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Exploring the Colors of the Small Magellanic Cloud -- Courtesy of ESA/NASA/JPL-Caltech/STScI – click to enlarge

Colors in the Cloud: Exploring the Colors of the Small Magellanic Cloud

February 27, 2015 3:02 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

Astronomical images often look like works of art. This picture of one of our nearest neighboring galaxies, the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), is certainly no exception! The scene is actually a collaboration between two cosmic artists — ESA’s Herschel space observatory and NASA’s Spitzer space telescope.

Chicago in Winter

February 26, 2015 9:46 am | News | Comments

From the International Space Station, astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti took this photograph of...

Astronaut Barry Wilmore on First of Three Spacewalks

February 24, 2015 12:09 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA astronaut Barry Wilmore works outside the International Space Station on the first of three...

Nightfall Raises the Curtain: Celestial Nomad Takes Center Stage

February 18, 2015 12:40 pm | by ESO | News | Comments

In this new ESO image, nightfall raises the curtain on a theatrical display taking place in the...

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Original Caption Released with Image: These six narrow-angle color images were made from the first ever 'portrait' of the solar system taken by Voyager 1, which was more than 4 billion miles from Earth and about 32 degrees above the ecliptic. The spacecra

Pale Blue Dot Images Turn 25

February 17, 2015 2:21 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Valentine's Day is special for NASA's Voyager mission. It was on February 14, 1990, that the Voyager 1 spacecraft looked back at our solar system and snapped the first-ever pictures of the planets from its perch at that time beyond Neptune. This "family portrait" captures Neptune, Uranus, Saturn, Jupiter, Earth and Venus from Voyager 1's unique vantage point.

Las Vegas and Lake Mead - Courtesy of USGS/ESA

Las Vegas and Lake Mead

February 13, 2015 3:51 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

This image from the Landsat-8 satellite acquired on September 23, 2014, brings us over the southwest United States: Nevada and Arizona. Las Vegas with its grid-like urban plan is visible near the center. Sitting in a basin of the Mojave Desert, the city is surrounded by a number of mountain ranges.

Little Sombrero an Edge-on Galaxy -- Courtesy of ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowledgement: Josh Barrington

Little Sombrero an Edge-on Galaxy

February 13, 2015 10:47 am | by NASA | News | Comments

Galaxies can take many shapes and be oriented any way relative to us in the sky. This can make it hard to figure out their actual morphology, as a galaxy can look very different from different viewpoints. A special case is when we are lucky enough to observe a spiral galaxy directly from its edge, providing us with a spectacular view like this one.

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Curiosity Rover at Pahrump Hills -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Curiosity Rover at Pahrump Hills

February 9, 2015 11:30 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover can be seen at the "Pahrump Hills" area of Gale Crater in this view from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Pahrump Hills is an outcrop at the base of Mount Sharp. The region contains sedimentary rocks that scientists believe formed in the presence of water.

An operator controls a robot that looks like an enlarged fiberscope during a demonstration for the media at a government facility in Hitachi, Ibaraki Prefecture, northeast of Tokyo. The snake-like robot, developed by Japanese electronics giant Hitachi and

Japan Readies First Robot to Probe Melted Fukushima Reactor

February 9, 2015 11:17 am | by Miki Toda, Associated Press | News | Comments

A snake-like robot designed to examine the inside of one of three melted reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant is ready to begin its expedition. Assessing the damage inside the reactors is a crucial step in the decommissioning of the plant, which was badly damaged by a 2011 earthquake and tsunami. Use of a remote-controlled robot is essential, because no humans can go close to the reactor chambers due to fatally high radiation.

Three moons and their shadows parade across Jupiter — comparison of beginning and end of sequence. Courtesy of NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage Team

Hubble Captures Rare Triple Moon Transit of Jupiter

February 9, 2015 11:02 am | by Hubble Space Telescope | News | Comments

New NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope images capture a rare occurrence, as three of Jupiter’s largest moons parade across the giant gas planet’s banded face. Hubble took a string of images of the event which show the three satellites — Europa, Callisto and Io — in action. The planet's four moons can commonly be seen transiting the face of Jupiter. However, seeing three of them transiting at the same time is rare.

A combination of the day-night band and high resolution infrared imagery from the NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed the historic blizzard near peak intensity as it moves over the New York through Boston Metropolitan areas at 06:45Z (1:45 a.m. EST) on

NASA Nighttime and Daytime Views of the Blizzard of 2015

January 28, 2015 2:07 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA and NOAA have provided nighttime and daytime views of the Blizzard of 2015. A combination of the day-night band and high-resolution infrared imagery showed the historic blizzard near peak intensity as it moves over the New York through Boston Metropolitan areas at 1:45 a.m. EST on January 27, 2015. Nighttime lights of the region were blurred by high cloud tops associated with the most intense parts of the storm.

