Advertisement
Biotechnology
Subscribe to Biotechnology

The Lead

ACD/Labs 2015 Cheminformatics Software

ACD/Labs 2015 Cheminformatics Software

January 29, 2015 10:38 am | Advanced Chemistry Development, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

ACD/Labs 2015 cheminformatics software builds upon the capabilities of the ACD/Spectrus and ACD/Percepta platforms. The ACD/Spectrus Platform is designed to make it easier for organizations to handle unified analytical data from multiple techniques and instruments. The ACD/Percepta Platform features improvements in the speed of calculation of physicochemical and ADME-Tox properties and expanded capabilities to leverage organizational knowledge.

Game Theory Explains Social Interactions of Cancer Cells

January 28, 2015 2:33 pm | by University of Basel | News | Comments

Researchers were able to predict the interactions of cancer cells using a part of game theory...

Biosurveillance Gateway Supports Centralized Global Disease Response

January 28, 2015 2:21 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

A new online resource, called the Biosurveillance Gateway, is in place at Los Alamos National...

Researchers get $1.4 Million to Advance Big Data for Genomic Research

January 22, 2015 2:04 pm | by Brian M. Mullen, Clemson University | News | Comments

A team of scientists has received a $1.4 million grant from the National Science Foundation to...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

An international team of roughly 300 scientists pooled brain scans and genetic data worldwide to pinpoint genes that enhance or break down key brain regions in people from 33 countries. This is the first high-profile study since the NIH launched its Big D

Global Consortium Cracks Part of Brain’s Genetic Code

January 21, 2015 4:05 pm | by Alison Trinidad, Keck Medicine of USC | News | Comments

In the largest collaborative study of the brain to date, researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) led a global consortium of 190 institutions to identify eight common genetic mutations that appear to age the brain an average of three years. The discovery could lead to targeted therapies and interventions for Alzheimer’s disease, autism and other neurological conditions.

Biomolecule Toolkit

Biomolecule Toolkit

January 21, 2015 12:27 pm | ChemAxon, Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

The Biomolecule Toolkit is a Web service-based toolkit designed to bridge the gap between biology and chemistry for complex biomolecular entities. It provides unambiguous representation at the sequence and atomic level for a diverse set of biomolecules such as peptides, oligonucleotides, proteins and antibody drug conjugates, including those containing unnatural and chemically-modified components, thereby allowing their storage, indexing and search within a database.

Solar panels on the roof of the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican. Pope Benedict XVI was dubbed "the Green Pope" for his frequent calls to stop ecological devastation and his efforts to bring solar power to the Vatican city-state. "Can we remain indifferent be

Pope's Statement on Climate Change: 5 Things to Know

January 20, 2015 2:43 pm | by Rachel Zoll, AP Religion Writer | News | Comments

Pope Francis, who pledged on the day of his installation as pontiff to make the environment a priority, is drafting a highly anticipated encyclical on ecology and climate change. Environmentalists are thrilled by the prospect of a rock-star pope putting his moral weight behind efforts to curb global warming. Francis said he wanted the document to be released in time to be read before the next round of U.N. climate treaty talks in Paris.

Advertisement
This live panel discussion looks at how big data and data science have fast become the next frontier for innovation, competition and productivity.

Big Data Insights: Accelerating Discovery in Medicine, Research & More

January 20, 2015 11:51 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

On Wednesday, January 21, Scientific Computing will host a live panel discussion that looks at how big data and data science have fast become the next frontier for innovation, competition and productivity. One of today’s significant advances in data science introduces us to the Next Generation Cyber Capability (NGCC) at Arizona State University (ASU)...

William Weaver is an associate professor in the Department of Integrated Science, Business, and Technology at La Salle University.

By Any Other Name: The Central Role of Informatics in STEM Education

January 9, 2015 3:05 pm | by William Weaver, Ph.D. | Blogs | Comments

The human lament that things in the past were much simpler is an accurate observation made from the perspective of riding along an exponentially increasing complexity curve. Examining the present or looking into the future can be a confusing torrent of concepts, vocabulary and technologies that appear to be spiraling out-of-control. At the First IEEE Integrated STEM Education Conference, Professor Steve Zilora reflected on this increase...

