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MIT researchers tested the viability of their algorithm by using it to guide a crew of three robots in the assembly of a chair. Courtesy of Dominick Reuter

New Algorithm lets Autonomous Robots Divvy up Assembly Tasks on the Fly

May 27, 2015 2:33 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Today’s industrial robots are remarkably efficient — as long as they’re in a controlled environment where everything is exactly where they expect it to be. But put them in an unfamiliar setting, where they have to think for themselves, and their efficiency plummets. And the difficulty of on-the-fly motion planning increases exponentially with the number of robots involved. For even a simple collaborative task...

New Kind of Computer Chip uses Flexible, Biodegradable Cellulose Nanofibril Substrate

May 27, 2015 10:25 am | by John Steeno, University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

Portable electronics — typically made of non-renewable, non-biodegradable, potentially toxic...

Code Advances Quantum Error Correction

May 26, 2015 3:15 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Crucial to most designs for quantum computers is quantum error correction, which helps preserve...

Important Step in AI: Making Computer Brains More like our Own

May 12, 2015 2:06 pm | by Sonia Fernandez, UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

In what marks a significant step forward for artificial intelligence, researchers at UC Santa...

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Each horizontal line in this computer display represents a different line of evidence that could be used to argue for or against the presence of gene in a DNA sequence. The student, seeing a discrepancy, must drill down deeper to try to find its source. C

Massively Parallel Genomics Students: Publication has 940 Undergraduate Authors

May 11, 2015 12:04 pm | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

The list of authors for an article on comparative genomics of a fruit fly chromosome runs three single-spaced pages. Large author lists are the norm in high-energy physics, but a novelty in biology. What is going on? The 1,014 authors include 940 undergraduates from 63 institutions, all working in parallel to solve mysteries embedded in the DNA sequences of the unusual dot chromosome in fruit flies. A large collaboration is providing...

NASA Infrared Telescope Facility above the clouds on Mauna Kea in Hawaii

Scientists at Work: Most Days in the Life of an Astronomer aren’t spent at Telescopes

May 11, 2015 10:38 am | by Nicole Estefania Cabrera Salazar, Georgia State University | Articles | Comments

On a telescope at the summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii, it’s not easy to put in a full night of work. At 14,000 feet, you’re operating at only 60 percent of the oxygen available at sea level, which makes concentrating difficult. Top that off with a shift that begins at 6:30 pm and ends at 6:30 am, and it becomes hard to imagine astronomers working like that year-round. Luckily, most of us don’t have to.

A peek inside the Oculus Rift

First Look at the Rift, Shipping Q1 2016

May 7, 2015 9:16 am | by Oculus VR | Blogs | Comments

Since the earliest days of the Oculus Kickstarter, the Rift has been shaped by gamers, backers, developers, and enthusiasts around the world. Today, we’re incredibly excited to announce that the Oculus Rift will be shipping to consumers in Q1 2016, with pre-orders later this year.

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Scientists have programmed DNA to calculate multiple GPS routes at the same time. Courtesy of the American Chemical Society

Next Step in DNA Computing: GPS Mapping?

May 6, 2015 12:23 pm | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

Conventional silicon-based computing, which has advanced by leaps and bounds in recent decades, is pushing against its practical limits. DNA computing could help take the digital era to the next level. Scientists are now reporting progress toward that goal with the development of a novel DNA-based GPS.

MIT spinout Verayo has created technology that tracks random variations in silicon chips to assign them unique "fingerprints." Integrated into radio frequency identification tags (shown here), the chips can be scanned by a mobile device or reader to deter

Fingerprinting Silicon Chips to Fight Counterfeiting

May 1, 2015 9:31 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT | News | Comments

It’s often said that no two human fingerprints are exactly alike. For that reason, police often use them as evidence to link suspects to crime scenes. The same goes for silicon chips: Manufacturing processes cause microscopic variations in chips that are unpredictable, permanent and effectively impossible to clone.

Amin Amini Maghsoud Bigy and Dr. Konstantinos Banitsas have turned Microsoft’s Kinect computer games controller into a system that can counter two of the most common and distressing symptoms of Parkinson’s.

Hacked Kinect Computer Games Controller a Game-changer for Parkinson’s

May 1, 2015 8:58 am | by Brunel University London | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a system for Parkinson’s sufferers to counter two of the most common and distressing symptoms of the degenerative disease.They have turned Microsoft’s Kinect computer games controller into a system that can be installed into a patient’s own home.

SQream DB GPU-based Columnar SQL Database

SQream DB GPU-based Columnar SQL Database

April 30, 2015 10:49 am | by SQream Technologies | Product Releases | Comments

SQream DB is a high-speed GPU-based columnar SQL database designed to uniquely address the speed, scalability and efficiency hurdles that face big data analytics. It is capable of processing and analyzing high volumes of data, while delivering a high cost/performance ratio. 

