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Poker is now a benchmark for artificial intelligence research, just as chess once was. It’s a game of exceeding complexity that requires a machine to make decisions based on incomplete and often misleading information, thanks to bluffing, slow play and ot

Brains vs. AI: Carnegie Mellon Computer Faces Poker Pros in Epic No-Limit Texas Hold’Em

April 24, 2015 3:30 pm | by Ken Walters, Carnegie Mellon University | News | Comments

In a contest that echoes Deep Blue’s chess victory over Garry Kasparov and Watson beating two Jeopardy! Champions, computer poker software developed at Carnegie Mellon University will challenge four of the world’s best professional poker players in a “Brains Vs. Artificial Intelligence” competition beginning April 24, 2015, at Rivers Casino.

Spintronic Data Storage: Putting a New Spin on Memory

April 24, 2015 2:36 pm | by Drexel University | News | Comments

Ever since computers have been small enough to be fixtures on desks, their central processing...

New Pentagon Strategy Warns of Cyberwar Capabilities

April 24, 2015 9:45 am | by Lolita C. Baldor, Associated Press | News | Comments

A new Pentagon cybersecurity strategy lays out for the first time publicly that the U.S....

UK CyberCenturion Competition Launches in Search for Young Cyber Security Talent

April 22, 2015 2:43 pm | by Northrop Grumman | News | Comments

Northrop Grumman has renewed its commitment to run the CyberCenturion competition for a second...

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A special feature of these molecular electronics is that they take place in a fluid within a test tube, where the molecules are contacted within the solution.

Advances in Molecular Electronics: A Computer from a Test Tube?

April 20, 2015 10:49 am | by University of Konstanz | News | Comments

Scientists are working on storing and processing information on the level of single molecules to create the smallest possible components that will combine autonomously to form a circuit. The researchers can switch on the current flow through a single molecule for the first time with the help of light.

INCITE seeks research proposals for capability computing: production simulations — including ensembles — that use a large fraction of Leadership Computing Facility systems or require the unique LCF architectural infrastructure for HPC projects that cannot

INCITE Seeking Proposals to Advance Science and Engineering at U.S. Leadership Computing Facilities

April 20, 2015 10:07 am | by Jeff Gary, OLCF | News | Comments

The Innovative and Novel Computational Impact on Theory and Experiment (INCITE) program is now accepting proposals for high-impact, computationally intensive research campaigns in a broad array of science, engineering and computer science domains.

Cybersecurity strategist George M. Schu says the emerging Internet of Things (IoT) will expose the global aviation industry to vulnerabilities at a level never before seen and will have a transformative impact on the industry.

Internet of Things Threatens Aviation Safety

April 15, 2015 2:55 pm | News | Comments

Cybersecurity strategist George M. Schu says the emerging Internet of Things (IoT) will expose the global aviation industry to vulnerabilities at a level never before seen and will have a transformative impact on the industry.

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If you’re designing a new computer, you want it to solve problems as fast as possible. Just how fast is possible is an open question when it comes to quantum computers, but physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have narrowed the

NIST Tightens Bounds on Quantum Information 'Speed Limit'

April 14, 2015 3:49 pm | by NIST | News | Comments

If you’re designing a new computer, you want it to solve problems as fast as possible. Just how fast is possible is an open question when it comes to quantum computers, but physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have narrowed the theoretical limits for where that “speed limit” is.

Imagine your computer screen could change shape. Imagine if that screen could spring to life at the touch of a fingertip, translating numbers and trends into shapes and gradients you can reach out and touch.

Shape-Changing Display is the End of 2D Graphing

April 14, 2015 3:37 pm | by Lancaster University | News | Comments

Imagine your computer screen could change shape. Imagine if that screen could spring to life at the touch of a fingertip, translating numbers and trends into shapes and gradients you can reach out and touch. 

