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Graphic showing the intensity of the radio beams after twisting Courtesy of Alan Willner / USC Viterbi

Scientists Twist Radio Beams to Send Data, Reach Speeds of 32 Gibit/s

September 17, 2014 2:55 pm | by University of Southern California | News | Comments

Building on previous research that twisted light to send data at unheard-of speeds, scientists at University of Southern California (USC) have developed a similar technique with radiowaves, reaching high speeds without some of the hassles that can go with optical systems.

Sound of an Atom Captured

September 12, 2014 3:16 pm | by Johanna Wilde and Martin Gustafsson, Chalmers University of Technology | News | Comments

The interaction between atoms and light is well-known and has been studied extensively in the...

New Species of Electrons Can Lead to Better Computing

September 11, 2014 4:18 pm | by The University of Manchester | News | Comments

Electrons that break the rules and move perpendicular to the applied electric field could be the...

Tools for Reducing, Managing, Analyzing and Visualizing Data Transform Beamline Science

September 10, 2014 3:48 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Some mysteries of science can only be explained on a nanometer scale — even smaller than a...

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University of Alabama at Birmingham associate professor Nitesh Saxena, Ph.D. Courtesy of UAB News

Improved Method Lets Computers Know You Are Human

September 9, 2014 3:21 pm | by University of Alabama at Birmingham | News | Comments

CAPTCHA services that require users to recognize and type in static distorted characters may be a method of the past, according to studies published by researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Nitesh Saxena led a team that investigated the security and usability of the next generation of CAPTCHAs that are based on simple computer games.

Intel Corporation unveiled its first eight-core desktop processor, the Intel Core i7-5960X processor Extreme Edition, formerly code-named "Haswell-E," targeted at power users who demand the most from their PCs. Intel's first client processor supports 16 c

Intel 8-Core Desktop Processor

September 8, 2014 3:36 pm | Intel Corp | Product Releases | Comments

Intel Corporation unveiled its first eight-core desktop processor, the Intel Core i7-5960X processor Extreme Edition, formerly code-named "Haswell-E," targeted at power users who demand the most from their PCs. Intel's first client processor supports 16 computing threads.

How do you prevent an earthquake from destroying expensive computer systems? That’s the question earthquake engineer Claudia Marin-Artieda aims to answer through a series of experiments conducted at the University at Buffalo.

Can a stack of computer servers survive an earthquake?

September 3, 2014 4:13 pm | by Cory Nealon, University at Buffalo | News | Comments

How do you prevent an earthquake from destroying expensive computer systems? That’s the question earthquake engineer Claudia Marin-Artieda aims to answer through a series of experiments conducted at the University at Buffalo.       

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The industry's preeminent event on Molecular Medicine, focusing on Drug Discovery, Genomics, Diagnostics and Information Technology.

22nd International Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference

August 28, 2014 3:17 pm | Events

The 22nd International Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference is the industry's Preeminent Event on Molecular Medicine, focusing on Drug Discovery, Genomics, Diagnostics and Information Technology. Spanning six days this year, the Tri-Conference includes an expanded program that includes 6 symposia, over 20 short courses, and 17 conference programs.

The Expo provides the perfect venue to share information and discuss enabling technologies that are driving biomedical research and the drug development process

2015 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo

August 28, 2014 3:06 pm | Events

The 2015 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo plans to unite 3,000+ life sciences, pharmaceutical, clinical, healthcare, and IT professionals from 32+ countries. The Expo provides the perfect venue to share information and discuss enabling technologies that are driving biomedical research and the drug development process.

The study combined two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Does your Computer Know How You’re Feeling?

August 25, 2014 11:16 am | by Taylor & Francis | News | Comments

Researchers in Bangladesh have designed a computer program that can accurately recognize users’ emotional states as much as 87 percent of the time, depending on the emotion. Writing in the journal Behaviour & Information Technology, A.F.M. Nazmul Haque Nahin and his colleagues describe how their study combined — for the first time — two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Rock Stars of Cybersecurity will take place in Austin, TX, on September 24, 2014

Top Cybersecurity Advice from the Rock Stars

August 22, 2014 10:57 am | by Amanda Sawyer, IEEE Computer Society | Blogs | Comments

High-profile security breaches, data thefts and cyberattacks are increasing in frequency, ferocity and stealth. They result in significant loss of revenue and reputation for organizations, destabilize governments, and hit everyone’s wallets. Cybersecurity is in the global spotlight and, now more than ever, organizations must understand how to identify weaknesses and protect company infrastructure from incursions.