IBM researcher Jerry Chow in the quantum computing lab at IBM's T.J. Watson Research Center. Courtesy of Jon Simon/Feature Photo Service for IBM

Scientists Achieve Critical Steps to Building First Practical Quantum Computer

April 29, 2015 9:21 am | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM scientists unveiled two critical advances towards the realization of a practical quantum computer. For the first time, they showed the ability to detect and measure both kinds of quantum errors simultaneously, as well as demonstrated a new, square quantum bit circuit design that is the only physical architecture that could successfully scale to larger dimensions.

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The functional genetic network shown is just one of the 144 such networks identified for a diverse set of human tissues and cell types. Courtesy of Simons Center for Data Analysis

Computer Science, Statistical Methods Combine to Analyze Stunningly Diverse Genomic Big Data Collections

April 28, 2015 3:36 pm | by Simons Foundation | News | Comments

A multi-year study led by researchers from the Simons Center for Data Analysis and major universities and medical schools has broken substantial new ground, establishing how genes work together within 144 different human tissues and cell types in carrying out those tissues’ functions. The paper also demonstrates how computer science and statistical methods may combine to analyze genomic ‘big-data’ collections.

Chris Evans, left, as Captain America/Steve Rogers, and Chris Hemsworth as Thor, in a scene of the new film, "Avengers: Age Of Ultron." The movie releases in the U.S. on May 1, 2015. (Jay Maidment/Disney/Marvel via AP)

'Avengers' Stars Wary of Artificial Intelligence

April 28, 2015 2:46 pm | by Ryan Pearson, AP Entertainment Writer | News | Comments

The cast of "Avengers: Age of Ultron" may battle out-of-control artificial intelligence on-screen but, in real life, they're not so sure about cutting-edge technology. AP talked with the cast about what they embrace and fear in today's high-tech landscape: ROBERT DOWNEY, JR.: I feel you have to embrace it. You know, there's always that shadow play that goes on ... But look, it took over a while ago...

Poker is now a benchmark for artificial intelligence research, just as chess once was. It’s a game of exceeding complexity that requires a machine to make decisions based on incomplete and often misleading information, thanks to bluffing, slow play and ot

Brains vs. AI: Carnegie Mellon Computer Faces Poker Pros in Epic No-Limit Texas Hold’Em

April 24, 2015 3:30 pm | by Ken Walters, Carnegie Mellon University | News | Comments

In a contest that echoes Deep Blue’s chess victory over Garry Kasparov and Watson beating two Jeopardy! Champions, computer poker software developed at Carnegie Mellon University will challenge four of the world’s best professional poker players in a “Brains Vs. Artificial Intelligence” competition beginning April 24, 2015, at Rivers Casino.

In spintronics memory applications, the spin of electrons can be controlled to encode data via the "up" and "down" binary pair of their spin.

Spintronic Data Storage: Putting a New Spin on Memory

April 24, 2015 2:36 pm | by Drexel University | News | Comments

Ever since computers have been small enough to be fixtures on desks, their central processing has functioned something like an atomic Etch A Sketch, with electromagnetic fields pushing data bits into place to encode data. Unfortunately, the same drawbacks and perils of the mechanical sketch board have been just as pervasive in computing: making a change often requires starting over, and dropping the device could wipe out the memory.

Defense Secretary Ash Carter said one way the Defense Department is responding is to be more transparent about cybersecurity, and that includes a new cybersecurity strategy that is far more open about the Pentagon's cyber missions. Courtesy of Greg West

New Pentagon Strategy Warns of Cyberwar Capabilities

April 24, 2015 9:45 am | by Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press | News | Comments

A new Pentagon cybersecurity strategy lays out for the first time publicly that the U.S. military plans to use cyberwarfare as an option in conflicts with enemies. The 33-page strategy says the Defense Department "should be able to use cyber operations to disrupt an adversary's command and control networks, military-related critical infrastructure and weapons capabilities."

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The winners of the CyberCenturion National Finals Competition, King Edward VI Grammar School, Chelmsford, with their coach pictured in front of Collossus at The National Museum of Computing, Bletchley Park. Their awards were presented April 17 by Andrew T

UK CyberCenturion Competition Launches in Search for Young Cyber Security Talent

April 22, 2015 2:43 pm | by Northrop Grumman | News | Comments

Northrop Grumman has renewed its commitment to run the CyberCenturion competition for a second year, continuing its efforts to seek out the UK's best young cyber talent. CyberCenturion is the UK's first team-based cyber security contest specifically designed to attract 12- to 18-year-olds. The competition aims to engage young people with an interest in cyber as a way to address the STEM skills gap and encourage careers in cyber security.

A special feature of these molecular electronics is that they take place in a fluid within a test tube, where the molecules are contacted within the solution.

Advances in Molecular Electronics: A Computer from a Test Tube?

April 20, 2015 10:49 am | by University of Konstanz | News | Comments

Scientists are working on storing and processing information on the level of single molecules to create the smallest possible components that will combine autonomously to form a circuit. The researchers can switch on the current flow through a single molecule for the first time with the help of light.

INCITE seeks research proposals for capability computing: production simulations — including ensembles — that use a large fraction of Leadership Computing Facility systems or require the unique LCF architectural infrastructure for HPC projects that cannot

INCITE Seeking Proposals to Advance Science and Engineering at U.S. Leadership Computing Facilities

April 20, 2015 10:07 am | by Jeff Gary, OLCF | News | Comments

The Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program is now accepting proposals for high-impact, computationally intensive research campaigns in a broad array of science, engineering and computer science domains.

