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This multitemporal Sentinel-1A radar image shows the Aral Sea, located on the border between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan in Central Asia. The Aral Sea is a striking example of humankind’s impact on the environment and natural resources.

Aral Sea Between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, Central Asia

April 15, 2015 2:33 pm | News | Comments

This multitemporal Sentinel-1A radar image shows the Aral Sea, located on the border between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan in Central Asia. The Aral Sea is a striking example of humankind’s impact on the environment and natural resources.

 

Data-enabled Science: Top500 Supercomputers Provide Universities with Competitive Edge

April 7, 2015 5:02 pm | by Paul Alongi, Clemson University | News | Comments

Researchers have long believed that supercomputers give universities a competitive edge in...

Star Trek Tricorder is No Longer Science Fiction

April 2, 2015 10:44 am | by American Friends of Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

For the crew of the Starship Enterprise, Star Trek's "Tricorder" was an essential tool...

Turning Buckyballs into Buckybombs: Nanoscale Explosives could Eliminate Cancer Cells

March 19, 2015 2:44 pm | by University of Southern California | News | Comments

In 1996, a trio of scientists won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for their discovery of...

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Physicist Chien-Shiung Wu in 1963 at Columbia University, where she was a professor. Known as the First Lady of Physics, Wu worked on the Manhattan Project and helped disprove a widely-accepted law of theoretical physics. Later in her life, Wu researched

Paving the Way: 28 Amazing Women, Trailblazing Science

March 18, 2015 12:16 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Breakthrough science requires pioneers. People who combine brilliance with courage, even in the face of daunting opposition. The women who paved the way for modern scientific exploration exemplify this spirit; grappling not only with fundamental questions of the universe, but with discrimination and societal constraints that often stripped them of scientific credit.

ACD/Spectrus Portal

ACD/Spectrus Portal

March 10, 2015 9:07 am | Advanced Chemistry Development, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

The ACD/Spectrus Portal is a Web-based interface that provides vendor neutral, multi-technique results from analytical chemistry experiments to laboratory chemists. The portal extends the ACD/Spectrus analytical and chemical laboratory intelligence platform through a series of domain-specific market applications.

A representation of a 9-nanometer azotosome, about the size of a virus, with a piece of the membrane cut away to show the hollow interior. Courtesy of James Stevenson

Life 'Not as We Know It' Possible on Saturn's Moon Titan

March 2, 2015 11:31 am | by Anne Ju, Cornell University | News | Comments

Liquid water is a requirement for life on Earth. But in other, much colder worlds, life might exist beyond the bounds of water-based chemistry. Taking a simultaneously imaginative and rigidly scientific view, chemical engineers and astronomers offer a template for life that could thrive in a harsh, cold world — specifically Titan, the giant moon of Saturn.

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In this April 26, 2009 file photo, actor Leonard Nimoy poses for a portrait in Beverly Hills, CA. Nimoy, famous for playing officer Mr. Spock in “Star Trek” died Friday, February 27, 2015, in Los Angeles of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Live Long and Prosper, Mr. #Spock! Leonard Nimoy dies at 83

February 27, 2015 2:31 pm | by Lynn Elber, AP Television Writer | News | Comments

Leonard Nimoy, the actor known and loved by generations of Star Trek fans as the pointy-eared, purely logical science officer Mr. Spock, has died. Nimoy died Friday of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at his Los Angeles home, with family at his side, said his son, Adam Nimoy. He was 83.

A 3-D model of the new class of auxetic metamaterials that defy logic and can be used to create better skin grafts and new smart materials. Courtesy of University of Malta

Logic-defying Mathematical Model could lead to Better Skin Grafts, New Smart Materials

February 26, 2015 2:00 pm | by Cassi Camilleri, University of Malta | News | Comments

Pull on a piece of plastic at separate ends; it becomes thinner. So does a rubber band. One might assume tha,t when a force is applied along an axis, materials will always stretch and become thinner. Wrong. Thanks to their peculiar internal geometry, auxetic materials grow wider. After confounding scientists for decades, researchers are now developing mathematical models to explain the unusual behavior of these logic-defying materials

NWChem molecular modeling software takes full advantage of a wide range of parallel computing systems, including Cascade. Courtesy of PNNL

PNNL Shifts Computational Chemistry into Overdrive

February 25, 2015 8:29 am | by Karol Kowalski, Ph.D., and Edoardo Apra, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

We computational chemists are an impatient lot. Despite the fact that we routinely deal with highly complicated chemical processes running on our laboratory’s equally complex HPC clusters, we want answers in minutes or hours, not days, months or even years. In many instances, that’s just not feasible; in fact, there are times when the magnitude of the problem simply exceeds the capabilities of the HPC resources available to us.

Another myth is that scientists look like this. U.S. Army RDECOM/Flickr, CC BY-SA

Seven Myths about Scientists Debunked

February 19, 2015 2:07 pm | by Jeffrey Craig and Marguerite Evans-Galea, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute | Articles | Comments

As scientific researchers, we are often surprised by some of the assumptions made about us by those outside our profession. So we put together a list of common myths we and our colleagues have heard anecdotally regarding scientific researchers.

In the search for ways to store data permanently, ETH researchers have been inspired by fossils. Courtesy of Philipp Stössel/ETH Zurich

Data Storage for Eternity: Encapsulated DNA-encoded Information Expected to Survive a Million Years

February 13, 2015 3:36 pm | by Angelika Jacobs, ETH Zurich | News | Comments

How can we preserve our knowledge today for the next millennia? Researchers have found a way to store information in the form of DNA, preserving it for nearly an eternity. As encapsulation in silica is roughly comparable to that in fossilized bones, researchers could draw on prehistoric information about long-term stability and calculate a prognosis: through storage in low temperatures, DNA-encoded information can survive.

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A code hidden in the arrangement of the genetic information of single-stranded RNA viruses tells the virus how to pack itself within its outer shell of proteins.

Molecular Warfare: Researchers Discover Viral "Enigma Machine"

February 4, 2015 2:21 pm | by University of Leeds | News | Comments

Researchers have cracked a code that governs infections by a major group of viruses, including the common cold and polio. The unnoticed code had been hidden in plain sight in the sequence of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) that makes up this type of viral genome. But researchers have unlocked its meaning and demonstrated that jamming the code can disrupt virus assembly. Stopping a virus assembling can stop it functioning.

ACD/Labs 2015 Cheminformatics Software

ACD/Labs 2015 Cheminformatics Software

January 29, 2015 10:38 am | Advanced Chemistry Development, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

ACD/Labs 2015 cheminformatics software builds upon the capabilities of the ACD/Spectrus and ACD/Percepta platforms. The ACD/Spectrus Platform is designed to make it easier for organizations to handle unified analytical data from multiple techniques and instruments. The ACD/Percepta Platform features improvements in the speed of calculation of physicochemical and ADME-Tox properties and expanded capabilities to leverage organizational knowledge.

Biomolecule Toolkit

Biomolecule Toolkit

January 21, 2015 12:27 pm | ChemAxon, Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

The Biomolecule Toolkit is a Web service-based toolkit designed to bridge the gap between biology and chemistry for complex biomolecular entities. It provides unambiguous representation at the sequence and atomic level for a diverse set of biomolecules such as peptides, oligonucleotides, proteins and antibody drug conjugates, including those containing unnatural and chemically-modified components, thereby allowing their storage, indexing and search within a database.

Solar panels on the roof of the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican. Pope Benedict XVI was dubbed "the Green Pope" for his frequent calls to stop ecological devastation and his efforts to bring solar power to the Vatican city-state. "Can we remain indifferent be

Pope's Statement on Climate Change: 5 Things to Know

January 20, 2015 2:43 pm | by Rachel Zoll, AP Religion Writer | News | Comments

Pope Francis, who pledged on the day of his installation as pontiff to make the environment a priority, is drafting a highly anticipated encyclical on ecology and climate change. Environmentalists are thrilled by the prospect of a rock-star pope putting his moral weight behind efforts to curb global warming. Francis said he wanted the document to be released in time to be read before the next round of U.N. climate treaty talks in Paris.

Map of diffuse interstellar bands Courtesy of T.W. Lan, G. Zasowski, B. Ménard, SDSS and 2MASS/UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF

Astronomers Map Mysterious Molecules in our Galaxy

January 12, 2015 10:20 am | by Phil Sneiderman, Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

By analyzing the light of hundreds of thousands of celestial objects, astronomers have created a unique map of enigmatic molecules in our galaxy that are responsible for puzzling features in the light from stars, called diffuse interstellar bands. DIBs have been a mystery ever since they were discovered in 1922 — exactly which of the many thousands of possible molecules are responsible for these features?

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William Weaver is an associate professor in the Department of Integrated Science, Business, and Technology at La Salle University.

By Any Other Name: The Central Role of Informatics in STEM Education

January 9, 2015 3:05 pm | by William Weaver, Ph.D. | Blogs | Comments

The human lament that things in the past were much simpler is an accurate observation made from the perspective of riding along an exponentially increasing complexity curve. Examining the present or looking into the future can be a confusing torrent of concepts, vocabulary and technologies that appear to be spiraling out-of-control. At the First IEEE Integrated STEM Education Conference, Professor Steve Zilora reflected on this increase...

Physicist Jim Bailey of Sandia National Laboratories observes a wire array that will heat foam to roughly 4 million degrees until it emits a burst of X-rays that heats a foil target to the interior conditions of the sun. Courtesy of Randy Montoya

Iron Sun: Not a Rock Band, but a Key to Stars’ Energy Transmission

January 6, 2015 12:16 pm | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

Working at temperatures matching the interior of the sun, researchers have been able to determine, for the first time in history, iron’s role in inhibiting energy transmission from the Sun's center to near the edge of its radiative band. Because that role is much greater than formerly surmised, the experimentally derived amount of iron’s opacity helps close a theoretical gap in the Standard Solar Model, used to model the behavior of stars.

This image illustrates possible ways methane might be added to Mars' atmosphere (sources) and removed from the atmosphere (sinks). NASA's Curiosity Mars rover has detected fluctuations in methane concentration in the atmosphere, implying both types of act

Rover Finds Active, Ancient Organic Chemistry on Mars

December 18, 2014 10:48 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA's Mars Curiosity rover has measured a tenfold spike in methane, an organic chemical, in the atmosphere around it and detected other organic molecules in a rock-powder sample collected by the robotic laboratory’s drill. Researchers used Curiosity’s onboard Sample Analysis at Mars laboratory a dozen times in a 20-month period to sniff methane in the atmosphere. During two of those months, four measurements averaged seven ppb.

Big Data and genetic complexity: HotNet2 helps define the terrain for complex genetic associations involved in cancer. “The next step,” says researcher Ben Raphael, “is translating all of this information from cancer sequencing into clinically actionable

Big Data v. Cancer: Algorithm Identifies Genetic Changes across Cancers

December 15, 2014 4:00 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

Using a computer algorithm that can sift through mounds of genetic data, researchers from Brown University have identified several networks of genes that, when hit by a mutation, could play a role in the development of multiple types of cancer. The algorithm, called Hotnet2, was used to analyze genetic data from 12 different types of cancer assembled as part of the pan-cancer project of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

Michael Boruta is Optical Spectroscopy Product Manager at ACD/Labs

Accessibility of Data and Application of Algorithms to Provide Insights in Predictive Analytics

December 15, 2014 11:56 am | by Michael Boruta, ACD/Labs | Blogs | Comments

Although there are a diverse range of applications for predictive analytics in R&D, two common basic requirements are data and insight. Data may be generated by running experiments/analyses, or re-applied from previous work when available. Insights come from application of knowledge — both explicitand tacit. There are a variety of roles for informatics in predictive analytics...

Comprised of four images taken with the navigation camera on Rosetta, this image shows comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on November 17, 2014, from a distance of 26 miles from the center of the comet. (AP Photo/ESA)

Mystery Deepens: Where Did Earth's Water Come From?

December 11, 2014 4:32 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The mystery of where Earth's water came from got murkier on December 10, 2014, when some astronomers essentially eliminated one of the chief suspects: comets. Over the past few months, the European Space Agency's Rosetta space probe closely examined the type of comet that some scientists theorized could have brought water to our planet 4 billion years ago. It found water, but the wrong kind.

The National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation medals ready to be presented to awardees. Courtesy of Sandy Schaeffer, NSF

National Medals of Science, Technology and Innovation Presented

November 25, 2014 12:00 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

At a White House ceremony on November 20, 2014, President Obama presented the National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation to individuals who have made outstanding contributions to science and engineering. The awards are the nation's highest honors for achievement and leadership in advancing the fields of science and technology.

Karol Kowalski, Capability Lead for NWChem Development, works in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at PNNL.

Advancing Computational Chemistry with NWChem

November 18, 2014 3:07 pm | by Mike Bernhardt, HPC Community Evangelist, Intel | Articles | Comments

An interview with PNNL’s Karol Kowalski, Capability Lead for NWChem Development - NWChem is an open source high performance computational chemistry tool developed for the Department of Energy at Pacific Northwest National Lab in Richland, WA. I recently visited with Karol Kowalski, Capability Lead for NWChem Development, who works in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at PNNL.

StarDrop Card View Drug Discovery Software

StarDrop Card View Drug Discovery Software

November 7, 2014 2:15 pm | Optibrium Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

Card View is designed to provide a unique way to look at compound data, clearly representing the relationships between compounds to highlight the best chemistries and optimization strategies. It presents compound structures and associated data on cards that can be moved, stacked and linked in a unique, flexible environment.

QT 2.5 Chemometrics Software

Symbion QT 2.5 Chemometrics Software

November 6, 2014 3:27 pm | Symbion Systems | Product Releases | Comments

Symbion QT 2.5. chemometrics software provides Parametric Data Cleaning, a technique that automates the handling of data compromised by excessive noise or other artifacts. Key cleaning parameters are under the control of the analyst, allowing chemometric optimization under a wide range of analytical situations.

As the United States pursues the next generation of computing (exascale), new software-centered partnerships could be the key to maximizing economic benefits for Americans

Supporting America’s Economic Competitiveness: A Look at Federal Supercomputing Leadership

October 28, 2014 11:18 am | by Council on Competitiveness | News | Comments

The Council on Competitiveness has released a new report that explores the value of government leadership in supercomputing for industrial competitiveness, titled Solve. The Exascale Effect: the Benefits of Supercomputing Investment for U.S. Industry. As the federal government pursues exascale computing to achieve national security and science missions, Solve examines how U.S.-based companies also benefit from leading-edge computation

High in the atmosphere of Titan, large patches of two trace gases glow near the north pole, on the dusk side of the moon, and near the south pole, on the dawn side. Brighter colors indicate stronger signals from the two gases, HNC (left) and HC3N (right);

Astrochemists Discover Titan Glows at Dusk and Dawn

October 24, 2014 3:49 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

New maps of Saturn’s moon Titan reveal large patches of trace gases shining brightly near the north and south poles. These regions are curiously shifted off the poles, to the east or west, so that dawn is breaking over the southern region while dusk is falling over the northern one.

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