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Measured signal during a reading operation for all eight possible states of a 110-nm, 3-bits, self-referenced MRAM cell. Courtesy of Quentin Stainer

Multi-Bit Spin for MRAM Storage may Rival Flash Memory

July 23, 2014 3:20 pm | by American Institute of Physics (AIP) | News | Comments

Interest in magnetic random access memory (MRAM) is escalating, thanks to demand for fast, low-cost, nonvolatile, low-consumption, secure memory devices. MRAM, which relies on manipulating the magnetization of materials for data storage rather than electronic charges, boasts all of these advantages as an emerging technology, but so far it hasn't been able to match flash memory in terms of storage density.

Internet Society to Measure, Display Quality of Connections around the World

July 18, 2014 3:47 pm | by Aalto University | News | Comments

Internet access is becoming increasingly mobile, and the next billion users will experience the...

Fundamental Chemistry Findings Could Help Extend Moore’s Law

July 16, 2014 11:49 am | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Over the years, computer chips have gotten smaller, thanks to advances in materials science and...

Scientists Track Quantum Errors in Real Time, Step Toward Age of Quantum Computing

July 15, 2014 4:33 pm | by Holly Lauridsen, Yale University | News | Comments

Scientists have demonstrated the ability to track real quantum errors as they occur, a major...

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NSF Frontier Award to Improve Time in Networked Physical Systems

July 9, 2014 4:28 pm | by Doug Ramsey, University of California, San Diego | News | Comments

The National Science Foundation has announced a five-year, $4 million “Frontier” award to tackle the challenge of time in cyber-physical systems (CPS) — engineered systems that are built from and depend upon the seamless integration of computational algorithms and physical components. Frontier awards constitute NSF’s largest single investments in CPS

National Data Service kicks off with the Materials Data Facility

July 9, 2014 4:12 pm | by Amber Harmon | News | Comments

In nearly every field of science, experiments, instruments, observations, sensors, simulations, and surveys are generating massive data volumes that grow at exponential rates. Discoverable, shareable data enables collaboration and supports repurposing for new discoveries — and for cross-disciplinary research enabled by exchange across communities that include both scientists and citizens.

Transparent Two-Sided Touchable Display Wall Developed

July 8, 2014 4:18 pm | by The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) | News | Comments

At a busy shopping mall, shoppers walk by store windows to find attractive items to purchase. Through the windows, shoppers can see the products displayed, but may have a hard time imagining doing something beyond just looking, such as touching the displayed items or communicating with sales assistants inside the store. With TransWall, however, window shopping could become more fun and real than ever before.

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Research Could Lead to Dramatic Data Farm Energy Savings

July 2, 2014 3:52 pm | by Tina Hilding, Washington State University | News | Comments

Washington State University has developed a wireless network on a computer chip that could reduce energy consumption at huge data farms by as much as 20 percent.                         

Computer analysis of photographs could help doctors diagnose which condition a child with a rare genetic disorder has, say Oxford University researchers.

Computer-aided Diagnosis of Rare Genetic Disorders from Family Photos

June 30, 2014 11:04 am | by University of Oxford | News | Comments

Computer analysis of photographs could help doctors diagnose which condition a child with a rare genetic disorder has, say Oxford University researchers.                           

University of Washington computer scientists have shown that crowdsourcing can be a quick and effective way to teach a robot how to complete tasks.

Robots Learn Faster, Better with Online Helpers

June 30, 2014 10:00 am | by Michelle Ma, University of Washington | News | Comments

University of Washington computer scientists have shown that crowdsourcing can be a quick and effective way to teach a robot how to complete tasks. Instead of learning from just one human, robots could one day query the larger online community, asking for instructions or input on the best way to set the table or water the garden.

In a chemistry lab at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany), Prof. Dr. Alexander Schiller is developing what could be called the "sweetest computer in the world."

The Sweetest Calculator in the World

June 19, 2014 4:37 pm | by Friedrich Schiller University Jena | News | Comments

In a chemistry lab at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany), Prof. Dr. Alexander Schiller is developing what could be called the "sweetest computer in the world." The reason: the sugar molecules he uses are part of a chemical sequence for information processing.

FCC Internet Neutrality rules — also referred to as Net Neutrality rules — currently apply, but thanks to pressure from Internet Service Providers (ISP), legislators and recent court rulings, that might change. Courtesy of Camilo Sanchez

Net Neutrality: No Demilitarized Zone

June 17, 2014 1:42 pm | by John R. Joyce, Ph.D. | Blogs | Comments

Internet regulation in the United States is potentially facing a major change. FCC Internet Neutrality rules — also referred to as Net Neutrality rules — currently apply, but thanks to pressure from Internet Service Providers (ISP), legislators and recent court rulings, that might change. You have undoubtedly heard the term Net Neutrality before, but may be at a loss regarding what it means or what its implications are.