TCP Stealth defense software can help to prevent cyberattacks. Courtesy of Artur Marciniec/Fotolia

TCP Stealth Offers Protection against Hacienda Intelligence Program

August 20, 2014 10:00 am | by Technische Universität München | News | Comments

According to a group of journalists, a spy program known as "Hacienda" is being used by five western intelligence agencies to identify vulnerable servers across the world in order to control them and use them for their own purposes. However, scientists at the Technische Universität München have developed free software that can help prevent this kind of identification and, thus, the subsequent capture of systems.

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Users can use the tool to focus on images in which President Obama appears over Stephen Colbert’s shoulder, and then observe Colbert’s typical body posture among those results. Courtesy of Jun-Yan Zhu, Yong Jae Lee and Alexei Efros, UC Berkeley

Single Picture worth 1000 — and More — Images

August 15, 2014 12:38 pm | by Sarah Yang, UC Berkeley | News | Comments

A photo is worth a thousand words, but what if the image could also represent thousands of other images? New software seeks to tame the vast amount of visual data in the world by generating a single photo that can represent massive clusters of images. This tool can give users the photographic gist of a kid on Santa’s lap or housecats. It works by generating an image that literally averages the key features of the other photos.

“There are just so many reasons why data sharing is important,” says Gary Berg-Cross, general secretary of the Spatial Ontology Community of Practice and a member of the US advisory committee for RDA.

Laying the Foundations for Better Sharing of Research Data

August 14, 2014 2:57 pm | by Andrew Purcell | Articles | Comments

The Research Data Alliance seeks to build the social and technical bridges that enable open sharing and reuse of data, so as to address cross-border and cross-disciplinary challenges faced by researchers. This September, the RDA will be hosting its Fourth Plenary Meeting. Ahead of the event, iSGTW spoke to Gary Berg-Cross, general secretary of the Spatial Ontology Community of Practice and a member of the US advisory committee for RDA.

The Bloch sphere, a representation of a qubit, the fundamental building block of quantum computers. Courtesy of Glosser

Quantum Simulators Explained

August 12, 2014 12:36 pm | by Springer Science+Business Media | News | Comments

Just about everything you ever wanted to know about quantum simulators is summed up in a new review. As part of a Thematic Series on Quantum Simulations, the open access journal European Physical Journal Quantum Technology has published an overview of just what a quantum simulator is, namely a device that actively uses quantum effects to answer questions on model systems.

In one brief lapse of concentration, I didn’t examine the URL on a “Windows update” and my venerable Dell Dimension 8300 was infected with a rootkit virus when I clicked “OK” to upgrade Internet Explorer.

The Root(kit) of all Evil: Software Criminals are Winning the Arms Race

August 12, 2014 11:40 am | by Randy C. Hice | Blogs | Comments

Ah, sad news in the Hice household. The patient is terminal, and I’m keeping it alive on life support. I keep wallowing in self-pity and ask myself, “Why me?” I feel as though I’m somehow responsible for the illness. Well, OK, I’m definitely responsible, why lie? I may as well have been sharing blood-soaked hypos with a drug addict, but what I did was equally careless. In one brief lapse of concentration, I didn’t examine the URL ...

The confirmation of registration by the American CSNET was first e-mail received in Germany. Courtesy of KIT

First Internet-based E-mail Received in Germany 30 Years Ago

August 5, 2014 12:44 pm | by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology | News | Comments

It is the central means of communication of our times: Electronic mailing. Worldwide, short messages as well as large data packages can be exchanged rapidly and at low costs. 30 years ago, the first e-mail arrived in Germany at the then Universität Karlsruhe (TH), today’s Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. It was the first Internet-based connection between the American network CSNET (Computer Science Net) and the new Karlsruhe CSNET server.

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Measured signal during a reading operation for all eight possible states of a 110-nm, 3-bits, self-referenced MRAM cell. Courtesy of Quentin Stainer

Multi-Bit Spin for MRAM Storage may Rival Flash Memory

July 23, 2014 3:20 pm | by American Institute of Physics (AIP) | News | Comments

Interest in magnetic random access memory (MRAM) is escalating, thanks to demand for fast, low-cost, nonvolatile, low-consumption, secure memory devices. MRAM, which relies on manipulating the magnetization of materials for data storage rather than electronic charges, boasts all of these advantages as an emerging technology, but so far it hasn't been able to match flash memory in terms of storage density.

Internet Society to Measure, Display Quality of Connections around the World

July 18, 2014 3:47 pm | by Aalto University | News | Comments

Internet access is becoming increasingly mobile, and the next billion users will experience the Internet in new ways from those already online. The experience of Internet connectivity is far from uniform, and observing the variety of connectivity, and how it is changing over time is important. Smartphone users around the globe can download an app and contribute their measurements to a global picture of Internet diversity and evolution.

