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Are you a Tau-ist? Pi Day is Under Attack

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — June 19-25

June 26, 2015 12:41 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

As we entered our first week of summer, the week’s biggest hits included a strong bent toward several “lighter” mathematical topics: learning how math drives Formula 1 and launches Angry Birds, inspiring young minds at MoMATH, and Pi Day under attack. You also won’t want to miss molecules exhibiting strange, exotic states, hot lava flows on Venus, and some of the coolest experimental technology showcased at this year’s Paris Air Show.

Jill Hruby will be First Woman to Lead National Security Lab

June 25, 2015 8:34 am | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

Jill Hruby was named the next president and director of Sandia National Laboratories, the...

Near Absolute Zero, Molecules Exhibit Strange, Exotic States of Matter

June 19, 2015 12:00 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

The air around us is a chaotic superhighway of molecules whizzing through space and constantly...

ChemAxon and BSSN Software Partner to Offer Analytical Data Management in a Chemical Context

June 18, 2015 3:15 pm | by ChemAxon | News | Comments

ChemAxon, a provider of chemistry software solutions and consulting services for life science...

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Manu Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford, and his students have developed a synchronous computer that operates using the unique physics of moving water droplets. Their goal is to design a new class of computers that can precisely

Computer Operates on Water Droplets

June 9, 2015 10:30 am | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford University | News | Comments

Stanford bioengineer Manu Prakash and his students have developed a synchronous computer that operates using the unique physics of moving water droplets. Computers and water typically don't mix, but in Manu Prakash's lab, the two are one and the same. Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford, and his students have built a synchronous computer that operates using the unique physics of moving water droplets.

Rose had a "formidable intellect and unwavering curiosity about fundamental biological and chemical processes that are the foundation for life,"

2004 Nobel Chemistry Winner Irwin Rose Dies at 88

June 4, 2015 3:54 pm | by AP | News | Comments

Irwin Rose, a biochemist who shared the 2004 Nobel Prize in chemistry for discovering a way that cells destroy unwanted proteins — the basis for developing new therapies for diseases such as cervical cancer and cystic fibrosis — has died. He was 88. He had a "formidable intellect and unwavering curiosity about fundamental biological and chemical processes that are the foundation for life."

The Legacy of John Nash and His Equilibrium Theory

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — May 22-28

May 29, 2015 3:10 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

Despite a holiday week in the US, there were several top stories you won’t want to miss. A hacked Kinect controller becomes a game-changer for Parkinson’s; insight into unification of General Relativity and quantum mechanics; deep web searching in the name of science; how infections affect your IQ; the legacy of John Nash; Pope Francis on moral justification to fight global warming; how a robot revolution is creating a visionary world...

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With that complicated history looming, Pope Francis, once a chemist, will soon issue an authoritative church document laying out the moral justification for fighting global warming, especially for the world's poorest billions.

Pope Francis, Once a Chemist, to Issue Document Laying out Moral Justification to Fight Global Warming

May 27, 2015 2:47 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

From Galileo to genetics, the Roman Catholic Church has danced with science, sometimes in a high-tension tango but more often in a supportive waltz. Pope Francis is about to introduce a new twist: global warming. Pope Francis, once a chemist, will soon issue an authoritative church document laying out the moral justification for fighting global warming, especially for the world's poorest billions.

When you look at this photograph, what colors are the dress?

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — May 15-21

May 22, 2015 11:56 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

In case you haven’t caught them yet, here's a recap of this week's most popular stories. Looking at the universe as a hologram; diesel fuel from carbon dioxide and water; first observations of a rare subatomic process; a big data history of music charts; secrets of colossal, invisible waves; perceptions of dress colors; and more are among the top hits.

Water, CO2 and green power - these are the ingredients for Audi e-diesel.

Audi Succeeds in Making Diesel Fuel from Carbon Dioxide and Water

April 28, 2015 10:03 am | by Audi | News | Comments

Audi has taken another big step in the development of new, CO2 neutral fuels: A pilot plant in Dresden has started production of the synthetic fuel Audi e diesel. After a commissioning phase of just four months, the research facility in Dresden started producing its first batches of high‑quality diesel fuel this month. The only raw materials needed are water and carbon dioxide.

This multitemporal Sentinel-1A radar image shows the Aral Sea, located on the border between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan in Central Asia. The Aral Sea is a striking example of humankind’s impact on the environment and natural resources.

Aral Sea Between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, Central Asia

April 15, 2015 2:33 pm | News | Comments

This multitemporal Sentinel-1A radar image shows the Aral Sea, located on the border between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan in Central Asia. The Aral Sea is a striking example of humankind’s impact on the environment and natural resources.  

A supercomputer that can do 551 trillion calculations per second is housed at Clemson’s Information Technology Center.

Data-enabled Science: Top500 Supercomputers Provide Universities with Competitive Edge

April 7, 2015 5:02 pm | by Paul Alongi, Clemson University | News | Comments

Researchers have long believed that supercomputers give universities a competitive edge in scientific research, but now they have some hard data showing it’s true. A Clemson University team found that universities with locally available supercomputers were more efficient in producing research in critical fields than universities that lacked supercomputers.

