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High in the atmosphere of Titan, large patches of two trace gases glow near the north pole, on the dusk side of the moon, and near the south pole, on the dawn side. Brighter colors indicate stronger signals from the two gases, HNC (left) and HC3N (right);

Astrochemists Discover Titan Glows at Dusk and Dawn

October 24, 2014 3:49 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

New maps of Saturn’s moon Titan reveal large patches of trace gases shining brightly near the north and south poles. These regions are curiously shifted off the poles, to the east or west, so that dawn is breaking over the southern region while dusk is falling over the northern one.

Nobel Prize-winning Technique Helps Design Antibiotics of Future

October 17, 2014 11:52 am | by Bristol University | News | Comments

Scientists have used computer simulations to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics...

UN-SCAN-IT Gel 7.1 Gel Analysis Software

October 9, 2014 9:32 am | Product Releases | Comments

UN-SCAN-IT Gel 7.1 gel analysis software converts virtually any scanner, digital camera or other...

Americans, German Awarded 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

October 8, 2014 9:43 am | by Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences | News | Comments

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Eric Betzig of...

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An illustration of water in our Solar System through time from before the Sun’s birth through the creation of the planets. Courtesy of Bill Saxton, NSF/AUI/NRAO

Earth’s Water is Older than the Sun

September 25, 2014 4:00 pm | by Carnegie Institution of Washington | News | Comments

Water was crucial to the rise of life on Earth and is also important to evaluating the possibility of life on other planets. Identifying the original source of Earth’s water is key to understanding how life-fostering environments come into being and how likely they are to be found elsewhere. New work has found that much of our Solar System’s water likely originated as ices that formed in interstellar space.

"Diamond nanothreads" promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymers. The core of the nanothreads is a long, thin strand of carbon atoms arranged just like the fundamental u

Smallest Possible Diamonds Form What may be World’s Strongest Material

September 24, 2014 2:36 pm | by Penn State University | News | Comments

For the first time, scientists have discovered how to produce ultra-thin "diamond nanothreads" that promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymers. The core of the nanothreads is a long, thin strand of carbon atoms arranged just like the fundamental unit of a diamond's structure.

Indian Space Research Organisation scientists watch screens display the graphics explaining Mars Orbiter Mission at their Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network complex in Bangalore, India, Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. India triumphed in its first interpla

Mars Mission Opens India for Space Business

September 24, 2014 2:22 pm | by Katy Daigle, Associated Press | News | Comments

India celebrated putting a spacecraft into orbit around Mars on September 24, 2014, hoping the rare feat will show the world it is open for business in space exploration and inspire a new generation of homegrown scientists to help drive growth. Those motivations help explain why India, a poor country of 1.2 billion, even invests in a space program when so many of its people lack access to proper toilets, electricity and health care.

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This protein model represents an NMDA receptor, which juts halfway out of the surface of cells of the nervous system that include the brain and spinal cord. It relays signals between nerve cells. Researchers found that a mechanical coupling was needed bet

Stampede used to Perform Modeling to Advance Potential Drug Targets for Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, Schizophrenia

September 23, 2014 3:59 pm | by Jorge Salazar, TACC | News | Comments

It all begins in the brain as a flood, tens of millions of neurotransmitters handed off from one neuron to another in just a fraction of a second. Memories, dreams and learning share a common thread in this exchange of electrical and chemical signals by the nearly 100 billion spindly neurons of the brain, each cell networked to 10,000 others.

Graphic representation of a seaborgium hexacarbonyl molecule on the silicon dioxide covered detectors of a COMPACT detector array. Courtesy of Alexander Yakushev (GSI) / Christoph E. Düllmann (JGU)

Chemistry of Superheavy Elements: New Vistas for Studying Effects of Einstein's Relativity

September 23, 2014 3:27 pm | by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz | News | Comments

An international collaboration has achieved the synthesis of a new class of chemical compounds for superheavy elements. For the first time, a chemical bond was established between a superheavy element — seaborgium (element 106) in the present study — and a carbon atom.

 Atoms in the Star of David molecule. Courtesy of University of Manchester

New Star-Shaped Molecule Most Complex Ever Created

September 22, 2014 3:12 pm | by University of Manchester | News | Comments

Scientists have generated a new star-shaped molecule made up of interlocking rings, which is the most complex of its kind ever created. Known as a ‘Star of David’ molecule, scientists have been trying to create one for over a quarter of a century. Consisting of two molecular triangles, entwined about each other three times into a hexagram, the structure’s interlocked molecules are tiny.

