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SciNet displays a range of keywords and topics in a topic radar. With the help of the directions on the radar, the engine displays how these topics are related to each other. The relevance of each keyword is displayed as its distance from the center point

SciNet Search Engine Helps Find Relevant, Diverse Results Faster

January 28, 2015 2:52 pm | by Alto University | News | Comments

A new search engine outperforms current ones, and helps people to do searches more efficiently. The SciNet search engine is different because it changes Internet searches into recognition tasks, by showing keywords related to the user’s search in topic radar. People using SciNet can get relevant and diverse search results faster, especially when they do not know exactly what they are looking for or how to formulate a query to find it.

Self-powered Intelligent Keyboard could Provide New Layer of Biometric Security

January 27, 2015 10:12 am | by John Toon, Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

By analyzing such parameters as the force applied by key presses and the time interval between...

Extending Einstein's Spooky Actions for Use in Quantum Networks

January 26, 2015 4:18 pm | by Swinburne University of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers have demonstrated that the 1935 Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen quantum mechanics paradox...

Transistor Improvements on Track to make Flexible Plastic Computers a Reality

January 26, 2015 2:03 pm | by National Institute for Materials Science | News | Comments

Researchers at Japan’s National Institute for Materials Science revealed that improvements...

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A notebook by Alan Turing, the World War II code-breaking genius depicted by Benedict Cumberbatch in the Oscar-nominated "The Imitation Game," is shown in a special preview at Bonhams auctioneers. The 56-page manuscript, containing Turing's complex mathem

British Code Breaker Alan Turing's Notebook Goes to Auction

January 26, 2015 1:33 pm | by AP | News | Comments

A handwritten notebook by Alan Turing, the World War II code-breaking genius depicted by Benedict Cumberbatch in the Oscar-nominated The Imitation Game, is going on the auction block. The 56-page manuscript was written at the time the British mathematician and computer science pioneer was working to break the seemingly unbreakable Enigma codes used by the Germans throughout World War II. It is expected to bring at least $1 million.

Dream it. Code it. Win it. is different from traditional competitions or hackathons, which focus on coding. The contest is judged on the quality of the problem being tackled, as well as the solution.

Dream it. Code it. Win it. Programming Competition Launches

January 23, 2015 2:15 pm | by TradingScreen | News | Comments

The MIT Enterprise Forum of New York and TradingScreen have announced the launch of the second annual award-winning “ Dream it. Code it. Win it. “ contest. The $50,000 student coding competition rewards and promotes creativity, diversity and literacy in the field of computer science.

The Repository of Industrial Security Incidents is a database of incidents of a cybersecurity nature that have (or could have) affected process control, industrial automation or Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems.

Cybersecurity Expert Warns Not Enough Being Done to Prevent Highly Destructive Cyberattacks on Critical Infrastructure

January 21, 2015 1:13 pm | by International Society of Automation | News | Comments

Inadequate training and a culture of complacency among many owners and operators of critical infrastructure are significantly raising the risks of highly damaging cyberattack throughout the world. That’s the viewpoint expressed by Steve Mustard, an industrial cybersecurity subject-matter expert and consultant with extensive development and management experience in real-time embedded equipment and automation systems.

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President Barack Obama speaks at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center in Arlington, VA, January 13, 2015. Obama renewed his call for Congress to pass cybersecurity legislation, including a proposal that encourages companies to

Obama Unveils Cybersecurity Proposals in Advance of State of the Union Address

January 14, 2015 11:46 am | by Jack Gillum, Associated Press | News | Comments

President Barack Obama has said that recent cyberthreats to Sony and the military's U.S. Central Command are reminders of the serious threats facing the nation. Obama laid out plans on January 13, 2015, as part of a push for new cybersecurity legislation that increases government information-sharing and protects businesses from lawsuits for revealing cyberthreats.

Measuring side-channel signals2: Georgia Tech researcher Alenka Zajic measures electromagnetic emissions from various components of a desktop computer. The researchers have studied emissions from desktop and laptop computers, as well as cellphones.

