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An April memo from the EPA's chief of staff said that "unsolicited contacts" need to be "appropriately managed" and that committee members should refrain from directly responding to requests about committees' efforts to advise the agency.

Groups to EPA: Stop Muzzling Science Advisers

August 13, 2014 12:39 pm | by Dina Cappiello, Associated Press | News | Comments

Journalist and scientific organizations accused the EPA of attempting to muzzle its independent scientific advisers by directing them to funnel all outside requests for information through agency officials. In a letter on August 12, 2014, groups representing journalists and scientists urged the EPA to allow advisory board members to talk directly to news reporters, Congress and other outside groups without first asking for permission.

3-D Comet Study Reveals Chemical Factory at Work

August 12, 2014 12:05 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A NASA-led team of scientists has created detailed 3-D maps of the atmospheres surrounding...

The Grass Really Is Greener on Computer Screens, Thanks to Quantum Dots

August 11, 2014 1:06 pm | by ACS | News | Comments

High-tech specks called quantum dots could bring brighter, more vibrant color to mass market TVs...

On the Frontiers of Cyborg Science: Seamless Marriage between Electronics and Brain Signaling

August 11, 2014 12:22 pm | by ACS | News | Comments

No longer just fantastical fodder for sci-fi buffs, cyborg technology is bringing us tangible...

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A close-up of tiny bioink droplets used to print organs shows live cells inside. Courtesy of the American Chemical Society

Exploring 3-D Printing to Make Organs for Transplants

July 30, 2014 9:44 am | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

Printing whole new organs for transplants sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, but the real-life budding technology could one day make actual kidneys, livers, hearts and other organs for patients who desperately need them. In the ACS journal Langmuir, scientists are reporting new understanding about the dynamics of 3-D bioprinting that takes them a step closer to realizing their goal of making working tissues and organs on-demand.

ArxLab Notebook Web-based Electronic Notebook

ArxLab Notebook Web-based Electronic Notebook

July 29, 2014 3:15 pm | by Arxspan | Product Releases | Comments

ArxLab Notebook is a Web-based electronic notebook application. Its SaaS platform is intended for use in experimental sciences; it is preconfigured for chemistry and biology workflows while supporting free-form research notes and data. The software provides full audit trails, electronic signatures, witnessing workflows and built-in sharing functionality.

Fundamental Chemistry Findings Could Help Extend Moore’s Law

July 16, 2014 11:49 am | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Over the years, computer chips have gotten smaller, thanks to advances in materials science and manufacturing technologies. This march of progress, the doubling of transistors on a microprocessor roughly every two years, is called Moore’s Law. But there’s one component of the chip-making process in need of an overhaul if Moore’s law is to continue: the chemical mixture called photoresist.

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Vampire Bat Venom Could Hold Key to New Drugs for Stroke, High Blood Pressure

July 15, 2014 4:38 pm | by University of Queensland | News | Comments

An international team of scientists has discovered that vampire bat venom contains molecules capable of evading the victim’s immune system. The results point to entirely new forms of anticoagulants in the venom, as well as novel molecules that cause dilation of the small arteries near the skin.

Chemists Discover Boron Buckyball

July 15, 2014 11:55 am | by Brown University | News | Comments

The discovery 30 years ago of soccer-ball-shaped carbon molecules called buckyballs helped to spur an explosion of nanotechnology research. Now, there appears to be a new ball on the pitch. Researchers have shown that a cluster of 40 boron atoms forms a hollow molecular cage similar to a carbon buckyball. It’s the first experimental evidence that a boron cage structure — previously only a matter of speculation — does indeed exist.

Core ELN Chemistry App on Platform for Science

July 11, 2014 12:16 pm | Core Informatics, ChemAxon, Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

Core ELN (electronic lab notebook) is a chemistry application for Platform for Science that is designed to help chemists document research activities and compound registration in the cloud. It is made possible through Platform for Science’s Platform-as-a-Service (sPaaS).

SLAS2015

July 11, 2014 10:24 am | by SLAS | Events

SLAS is a global organization that provides forums for education and information exchange to encourage study and professional collaboration aimed at advancing laboratory science and technology for the drug discovery, biotechnology, chemical, data informatics, clinical diagnostic, consumer product, pharmaceutical, and other industries.

Pittcon 2015 Technical Program Places Emphasis on Energy and Fuels

July 8, 2014 4:05 pm | by Pittcon | News | Comments

The Program Committee has announced a call for papers for the Pittcon 2015 Technical Program.  Abstracts are currently being accepted for contributed oral and poster presentations in areas such as, but not limited to, analytical chemistry, applied spectroscopy, life science, bioanalysis, food science, nanotechnology, environmental science and pharmaceutical. The 2015 committee is especially interested in topics relevant to energy and fuels.