A key handwritten scientific document by Alan Turing in which he works on the foundations of mathematical notation and computer science was sold for $1,025,000 in the Fine Books & Manuscripts Sale at Bonhams New York.

Alan Turing's Manuscript on Foundations of Mathematics and Computer Science Sold for $1,025,000

April 14, 2015 3:00 pm | by Bonhams | News | Comments

A key handwritten scientific document by Alan Turing in which he works on the foundations of mathematical notation and computer science was sold for $1,025,000 in the Fine Books & Manuscripts Sale at Bonhams New York.

As the liquid crystals align in electric fields, it helps to align the nanotubes — changing the electrical structure of the materials. You can see the thermal output from the material during this “training” process. Bright colors represent localized heati

Evolution-in-materio: Carbon Nanotube Computing?

April 9, 2015 4:29 pm | by American Institute of Physics (AIP) | News | Comments

As we approach the miniaturization limits of conventional electronics, alternatives to silicon-based transistors — the building blocks of the multitude of electronic devices we’ve come to rely on — are being hotly pursued. Inspired by the way living organisms have evolved in nature to perform complex tasks with remarkable ease, a group of researchers is exploring similar “evolutionary” methods to create information processing devices.

Ransomware infiltrates a computer after a user clicks on a link or attachment in an e-mail. It can also attack when a user visits a Web site, including well-known ones with good security systems.

A Q&A about the Malicious Software Known as Ransomware

April 9, 2015 4:23 pm | by Joyce M. Rosenberg, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

Ransomware is a growing threat to computer users, who can suddenly find they're unable to open or use their files when their machines are infected. The malicious software can attack any user — an individual, small business, Fortune 500 company or a government agency.

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President Barack Obama speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. President Barack Obama on Wednesday authorized a new U.S. government approach to deterring cyberattacks: financial sanctions against malicious overseas hackers and companie

Obama Signs Order Creating New Cyber Sanctions Program

April 9, 2015 9:59 am | by Ken Dilanian, AP Intelligence Writer | News | Comments

President Barack Obama authorized a new U.S. government approach to deterring cyberattacks on April 8, 2015: financial sanctions against malicious overseas hackers and companies that knowingly benefit from the fruits of cyberespionage. The latter category could include state-owned corporations in Russia, China and elsewhere, setting the stage for major diplomatic friction if the sanctions are employed in that way.

Researchers have accomplished a new step forward in electronics that could bring brain-like computing closer to reality. Courtesy of Rolff Images

Memristors Mimic Brain Function

April 7, 2015 10:44 am | by Amanda Morris, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Researchers are always searching for improved technologies, but the most efficient computer possible already exists. It can learn and adapt without needing to be programmed or updated. It has nearly limitless memory, is difficult to crash, and works at extremely fast speeds. It’s not a Mac or a PC; it’s the human brain. And scientists around the world want to mimic its abilities.

The core circuits of quantum teleportation, which generate and detect quantum entanglement, have been successfully integrated into a photonic chip by an international team of scientists from the universities of Bristol, Tokyo, Southampton and NTT Device T

Quantum Teleportation on Chip Significant Step toward Ultra-High Speed Quantum Computers

April 6, 2015 4:07 pm | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

The core circuits of quantum teleportation, which generate and detect quantum entanglement, have been successfully integrated into a photonic chip by an international team of scientists from the universities of Bristol, Tokyo, Southampton and NTT Device Technology Laboratories. These results pave the way to developing ultra-high-speed quantum computers and strengthening the security of communication.

Researchers have harnessed bionanotechnology to emit a full range of colors in one pliable pixel layer — as opposed to the several rigid layers that constitute today's screens.

From Genes to Screens: Molecular Backbone of Super-Slim, Bendable Digital Displays Developed

March 31, 2015 11:44 am | by Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

A new study suggests that a novel DNA-peptide structure can be used to produce thin, transparent and flexible screens. The research harnesses bionanotechnology to emit a full range of colors in one pliable pixel layer — as opposed to the several rigid layers that constitute today's screens.

