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Russia's defense ministry is establishing its own cyber command responsible for offensive activities, "including propaganda operations and inserting malware into enemy command and control systems." Courtesy of Contando Estrelas

Russian Cyber Threat more Severe than Previously Assessed

February 26, 2015 1:11 pm | by Ken Dilanian, AP Intelligence Writer | News | Comments

The U.S. has elevated its appraisal of the cyber threat from Russia, the U.S. intelligence chief said February 26, 2015, as he delivered the annual assessment by intelligence agencies of the top dangers facing the country. "While I can't go into detail here, the Russian cyber threat is more severe than we had previously assessed," James Clapper, the director of national intelligence, told the Senate Armed Services Committee.

Flying Software Lab to Test Radically New Experimental Control Systems

February 26, 2015 8:35 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

ESA is developing a mini-satellite to test out radically new control systems and techniques and...

Upgrade to Core HTTP Protocol Promises Speedier, Easier Web

February 23, 2015 4:13 pm | by Peter Maynard, Queen's University Belfast | News | Comments

Hypertext Transfer Protocol, HTTP, is a key component of the World Wide Web. It is the...

New Spin on Spintronics: Radiation-resistant Material May Enable Devices in Harsh Environments

February 23, 2015 4:01 pm | by American Institute of Physics (AIP) | News | Comments

A team of researchers is exploring new materials that could yield higher computational speeds...

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id the National Security Agency plant spyware deep in the hard drives of thousands of computers used by foreign governments, banks and other surveillance targets around the world?  A new report from Russian cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab said its resear

Cyber Espionage: Seagate, Western Digital, Toshiba, IBM Products Reported Compromised

February 18, 2015 9:36 am | by Brandon Bailey, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Did the National Security Agency plant spyware deep in the hard drives of thousands of computers used by foreign governments, banks and other surveillance targets around the world? A new report from Russian cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab said its researchers identified a new family of malicious programs or worms that infected computers in multiple countries, primarily overseas.

Apple CEO Tim Cook, right, watches as President Barack Obama speaks during a summit on cybersecurity and consumer protection at Stanford University in Palo Alto, CA. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Obama calls on Silicon Valley to help thwart Cyber Attacks

February 17, 2015 2:15 pm | by Darlene Superville and Martha Mendoza, Associated Press | News | Comments

Cyberspace is the new "Wild West," President Barack Obama said, with everyone looking to the government to be the sheriff. But he told the private sector it must do more to stop cyber attacks aimed at the U.S. every day. Obama signed an executive order aimed at making it easier for private firms to have access to classified information about cyber attacks.

The IoT concept is much broader today, with the possibility of networking national and even international infrastructure for improved transport, weather forecasting, earthquake prediction and response, disease tracking and control and many other applicati

Internet of Things Reality Check: Obstacles may limit a Connected World

February 13, 2015 11:31 am | by Inderscience | News | Comments

Connecting different kinds of devices, not just computers and communications devices, to the Internet could lead to new ways of working with a wide range of machinery, sensors, domestic and other appliances. Researchers suggest that we are on the verge of another technological revolution, but practicalities and legal obstacles may stymie the development of the so-called Internet of Things (IoT) if they are not addressed quickly.

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Seagate EVault Backup Target Appliance

Seagate EVault Backup Target Appliance

February 13, 2015 10:16 am | Seagate Technology, LLC | Product Releases | Comments

The Seagate EVault Backup Target Appliance is a backup device for large enterprises and service providers seeking data protection for multiple operating systems and appliances, including Oracle databases. It is based on Seagate’s hybrid cloud model, which supports environments where both private (on-premise) and public (off-premise) storage is used.

Researchers are reporting a fascinating discovery that provides insight into how the brain makes sense of data from fingers.Courtesy of Quinn Dombrowski

Bringing Texture to Touchscreens: How the Brain Makes Sense of Data from Fingers

February 12, 2015 2:31 pm | by Megan Fellman, Northwestern University | News | Comments

What if the touchscreen of your smartphone or tablet could touch you back? What if touch was as integrated into our ubiquitous technology as sight and sound? Northwestern University and Carnegie Mellon University researchers now report a fascinating discovery that provides insight into how the brain makes sense of data from fingers.

