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Researchers found that people who played violent video games in 3-D showed more evidence of anger afterward than did people who played using traditional 2-D systems — even those with large screens. © lassedesignen / Fotolia

Violent 3-D Gaming Provokes More Anger

October 24, 2014 5:17 pm | by Jeff Grabmeier, The Ohio State University | News | Comments

Playing violent video games in 3-D makes everything seem more real — and that may have troubling consequences for players, a new study reveals. Researchers found that people who played violent video games in 3-D showed more evidence of anger afterward than did people who played using traditional 2-D systems — even those with large screens.

Constructing Precisely Functioning, Programmable Bio-computers

October 23, 2014 3:40 pm | by Fabio Bergamin, ETH | News | Comments

Bio-engineers are working on the development of biological computers with the aim of designing...

Quantum Holograms could become Quantum Information Memory

October 22, 2014 12:22 pm | by Springer | News | Comments

Russian scientists have developed a theoretical model of quantum memory for light, adapting the...

Counter-measure Offers Cyber Protection for Supply Chains

October 22, 2014 10:14 am | by University of Maryland | News | Comments

The supply chain is ground zero for several recent cyber breaches. Hackers, for example, prey on...

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Quantum Entanglement Made Tangible

October 5, 2014 11:46 pm | by Nik Papageorgiou | News | Comments

EPFL scientists have designed a first-ever experiment for demonstrating quantum entanglement in the macroscopic realm. Unlike other such proposals, the experiment is relatively easy to set up and run with existing semiconductor devices. Interest in entanglement is increasing today, as it challenges the foundations of quantum mechanics itself.

A Purdue-based startup is developing high-temperature "plasmonic metamaterials" that could dramatically increase data-storage capabilities, improve solar-cell and waste-heat recovery performance and provide a new avenue for clinical therapeutics.

Plasmonics Advances Optics, Improves Data-storage, Solar Cell Performance

October 3, 2014 2:26 pm | by Purdue University | News | Comments

A Purdue-based startup is developing high-temperature "plasmonic metamaterials" that could dramatically increase data-storage capabilities, improve solar-cell and waste-heat recovery performance and provide a new avenue for clinical therapeutics.

Where are the quantum computers? Aren’t they supposed to be speeding up decryption and internet searches? After two decades of research, you still can’t find them in stores. Well, it took two decades or more of research dedicated to semiconductors and cir

Quantum Environmentalism

October 3, 2014 2:13 pm | by The Joint Quantum Institute | News | Comments

Where are the quantum computers? Aren’t they supposed to be speeding up decryption and internet searches? After two decades of research, you still can’t find them in stores. Well, it took two decades or more of research dedicated to semiconductors and circuit integration before we had digital computers. For quantum computers too it will take technology more time to catch up to the science.

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Researchers have brought ultra-fast, nano-scale data storage within striking reach, using technology that mimics the human brain. They have built a novel nano-structure that offers a new platform for the development of highly stable and reliable nanoscale

Nano-scale Data Storage Mimics Brain Cells to Boost Memory Power

October 1, 2014 3:56 pm | by RMIT University | News | Comments

Researchers have brought ultra-fast, nano-scale data storage within striking reach, using technology that mimics the human brain. They have built a novel nano-structure that offers a new platform for the development of highly stable and reliable nanoscale memory devices.

A researcher proposes to construct a new quantum computer, able to perform multiple operations in a few seconds, which is based on the diamond structure to process information similarly to regular computers but with their own units of information called q

From Diamonds to Supercomputers

September 29, 2014 3:37 pm | by Investigación y Desarrollo | News | Comments

A researcher proposes to construct a new quantum computer, able to perform multiple operations in a few seconds, which is based on the diamond structure to process information similarly to regular computers but with their own units of information called qubits that allow much faster data processing, equal to one thousand computers working simultaneously.

A qubit (quantum bit) is the quantum state of a two-level quantum system. Courtesy of Clemens Adolphs

Putting the Squeeze on Quantum Information

September 26, 2014 12:56 pm | by Canadian Institute for Advanced Research | News | Comments

Researchers have shown that information stored in quantum bits can be exponentially compressed without losing information. The achievement is an important proof of principle, and could be useful for efficient quantum communications and information storage. Compression is vital for modern digital communication. It helps movies to stream quickly over the Internet and millions of telephone calls to bounce off of satellites.

People who practice yoga and meditation long term can learn to control a computer with their minds faster and better than people with little or no yoga or meditation experience, new research shows. The research could have major implications for treatments

Meditation may Help People Control Computers with Their Mind

September 26, 2014 12:32 pm | by University of Minnesota | News | Comments

New research by biomedical engineers at the University of Minnesota shows that people who practice yoga and meditation long-term can learn to control a computer with their minds faster and better than people with little or no yoga or meditation experience. The research could have major implications for treatments of people who are paralyzed or have neurodegenerative diseases.