Countering Side-channel Hacker Attacks

January 14, 2015 11:35 am | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

If you’re sitting in a coffee shop, tapping away on your laptop, feeling safe from hackers because you didn’t connect to the shop’s Wi-Fi, think again. The bad guys may be able to see what you’re doing just by analyzing the low-power electronic signals your laptop emits, even when it’s not connected to the Internet. Side-channel signals could provide hackers with another way to see what the devices are doing.

The MHL Specification, created and maintained by the MHL Consortium, defines a high-definition video and digital audio interface intended for connecting mobile smart devices, such as tablets and cell phones, with high-definition televisions and other pers

Understanding Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL) Technology

January 12, 2015 9:00 am | by John R. Joyce, Ph.D. | Blogs | Comments

Okay, for today's pop-quiz, what is Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL) technology and what can it do? Is it a new NASA deep space communication protocol? Is it an upgrade to Google's street cams? Have you even heard of it? It turns out that many of you are equipped with devices that incorporate this technology. Specifically, many, though not all, of the current crop of smart phones and tablets support MHL.

The all-electric Nissan Leaf fitted with autonomous drive equipment allowed to park at NASA's Ames Research Center. Courtesy of Business Wire

NASA, Nissan Partner to Deploy Autonomous Drive Vehicles by Year End

January 9, 2015 11:28 am | by Nissan | News | Comments

NASA and Nissan have announced the formation of a five-year research and development partnership to advance autonomous vehicle systems and prepare for commercial application of the technology. Researchers from NASA’s Ames Research Center and Nissan’s U.S. Silicon Valley Research Center will focus on autonomous drive systems, human-machine interface solutions, network-enabled applications, and software analysis and verification.

Helen Greiner, chairman and co-founder iRobot Corporation, poses for photo with an iRobot PackBot EOD in front of her booth during RoboBusiness Conference and Exposition. Greiner, one of the inventors behind the Roomba, the robotic vacuum that can clean y

Today’s Drone Market Resembles Silicon Valley's Early Days

January 9, 2015 10:51 am | by Scott Mayerowitz, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

To see the future of drones, head up the hill at the intersection of Industrial Drive and Electronics Avenue. Inside a bland brick office building, the team at CyPhy is working on tethered machines that can fly nonstop for days and pocket-sized drones for search-and-rescue missions. It's not a fancy building. There's no giant aerospace or defense company here. Just small teams of computer scientists and mechanical engineers...

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Hole cards in a game of Texas Hold 'em. A computer program that taught itself to play poker has created nearly the best possible strategy for one version of the game, showing the value of techniques that may prove useful for real-world challenges Courtesy

Game Theory: Self-taught Program Finds Ideal Poker Strategy

January 9, 2015 10:14 am | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

A computer program that taught itself to play poker has created nearly the best possible strategy for one version of the game, showing the value of techniques that may prove useful to help decision-making in medicine and other areas. The program considered 24 trillion simulated poker hands per second for two months, probably playing more poker than all humanity has ever experienced.

On-the-Go is an extension to the Universal Serial Bus (USB) standard, more commonly seen as USB OTG.

On-the-Go! Fascinating Facts about USB OTG

January 5, 2015 4:10 pm | by John R. Joyce, Ph.D. | Blogs | Comments

No, as much as it might be needed, this column doesn't address how to deal with the numerous frenetic projects that we are tasked with handling every day. On-the-Go is an extension to the Universal Serial Bus (USB) standard, more commonly seen as USB OTG. We'll forgo trying to determine who came up with a name like this and, instead, take a look at some of the fascinating things it allows us to do.

Besides being a fundamental breakthrough, this discovery opens up the possibility of making devices which take the benefits of both light and matter.

Half-Light, Half-Matter Quantum Particles a Step toward Practical Quantum Computing Platforms

January 5, 2015 11:36 am | by City College of New York | News | Comments

Prospects of developing computing and communication technologies based on quantum properties of light and matter may have taken a major step forward. In a pioneering study, researchers were able to discover half-light, half-matter particles in atomically thin semiconductors consisting of a 2-D layer of molybdenum and sulfur atoms arranged similar to graphene.