StarDrop 5.5 Software Suite

StarDrop 5.5 Software Suite

September 16, 2014 3:15 pm | Optibrium Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

StarDrop 5.5 is a suite of software for guiding decisions in drug discovery, helping project teams quickly identify high-quality compounds. It works by evaluating complex data, which is often uncertain because of experimental variability or predictive error.

Rice researchers tune the color output of each array both by varying the length of the nanorods and by adjusting the length of the spaces between nanorods. Courtesy of J. Olson/Rice University

Full-color Camouflage Displays Sense Color, Automatically Blend In

September 16, 2014 2:27 pm | by Jade Boyd, Rice University | News | Comments

The quest to create artificial “squid skin” — camouflaging metamaterials that can “see” colors and automatically blend into the background — is one step closer to reality, thanks to a color-display technology unveiled by Rice University’s Laboratory for Nanophotonics. The new full-color display technology uses aluminum nanoparticles to create the vivid red, blue and green hues found in today’s top-of-the-line LCD televisions and monitors.

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Sentira Data Visualization Software

Sentira Data Visualization Software

September 12, 2014 2:36 pm | Optibrium Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

Sentira is a desktop application designed to provide elegant and dynamic visualization for compound data. The software is applicable across many fields of chemistry, enabling users to quickly find patterns in compound data, visualize structure-activity relationships and present and report results.

This undated image provided by NASA shows the ozone layer over the years, September 17, 1979, top left, October 7, 1989, top right, October 9, 2006, lower left, and October 1, 2010, lower right. Earth’s protective but fragile ozone layer is finally starti

Scientists say Ozone Layer is Recovering

September 10, 2014 4:17 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Earth's protective but fragile ozone layer is beginning to recover, largely because of the phase-out since the 1980s of certain chemicals used in refrigerants and aerosol cans, a U.N. scientific panel reported September 10, 2014, in a rare piece of good news about the health of the planet. Scientists said the development demonstrates that, when the world comes together, it can counteract a brewing ecological crisis.

Cool Calculations for Cold Atoms

September 3, 2014 9:14 am | by The Joint Quantum Institute | News | Comments

Chemical reactions drive the mechanisms of life as well as a million other natural processes on earth. These reactions occur at a wide spectrum of temperatures, from those prevailing at the chilly polar icecaps to those at work churning near the earth’s core. At nanokelvin temperatures, by contrast, nothing was supposed to happen. Chemistry was expected to freeze up. Experiments and theoretical work have now show that this is not true.

The Expo provides the perfect venue to share information and discuss enabling technologies that are driving biomedical research and the drug development process

2015 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo

August 28, 2014 3:06 pm | Events

The 2015 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo plans to unite 3,000+ life sciences, pharmaceutical, clinical, healthcare, and IT professionals from 32+ countries. The Expo provides the perfect venue to share information and discuss enabling technologies that are driving biomedical research and the drug development process.

An April memo from the EPA's chief of staff said that "unsolicited contacts" need to be "appropriately managed" and that committee members should refrain from directly responding to requests about committees' efforts to advise the agency.

Groups to EPA: Stop Muzzling Science Advisers

August 13, 2014 12:39 pm | by Dina Cappiello, Associated Press | News | Comments

Journalist and scientific organizations accused the EPA of attempting to muzzle its independent scientific advisers by directing them to funnel all outside requests for information through agency officials. In a letter on August 12, 2014, groups representing journalists and scientists urged the EPA to allow advisory board members to talk directly to news reporters, Congress and other outside groups without first asking for permission.

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This 3-D map shows how HCN molecules (made of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen) are released from the nucleus of comet Lemmon and then spread evenly throughout the atmosphere, or coma. Similar maps revealed that HNC and formaldehyde are produced in the coma,

3-D Comet Study Reveals Chemical Factory at Work

August 12, 2014 12:05 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A NASA-led team of scientists has created detailed 3-D maps of the atmospheres surrounding comets, identifying several gases and mapping their spread at the highest resolution ever achieved. Almost unheard of for comet studies, the 3-D perspective provides deeper insight into which materials are shed from the nucleus of the comet and which are produced within the atmosphere, or coma.

Quantum dots make greens and reds pop on screens (left) compared with other types of displays (right).