Magnetic states at oxide interfaces controlled by electricity. Top image shows magnetic state with -3 volts applied, and bottom image shows nonmagnetic state with 0 volts applied.

New Discovery Could Pave the Way for Spin-based Computing

September 26, 2014 11:12 am | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

Electricity and magnetism rule our digital world. Semiconductors process electrical information, while magnetic materials enable long-term data storage. A University of Pittsburgh research team has discovered a way to fuse these two distinct properties in a single material, paving the way for new ultrahigh density storage and computing architectures.

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Graphic showing the intensity of the radio beams after twisting Courtesy of Alan Willner / USC Viterbi

Scientists Twist Radio Beams to Send Data, Reach Speeds of 32 Gibit/s

September 17, 2014 2:55 pm | by University of Southern California | News | Comments

Building on previous research that twisted light to send data at unheard-of speeds, scientists at University of Southern California (USC) have developed a similar technique with radiowaves, reaching high speeds without some of the hassles that can go with optical systems.

On the right, an artificial atom generates sound waves consisting of ripples on the surface of a solid. The sound, known as a surface acoustic wave (SAW) is picked up on the left by a "microphone" composed of interlaced metal fingers. According to theory,

Sound of an Atom Captured

September 12, 2014 3:16 pm | by Johanna Wilde and Martin Gustafsson, Chalmers University of Technology | News | Comments

The interaction between atoms and light is well-known and has been studied extensively in the field of quantum optics. However, to achieve the same kind of interaction with sound waves has been a more challenging undertaking. In collaboration between experimental and theoretical physicists, Chalmers University of Technology researchers have succeeded in making acoustic waves couple to an artificial atom.

It is extremely rare to come across with a phenomenon that bridges materials science, particle physics, relativity and topology.

New Species of Electrons Can Lead to Better Computing

September 11, 2014 4:18 pm | by The University of Manchester | News | Comments

Electrons that break the rules and move perpendicular to the applied electric field could be the key to delivering next generation, low-energy computers, a collaboration of scientists from The University of Manchester and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found. They report a material in which electrons move at a controllable angle to applied fields, similar to sailboats driven diagonally to the wind.

The Department of Energy’s Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamline 7.3.3 (SAXS/WAXS/GISAXS/GIWAXS) and endstation at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Courtesy of Roy Kaltschmidt

Tools for Reducing, Managing, Analyzing and Visualizing Data Transform Beamline Science

September 10, 2014 3:48 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Some mysteries of science can only be explained on a nanometer scale — even smaller than a single strand of human DNA, which is about 2.5 nanometers wide. At this scale, scientists can investigate the structure and behavior of proteins that help our bodies fight infectious microbes, and even catch chemical reactions in action. To resolve these very fine details, they rely on synchrotron light sources like the ALS at Berkeley Lab.

University of Alabama at Birmingham associate professor Nitesh Saxena, Ph.D. Courtesy of UAB News

Improved Method Lets Computers Know You Are Human

September 9, 2014 3:21 pm | by University of Alabama at Birmingham | News | Comments

CAPTCHA services that require users to recognize and type in static distorted characters may be a method of the past, according to studies published by researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Nitesh Saxena led a team that investigated the security and usability of the next generation of CAPTCHAs that are based on simple computer games.

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Intel Corporation unveiled its first eight-core desktop processor, the Intel Core i7-5960X processor Extreme Edition, formerly code-named "Haswell-E," targeted at power users who demand the most from their PCs. Intel's first client processor supports 16 c

Intel 8-Core Desktop Processor

September 8, 2014 3:36 pm | Intel Corp | Product Releases | Comments

Intel Corporation unveiled its first eight-core desktop processor, the Intel Core i7-5960X processor Extreme Edition, formerly code-named "Haswell-E," targeted at power users who demand the most from their PCs. Intel's first client processor supports 16 computing threads.

How do you prevent an earthquake from destroying expensive computer systems? That’s the question earthquake engineer Claudia Marin-Artieda aims to answer through a series of experiments conducted at the University at Buffalo.

Can a stack of computer servers survive an earthquake?

September 3, 2014 4:13 pm | by Cory Nealon, University at Buffalo | News | Comments

How do you prevent an earthquake from destroying expensive computer systems? That’s the question earthquake engineer Claudia Marin-Artieda aims to answer through a series of experiments conducted at the University at Buffalo.       

The industry's preeminent event on Molecular Medicine, focusing on Drug Discovery, Genomics, Diagnostics and Information Technology.

22nd International Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference

August 28, 2014 3:17 pm | Events

The 22nd International Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference is the industry's Preeminent Event on Molecular Medicine, focusing on Drug Discovery, Genomics, Diagnostics and Information Technology. Spanning six days this year, the Tri-Conference includes an expanded program that includes 6 symposia, over 20 short courses, and 17 conference programs.