The FBI is recruiting new cyber special agents, along with computer scientists, digital forensic examiners, and cyber-skilled interns.

FBI Seeking Tech Experts to Become Cyber Special Agents

January 2, 2015 12:22 pm | by FBI | News | Comments

Since its earliest days, the FBI has looked for recruits with specialized skills to fill its special agent ranks. Today, the most sought-after candidates possess a uniquely 21st century quality: cyber expertise. To keep pace with the evolving threat, the Bureau is appealing to experienced and certified cyber experts to consider joining the FBI to apply their well-honed tradecraft as cyber special agents.

The Internet Archives Book Images Project was launched to catalog the imagery from half a millennium of books.

Unlocking the Imagery of 500 Years of Books

December 22, 2014 4:49 pm | by Library of Congress | Blogs | Comments

Over 14.7 million images were extracted from over 600 million pages covering an enormous variety of topics and stretching back to the year 1500. Yet, perhaps what is most remarkable about this montage is that these images come not from some newly-unearthed archive being seen for the first time, but rather from the books we have been digitizing for the past decade that have been resting in our digital libraries.

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Sample images from Airport Scanner: the left image contains one target (hand grenade), the middle contains two identical targets (two exemplars of the dynamite stick target type), and the right image contains two different target types (derringer, gasolin

Crowdsourcing: Game Apps Bring Big Data to Psychological Research

December 22, 2014 4:34 pm | by American Psychological Association | News | Comments

A fast-paced game app where players pretend they are baggage screening officers operating airport x-ray scanners has provided researchers with billions of pieces of data in record time. To demonstrate the potential of mobile technology to gather data, the researchers partnered with the developer of popular mobile app game Airport Scanner, which challenges players to identify illegal items in luggage passing through an airport x-ray scanner.

Quantum physics says that particles can behave like waves, and vice versa. Research published in Nature Communications shows that this 'wave-particle duality' is simply the quantum uncertainty principle in disguise.

Puzzle Solved: Two Quantum Mysteries Merge into One

December 22, 2014 3:20 pm | by Centre for Quantum Technologies | News | Comments

Researchers have proved that two peculiar features of the quantum world — previously considered distinct — are different manifestations of the same thing. They found that 'wave-particle duality' is simply the quantum 'uncertainty principle' in disguise, reducing two mysteries to one. The discovery deepens our understanding of quantum physics and could prompt ideas for new applications of wave-particle duality.

The NORAD Tracks Santa Web site features a mobile version, a holiday countdown, and new games and daily activities.

NORAD Ready to Track Santa’s Flight

December 16, 2014 11:19 am | by North American Aerospace Defense Command | News | Comments

The North American Aerospace Defense Command is once again ready to track Santa’s yuletide journey. It all started in 1955 when a local media advertisement directed children to call Santa direct — only the number was misprinted. Instead of reaching Santa, the phone rang through to the Crew Commander on duty at the Continental Air Defense Command Operations Center. Thus began the tradition, which NORAD has carried on since 1958.

Madhu Sudan and his colleagues have begun to describe theoretical limits on the degree of imprecision that communicating computers can tolerate, with very real implications for the design of communication protocols. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

New Theory could Yield More Reliable Communication Protocols

December 12, 2014 5:23 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Communication protocols for digital devices are very efficient but also very brittle: They require information to be specified in a precise order with a precise number of bits. If sender and receiver — say, a computer and a printer — are off by even a single bit relative to each other, communication between them breaks down entirely.

The Simula SpringerBriefs on Computing series will provide introductory volumes on the main topics within Simula’s expertise, including communications technology, software engineering and scientific computing.

New Open Access Book Series Introduces Essentials of Computing Science

December 11, 2014 3:58 pm | by Springer | News | Comments

Springer and Simula have launched a new book series, which aims to provide introductions to select research in computing. The series presents both a state-of-the-art disciplinary overview and raises essential critical questions in the field. All Simula SpringerBriefs on Computing are open access, allowing for faster sharing and wider dissemination of knowledge.