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A first-generation demonstration system of the hyperspectral platform, which combines an optical component and image processing software

Star Trek Tricorder is No Longer Science Fiction

April 2, 2015 10:44 am | by American Friends of Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

For the crew of the Starship Enterprise, Star Trek's "Tricorder" was an essential tool, a multifunctional hand-held device used to sense, compute and record data in a threatening and unpredictable universe. It simplified a number of Starfleet tasks, scientific or combat-related, by beaming sensors at objects to obtain instant results. A new invention may be able to turn smartphones into powerful hyperspectral sensors...

Buckybombs could one day be used for demolition of cancer cells. Courtesy of USC/Holly Wilder

Turning Buckyballs into Buckybombs: Nanoscale Explosives could Eliminate Cancer Cells

March 19, 2015 2:44 pm | by University of Southern California | News | Comments

In 1996, a trio of scientists won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for their discovery of Buckminsterfullerene — soccer-ball-shaped spheres of 60 joined carbon atoms that exhibit special physical properties. Now, 20 years later, scientists have figured out how to turn them into Buckybombs. These nanoscale explosives show potential for use in fighting cancer, with the hope that they could target and eliminate cancer at the cellular level.

Physicist Chien-Shiung Wu in 1963 at Columbia University, where she was a professor. Known as the First Lady of Physics, Wu worked on the Manhattan Project and helped disprove a widely-accepted law of theoretical physics. Later in her life, Wu researched

Paving the Way: 28 Amazing Women, Trailblazing Science

March 18, 2015 12:16 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Breakthrough science requires pioneers. People who combine brilliance with courage, even in the face of daunting opposition. The women who paved the way for modern scientific exploration exemplify this spirit; grappling not only with fundamental questions of the universe, but with discrimination and societal constraints that often stripped them of scientific credit.

ACD/Spectrus Portal

ACD/Spectrus Portal

March 10, 2015 9:07 am | Advanced Chemistry Development, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

The ACD/Spectrus Portal is a Web-based interface that provides vendor neutral, multi-technique results from analytical chemistry experiments to laboratory chemists. The portal extends the ACD/Spectrus analytical and chemical laboratory intelligence platform through a series of domain-specific market applications.

A representation of a 9-nanometer azotosome, about the size of a virus, with a piece of the membrane cut away to show the hollow interior. Courtesy of James Stevenson

Life 'Not as We Know It' Possible on Saturn's Moon Titan

March 2, 2015 11:31 am | by Anne Ju, Cornell University | News | Comments

Liquid water is a requirement for life on Earth. But in other, much colder worlds, life might exist beyond the bounds of water-based chemistry. Taking a simultaneously imaginative and rigidly scientific view, chemical engineers and astronomers offer a template for life that could thrive in a harsh, cold world — specifically Titan, the giant moon of Saturn.

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In this April 26, 2009 file photo, actor Leonard Nimoy poses for a portrait in Beverly Hills, CA. Nimoy, famous for playing officer Mr. Spock in “Star Trek” died Friday, February 27, 2015, in Los Angeles of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Live Long and Prosper, Mr. #Spock! Leonard Nimoy dies at 83

February 27, 2015 2:31 pm | by Lynn Elber, AP Television Writer | News | Comments

Leonard Nimoy, the actor known and loved by generations of Star Trek fans as the pointy-eared, purely logical science officer Mr. Spock, has died. Nimoy died Friday of end-stage chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at his Los Angeles home, with family at his side, said his son, Adam Nimoy. He was 83.

A 3-D model of the new class of auxetic metamaterials that defy logic and can be used to create better skin grafts and new smart materials. Courtesy of University of Malta

Logic-defying Mathematical Model could lead to Better Skin Grafts, New Smart Materials

February 26, 2015 2:00 pm | by Cassi Camilleri, University of Malta | News | Comments

Pull on a piece of plastic at separate ends; it becomes thinner. So does a rubber band. One might assume tha,t when a force is applied along an axis, materials will always stretch and become thinner. Wrong. Thanks to their peculiar internal geometry, auxetic materials grow wider. After confounding scientists for decades, researchers are now developing mathematical models to explain the unusual behavior of these logic-defying materials

NWChem molecular modeling software takes full advantage of a wide range of parallel computing systems, including Cascade. Courtesy of PNNL

PNNL Shifts Computational Chemistry into Overdrive

February 25, 2015 8:29 am | by Karol Kowalski, Ph.D., and Edoardo Apra, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

We computational chemists are an impatient lot. Despite the fact that we routinely deal with highly complicated chemical processes running on our laboratory’s equally complex HPC clusters, we want answers in minutes or hours, not days, months or even years. In many instances, that’s just not feasible; in fact, there are times when the magnitude of the problem simply exceeds the capabilities of the HPC resources available to us.

Another myth is that scientists look like this. U.S. Army RDECOM/Flickr, CC BY-SA

Seven Myths about Scientists Debunked

February 19, 2015 2:07 pm | by Jeffrey Craig and Marguerite Evans-Galea, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute | Articles | Comments

As scientific researchers, we are often surprised by some of the assumptions made about us by those outside our profession. So we put together a list of common myths we and our colleagues have heard anecdotally regarding scientific researchers.