 Using a new algorithm ECG map can help diagnose the location of cardiac disorder in a way which is better for the patients and more cost effective for health services. Courtesy of Meul

Electrocardiogram Algorithm Pinpoints exact Location of Heart Defects

January 8, 2015 3:15 pm | by Manchester University | News | Comments

A new technique to help surgeons find the exact location of heart defects could save lives, help them to treat patients more effectively and save health service cash. The development will allow non-invasive detection of the origin of heart problems and allow more effective treatment.

A bundle of nerves that relays information from touch receptors on the skin to the spinal cord and ultimately the brain, imaged with the new technique. Courtesy of EMBL/L.Castaldi -- Click to enlarge

Unprecedentedly Detailed Image of Mouse Neurons

January 7, 2015 12:48 pm | by European Molecular Biology Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists can now explore nerves in mice in much greater detail than ever before, thanks to an approach developed by scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. The work enables researchers to easily use artificial tags, broadening the range of what they can study and vastly increasing image resolution.

A leading cause of skin and wound infections once confined largely to hospitals and nursing homes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, is now cropping up in schools, farms and locker rooms, infecting otherwise healthy people. Researchers

Algorithm Predicts Superbugs' Countermoves

January 2, 2015 4:24 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

With drug-resistant bacteria on the rise, even common infections that were easily controlled for decades — such as pneumonia — are proving trickier to treat with standard antibiotics. New drugs are desperately needed, but so are ways to maximize the effective lifespan of these drugs. Researchers used software they developed to predict a constantly-evolving infectious bacterium's countermoves to one of these new drugs ahead of time...

Advertisement
Trophic Coherence allows food webs to become larger while maintaining stability, a bit like flying buttresses were the element needed for cathedrals to do likewise. Courtesy of Additya

Universal Mathematical Property Identified in Every Ecosystem in Nature

December 24, 2014 9:58 am | by University of Warwick | News | Comments

A previously unknown mathematical property has been found to be behind one of nature’s greatest mysteries — how ecosystems survive. Found in nature and common to all ecosystems, Trophic Coherence is a measure of how plant and animal life interact within the food web of each ecosystem — providing scientists with the first-ever mathematical understanding of their architecture and how food webs are able to grow larger and more stable

This photo combo provided by the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center via NASA, shows NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko. Kelly and Kornienko will rocket into orbit from Kazakhstan in March, 2015. They will spend a year aboard

One-year Mission to Test Space Endurance

December 22, 2014 4:38 pm | by Marcia Dunn, AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

Two men assigned to a one-year spaceflight said that their upcoming mission will allow the world to push deeper into space. NASA astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko will rocket into orbit from Kazakhstan in March and move into the International Space Station for an entire year. For NASA, it will represent a space endurance record; for Russia, it will fall two months shy of its world record.

Sample images from Airport Scanner: the left image contains one target (hand grenade), the middle contains two identical targets (two exemplars of the dynamite stick target type), and the right image contains two different target types (derringer, gasolin

Crowdsourcing: Game Apps Bring Big Data to Psychological Research

December 22, 2014 4:34 pm | by American Psychological Association | News | Comments

A fast-paced game app where players pretend they are baggage screening officers operating airport x-ray scanners has provided researchers with billions of pieces of data in record time. To demonstrate the potential of mobile technology to gather data, the researchers partnered with the developer of popular mobile app game Airport Scanner, which challenges players to identify illegal items in luggage passing through an airport x-ray scanner.

A new UCLA institute, headed by professor Alexander Hoffman, left, is intended to help scientists and physicians make sense of a deluge of medical data. Hoffman is pictured with UCLA medical professor Douglas Bell.