Fundamental Chemistry Findings Could Help Extend Moore’s Law

July 16, 2014 11:49 am | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Over the years, computer chips have gotten smaller, thanks to advances in materials science and manufacturing technologies. This march of progress, the doubling of transistors on a microprocessor roughly every two years, is called Moore’s Law. But there’s one component of the chip-making process in need of an overhaul if Moore’s law is to continue: the chemical mixture called photoresist.

Scientists Track Quantum Errors in Real Time, Step Toward Age of Quantum Computing

July 15, 2014 4:33 pm | by Holly Lauridsen, Yale University | News | Comments

Scientists have demonstrated the ability to track real quantum errors as they occur, a major step in the development of reliable quantum computers. Quantum computers could significantly improve the computational power of modern computers, but a major problem stands in the way: information loss, or quantum errors. To combat errors, physicists must be able to detect that an error has occurred and then correct it in real time.

NSF Frontier Award to Improve Time in Networked Physical Systems

July 9, 2014 4:28 pm | by Doug Ramsey, University of California, San Diego | News | Comments

The National Science Foundation has announced a five-year, $4 million “Frontier” award to tackle the challenge of time in cyber-physical systems (CPS) — engineered systems that are built from and depend upon the seamless integration of computational algorithms and physical components. Frontier awards constitute NSF’s largest single investments in CPS

National Data Service kicks off with the Materials Data Facility

July 9, 2014 4:12 pm | by Amber Harmon | News | Comments

In nearly every field of science, experiments, instruments, observations, sensors, simulations, and surveys are generating massive data volumes that grow at exponential rates. Discoverable, shareable data enables collaboration and supports repurposing for new discoveries — and for cross-disciplinary research enabled by exchange across communities that include both scientists and citizens.

Transparent Two-Sided Touchable Display Wall Developed

July 8, 2014 4:18 pm | by The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) | News | Comments

At a busy shopping mall, shoppers walk by store windows to find attractive items to purchase. Through the windows, shoppers can see the products displayed, but may have a hard time imagining doing something beyond just looking, such as touching the displayed items or communicating with sales assistants inside the store. With TransWall, however, window shopping could become more fun and real than ever before.

Research Could Lead to Dramatic Data Farm Energy Savings

July 2, 2014 3:52 pm | by Tina Hilding, Washington State University | News | Comments

Washington State University has developed a wireless network on a computer chip that could reduce energy consumption at huge data farms by as much as 20 percent.                         

Computer analysis of photographs could help doctors diagnose which condition a child with a rare genetic disorder has, say Oxford University researchers.

Computer-aided Diagnosis of Rare Genetic Disorders from Family Photos

June 30, 2014 11:04 am | by University of Oxford | News | Comments

Computer analysis of photographs could help doctors diagnose which condition a child with a rare genetic disorder has, say Oxford University researchers.                           

University of Washington computer scientists have shown that crowdsourcing can be a quick and effective way to teach a robot how to complete tasks.

Robots Learn Faster, Better with Online Helpers

June 30, 2014 10:00 am | by Michelle Ma, University of Washington | News | Comments

University of Washington computer scientists have shown that crowdsourcing can be a quick and effective way to teach a robot how to complete tasks. Instead of learning from just one human, robots could one day query the larger online community, asking for instructions or input on the best way to set the table or water the garden.

In a chemistry lab at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany), Prof. Dr. Alexander Schiller is developing what could be called the "sweetest computer in the world."

The Sweetest Calculator in the World

June 19, 2014 4:37 pm | by Friedrich Schiller University Jena | News | Comments

In a chemistry lab at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany), Prof. Dr. Alexander Schiller is developing what could be called the "sweetest computer in the world." The reason: the sugar molecules he uses are part of a chemical sequence for information processing.

FCC Internet Neutrality rules — also referred to as Net Neutrality rules — currently apply, but thanks to pressure from Internet Service Providers (ISP), legislators and recent court rulings, that might change. Courtesy of Camilo Sanchez

Net Neutrality: No Demilitarized Zone

June 17, 2014 1:42 pm | by John R. Joyce, Ph.D. | Blogs | Comments

Internet regulation in the United States is potentially facing a major change. FCC Internet Neutrality rules — also referred to as Net Neutrality rules — currently apply, but thanks to pressure from Internet Service Providers (ISP), legislators and recent court rulings, that might change. You have undoubtedly heard the term Net Neutrality before, but may be at a loss regarding what it means or what its implications are.

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