Artist’s depiction of light traveling through a photonic crystal superlattice, where holes have been randomly patterned. The result is a more narrow beam of light. Courtesy of Nicoletta Barolini

More Precise Information Transfer in Computer Chips Using Disorder to Control Light

February 4, 2015 2:56 pm | by Matthew Chin, UCLA | News | Comments

A breakthrough could lead to the more precise transfer of information in computer chips, as well as new types of optical materials for light emission and lasers. Researchers were able to control light at tiny lengths around 500 nanometers — smaller than the light’s own wavelength — by using random crystal lattice structures to counteract light diffraction. The discovery could begin a new phase in laser collimation.

The IBM-SUNY Poly partnership expands beyond Albany, as SUNY Poly continues its explosive growth across New York.

IBM Research to Lead Advanced Computer Chip R&D at SUNY Poly

February 2, 2015 11:47 am | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM and SUNY Polytechnic Institute (SUNY Poly) have announced that more than 220 engineers and scientists who lead IBM's advanced chip research and development efforts at SUNY Poly's Albany Nanotech campus will become part of IBM Research, the technology industry's largest and most influential research organization.

SciNet displays a range of keywords and topics in a topic radar. With the help of the directions on the radar, the engine displays how these topics are related to each other. The relevance of each keyword is displayed as its distance from the center point

SciNet Search Engine Helps Find Relevant, Diverse Results Faster

January 28, 2015 2:52 pm | by Alto University | News | Comments

A new search engine outperforms current ones, and helps people to do searches more efficiently. The SciNet search engine is different because it changes Internet searches into recognition tasks, by showing keywords related to the user’s search in topic radar. People using SciNet can get relevant and diverse search results faster, especially when they do not know exactly what they are looking for or how to formulate a query to find it.

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The intelligent keyboard records each letter touched, but also captures information about the amount of force applied to the key and the length of time between one keystroke and the next. Such typing style is unique to individuals, and so could provide a

Self-powered Intelligent Keyboard could Provide New Layer of Biometric Security

January 27, 2015 10:12 am | by John Toon, Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

By analyzing such parameters as the force applied by key presses and the time interval between them, a new self-powered non-mechanical intelligent keyboard could provide a stronger layer of security for computer users. The self-powered device generates electricity when a user’s fingertips contact the multi-layer plastic materials that make up the device.

Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) quantum mechanics paradox

Extending Einstein's Spooky Actions for Use in Quantum Networks

January 26, 2015 4:18 pm | by Swinburne University of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers have demonstrated that the 1935 Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen quantum mechanics paradox may be extended to more than two optical systems, paving the way for exploration of larger quantum networks. The experiment also identified properties that may be useful in establishing secure quantum communication networks where shared sequences of numbers created between two parties need to be kept secret from a third party.

LE-OFETs are being used to develop flexible, transparent computer screens. Copyright RDECOM/CC

Transistor Improvements on Track to make Flexible Plastic Computers a Reality

January 26, 2015 2:03 pm | by National Institute for Materials Science | News | Comments

Researchers at Japan’s National Institute for Materials Science revealed that improvements should soon be expected in the manufacture of transistors that can be used to make flexible, paper-thin computer screens.The scientists reviewed the latest developments in research on photoactive organic field-effect transistors; devices that incorporate organic semi-conductors, amplify weak electronic signals, and either emit or receive light.

A notebook by Alan Turing, the World War II code-breaking genius depicted by Benedict Cumberbatch in the Oscar-nominated "The Imitation Game," is shown in a special preview at Bonhams auctioneers. The 56-page manuscript, containing Turing's complex mathem

British Code Breaker Alan Turing's Notebook Goes to Auction

January 26, 2015 1:33 pm | by AP | News | Comments

A handwritten notebook by Alan Turing, the World War II code-breaking genius depicted by Benedict Cumberbatch in the Oscar-nominated The Imitation Game, is going on the auction block. The 56-page manuscript was written at the time the British mathematician and computer science pioneer was working to break the seemingly unbreakable Enigma codes used by the Germans throughout World War II. It is expected to bring at least $1 million.