The Brightest Comet in Earth's Sky -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

The Brightest Comet in Earth's Sky

January 23, 2015 1:55 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) is one of more than 32 comets imaged by NASA's NEOWISE mission from December 2013 to December 2014. This image combines a series of observations made in November 2013, when Lovejoy was 1.7 astronomical units from the sun. The image spans half of one degree. It shows the comet moving in a mostly west and slightly south direction.

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Rendering of the LSST camera. SLAC is leading the construction of the 3,200-megapixel camera, which will be the size of a small car and weigh more than 3 tons. The digital camera will be the largest ever built, allowing LSST to create an unprecedented arc

World's Most Powerful Camera Receives DOE Funding Approval

January 14, 2015 11:56 am | by Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

Plans for the construction of the world's largest digital camera at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have reached a major milestone. The 3,200-megapixel centerpiece of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, which will provide unprecedented details of the universe and help address some of its biggest mysteries, has received key "Critical Decision 2" approval from the DOE.

A heat map of a home captured by one of Essess' thermal-imaging cars. Courtesy of Essess

Drive-by Heat Mapping: Thermal Imaging Tracks Energy Leaks in Thousands of Homes

January 6, 2015 12:04 pm | by Rob Matheson, MIT | News | Comments

In 2007, Google unleashed a fleet of cars with roof-mounted cameras to provide street-level images of roads around the world. Now, an MIT spinout is bringing similar drive-by innovations to energy efficiency by deploying cars with thermal-imaging rooftop rigs that create heat maps of thousands of homes and buildings per hour, detecting fixable leaks in building envelopes — windows, doors, walls and foundations — to help curb energy loss.

Cassini’s view of Jupiter’s southern hemisphere -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Cassini’s View of Jupiter’s Southern Hemisphere

December 10, 2014 10:09 am | by European Space Agency (ESA) | News | Comments

This Cassini image shows Jupiter from an unusual perspective. If you were to float just beneath the giant planet and look directly up, you would be greeted with this striking sight: red, bronze and white bands encircling a hazy south pole. The multicolored concentric layers are broken in places by prominent weather systems such as Jupiter’s famous Great Red Spot, visible towards the upper left, chaotic patches of cloud and pale white dots.

This 20X view of an enteric valve of patawatermes nigripunctatus, a humivore   termite belonging to the Apicotermitinae subfamily, received an Image of   Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography   Competition, which reco

Humivore Termite Valve

December 8, 2014 4:22 pm | News | Comments

This 20X view of an enteric valve of patawatermes nigripunctatus, a humivore termite belonging to the Apicotermitinae subfamily, received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. 

This 20x photo of Urania ripheus (Madagascan Sunset Moth) received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. Mr. Laurie Knig

Madagascan Sunset Moth

December 2, 2014 4:12 pm | News | Comments

This 20x photo of Urania ripheus (Madagascan Sunset Moth) received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. Mr. Laurie Knight of Maidstone, Kent, UK captured the moth with focus stacked, twin flash front illumination.

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Micro-optical array projectors: Double-sided lens array with buried slide array (left) and lens array with buried color filters for LCD micro-imager (right) © Fraunhofer IOF

Researchers Project a Million Dazzlingly Sharp Images per Second on Curved Screens

October 27, 2014 5:38 am | by Fraunhofer | News | Comments

Projecting images on curved screens poses a dilemma. The sharper the image, the darker it is. A novel optical approach brings brightness and sharpness together for the first time on screens of any curvature — and additionally allows about 10,000-times faster projection rates. Researchers have applied a proven approach used with cameras.

Researchers used the Pancam on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity to capture this 10-second-exposure view of comet C/2013 A1 Siding Spring as it flew near Mars on October 19, 2014. Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./ASU/TAMU

NASA Rover Opportunity Captured Images of Comet Siding Spring

October 23, 2014 3:56 pm | by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory | News | Comments

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured images of a comet passing much closer to Mars than any previous known comet flyby of Earth or Mars. The images of comet Siding Spring were taken against a backdrop of the pre-dawn Martian sky on October 19, 2014. Images of comet A1 Siding Spring from the rover's panoramic camera (Pancam) are online.