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Nerve agent sarin bound to bioscavenger enzyme

Chemical Weapons: Engineering Enzymes to Neutralize Nerve Agents

June 17, 2014 2:15 pm | by The University of Tennessee | News | Comments

Researchers at The University of Tennessee are a step closer to creating a prophylactic drug that would neutralize the deadly effects of the chemical weapons used in Syria and elsewhere. Jeremy Smith, UT-ORNL Governor’s Chair and an expert in computational biology, is part of the team that is trying to engineer enzymes — called bioscavengers — so they work more efficiently against chemical weapons. 

The quest to create artificial blood is big business, with the past 25 years seeing up to £2 billion invested globally on research into a usable alternative and many major US companies falling by the wayside in the hunt for a substitute.

The Quest for Blood: Finding a Long-lasting, One-size-fits-all Viable Substitute

June 12, 2014 3:47 pm | by University of Essex | News | Comments

Every day thousands of people around the world have their lives saved or improved thanks to someone giving blood. But imagine how many more lives could be saved if a long-lasting blood substitute could be found, which could easily be stored at room temperature and available to all patients, regardless of their blood type. This is the challenge a team of scientists at the University of Essex are hoping to overcome with their Haem02 project 

High-resolution CESM simulation run on Yellowstone. This featured CAM-5 spectral element at roughly 0.25deg grid spacing, and POP2 on a nominal 0.1deg grid.

Building Momentum for Code Modernization: The Intel Parallel Computing Centers

June 9, 2014 12:06 pm | by Doug Black | Articles | Comments

Like a Formula One race car stuck in a traffic jam, HPC hardware performance is frequently hampered by HPC software. This is because some of the most widely used application codes have not been updated for years, if ever, leaving them unable to leverage advances in parallel systems. As hardware power moves toward exascale, the imbalance between hardware and software will only get worse. The problem of updating essential scientific ...

A Sept. 6, 2008, photo of Alexander Shulgin in San Francisco. Shulgin, a respected chemist famed for dusting off a decades-old recipe for the psychedelic drug ecstasy, died Monday, June 3, 2014, at his Northern California home. He was 88. (AP Photo/Greg M

Ecstasy Chemist Shulgin, 88, Dies in California

June 5, 2014 5:37 pm | by Paul Elias, Associated Press | News | Comments

Alexander Shulgin, a respected chemist famed for dusting off a decades-old recipe for the psychedelic drug ecstasy, died June 2, 2014, at his Northern California home. He was 88. Shulgin's wife, Ann, said liver cancer was the cause. She said he had been diagnosed about a year ago and was surrounded by family and friends when he died at "the farm," his sprawling residence and lab in a remote part of Lafayette, CA

Swedish geochemist Alatariel Elensar submitted the idea for a female set featuring minifigure scientists — an astronomer with a telescope, a paleontologist with a dinosaur and a chemist in a lab.

New LEGO Set Celebrates Women in Science

June 5, 2014 10:10 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

LEGO has announced that a female minifigure set, featuring three scientists along with their lab gear, will be released as the next LEGO Ideas set. This “Research Institute” model is an official set of all-female scientist figures — a paleontologist, an astronomer and a chemist — made with regular LEGO minifigures.

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The winners, announced by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, will share three $1 million Kavli Prizes.

Kavli Science Prizes Awarded for Findings in Astrophysics, Neuroscience and Nanoscience

May 29, 2014 12:06 pm | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Nine scientists won awards May 29, 2014, for theories about the first moments of the universe, discoveries about the brain and techniques to let researchers see ever-tinier things. The winners, announced by the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, will share three $1 million Kavli Prizes. Awarded biennially since 2008, the prizes are named after philanthropist Fred Kavli, a native of Norway. Kavli died last November.

The new brand is a combination of Dassault Systèmes’ own activities in BioIntelligence, its collaborative 3DEXPERIENCE technologies, and the leading life sciences and material sciences applications from the recent acquisition of Accelrys.

Dassault Systèmes Introduces BIOVIA, Combines Accelrys and BioPLM

May 23, 2014 10:10 am | by Dassault Systèmes | News | Comments

Dassault Systèmes, a 3-D design software company, has announced the introduction of its newest brand, BIOVIA. The new brand is a combination of Dassault Systèmes’ own activities in BioIntelligence, its collaborative 3DEXPERIENCE technologies, and the life sciences and material sciences applications from the recent acquisition of Accelrys.

Cell patterning using a specific kind of sonic screwdriver — a Heptagon Acoustic Tweezer — may soon be in a position to deliver important results. Courtesy of R. Steven Rainwater

Sonic Screwdriver Can Turn Cells Tartan

May 13, 2014 3:52 pm | by University of Glasgow | News | Comments

It’s the sort of thing you would expect Dr Who to do – join up someone’s damaged nerves by using a sonic screwdriver. But the scientists at the University of Glasgow are no time-travellers and their work is based in a lab — not a Tardis. Their research shows that cell patterning using a specific kind of sonic screwdriver — a Heptagon Acoustic Tweezer — may soon be in a position to deliver important results.