In the search for ways to store data permanently, ETH researchers have been inspired by fossils. Courtesy of Philipp Stössel/ETH Zurich

Data Storage for Eternity: Encapsulated DNA-encoded Information Expected to Survive a Million Years

February 13, 2015 3:36 pm | by Angelika Jacobs, ETH Zurich | News | Comments

How can we preserve our knowledge today for the next millennia? Researchers have found a way to store information in the form of DNA, preserving it for nearly an eternity. As encapsulation in silica is roughly comparable to that in fossilized bones, researchers could draw on prehistoric information about long-term stability and calculate a prognosis: through storage in low temperatures, DNA-encoded information can survive.

A code hidden in the arrangement of the genetic information of single-stranded RNA viruses tells the virus how to pack itself within its outer shell of proteins.

Molecular Warfare: Researchers Discover Viral "Enigma Machine"

February 4, 2015 2:21 pm | by University of Leeds | News | Comments

Researchers have cracked a code that governs infections by a major group of viruses, including the common cold and polio. The unnoticed code had been hidden in plain sight in the sequence of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) that makes up this type of viral genome. But researchers have unlocked its meaning and demonstrated that jamming the code can disrupt virus assembly. Stopping a virus assembling can stop it functioning.

ACD/Labs 2015 Cheminformatics Software

ACD/Labs 2015 Cheminformatics Software

January 29, 2015 10:38 am | Advanced Chemistry Development, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

ACD/Labs 2015 cheminformatics software builds upon the capabilities of the ACD/Spectrus and ACD/Percepta platforms. The ACD/Spectrus Platform is designed to make it easier for organizations to handle unified analytical data from multiple techniques and instruments. The ACD/Percepta Platform features improvements in the speed of calculation of physicochemical and ADME-Tox properties and expanded capabilities to leverage organizational knowledge.

Biomolecule Toolkit

Biomolecule Toolkit

January 21, 2015 12:27 pm | ChemAxon, Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

The Biomolecule Toolkit is a Web service-based toolkit designed to bridge the gap between biology and chemistry for complex biomolecular entities. It provides unambiguous representation at the sequence and atomic level for a diverse set of biomolecules such as peptides, oligonucleotides, proteins and antibody drug conjugates, including those containing unnatural and chemically-modified components, thereby allowing their storage, indexing and search within a database.

Solar panels on the roof of the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican. Pope Benedict XVI was dubbed "the Green Pope" for his frequent calls to stop ecological devastation and his efforts to bring solar power to the Vatican city-state. "Can we remain indifferent be

Pope's Statement on Climate Change: 5 Things to Know

January 20, 2015 2:43 pm | by Rachel Zoll, AP Religion Writer | News | Comments

Pope Francis, who pledged on the day of his installation as pontiff to make the environment a priority, is drafting a highly anticipated encyclical on ecology and climate change. Environmentalists are thrilled by the prospect of a rock-star pope putting his moral weight behind efforts to curb global warming. Francis said he wanted the document to be released in time to be read before the next round of U.N. climate treaty talks in Paris.

Map of diffuse interstellar bands Courtesy of T.W. Lan, G. Zasowski, B. Ménard, SDSS and 2MASS/UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF

Astronomers Map Mysterious Molecules in our Galaxy

January 12, 2015 10:20 am | by Phil Sneiderman, Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

By analyzing the light of hundreds of thousands of celestial objects, astronomers have created a unique map of enigmatic molecules in our galaxy that are responsible for puzzling features in the light from stars, called diffuse interstellar bands. DIBs have been a mystery ever since they were discovered in 1922 — exactly which of the many thousands of possible molecules are responsible for these features?

William Weaver is an associate professor in the Department of Integrated Science, Business, and Technology at La Salle University.

By Any Other Name: The Central Role of Informatics in STEM Education

January 9, 2015 3:05 pm | by William Weaver, Ph.D. | Blogs | Comments

The human lament that things in the past were much simpler is an accurate observation made from the perspective of riding along an exponentially increasing complexity curve. Examining the present or looking into the future can be a confusing torrent of concepts, vocabulary and technologies that appear to be spiraling out-of-control. At the First IEEE Integrated STEM Education Conference, Professor Steve Zilora reflected on this increase...

Physicist Jim Bailey of Sandia National Laboratories observes a wire array that will heat foam to roughly 4 million degrees until it emits a burst of X-rays that heats a foil target to the interior conditions of the sun. Courtesy of Randy Montoya

Iron Sun: Not a Rock Band, but a Key to Stars’ Energy Transmission

January 6, 2015 12:16 pm | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

Working at temperatures matching the interior of the sun, researchers have been able to determine, for the first time in history, iron’s role in inhibiting energy transmission from the Sun's center to near the edge of its radiative band. Because that role is much greater than formerly surmised, the experimentally derived amount of iron’s opacity helps close a theoretical gap in the Standard Solar Model, used to model the behavior of stars.

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