Dream it. Code it. Win it. is different from traditional competitions or hackathons, which focus on coding. The contest is judged on the quality of the problem being tackled, as well as the solution.

Dream it. Code it. Win it. Programming Competition Launches

January 23, 2015 2:15 pm | by TradingScreen | News | Comments

The MIT Enterprise Forum of New York and TradingScreen have announced the launch of the second annual award-winning “ Dream it. Code it. Win it. “ contest. The $50,000 student coding competition rewards and promotes creativity, diversity and literacy in the field of computer science.

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The Repository of Industrial Security Incidents is a database of incidents of a cybersecurity nature that have (or could have) affected process control, industrial automation or Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems.

Cybersecurity Expert Warns Not Enough Being Done to Prevent Highly Destructive Cyberattacks on Critical Infrastructure

January 21, 2015 1:13 pm | by International Society of Automation | News | Comments

Inadequate training and a culture of complacency among many owners and operators of critical infrastructure are significantly raising the risks of highly damaging cyberattack throughout the world. That’s the viewpoint expressed by Steve Mustard, an industrial cybersecurity subject-matter expert and consultant with extensive development and management experience in real-time embedded equipment and automation systems.

President Barack Obama speaks at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center in Arlington, VA, January 13, 2015. Obama renewed his call for Congress to pass cybersecurity legislation, including a proposal that encourages companies to

Obama Unveils Cybersecurity Proposals in Advance of State of the Union Address

January 14, 2015 11:46 am | by Jack Gillum, Associated Press | News | Comments

President Barack Obama has said that recent cyberthreats to Sony and the military's U.S. Central Command are reminders of the serious threats facing the nation. Obama laid out plans on January 13, 2015, as part of a push for new cybersecurity legislation that increases government information-sharing and protects businesses from lawsuits for revealing cyberthreats.

Measuring side-channel signals2: Georgia Tech researcher Alenka Zajic measures electromagnetic emissions from various components of a desktop computer. The researchers have studied emissions from desktop and laptop computers, as well as cellphones.

Countering Side-channel Hacker Attacks

January 14, 2015 11:35 am | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

If you’re sitting in a coffee shop, tapping away on your laptop, feeling safe from hackers because you didn’t connect to the shop’s Wi-Fi, think again. The bad guys may be able to see what you’re doing just by analyzing the low-power electronic signals your laptop emits, even when it’s not connected to the Internet. Side-channel signals could provide hackers with another way to see what the devices are doing.

The MHL Specification, created and maintained by the MHL Consortium, defines a high-definition video and digital audio interface intended for connecting mobile smart devices, such as tablets and cell phones, with high-definition televisions and other pers

Understanding Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL) Technology

January 12, 2015 9:00 am | by John R. Joyce, Ph.D. | Blogs | Comments

Okay, for today's pop-quiz, what is Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL) technology and what can it do? Is it a new NASA deep space communication protocol? Is it an upgrade to Google's street cams? Have you even heard of it? It turns out that many of you are equipped with devices that incorporate this technology. Specifically, many, though not all, of the current crop of smart phones and tablets support MHL.

The all-electric Nissan Leaf fitted with autonomous drive equipment allowed to park at NASA's Ames Research Center. Courtesy of Business Wire

NASA, Nissan Partner to Deploy Autonomous Drive Vehicles by Year End

January 9, 2015 11:28 am | by Nissan | News | Comments

NASA and Nissan have announced the formation of a five-year research and development partnership to advance autonomous vehicle systems and prepare for commercial application of the technology. Researchers from NASA’s Ames Research Center and Nissan’s U.S. Silicon Valley Research Center will focus on autonomous drive systems, human-machine interface solutions, network-enabled applications, and software analysis and verification.