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A new structure developed by UCLA researchers for more energy-efficient computer chips. The arrows indicate the effective magnetic field due to the structure's asymmetry. Courtesy of UCLA Engineering

Innovative Nanoscale Structure Could Yield Higher-performance Computer Memory

June 12, 2014 3:22 pm | by Matthew Chin, UCLA | News | Comments

Researchers at UCLA have created a nanoscale magnetic component for computer memory chips that could significantly improve their energy efficiency and scalability. The design brings a new and highly sought-after type of magnetic memory one step closer to being used in computers, mobile electronics such as smart phones and tablets, as well as large computing systems for big data.

In the field of Artificial Intelligence, there is no more iconic and controversial milestone than the Turing Test, when a computer convinces a sufficient number of interrogators into believing that it is not a machine but rather is a human.

Can Machines Think? Turing Test Success a Milestone in Computing History

June 9, 2014 9:07 am | by University of Reading | News | Comments

An historic milestone in artificial intelligence set by Alan Turing — the father of modern computer science — has been achieved. The 65 year-old iconic Turing Test was passed for the very first time by supercomputer Eugene Goostman during Turing Test 2014 held at the Royal Society in London on June 7, 2014, and organized by the University of Reading.

Rutgers engineering researchers are exploring the security and memorability of free-form gestures as passwords

Are Squiggly Lines the Future of Password Security?

June 5, 2014 10:20 am | by Rutgers University | News | Comments

As more people use smart phones or tablets to pay bills, make purchases, store personal information and even control access to their houses, the need for robust password security has become more critical than ever. A new study shows that free-form gestures — sweeping fingers in shapes across the screen of a smart phone or tablet — can be used to unlock phones and grant access to apps.

Gregorio Valdez and his team designed a search engine – called EvoCor – that quickly sifts through the evolutionary history of all mapped genes – human and otherwise.

Search Engine finds Functionally Linked Genes

June 4, 2014 7:47 pm | by Ashley WennersHerron, Virginia Tech | News | Comments

A frontier lies deep within our cells. Our bodies are as vast as oceans and space, composed of a dizzying number of different types of cells. Exploration reaches far, yet the genes that make each cell and tissue unique have remained largely obscure. That’s changing with a search engine called EvoCor that identifies functionally linked genes.

A Turing machine built from legos. Courtesy of Projet Rubens, ENS Lyon

Basic Logic Research Crucial for Computer, Software Engineering

June 3, 2014 3:27 pm | by Vienna University of Technology | News | Comments

All men are mortal. Socrates is a man. Therefore, Socrates is mortal. Logical arguments like this one have been studied since antiquity. In the last few decades, however, logic research has changed considerably: the computer sciences were born. The success of informatics would have been impossible without the groundwork provided by logicians — and, in turn, computer sciences keep posing new interesting questions

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Professor Jayan Thomas is a professor and scientist at the University of Central Florida Nanoscience Technology Center. Courtesy of UCF

New NanoTech May Provide Power Storage in your Clothes

June 2, 2014 11:42 am | by University of Central Florida | News | Comments

Imagine being able to carry all the juice you needed to power your MP3 player, smartphone and electric car in the fabric of your jacket? Sounds like science fiction, but it may become a reality thanks to breakthrough technology developed at a University of Central Florida research lab.

Sandia National Laboratories’ Francois Leonard holds a wire mesh cylinder similar in design to a carbon nanotube that might form the basis for future computing technology. Computing experts at Sandia are exploring what computers of the future might look l

Get Ready for Computers of the Future: Sandia Launches Push to Innovate Next-Gen Machines

May 28, 2014 10:30 am | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

Computing experts at Sandia National Laboratories have launched an effort to help discover what computers of the future might look like, from next-generation supercomputers to systems that learn on their own — new machines that do more while using less energy.

Scientists from Argonne created the world’s thinnest flexible, transparent thin-film transistor, which could one day be useful in making a truly flexible display screen for TVs or phones. From left: Andreas Roelofs, Anirudha Sumant, and Richard Gulotty

Flexible, Transparent Thin Film Transistors Raise Hopes for Flexible Screens

May 27, 2014 3:38 pm | by Argonne National Laboratory | News | Comments

The electronics world has been dreaming for half a century of the day you can roll a TV up in a tube. Last year, Samsung even unveiled a smartphone with a curved screen — but it was solid, not flexible; the technology just hasn’t caught up yet. But scientists got one step closer last month when researchers at Argonne National Laboratory reported the creation of the world’s thinnest flexible, see-through 2-D thin film transistors.

Researchers developed a prototype automated system that is now running on the data analytics pipeline of Bing. It's the first time automated privacy compliance analysis has been applied to the production code of an Internet-scale system.

