dynamics software, on multi-core Intel Xeon processors and “manycore” Intel Xeon Phi processors.

SDSC Joins Intel Parallel Computing Centers Program with Focus on Molecular Dynamics, Neuroscience and Life Sciences

September 12, 2014 2:44 pm | by San Diego Supercomputer Center | News | Comments

The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California, San Diego, is working with semiconductor chipmaker Intel to further optimize research software to improve the parallelism, efficiency, and scalability of widely used molecular and neurological simulation technologies.

Parents and physicians and scientists from the Neuroblastoma and Medulloblastoma Translational Research Consortium and TGen have teamed to launch a groundbreaking personalized medicine clinical trial investigation for pediatric cancer.

Providing Critical Child-cancer Research Tools to Speed Development of Personalized Treatments

September 11, 2014 3:25 pm | by TGen | News | Comments

Dell, Terascala and the Translational Genomics Research Institute are installing state-of-the-art computing and programing specialized for human genome investigations at the National Cancer Institute. The mission of the Oncogenomics Section at the NCI is to harness the power of high throughput genomic and proteomic methods to improve the outcome of children with high-risk metastatic, refractory and recurrent cancers.

Ralph Lauren Corp. is unveiling the high-performance, fashion-forward Polo Tech shirt on opening day of the US Open. The Polo Tech shirt is an innovative new product from a fashion brand that merges biometrics into active lifestyle apparel, marking a revo

Ralph Lauren Introduces the Next Evolution of Wearable Technology

September 3, 2014 3:33 pm | by Ralph Lauren Corporation | News | Comments

Ralph Lauren Corp. is unveiling the high-performance, fashion-forward Polo Tech shirt on opening day of the US Open. The Polo Tech shirt is an innovative new product from a fashion brand that merges biometrics into active lifestyle apparel, marking a revolution in advanced technology designed to improve general wellness and increase personal fitness.

The industry's preeminent event on Molecular Medicine, focusing on Drug Discovery, Genomics, Diagnostics and Information Technology.

22nd International Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference

August 28, 2014 3:17 pm | Events

The 22nd International Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference is the industry's Preeminent Event on Molecular Medicine, focusing on Drug Discovery, Genomics, Diagnostics and Information Technology. Spanning six days this year, the Tri-Conference includes an expanded program that includes 6 symposia, over 20 short courses, and 17 conference programs.

The Expo provides the perfect venue to share information and discuss enabling technologies that are driving biomedical research and the drug development process

2015 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo

August 28, 2014 3:06 pm | Events

The 2015 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo plans to unite 3,000+ life sciences, pharmaceutical, clinical, healthcare, and IT professionals from 32+ countries. The Expo provides the perfect venue to share information and discuss enabling technologies that are driving biomedical research and the drug development process.

Pathogenic bacteria (red) live side-by-side with benign species (green) in a healthy mouth. Scientists are beginning to understand what causes bacterial communities to shift from health to diseases like periodontitis, diabetes, and Crohn's disease. Courte

Mouth Bacteria Can Change its Diet, Supercomputers Reveal

August 22, 2014 12:28 pm | by Jorge Salazar, TACC | News | Comments

Bacteria inside your mouth drastically change how they act when you're diseased. Scientists say these surprising findings might lead to better ways to prevent or even reverse the gum disease periodontitis, diabetes and Crohn's disease. UT Austin researchers used shotgun metagenomic sequencing, a non-targeted way to study the all the genetic material of the bacterial communities. They analyzed the RNA collected with  Lonestar and Stampede.

The Ebola virus viewed through an electron microscope. As of mid-2014, Ebola has caused two dozen outbreaks in Africa since the virus first emerged in 1976. (AP Photo/Antwerp Institute of Tropical Medicine)

Another Ebola Problem: Finding its Natural Source

August 18, 2014 12:25 pm | by Mike Stobbe and Marilynn Marchione, AP Medical Writers | News | Comments

A scary problem lurks beyond the frenzied efforts to keep people from spreading Ebola: No one knows exactly where the virus comes from or how to stop it from seeding new outbreaks. Ebola has caused two dozen outbreaks in Africa since it first emerged in 1976. It is coming from somewhere — probably bats — but experts agree they need to pinpoint its origins in nature.

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