Cybersecurity strategist George M. Schu says the emerging Internet of Things (IoT) will expose the global aviation industry to vulnerabilities at a level never before seen and will have a transformative impact on the industry.

Internet of Things Threatens Aviation Safety

April 15, 2015 2:55 pm | News | Comments

Cybersecurity strategist George M. Schu says the emerging Internet of Things (IoT) will expose the global aviation industry to vulnerabilities at a level never before seen and will have a transformative impact on the industry.

If you’re designing a new computer, you want it to solve problems as fast as possible. Just how fast is possible is an open question when it comes to quantum computers, but physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have narrowed the

NIST Tightens Bounds on Quantum Information 'Speed Limit'

April 14, 2015 3:49 pm | by NIST | News | Comments

If you’re designing a new computer, you want it to solve problems as fast as possible. Just how fast is possible is an open question when it comes to quantum computers, but physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have narrowed the theoretical limits for where that “speed limit” is.

Imagine your computer screen could change shape. Imagine if that screen could spring to life at the touch of a fingertip, translating numbers and trends into shapes and gradients you can reach out and touch.

Shape-Changing Display is the End of 2D Graphing

April 14, 2015 3:37 pm | by Lancaster University | News | Comments

Imagine your computer screen could change shape. Imagine if that screen could spring to life at the touch of a fingertip, translating numbers and trends into shapes and gradients you can reach out and touch. 

A key handwritten scientific document by Alan Turing in which he works on the foundations of mathematical notation and computer science was sold for $1,025,000 in the Fine Books & Manuscripts Sale at Bonhams New York.

Alan Turing's Manuscript on Foundations of Mathematics and Computer Science Sold for $1,025,000

April 14, 2015 3:00 pm | by Bonhams | News | Comments

A key handwritten scientific document by Alan Turing in which he works on the foundations of mathematical notation and computer science was sold for $1,025,000 in the Fine Books & Manuscripts Sale at Bonhams New York.

As the liquid crystals align in electric fields, it helps to align the nanotubes — changing the electrical structure of the materials. You can see the thermal output from the material during this “training” process. Bright colors represent localized heati

Evolution-in-materio: Carbon Nanotube Computing?

April 9, 2015 4:29 pm | by American Institute of Physics (AIP) | News | Comments

As we approach the miniaturization limits of conventional electronics, alternatives to silicon-based transistors — the building blocks of the multitude of electronic devices we’ve come to rely on — are being hotly pursued. Inspired by the way living organisms have evolved in nature to perform complex tasks with remarkable ease, a group of researchers is exploring similar “evolutionary” methods to create information processing devices.

Ransomware infiltrates a computer after a user clicks on a link or attachment in an e-mail. It can also attack when a user visits a Web site, including well-known ones with good security systems.

A Q&A about the Malicious Software Known as Ransomware

April 9, 2015 4:23 pm | by Joyce M. Rosenberg, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

Ransomware is a growing threat to computer users, who can suddenly find they're unable to open or use their files when their machines are infected. The malicious software can attack any user — an individual, small business, Fortune 500 company or a government agency.

President Barack Obama speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. President Barack Obama on Wednesday authorized a new U.S. government approach to deterring cyberattacks: financial sanctions against malicious overseas hackers and companie

Obama Signs Order Creating New Cyber Sanctions Program

April 9, 2015 9:59 am | by Ken Dilanian, AP Intelligence Writer | News | Comments

President Barack Obama authorized a new U.S. government approach to deterring cyberattacks on April 8, 2015: financial sanctions against malicious overseas hackers and companies that knowingly benefit from the fruits of cyberespionage. The latter category could include state-owned corporations in Russia, China and elsewhere, setting the stage for major diplomatic friction if the sanctions are employed in that way.

Researchers have accomplished a new step forward in electronics that could bring brain-like computing closer to reality. Courtesy of Rolff Images

Memristors Mimic Brain Function

April 7, 2015 10:44 am | by Amanda Morris, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Researchers are always searching for improved technologies, but the most efficient computer possible already exists. It can learn and adapt without needing to be programmed or updated. It has nearly limitless memory, is difficult to crash, and works at extremely fast speeds. It’s not a Mac or a PC; it’s the human brain. And scientists around the world want to mimic its abilities.

The core circuits of quantum teleportation, which generate and detect quantum entanglement, have been successfully integrated into a photonic chip by an international team of scientists from the universities of Bristol, Tokyo, Southampton and NTT Device T

Quantum Teleportation on Chip Significant Step toward Ultra-High Speed Quantum Computers

April 6, 2015 4:07 pm | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

The core circuits of quantum teleportation, which generate and detect quantum entanglement, have been successfully integrated into a photonic chip by an international team of scientists from the universities of Bristol, Tokyo, Southampton and NTT Device Technology Laboratories. These results pave the way to developing ultra-high-speed quantum computers and strengthening the security of communication.

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