The 2015 Ethernet Roadmap provides practical guidance to the development of Ethernet, and offers an in-depth look at Ethernet’s accelerating evolution and expansion in four key areas: consumer and residential; enterprise and campus; hyperscale data center

Ethernet Alliance Unveils Detailed Roadmap

March 25, 2015 1:57 pm | by Ethernet Alliance | News | Comments

The Ethernet Alliance, a global consortium dedicated to the continued success and advancement of Ethernet technologies, has released the 2015 Ethernet Roadmap. The first-ever publicly available industry roadmap will outline the ongoing development and evolution of Ethernet through the end of the decade. Ethernet, the world’s most widely adopted networking technology, saw a period of rapid change and diversification in 2014.

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Michael Stonebraker invented many of the concepts that are used in almost all modern database systems. Courtesy of Dcoetzee

“Nobel Prize in Computing” goes to MIT Database Systems Architecture Pioneer

March 25, 2015 1:44 pm | by Association for Computing Machinery | News | Comments

The Association for Computing Machinery has named Michael Stonebraker of MIT recipient of the 2014 ACM A.M. Turing Award for fundamental contributions to the concepts and practices underlying modern database systems. Database systems are critical applications of computing and preserve much of the world's important data. Stonebraker invented many of the concepts that are used in almost all modern database systems.

Online negotiations can be improved if computer programs take social values, such as honesty and trust into account when bargaining with human counterparts. © tatniz

Solving the Trust Equation: Socially Intelligent Computers can turn Difficult Negotiations into Win-win Situations

March 25, 2015 12:19 pm | by A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing | News | Comments

Programming fundamental social intelligence skills into software agents can make humans substantially more trusting of online negotiations, which can lead to superior outcomes in e-commerce transactions, finds a team of technology researchers, business experts and cognitive scientists. People are naturally skeptical of negotiations lacking face-to-face contact...

The desktop software application is free and can be used on any basic desktop or laptop computer. Amateur astronomers may take images from their telescopes and analyze them with the application. The application will tell the user whether a matching astero

Help NASA Explore the Universe with Free Asteroid Data Hunter App

March 23, 2015 11:35 am | by NASA | News | Comments

During a panel at the South by Southwest Festival, NASA representatives discussed how citizen scientists have made a difference in asteroid hunting and announced the release of a desktop software application developed by NASA. The application is based on an Asteroid Data Hunter-derived algorithm that analyzes images for potential asteroids. It’s a tool that can be used by amateur astronomers and citizen scientists.

The aim of Public Encryption is to bring end-to-end encryption to the masses. © Fraunhofer SIT

Cryptography for Everyone: Bringing End-to-end Encryption to the Masses

March 17, 2015 2:42 pm | by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft | News | Comments

In the wake of the revelations that intelligence agencies have been engaged in mass surveillance activities, both industry and society at large are looking for practicable encryption solutions that protect businesses and individuals. Previous technologies have failed in practice because they were too expensive or not user friendly enough. An open initiative called “Volksverschlüsselung” aims to bring end-to-end encryption to the masses.

Mellanox Multi-Host

Mellanox Multi-Host

March 17, 2015 2:06 pm | Mellanox Technologies, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Mellanox Multi-Host is designed to provide flexibility and savings in building next-generation, scalable Cloud, Web 2.0 and high-performance data centers. The technology enables designing and building new scale-out heterogeneous compute and storage racks with direct connectivity between compute elements, storage elements and the network.

Chalcogenide glass: Using conventional fiber drawing techniques, microfibers can be produced from chalcogenide (glasses based on sulphur) that possess a variety of broadband photoinduced effects, which allow the fibers to be switched on and off.

Optical Fibers Light Way for Brain-like Computing

March 11, 2015 12:36 pm | by University of Southampton | News | Comments

Computers that function like the human brain could soon become a reality thanks to new research using optical fibers made of specialty glass, which has the potential to allow faster and smarter optical computers capable of learning and evolving. Researchers have demonstrated how neural networks and synapses in the brain can be reproduced, with optical pulses as information carriers, using special fibers made from chalcogenides.