Institute for Quantitative and Computational Biosciences will Integrate Big Data to Solve Biomedical Problems

December 22, 2014 4:05 pm | by Eryn Brown, UCLA | News | Comments

UCLA has announced a new institute to help medical and biology researchers make sense of 'big data.' Analyzing big data might help scientists understand how genes interact with the environment to promote good health or cause disease, and provide a clearer understanding of which medical treatments work best for particular populations, or in particular circumstances.

The expedition broke several records for the deepest living fish either caught or seen on video. Setting the record at 26,872 feet was a completely unknown variety of snailfish, which stunned scientists when it was filmed several times during seafloor exp

New Species Found at Greatest Depths ever Recorded

December 22, 2014 3:04 pm | by Gina Ohnstad, Whitman College | News | Comments

Biologists have returned from the first detailed study of the Mariana Trench aboard Schmidt Ocean Institute's research vessel Falkor. The Mariana Trench has been the focus of high-profile voyages to conquer Challenger Deep, the deepest place on Earth. This recent expedition set many new records, including the deepest rock samples ever collected and the discovery of new fish species at the greatest depths ever recorded.

Advertisement
A team of MIT neuroscientists has found that some computer programs can identify the objects in these images just as well as the primate brain. Courtesy of the researchers

Deep Computer Neural Networks Catch Up to Primate Brain

December 18, 2014 4:53 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

For decades, neuroscientists have been trying to design computer networks that can mimic visual skills such as recognizing objects. Until now, no computer model has been able to match the primate brain at visual object recognition during a brief glance. However, a new study from MIT neuroscientists has found that one of the latest generation of these so-called “deep neural networks” matches the primate brain.

Molecule and Deep Learning – Frey’s team used computational deep learning techniques to train a system that mimics the process of splicing in the cell (left panel). Features such as motifs, RNA secondary structures and nucleosome positions are computation

Deep Learning Reveals Unexpected Genetic Roots of Cancers, Autism and Other Disorders

December 18, 2014 4:23 pm | by The University of Toronto | News | Comments

In the decade since the genome was sequenced, scientists and doctors have struggled to answer an all-consuming question: Which DNA mutations cause disease? A new computational technique developed at the University of Toronto may now be able to tell us. A team has developed the first method for ‘ranking’ genetic mutations based on how living cells ‘read’ DNA, revealing how likely any given alteration is to cause disease.

This image illustrates possible ways methane might be added to Mars' atmosphere (sources) and removed from the atmosphere (sinks). NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has detected fluctuations in methane concentration in the atmosphere, implying both types of act

Rover Finds Active, Ancient Organic Chemistry on Mars

December 18, 2014 10:48 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA's Mars Curiosity rover has measured a tenfold spike in methane, an organic chemical, in the atmosphere around it and detected other organic molecules in a rock-powder sample collected by the robotic laboratory’s drill. Researchers used Curiosity’s onboard Sample Analysis at Mars laboratory a dozen times in a 20-month period to sniff methane in the atmosphere. During two of those months, four measurements averaged seven ppb.

Watson will make it possible for VHA physicians to interact with medical data in natural language, process millions of pages of patient information and medical literature to uncover patterns and insights, and learn from each interaction.

VA Clinical Reasoning System Based on Watson Cognitive Capabilities

December 17, 2014 3:45 pm | News | Comments

IBM announced that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs is using Watson technology in a pilot to assist physicians in helping accelerate the process of evidence-based medical decision making. The VA joins leading healthcare organizations that are working with IBM Watson to help improve efficiency and quality of care being delivered. The VHA will also work with Watson for a clinical focus supporting veterans with PTSD.

Big Data and genetic complexity: HotNet2 helps define the terrain for complex genetic associations involved in cancer. “The next step,” says researcher Ben Raphael, “is translating all of this information from cancer sequencing into clinically actionable

Big Data v. Cancer: Algorithm Identifies Genetic Changes across Cancers

December 15, 2014 4:00 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

Using a computer algorithm that can sift through mounds of genetic data, researchers from Brown University have identified several networks of genes that, when hit by a mutation, could play a role in the development of multiple types of cancer. The algorithm, called Hotnet2, was used to analyze genetic data from 12 different types of cancer assembled as part of the pan-cancer project of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

Researchers will track the lives of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) in unprecedented detail in OPTIMISE — a project to improve the evaluation of treatments.