The periodic table includes every known element, from the lightest substances, hydrogen and helium, through to super-heavy elements, nearly 300 times heavier than hydrogen. Courtesy of Brian Cantoni

New Super-heavy Element 117 Found

May 5, 2014 12:34 pm | by Australian National University | News | Comments

The stage is set for a new, super-heavy element to be added to the periodic table following research published by a multinational team of physicists and chemists. The team created atoms of element 117, matching the heaviest atoms ever observed, which are 40 percent heavier than an atom of lead.

Vortex Data Analysis and Visualization Tool

Vortex Data Analysis and Visualization Tool

April 30, 2014 2:32 pm | Dotmatics Limited | Product Releases | Comments

The Vortex data analysis and visualization tool is designed for scientists working in the areas of chemistry, biology and engineering. It is compatible with the credit-card sized computer Raspberry Pi, as well as Windows, Mac OS X and Linux, offering an alternative to spreadsheets and providing the plots and functionality required by scientists to explore and understand large sets of complex data.

Van Duyne recently identified the chemical components of paint, now partially faded, used by Renoir in his oil painting “Madame Léon Clapisson.”

Chemist Reveals Renoir Masterpiece's True Colors

April 23, 2014 12:36 pm | by Northwestern University | News | Comments

Scientists are using powerful analytical and imaging tools to study artworks from all ages, delving deep below the surface to reveal the process and materials used by some of the world’s greatest artists. Chemist Richard Van Duyne, in collaboration with conservation scientists at the Art Institute of Chicago, has been using a scientific method to investigate masterpieces by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Winslow Homer and Mary Cassatt.

The author loses control of an interview with subject-matter experts Cheech and Chong.

Up In Smoke: Rocky Mountain High Redefined by Legalized Marijuana

April 21, 2014 3:38 pm | by Randy C. Hice | Blogs | Comments

Tens of thousands of pot smokers wheezed a sigh of relief when recreational marijuana use was made legal January 1, 2014. Gone is the cottage industry of gray-area physicians rubber-stamping medical prescriptions for a well-informed gaggle of would-be stoners who memorized popular conditions sure to garner approval.

Scientists were stunned to discover an ancient tundra landscape frozen under two miles of ice in Greenland. It’s been there for three million years — and may lead geologists to rethink how Greenland’s big ice works. UVM professor Paul Bierman led the team

3-million-year-old Landscape Found beneath Greenland Ice Sheet

April 17, 2014 8:48 pm | by Joshua E. Brown, University of Vermont | News | Comments

Glaciers are commonly thought to work like a belt sander. As they move over the land they scrape off everything — vegetation, soil, and even the top layer of bedrock. So scientists were greatly surprised to discover an ancient tundra landscape preserved under the Greenland Ice Sheet, below two miles of ice.

New Study Outlines Water World Theory of Life's Origins

April 16, 2014 12:37 pm | by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory | News | Comments

Life took root more than four billion years ago on our nascent Earth, a wetter and harsher place than now, bathed in sizzling ultraviolet rays. What started out as simple cells ultimately transformed into slime molds, frogs, elephants, humans and the rest of our planet's living kingdoms. How did it all begin?

Modesto Orozco, Professor Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, IRB Barcelona

Modesto Orozco

April 15, 2014 7:00 pm | Biographies

Modesto Orozco’s research activity is focused on the theoretical study of biological systems. More than 350 papers published in international peer-reviewed journals like Nature, Nature Genetics, Angew Chem., Proc.Natl.Acad.Sci.USA, Chem.Rev., Chem.Soc.Rev., Acc. Chem. Res., J.Am.Chem.Soc. His publications have collected more than 14000 citations with an h-index of 65.

Claudio Zannoni, Professor of Physical Chemistry, University Bologna

Claudio Zannoni

April 15, 2014 6:36 pm | Biographies

Research activity is in the field of liquid crystals and anisotropic soft materials using theory, computer simulations and various spectroscopical techniques and has led to over 250 publications in international journals or multi-author books, particularly on Computer Simulations and Modeling (Monte Carlo, Molecular Dynamics) of lattice (Lebwohl-Lasher), molecular (Gay-Berne) and atomistic models and Statistical Theories of bulk and confined Liquid Crystals.

Robotic Arm Probes Chemistry of 3-D Objects

April 11, 2014 9:53 am | by Brett Israel, Georgia Tech | News | Comments

When life on Earth was first getting started, simple molecules bonded together into the precursors of modern genetic material. A catalyst would have been needed, but enzymes had not yet evolved. One theory is that the catalytic minerals on a meteorite’s surface could have jump-started life’s first chemical reactions. But scientists need a way to directly analyze these rough, irregularly shaped surfaces.

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