The ancient Antikythera relic was rescued from a shipwreck. Courtesy of Giovanni Dall Orto

World's Oldest Computer, Ancient Greek Antikythera Mechanism, 100 Years Older than Previously Believed

December 9, 2014 2:10 pm | by University of Puget Sound | News | Comments

An ancient Greek astronomical puzzle has one more piece in place. The new evidence results from research by James Evans, professor of physics at University of Puget Sound, and Christián Carman, history of science professor at University of Quilmes, Argentina. The two researchers published a paper advancing our understanding of the Antikythera Mechanism, an ancient Greek mechanism that modeled the known universe of 2,000 years ago. 

A new machine-learning algorithm clusters data according to both a small number of shared features (circled in blue) and similarity to a representative example (far right). Courtesy of Christine Daniloff

Teaching by Example: Pattern-recognition Systems Convey What they Learn to Humans

December 9, 2014 2:00 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Computers are good at identifying patterns in huge data sets. Humans, by contrast, are good at inferring patterns from just a few examples. In a paper appearing at the Neural Information Processing Society’s conference next week, MIT researchers present a new system that bridges these two ways of processing information, so that humans and computers can collaborate to make better decisions.

This tiny slice of silicon, etched in Jelena Vuckovic's lab at Stanford with a pattern that resembles a bar code, is one step on the way toward linking computer components with light instead of wires. Courtesy Vuckovic Lab

New Algorithm a Big Step toward Using Light to Transmit Data

December 9, 2014 1:38 pm | by Stanford University, Chris Cesare | News | Comments

Engineers have designed and built a prism-like device that can split a beam of light into different colors and bend the light at right angles, a development that could eventually lead to computers that use optics, rather than electricity, to carry data. The optical link is a tiny slice of silicon etched with a pattern that resembles a bar code. When a beam of light is shined at the link, two different wavelengths of light split off

Biological engineers have created a new computer model that allows them to design the most complex three-dimensional DNA shapes ever produced, including rings, bowls, and geometric structures such as icosahedrons that resemble viral particles.

Computer Model Enables Design of Complex DNA Shapes

December 3, 2014 3:45 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Biological engineers have created a new computer model that allows them to design the most complex three-dimensional DNA shapes ever produced, including rings, bowls, and geometric structures such as icosahedrons that resemble viral particles. 

It's a robot unlike any other: inspired by the world's fastest land animal, controlled by video game technology and packing nifty sensors — including one used to maneuver drones, satellites and ballistic missiles. The robot, called the cheetah, is the cre

MIT Engineers Have High Hopes for Cheetah Robot

December 2, 2014 3:27 pm | by Rodrique Ngowi, Associated Press | News | Comments

It's a robot unlike any other: inspired by the world's fastest land animal, controlled by video game technology and packing nifty sensors — including one used to maneuver drones, satellites and ballistic missiles. The robot, called the cheetah, is the creation of researchers at the Massachusetts of Technology, who had to design key elements from scratch because of a lack of or shortcomings in existing technology.

Engineers have designed and built a prism-like device that can split a beam of light into different colors and bend the light at right angles, a development that could eventually lead to computers that use optics, rather than electricity, to carry data.

Using Light Instead of Wires Inside Computers

December 2, 2014 3:01 pm | by Chris Cesare, Stanford University | News | Comments

Engineers have designed and built a prism-like device that can split a beam of light into different colors and bend the light at right angles, a development that could eventually lead to computers that use optics, rather than electricity, to carry data.

The program showed "mind-blowing" sophistication by penetrating several different computer networks in an unnamed Middle Eastern country. Rather than communicate with each target, the malware was able to avoid detection by using one network to relay comma

Mind-blowingly Sophisticated Hacking Program is Groundbreaking, Almost Peerless

November 26, 2014 12:15 pm | by Brandon Bailey, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Cyber-security researchers say they've identified a highly sophisticated computer hacking program that appears to have been used to spy on banks, telecommunications companies, official agencies and other organizations around the world. The malicious software known as "Regin" is designed to collect data from its targets for periods of months or years, penetrating deep into computer networks while covering its tracks to avoid detection.

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