Helen Greiner, chairman and co-founder iRobot Corporation, poses for photo with an iRobot PackBot EOD in front of her booth during RoboBusiness Conference and Exposition. Greiner, one of the inventors behind the Roomba, the robotic vacuum that can clean y

Today’s Drone Market Resembles Silicon Valley's Early Days

January 9, 2015 10:51 am | by Scott Mayerowitz, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

To see the future of drones, head up the hill at the intersection of Industrial Drive and Electronics Avenue. Inside a bland brick office building, the team at CyPhy is working on tethered machines that can fly nonstop for days and pocket-sized drones for search-and-rescue missions. It's not a fancy building. There's no giant aerospace or defense company here. Just small teams of computer scientists and mechanical engineers...

Hole cards in a game of Texas Hold 'em. A computer program that taught itself to play poker has created nearly the best possible strategy for one version of the game, showing the value of techniques that may prove useful for real-world challenges Courtesy

Game Theory: Self-taught Program Finds Ideal Poker Strategy

January 9, 2015 10:14 am | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

A computer program that taught itself to play poker has created nearly the best possible strategy for one version of the game, showing the value of techniques that may prove useful to help decision-making in medicine and other areas. The program considered 24 trillion simulated poker hands per second for two months, probably playing more poker than all humanity has ever experienced.

On-the-Go is an extension to the Universal Serial Bus (USB) standard, more commonly seen as USB OTG.

On-the-Go! Fascinating Facts about USB OTG

January 5, 2015 4:10 pm | by John R. Joyce, Ph.D. | Blogs | Comments

No, as much as it might be needed, this column doesn't address how to deal with the numerous frenetic projects that we are tasked with handling every day. On-the-Go is an extension to the Universal Serial Bus (USB) standard, more commonly seen as USB OTG. We'll forgo trying to determine who came up with a name like this and, instead, take a look at some of the fascinating things it allows us to do.

Besides being a fundamental breakthrough, this discovery opens up the possibility of making devices which take the benefits of both light and matter.

Half-Light, Half-Matter Quantum Particles a Step toward Practical Quantum Computing Platforms

January 5, 2015 11:36 am | by City College of New York | News | Comments

Prospects of developing computing and communication technologies based on quantum properties of light and matter may have taken a major step forward. In a pioneering study, researchers were able to discover half-light, half-matter particles in atomically thin semiconductors consisting of a 2-D layer of molybdenum and sulfur atoms arranged similar to graphene.

The FBI is recruiting new cyber special agents, along with computer scientists, digital forensic examiners, and cyber-skilled interns.

FBI Seeking Tech Experts to Become Cyber Special Agents

January 2, 2015 12:22 pm | by FBI | News | Comments

Since its earliest days, the FBI has looked for recruits with specialized skills to fill its special agent ranks. Today, the most sought-after candidates possess a uniquely 21st century quality: cyber expertise. To keep pace with the evolving threat, the Bureau is appealing to experienced and certified cyber experts to consider joining the FBI to apply their well-honed tradecraft as cyber special agents.

The Internet Archives Book Images Project was launched to catalog the imagery from half a millennium of books.

Unlocking the Imagery of 500 Years of Books

December 22, 2014 4:49 pm | by Library of Congress | Blogs | Comments

Over 14.7 million images were extracted from over 600 million pages covering an enormous variety of topics and stretching back to the year 1500. Yet, perhaps what is most remarkable about this montage is that these images come not from some newly-unearthed archive being seen for the first time, but rather from the books we have been digitizing for the past decade that have been resting in our digital libraries.

Sample images from Airport Scanner: the left image contains one target (hand grenade), the middle contains two identical targets (two exemplars of the dynamite stick target type), and the right image contains two different target types (derringer, gasolin

Crowdsourcing: Game Apps Bring Big Data to Psychological Research

December 22, 2014 4:34 pm | by American Psychological Association | News | Comments

A fast-paced game app where players pretend they are baggage screening officers operating airport x-ray scanners has provided researchers with billions of pieces of data in record time. To demonstrate the potential of mobile technology to gather data, the researchers partnered with the developer of popular mobile app game Airport Scanner, which challenges players to identify illegal items in luggage passing through an airport x-ray scanner.

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