Big Data Project Captures Multiple Sclerosis Patient Experience

December 11, 2014 3:43 pm | by Francesca Davenport, Imperial College London | News | Comments

MS affects more than two million people worldwide. Symptoms are different for everyone but commonly include fatigue, tingling, speech problems and difficulties with walking and balance. To gain a better understanding of MS and its treatments, there is a need for a system to collect comprehensive data that provides an in-depth picture of the experiences of MS patients across a large population.

World Community Grid enables anyone with a computer, smartphone or tablet to donate their unused computing power to advance cutting-edge scientific research on topics related to health, poverty and sustainability.

Donate Processing Time to Fight Ebola

December 10, 2014 3:15 pm | by Brandon Bailey, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Scientists at Scripps Research Institute have teamed with IBM on a project that aims to combine the power of thousands of small computers to help analyze various compounds to see which might be effective in attacking the Ebola virus and also to help with a longer-term effort to understand how Ebola proteins change shape over time.

Watson's Nobel prize for the discovery of the structure of DNA sold at Christie's in a New York auction for $4.7 million, a world auction record for any Nobel.

Tycoon buys Watson's Nobel Prize, Gives it Back

December 10, 2014 2:25 pm | by AP | News | Comments

Russia's richest man says he has bought James D. Watson's Nobel Prize medal at Christie's in order to return it to the scientist. The 1962 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded jointly to Francis Harry Compton Crick, James Dewey Watson and Maurice Hugh Frederick Wilkins "for their discoveries concerning the molecular structure of nucleic acids and its significance for information transfer in living material."

This is an early draft of the title page for what would become On the Origin of Species.  Darwin Manuscripts Project

Digitizing Darwin’s Writings: Over 12,000 Pages Released Online

December 9, 2014 1:53 pm | by American Museum of Natural History | News | Comments

Tracing the evolution of Charles Darwin’s thoughts about evolution is becoming an increasingly accessible project, thanks to a growing cache of publicly available digitized Darwin manuscripts on the American Museum of Natural History’s Web site. By June 2015, the Museum will host more than 30,000 digitized documents written by Darwin between 1835 and 1882.

This 6x image of myxomycete sp. (slime mold) received an Image of Distinction   designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition,   which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. the   photo was taken us

Slime Mold is Not Fungi

December 4, 2014 4:59 pm | News | Comments

This 6x image of myxomycete sp (slime mold) received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. the photo was taken using episcopic illumination by Philippe Verrees of Knokke-Heist, Belgium.

Geckos have fascinated people for hundreds of years. Scientists have been especially intrigued by these lizards, and have studied a variety of features such as the adhesive toe pads on the underside of gecko feet with which geckos attach to surfaces with

Geckos are Effortlessly Sticky

December 3, 2014 4:07 pm | by Iqbal Pittalwala, University of California, Riverside | News | Comments

Geckos have fascinated people for hundreds of years. Scientists have been especially intrigued by these lizards, and have studied a variety of features such as the adhesive toe pads on the underside of gecko feet with which geckos attach to surfaces with remarkable strength. One question that has captivated researchers is: Is the strength of this adhesion determined by the gecko or is it somehow intrinsic to the adhesive system?

Left to right: Ron Weiss, professor of biological engineering; Domitilla Del Vecchio, associate professor of mechanical engineering; and Deepak Mishra, MIT graduate student in biological engineering. Courtesy of Brian Teague

New Device Could Make Large Biological Circuits Practical

November 26, 2014 1:49 pm | by David L. Chandler, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers have made great progress in recent years in the design and creation of biological circuits — systems that, like electronic circuits, can take a number of different inputs and deliver a particular kind of output. But, while individual components of such biological circuits can have precise and predictable responses, those outcomes become less predictable as more such elements are combined.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading