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New Study Outlines Water World Theory of Life's Origins

April 16, 2014 12:37 pm | by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory | News | Comments

Life took root more than four billion years ago on our nascent Earth, a wetter and harsher place than now, bathed in sizzling ultraviolet rays. What started out as simple cells ultimately transformed into slime molds, frogs, elephants, humans and the rest of our planet's living kingdoms. How did it all begin?

Robotic Arm Probes Chemistry of 3-D Objects

April 11, 2014 9:53 am | by Brett Israel, Georgia Tech | News | Comments

When life on Earth was first getting started, simple molecules bonded together into the...

Accelrys Insight

April 10, 2014 2:37 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Accelrys Insight and Accelrys Insight for Excel are designed to enhance scientific data analysis...

Streamlining Big Data Analysis Improves Accuracy and Performance

March 12, 2014 3:57 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

Next week, Scientific Computing will host a live panel discussion that looks at how a...

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Accelrys Insight

April 10, 2014 2:37 pm | Accelrys | Product Releases | Comments

Accelrys Insight and Accelrys Insight for Excel are designed to enhance scientific data analysis with capabilities that include the ability to run database searches directly from the Excel spreadsheet environment. The Web-based life science, discovery and innovation support environment speeds decisions by simplifying access to complex hierarchical data and implementing data-rich tooltips for scatterplots...

Streamlining Big Data Analysis Improves Accuracy and Performance

March 12, 2014 3:57 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

Next week, Scientific Computing will host a live panel discussion that looks at how a unique supercomputing system, created to serve the needs of a scientific community alliance in seven northern German states, has unified datacenter resources to address big data challenges. By streamlining the analysis process through automation, the HLRN alliance has improved performance and increased accuracy, resulting in greater efficiency.

Crowdsourced Rain Samples Map Hurricane Sandy's Evolution

March 11, 2014 7:36 pm | by University of Utah | News | Comments

A unique method to collect rain water samples during Hurricane Sandy has revealed the storm's chemical "signature" with a new level of detail. The technique may also lead to weather model advances that will ultimately improve storm prediction. Hurricane Sandy, also known as Superstorm Sandy, was the deadliest and most destructive hurricane of the 2012 Atlantic hurricane season. Nearly 300 people perished along the path of the storm.

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SciFinder Review: Chemistry/Biology References and More

March 6, 2014 4:31 pm | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

This month’s review is a bit off of the usual track, e.g. statistical, mathematical and genomics software. However, it does include much pertinent information for chemists, chemical engineers and biologists. SciFinder is a search engine for chemistry and biology references for just about anything that can be accurately described in the search feature.

Dimer Molecules Help Gauge Exoplanet Pressure, Aid Hunt for Life

March 4, 2014 8:34 pm | by Peter Kelley, University of Washington | News | Comments

Astronomers at the University of Washington have developed a new method of gauging the atmospheric pressure of exoplanets, or worlds beyond the solar system, by looking for a certain type of molecule. And if there is life out in space, scientists may one day use this same technique to detect its biosignature — the telltale chemical signs of its presence — in the atmosphere of an alien world.

ACD/Spectrus Platform

March 3, 2014 1:23 pm | Advanced Chemistry Development, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

The ACD/Spectrus Platform enables organizations to apply chemical context to their spectroscopy, spectrometry, and chromatography content by making it easier to manage unified analytical data from multiple techniques and instruments, and to combine it with chemical and structural information in a homogeneous environment.

Science Academies Explain Global Warming Reality

February 27, 2014 3:17 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Man-made global warming is worsening and will disrupt both the natural world and human society, warns a joint report of two of the world's leading scientific organizations. The U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society, which is the national scientific academy of the United Kingdom, are releasing an unusual plain language report on climate change that addressed 20 issues in a question-and-answer format.

Multi-scale Simulation Software for Chemistry Research Developed Using Trestles and Gordon Supercomputers

February 19, 2014 6:48 pm | by San Diego Supercomputer Center | News | Comments

Researchers at the San Diego Supercomputer Center at the University of California, San Diego, have developed software that greatly expands the types of multi-scale QM%2FMM (mixed quantum and molecular mechanical) simulations of complex chemical systems that scientists can use to design new drugs, better chemicals, or improved enzymes for biofuels production.

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Registration Opens for $2 Million Ocean Health XPRIZE

February 12, 2014 12:54 pm | by XPRIZE | News | Comments

XPRIZE has announced that team registration is open for the $2 million Wendy Schmidt Ocean Health XPRIZE, a competition to incentivize breakthroughs in ocean pH sensor technology that will radically transform our understanding of ocean acidification. Teams are expected to come from diverse backgrounds, ranging from nanotechnology and biotechnology to industrial chemistry and marine science

Astronomers Discover Oldest Known Star in the Universe

February 11, 2014 8:54 am | by Australian National University | News | Comments

A team led by astronomers at The Australian National University has discovered the oldest known star in the Universe, which formed shortly after the Big Bang 13.7 billion years ago. The discovery has allowed astronomers for the first time to study the chemistry of the first stars, giving scientists a clearer idea of what the Universe was like in its infancy.

Cells Sense Light without Seeing

February 10, 2014 3:27 pm | by Ohio Supercomputer Center (OSC) | News | Comments

Researchers have found that the melanopsin pigment in the eye is potentially more sensitive to light than its more famous counterpart, rhodopsin, the pigment that allows for night vision. For more than two years, they have been investigating melanopsin, a retina pigment capable of sensing light changes in the environment, informing the nervous system and synchronizing it with the day/night rhythm.

ScienceCloud by Accelrys

February 7, 2014 10:39 am | Accelrys | Product Releases | Comments

ScienceCloud is an SaaS-based information management and collaboration workspace for externalized life science research and development. It is designed to advance collaborative drug discovery with a new generation of integrated applications built on a scalable, cloud-based scientific platform.

High Performance Computing Symposium (HPCS) 2014

February 7, 2014 9:39 am | Events

HPCS is a multi-disciplinary conference, considered Canada's premier advanced computing forum. Each year, Canadian researchers, analysts, and IT professionals from academia and industry gather to exchange the ideas, tools, and new discoveries that are driving today's innovations in computational research.

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Dassault Systèmes Acquires Accelrys

January 30, 2014 8:54 am | by Accelrys | News | Comments

Dassault Systèmes, a 3-D design software, 3-D Digital Mock Up and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) solutions provider, and Accelrys, a provider of scientific innovation lifecycle management software for chemistry, biology and materials, have announced the signing of a definitive merger agreement for Dassault Systèmes to acquire San Diego-based Accelrys, Inc.

Novel Biological Mechanism: Hugging Hemes Help Electrons Hop

January 21, 2014 11:23 am | by PNNL | News | Comments

Researchers simulating how certain bacteria run electrical current through tiny molecular wires have discovered a secret Nature uses for electron travel. The results are key to understanding how the bacteria do chemistry in the ground, and will help researchers use them in microbial fuel cells, batteries, or for turning waste into electricity.

Pittcon, Food Labs Conference Announce Co-location

January 20, 2014 2:45 pm | by Pittcon | News | Comments

The Pittcon Organizing Committee has announced that Innovative Publishing, producer of Food Labs Conference and publisher of Food Safety Tech eJournal, has signed an agreement for the second year for the co-location of Food Labs Conference to be held in conjunction with Pittcon 2014.

Old Mathematical Puzzle may Soon be Unraveled

January 16, 2014 2:53 pm | by University of Montreal | News | Comments

It is one the oldest mathematical problems in the world. Several centuries ago, the twin primes conjecture was formulated. As its name indicates, this hypothesis deals with prime numbers, those divisible only by themselves and by one. Under this assumption, there exists an infinite number of pairs of prime numbers whose difference is two, called twin primes, but nobody has been able to confirm this so far.

Microscopic Fountain Pen to Feature Chemical Sensor

January 15, 2014 3:30 am | by University of Twente | News | Comments

The Atomic Force Microscope (AFM), which uses a fine-tipped probe to scan surfaces at the atomic scale, will soon be augmented with a chemical sensor. This involves the use of a hollow AFM cantilever, through which a liquid - in this case mercury - is passed under pressure. The droplet of mercury at the tip acts as a sensor. This microscopic fountain pen was developed by researchers at the...

Kiss my Turbine: What Electronics Firms Can Learn from the Doomed Airline Industry

January 13, 2014 4:39 pm | by Randy C. Hice | Blogs | Comments

Ah, 30,000 feet and some old Dire Straits on the headphones, and waiting for my warm Heineken. Perfect. Though I enjoy lambasting companies that get it wrong, I’m also quick to stomp my feet and clap my hands when companies get it right. And I’ll do that, I promise, but allow me my fun first.

Analog Computing: Designing Metamaterials to do Photonic Calculus

January 10, 2014 9:49 am | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

The field of metamaterials has produced structures with unprecedented abilities, including flat lenses, invisibility cloaks and even optical metatronic devices that can manipulate light in the way electronic circuitry manipulates the flow of electrons. Now, the birthplace of the digital computer, ENIAC, is using this technology in the rebirth of analog computing. Metamaterials can be designed to do photonic calculus

The Chemistry of Cyborgs: Interfacing Technical Devices with Organisms

January 10, 2014 8:54 am | by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Medical implants, complex interfaces between brain and machine or remotely controlled insects: Recent developments combining machines and organisms have great potentials, but also give rise to major ethical concerns. In their review entitled “Chemie der Cyborgs – zur Verknüpfung technischer Systeme mit Lebewesen” KIT scientists discuss the state of the art of research, opportunities, and risks.

Chemical Imaging brings Cancer Tissue Analysis into Digital Age

January 8, 2014 7:13 am | by Imperial College London | News | Comments

A new imaging method for analyzing biological samples based on their chemical makeup is set to transform the way medical scientists examine diseased tissue. Researchers at Imperial College London have outlined a recipe for processing mass spectrometry imaging data and building a database of tissue types.

Data Integrity in a Nutshell: Industry must take bold steps to assure the data used for drug quality decisions is trustworthy

January 7, 2014 12:31 pm | by Mark E. Newton | Articles | Comments

Regulatory inspectors have started digging much deeper into data, no longer accepting batch release data and supportive testing at face value. Even worse, this effort is justified: they have cited a number of firms for violations of data integrity, a most fundamental bond of trust between manufacturers and the regulators that inspect them. Industry must take bold steps to assure the data used for drug quality decisions is trustworthy...

Comparison of FDA and EU Regulations for Audit Trails

January 7, 2014 12:02 pm | by R.D. McDowall | Articles | Comments

Data integrity is a current hot topic with regulatory agencies, as seen with recent publications in this magazine, and audit trails are an important aspect of ensuring this in computerized systems. The purpose of this article is to compare and contrast the EU and FDA GMP regulatory requirements for computerized system audit trails.

A Fresh Look at the AnIML Data Standard

January 7, 2014 11:47 am | by Burkhard Schaefer | Articles | Comments

One of the challenges in laboratory data management is the handling and exchange of experiment data. Many vendors provide excellent instruments, but most produce data in their own proprietary formats. This leads to major difficulties for data processing, collaboration, instrument integration and archiving. The ASTM AnIML standardization effort addresses these problems by providing a neutral XML-based format for exchanging scientific data.

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