The robot has a friction crawler-based drive system (such as the one in war tanks), ideal for all types of terrain. It also has motion sensors, cameras, a laser and an infrared system, allowing it to rebuild the environment and, thereby, find paths or cre

Robot Scans Rubble, Recognizes Humans in Disaster Situations

October 21, 2014 9:35 am | by Investigación y Desarrollo | News | Comments

Through a computational algorithm, researchers have developed a neural network that allows a small robot to detect different patterns, such as images, fingerprints, handwriting, faces, bodies, voice frequencies and DNA sequences. Nancy Guadalupe Arana Daniel focused on the recognition of human silhouettes in disaster situations.

NGC 5474, a dwarf galaxy located 21 million light-years away -- Courtesy of ESA/NASA

Hubble Sees a Dwarf Galaxy Shaped by a Grand Design

October 6, 2014 2:53 pm | by European Space Agency | News | Comments

The subject of this Hubble image is NGC 5474, a dwarf galaxy located 21 million light-years away in the constellation of Ursa Major (The Great Bear). This beautiful image was taken with Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The term "dwarf galaxy" may sound diminutive, but don't let that fool you — NGC 5474 contains several billion stars!

NGC 3081 -- Courtesy of ESA/Hubble & NASA; acknowledgement: R. Buta (University of Alabama)

Magnificent Face-on Image of Golden Rings of Star Formation

August 15, 2014 11:39 am | by European Space Agency | News | Comments

Taking center stage in this new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image is a galaxy known as NGC 3081, set against an assortment of glittering galaxies in the distance. Located in the constellation of Hydra (The Sea Serpent), NGC 3081 is located over 86 million light-years from us. It is known as a type II Seyfert galaxy, characterized by its dazzling nucleus.

This gorgeous, high-arching double rainbow signaled the end to a stormy spring day.

Sunset Rainbow over Samos Island, Greece

June 26, 2014 9:15 am | News | Comments

This gorgeous, high-arching double rainbow signaled the end to a stormy spring day. It was taken at sunset from Samos Island, Greece, a small island in the Aegean Sea. Reddened colors of the primary and secondary bows result from the increased path length of sunlight when the Sun is below the horizon.

Crystal of Sulphur, Resorcinal, Azelaic Acid

June 24, 2014 8:58 am | News | Comments

This 50x photo of a crystal of sulphur, resorcinal and azelaic acid received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The polarized light image was taken by Dr. John Hart of Hart3D Films and Deptartment of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science, Univ. of Colorado, Boulder.

Giant Landform on Mars  -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

Giant Landform on Mars

June 9, 2014 12:50 pm | by Matthew Chojnacki, NASA | News | Comments

Sandy landforms formed by the wind, or aeolian bedforms, are classified by the wavelength — or length — between crests. On Mars, we can observe four classes of bedforms (in order of increasing wavelengths): ripples, transverse aeolian ridges (known as TARs), dunes, and what are called “draa.” All of these are visible in this Juventae Chasma image.

Wonders in the Antarctic Sky -- Courtesy of Michael Studinger

Wonders in the Antarctic Sky

May 15, 2014 2:12 pm | by Adam Voiland, NASA | News | Comments

In 43 hours across five science flights in late November 2013, NASA's P-3 research aircraft collected more than 20,000 kilometers (12,000 miles) worth of science data. Instruments gathered information about the thickness of the ice over subglacial lakes, mountains, coasts and frozen seas. The flights over Antarctica were part of Operation IceBridge, a multi-year mission to monitor conditions in Antarctica and the Arctic

Chetro Ketl Great Kiva in Chaco Canyon, NM

Drones Unearth More Details about Chaco Culture

April 22, 2014 3:40 pm | by Susan Montoya Bryan, Associated Press | News | Comments

Recently published research describes how archaeologists outfitted a customized drone with a heat-sensing camera to unearth what they believe are ceremonial pits and other features at the site of an ancient village in New Mexico. The discovery of the structures hidden beneath layers of sediment and sagebrush is being hailed as an important step that could help archaeologists shed light on mysteries long buried by eroding desert landscapes

The Grand Canyon -- Courtesy of NASA

Geologic Icon: The Grand Canyon

April 21, 2014 9:04 am | by M. Justin Wilkinson, Jacobs at NASA-JSC | News | Comments

The Grand Canyon in northern Arizona is a favorite for astronauts shooting photos from the International Space Station, as well as one of the best-known tourist attractions in the world. The steep walls of the Colorado River canyon and its many side canyons make an intricate landscape that contrasts with the dark green, forested plateau to the north and south.

Newfound Pink World Lurks at Solar System Fringes

March 28, 2014 2:45 pm | by Alicia Chang, Associated Press | News | Comments

Peering into the far reaches of the solar system, astronomers have spied a pink frozen world 7½ billion miles from the sun. It's the second such object to be discovered in a region of space beyond Pluto long considered a celestial wasteland.   

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