The Expo provides the perfect venue to share information and discuss enabling technologies that are driving biomedical research and the drug development process

2015 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo

August 28, 2014 3:06 pm | Events

The 2015 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo plans to unite 3,000+ life sciences, pharmaceutical, clinical, healthcare, and IT professionals from 32+ countries. The Expo provides the perfect venue to share information and discuss enabling technologies that are driving biomedical research and the drug development process.

The study combined two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Does your Computer Know How You’re Feeling?

August 25, 2014 11:16 am | by Taylor & Francis | News | Comments

Researchers in Bangladesh have designed a computer program that can accurately recognize users’ emotional states as much as 87 percent of the time, depending on the emotion. Writing in the journal Behaviour & Information Technology, A.F.M. Nazmul Haque Nahin and his colleagues describe how their study combined — for the first time — two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Rock Stars of Cybersecurity will take place in Austin, TX, on September 24, 2014

Top Cybersecurity Advice from the Rock Stars

August 22, 2014 10:57 am | by Amanda Sawyer, IEEE Computer Society | Blogs | Comments

High-profile security breaches, data thefts and cyberattacks are increasing in frequency, ferocity and stealth. They result in significant loss of revenue and reputation for organizations, destabilize governments, and hit everyone’s wallets. Cybersecurity is in the global spotlight and, now more than ever, organizations must understand how to identify weaknesses and protect company infrastructure from incursions.

TCP Stealth defense software can help to prevent cyberattacks. Courtesy of Artur Marciniec/Fotolia

TCP Stealth Offers Protection against Hacienda Intelligence Program

August 20, 2014 10:00 am | by Technische Universität München | News | Comments

According to a group of journalists, a spy program known as "Hacienda" is being used by five western intelligence agencies to identify vulnerable servers across the world in order to control them and use them for their own purposes. However, scientists at the Technische Universität München have developed free software that can help prevent this kind of identification and, thus, the subsequent capture of systems.

Users can use the tool to focus on images in which President Obama appears over Stephen Colbert’s shoulder, and then observe Colbert’s typical body posture among those results. Courtesy of Jun-Yan Zhu, Yong Jae Lee and Alexei Efros, UC Berkeley

Single Picture worth 1000 — and More — Images

August 15, 2014 12:38 pm | by Sarah Yang, UC Berkeley | News | Comments

A photo is worth a thousand words, but what if the image could also represent thousands of other images? New software seeks to tame the vast amount of visual data in the world by generating a single photo that can represent massive clusters of images. This tool can give users the photographic gist of a kid on Santa’s lap or housecats. It works by generating an image that literally averages the key features of the other photos.

“There are just so many reasons why data sharing is important,” says Gary Berg-Cross, general secretary of the Spatial Ontology Community of Practice and a member of the US advisory committee for RDA.

Laying the Foundations for Better Sharing of Research Data

August 14, 2014 2:57 pm | by Andrew Purcell | Articles | Comments

The Research Data Alliance seeks to build the social and technical bridges that enable open sharing and reuse of data, so as to address cross-border and cross-disciplinary challenges faced by researchers. This September, the RDA will be hosting its Fourth Plenary Meeting. Ahead of the event, iSGTW spoke to Gary Berg-Cross, general secretary of the Spatial Ontology Community of Practice and a member of the US advisory committee for RDA.

The Bloch sphere, a representation of a qubit, the fundamental building block of quantum computers. Courtesy of Glosser

Quantum Simulators Explained

August 12, 2014 12:36 pm | by Springer Science+Business Media | News | Comments

Just about everything you ever wanted to know about quantum simulators is summed up in a new review. As part of a Thematic Series on Quantum Simulations, the open access journal European Physical Journal Quantum Technology has published an overview of just what a quantum simulator is, namely a device that actively uses quantum effects to answer questions on model systems.

In one brief lapse of concentration, I didn’t examine the URL on a “Windows update” and my venerable Dell Dimension 8300 was infected with a rootkit virus when I clicked “OK” to upgrade Internet Explorer.

The Root(kit) of all Evil: Software Criminals are Winning the Arms Race

August 12, 2014 11:40 am | by Randy C. Hice | Blogs | Comments

Ah, sad news in the Hice household. The patient is terminal, and I’m keeping it alive on life support. I keep wallowing in self-pity and ask myself, “Why me?” I feel as though I’m somehow responsible for the illness. Well, OK, I’m definitely responsible, why lie? I may as well have been sharing blood-soaked hypos with a drug addict, but what I did was equally careless. In one brief lapse of concentration, I didn’t examine the URL ...

The confirmation of registration by the American CSNET was first e-mail received in Germany. Courtesy of KIT

First Internet-based E-mail Received in Germany 30 Years Ago

August 5, 2014 12:44 pm | by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology | News | Comments

It is the central means of communication of our times: Electronic mailing. Worldwide, short messages as well as large data packages can be exchanged rapidly and at low costs. 30 years ago, the first e-mail arrived in Germany at the then Universität Karlsruhe (TH), today’s Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. It was the first Internet-based connection between the American network CSNET (Computer Science Net) and the new Karlsruhe CSNET server.

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