The Grass Really Is Greener on Computer Screens, Thanks to Quantum Dots

August 11, 2014 1:06 pm | by ACS | News | Comments

High-tech specks called quantum dots could bring brighter, more vibrant color to mass market TVs, tablets, phones and other displays. A scientist has described a new technology, called 3M quantum dot enhancement film (QDEF), that efficiently makes liquid crystal display (LCD) screens more richly colored. His talk was given at the 248th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

Seamlessly marrying electronics and brain signaling could transform how we treat some of the most puzzling and devastating diseases. Courtesy of Janulla

On the Frontiers of Cyborg Science: Seamless Marriage between Electronics and Brain Signaling

August 11, 2014 12:22 pm | by ACS | News | Comments

No longer just fantastical fodder for sci-fi buffs, cyborg technology is bringing us tangible progress toward real-life electronic skin, prosthetics and ultraflexible circuits. Taking this human-machine concept to an unprecedented level, pioneering scientists are working on the seamless marriage between electronics and brain signaling, with the potential to transform our understanding of how to treat the brain's most devastating diseases.

A close-up of tiny bioink droplets used to print organs shows live cells inside. Courtesy of the American Chemical Society

Exploring 3-D Printing to Make Organs for Transplants

July 30, 2014 9:44 am | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

Printing whole new organs for transplants sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, but the real-life budding technology could one day make actual kidneys, livers, hearts and other organs for patients who desperately need them. In the ACS journal Langmuir, scientists are reporting new understanding about the dynamics of 3-D bioprinting that takes them a step closer to realizing their goal of making working tissues and organs on-demand.

ArxLab Notebook Web-based Electronic Notebook

ArxLab Notebook Web-based Electronic Notebook

July 29, 2014 3:15 pm | by Arxspan | Product Releases | Comments

ArxLab Notebook is a Web-based electronic notebook application. Its SaaS platform is intended for use in experimental sciences; it is preconfigured for chemistry and biology workflows while supporting free-form research notes and data. The software provides full audit trails, electronic signatures, witnessing workflows and built-in sharing functionality.

Fundamental Chemistry Findings Could Help Extend Moore’s Law

July 16, 2014 11:49 am | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Over the years, computer chips have gotten smaller, thanks to advances in materials science and manufacturing technologies. This march of progress, the doubling of transistors on a microprocessor roughly every two years, is called Moore’s Law. But there’s one component of the chip-making process in need of an overhaul if Moore’s law is to continue: the chemical mixture called photoresist.

Vampire Bat Venom Could Hold Key to New Drugs for Stroke, High Blood Pressure

July 15, 2014 4:38 pm | by University of Queensland | News | Comments

An international team of scientists has discovered that vampire bat venom contains molecules capable of evading the victim’s immune system. The results point to entirely new forms of anticoagulants in the venom, as well as novel molecules that cause dilation of the small arteries near the skin.

Chemists Discover Boron Buckyball

July 15, 2014 11:55 am | by Brown University | News | Comments

The discovery 30 years ago of soccer-ball-shaped carbon molecules called buckyballs helped to spur an explosion of nanotechnology research. Now, there appears to be a new ball on the pitch. Researchers have shown that a cluster of 40 boron atoms forms a hollow molecular cage similar to a carbon buckyball. It’s the first experimental evidence that a boron cage structure — previously only a matter of speculation — does indeed exist.

Core ELN Chemistry App on Platform for Science

July 11, 2014 12:16 pm | Core Informatics, ChemAxon, Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

Core ELN (electronic lab notebook) is a chemistry application for Platform for Science that is designed to help chemists document research activities and compound registration in the cloud. It is made possible through Platform for Science’s Platform-as-a-Service (sPaaS).

SLAS2015

July 11, 2014 10:24 am | by SLAS | Events

SLAS is a global organization that provides forums for education and information exchange to encourage study and professional collaboration aimed at advancing laboratory science and technology for the drug discovery, biotechnology, chemical, data informatics, clinical diagnostic, consumer product, pharmaceutical, and other industries.

Pittcon 2015 Technical Program Places Emphasis on Energy and Fuels

July 8, 2014 4:05 pm | by Pittcon | News | Comments

The Program Committee has announced a call for papers for the Pittcon 2015 Technical Program.  Abstracts are currently being accepted for contributed oral and poster presentations in areas such as, but not limited to, analytical chemistry, applied spectroscopy, life science, bioanalysis, food science, nanotechnology, environmental science and pharmaceutical. The 2015 committee is especially interested in topics relevant to energy and fuels.

Nerve agent sarin bound to bioscavenger enzyme

Chemical Weapons: Engineering Enzymes to Neutralize Nerve Agents

June 17, 2014 2:15 pm | by The University of Tennessee | News | Comments

Researchers at The University of Tennessee are a step closer to creating a prophylactic drug that would neutralize the deadly effects of the chemical weapons used in Syria and elsewhere. Jeremy Smith, UT-ORNL Governor’s Chair and an expert in computational biology, is part of the team that is trying to engineer enzymes — called bioscavengers — so they work more efficiently against chemical weapons. 

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