Before scientists develop a full quantum computer, quantum physicists will have to create circuitry that takes advantage of the marvelous computing prowess promised by the quantum bit (“qubit”), while compensating for its high vulnerability to environment

Quantum Device Detects and Corrects Own Errors

March 5, 2015 9:24 am | by Sonia Fernandez, UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

Before scientists develop a full quantum computer, quantum physicists will have to create circuitry that takes advantage of the marvelous computing prowess promised by the quantum bit (“qubit”), while compensating for its high vulnerability to environmentally-induced error.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives for a press conference at the Mobile World Congress, the world's largest mobile phone trade show in Barcelona, Spain, March 2, 2015. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)

Google, Facebook Update Contrasting Plans to Connect World

March 3, 2015 9:25 am | by Joseph Wilson, Associated Press | News | Comments

Sci-fi solutions or making friends one at a time? Google and Facebook are taking different routes to expanding Internet use and access among the unconnected in developing countries. The two Internet giants gave updates on their efforts — and differing approaches — at the Mobile World Congress wireless show in Barcelona on March 2, 2015.

Russia's defense ministry is establishing its own cyber command responsible for offensive activities, "including propaganda operations and inserting malware into enemy command and control systems." Courtesy of Contando Estrelas

Russian Cyber Threat more Severe than Previously Assessed

February 26, 2015 1:11 pm | by Ken Dilanian, AP Intelligence Writer | News | Comments

The U.S. has elevated its appraisal of the cyber threat from Russia, the U.S. intelligence chief said February 26, 2015, as he delivered the annual assessment by intelligence agencies of the top dangers facing the country. "While I can't go into detail here, the Russian cyber threat is more severe than we had previously assessed," James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, told the Senate Armed Services Committee.

As a flying laboratory, ESA's OPS-SAT will test and validate new techniques in mission control and on-board systems. It will be operated by ESA's European Space Operations Centre as a test and validation resource for over 100 European industrial partners

Flying Software Lab to Test Radically New Experimental Control Systems

February 26, 2015 8:35 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

ESA is developing a mini-satellite to test out radically new control systems and techniques and to demonstrate drastically improved mission control capabilities that will arise when satellites can fly more powerful on-board computers. Known as Ops-Sat, it is made up of three CubeSat units with deployable solar panels. Although only 30 cm high, it contains an experimental computer 10 times more powerful than any current spacecraft.

Rather than using clear text, HTTP/2 is now a binary protocol which is quicker to parse and more compact in transmission. Courtesy of Rock1997

Upgrade to Core HTTP Protocol Promises Speedier, Easier Web

February 23, 2015 4:13 pm | by Peter Maynard, Queen's University Belfast | News | Comments

Hypertext Transfer Protocol, HTTP, is a key component of the World Wide Web. It is the communications layer through which Web browsers request Web pages from Web servers and with which Web servers respond with the contents of the page. Like much of the internet it’s been around for decades, but a recent announcement reveals that HTTP/2, the first major update in 15 years, is about to arrive.

A laser pulse is split into two paths: circularly polarized pump (blue) and linearly polarized probe (red). The pump’s path length is adjustable using a delay stage so that the relative arrival time between the pump and probe can be adjusted. After the pr

New Spin on Spintronics: Radiation-resistant Material May Enable Devices in Harsh Environments

February 23, 2015 4:01 pm | by American Institute of Physics (AIP) | News | Comments

A team of researchers is exploring new materials that could yield higher computational speeds and lower power consumption, even in harsh environments. Most modern electronic circuitry relies on controlling electronic charge within a circuit, but this control can easily be disrupted in the presence of radiation. Electronics that use spintronics may offer an alternative that is robust even in radiation-filled environments.

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