Carnegie Mellon, Microsoft Research Automate Privacy Compliance for Big Data Systems

May 22, 2014 3:19 pm | by Carnegie Mellon University | News | Comments

Web services companies, such as Facebook, Google and Microsoft, all make promises about how they will use personal information they gather. But ensuring that millions of lines of code in their systems operate in ways consistent with privacy promises is labor-intensive and difficult. A team from Carnegie Mellon University and Microsoft Research, however, has shown these compliance checks can be automated.

The GE-225 mainframe computer in the basement of Dartmouth’s College Hall. Courtesy of the Trustees of Dartmouth College

BASIC, Woz and How GE's Mainframe Midwifed Modern Computing

May 22, 2014 9:51 am | by GE | Blogs | Comments

Fifty years ago, on May 1, 1964, two Dartmouth professors and their students developed the BASIC programming language and supercharged the information age. BASIC revolutionized personal computing and helped launch icons like Apple and Microsoft.

Press materials are displayed on a table of the Justice Department in Washington, May 19, 2014, before Attorney General Eric Holder was to speak at a news conference. Holder was announcing that a U.S. grand jury has charged five Chinese hackers with econo

US Charges Chinese Officials in Cyberspying Case

May 21, 2014 3:11 pm | by Eric Tucker, Associated Press | News | Comments

The United States announced on Monday unprecedented cyber espionage charges against five Chinese military officials accused of hacking into U.S. companies to gain trade secrets. The hackers targeted big-name makers of nuclear and solar technology, stealing confidential business information, sensitive trade secrets and internal communications for competitive advantage, according to a grand jury indictment.

Exterior view of the Europol headquarters in The Hague, Netherlands

FBI: BlackShades Infected Half Million Computers

May 19, 2014 4:37 pm | by Larry Neumeister and Toby Sterling, Associated Press | News | Comments

More than a half million computers in over 100 countries were infected by sophisticated malware that lets cybercriminals take over a computer and hijack its webcam, authorities said as charges were announced May 19, 2014, against more than 100 people worldwide.

Google co-founder Sergey Brin wears Google Glass. Google is once again selling its Internet-connected eyewear to anyone in the U.S. as the company fine tunes a device that has sparked intrigue and disdain for its potential to change the way people interac

Google Resumes Glass Sales in the US

May 15, 2014 3:31 pm | by AP | News | Comments

Google is once again selling its Internet-connected eyewear to anyone in the U.S. as the company fine-tunes a device that has sparked intrigue and disdain for its potential to change the way people interact with technology. The latest release of Google Glass comes a month after a one-day sale gave U.S. residents their first chance to buy the hottest accessory in geek fashion.

Silvia Ferrari and her team at Duke University trained a virtual insect whose nervous system is modeled by a large spiking neural network. The virtual insect was trained with an algorithm that responds to sensory feedback

Neural Networks Imitate Intelligence of Biological Brains

May 15, 2014 2:53 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

For every thought or behavior, the brain erupts in a riot of activity, as thousands of cells communicate via electrical and chemical signals. Each nerve cell influences others within an intricate, interconnected neural network. And connections between brain cells change over time in response to our environment.

The generative model can be used to tailor networks to the environments in which they are expected to operate.

Molecular, Neural, Bacterial Networks Provide Security Insights

May 8, 2014 3:02 pm | by Carnegie Mellon University | News | Comments

The robust defenses that yeast cells have evolved to protect themselves from environmental threats hold lessons that can be used to design computer networks and analyze how secure they are, say computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University.

The Neurogrid circuit board can simulate orders of magnitude more neurons and synapses than other brain mimics on the power it takes to run a tablet computer.

Circuit Board Modeled on Human Brain

May 1, 2014 12:45 pm | by Tom Abate, Stanford University | News | Comments

Stanford bioengineers have developed faster, more energy-efficient microchips based on the human brain — 9,000 times faster and using significantly less power than a typical PC. This offers greater possibilities for advances in robotics and a new way of understanding the brain. For instance, a chip as fast and efficient as the human brain could drive prosthetic limbs with the speed and complexity of our own actions.

Google co-founder Sergey Brin gestures after riding in a driverless car to a bill signing for driverless cars at Google headquarters in Mountain View. Google engineers say they have turned a corner in their pursuit of creating a car that can drive itself

Google X Lab: Driverless Cars Mastering City Streets

April 28, 2014 10:51 am | by Justin Pritchard, Associated Press | News | Comments

Google says its self-driving cars are motoring along: they can navigate freeways comfortably, albeit with a driver ready to take control. But city driving — with its obstacle course of stray walkers, bicyclists and blind corners — has been a far greater challenge for the cars' computers.

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