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Indian Space Research Organisation scientists watch screens display the graphics explaining Mars Orbiter Mission at their Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network complex in Bangalore, India, Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. India triumphed in its first interpla

Mars Mission Opens India for Space Business

September 24, 2014 2:22 pm | by Katy Daigle, Associated Press | News | Comments

India celebrated putting a spacecraft into orbit around Mars on September 24, 2014, hoping the rare feat will show the world it is open for business in space exploration and inspire a new generation of homegrown scientists to help drive growth. Those motivations help explain why India, a poor country of 1.2 billion, even invests in a space program when so many of its people lack access to proper toilets, electricity and health care.

Fingertip Sensor Gives Robot Unprecedented Dexterity

September 23, 2014 3:37 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers have equipped a robot with a novel tactile sensor that lets it grasp a USB cable...

NASA Technology Can Detect Heartbeats in Rubble

September 19, 2014 4:46 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

When natural disasters or human-made catastrophes topple buildings, search and rescue teams...

Building a Global Network of Citizen Oceanographers

September 12, 2014 3:00 pm | by Nanyang Technological University (NTU) | News | Comments

NTU is working with other international universities to build a global network of ‘citizen...

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The position and structure at the micron- and nano-scales of the compound eyes of flies provide them a wide angular field of view. Courtesy of D.P. Pulsifer/PSU

Pesky Insect Inspires Practical Technology

September 9, 2014 3:41 pm | by American Institute of Physics (AIP) | News | Comments

In our vain struggle to kill flies, hands and swatters often come up lacking. This is due to no fault of our own, but rather to flies’ compound eyes. Arranged in a hexagonal, convex pattern, compound eyes consist of hundreds of optical units called ommatidia, which together bestow upon flies a nearly 360-degree field of vision. With this capability in mind, researchers are drawing on this structure to create miniature light-emitting devices

Eugenia Cheng, visiting senior lecturer in mathematics and a concert pianist, specializes in category theory, which she characterizes as 'the mathematics of mathematics.' Courtesy of Robert Kozloff

Power of Mathematics Opens New Possibilities in Music

August 27, 2014 3:34 pm | by Steve Koppes, University of Chicago | News | Comments

Anthony Cheung’s formal mathematical training essentially ended with high school calculus. But as a musician and composer, he has explored mathematical phenomena in new ways, especially through their influence on harmony and timbre. “Through technology and thinking about acoustics, we can change sounds on the computer in innumerable ways,” says Cheung, whose musical composition earned him a 2012 Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome.

Mosaic of satellite images of Antarctica taken by RADARSAT-2. Courtesy of RADARSAT-2 Data and Products © MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd. (2008) – All Rights Reserved.  RADARSAT is an official mark of the Canadian Space Agency.

Most Complete Antarctic Map for Climate Research Publicly Available

August 26, 2014 4:18 pm | by University of Waterloo | News | Comments

The University of Waterloo has unveiled a new satellite image of Antarctica, and the imagery will help scientists all over the world gain new insight into the effects of climate change. The mosaic is free and fully accessible to the academic world and the public. Using Synthetic Aperture Radar with multiple polarization modes aboard the RADARSAT-2 satellite, the CSA collected more than 3,150 images of the continent.

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The study combined two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Does your Computer Know How You’re Feeling?

August 25, 2014 11:16 am | by Taylor & Francis | News | Comments

Researchers in Bangladesh have designed a computer program that can accurately recognize users’ emotional states as much as 87 percent of the time, depending on the emotion. Writing in the journal Behaviour & Information Technology, A.F.M. Nazmul Haque Nahin and his colleagues describe how their study combined — for the first time — two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Once installed, the sensors would provide information about the condition of bridges that cannot be obtained by visual inspection alone and would allow authorities to identify and focus on bridges that need immediate attention. Courtesy of USchick

Wireless Sensors and Flying Robots Monitor Deteriorating Bridges

August 22, 2014 12:45 pm | by Tufts School of Engineering | News | Comments

As a report from the Obama administration warns that one in four bridges in the United States needs significant repair or cannot handle automobile traffic, Tufts University engineers are employing wireless sensors and flying robots that could have the potential to help authorities monitor the condition of bridges in real time.

In this August 6, 2014, photo provided by Catlin Seaview Survey, Catlin's Christophe Bailhache surveys "Christ of the Abyss," with the SVII cameras off the coast of Key Largo, Fla. U.S. government scientists hope people will soon be able to go online and

Street View goes Undersea to Map Reefs, Wonders

August 13, 2014 2:16 pm | by Jennifer Kay, Associated Press | News | Comments

It's easy to go online and get a 360-degree, ground-level view of almost any street in the US and throughout the world. Soon, scientists hope to do the same with coral reefs and other underwater wonders. They are learning to use specialized fisheye lenses underwater in the Florida Keys in hopes of applying "street view" mapping to research and management plans in marine sanctuaries nationwide. Some of the images will be available online...

Hurricanes Iselle and Julio -- Courtesy of NASA; image by Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE/EOSDIS Rapid Response

Hurricanes Iselle and Julio Nearing the Hawaiian Islands

August 11, 2014 11:38 am | by Mike Carlowicz, NASA | News | Comments

In early August 2014, not one but two hurricanes were headed for the Hawaiian Islands. Storms arriving from the east are a relative rarity, and landfalling storms are also pretty infrequent. This image is a composite of three satellite passes over the tropical Pacific Ocean in the early afternoon.

This July 2014 image provided by the Bureau of Land Management shows researchers in the interior of the Natural Trap Cave in north-central Wyoming. The cave holds the remains of tens of thousands of animals, including many now-extinct species, from the la

Dig This: Ancient Bones found in Wyoming Cave

August 8, 2014 4:36 pm | by Mead Gruver, Associated Press | News | Comments

North American lions, cheetahs and short-faced bears: Those are just a few fearsome critters from 25,000 years ago paleontologists already might have found in their first excavation of a bizarre northern Wyoming cave in 30 years. Good fossils also come in small packages: Exquisite rodent bones best examined by microscope, or even snippets of genetic material from long-extinct species, could be in their haul.

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The aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) transits the Pacific Ocean with ships assigned to Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 combined task force as part of a photo exercise north of Hawaii. RIMPAC, the world's largest multinational maritime exercise

Jam Session: New Technology Helps Sailors on the Digital Frontier

August 7, 2014 2:56 pm | by Eric Beidel, ONR | News | Comments

During the world's largest international maritime exercise, Sailors demonstrated a new system that could transform the future of electronic warfare and defense of ships at sea. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, Electronic Warfare Battle Management for Surface Defense will help Sailors and Marines coordinate electronic countermeasure responses to inbound threats faster than is possible through traditional voice communications

The sea ice in July 2014 as it begins to retreat from the Alaskan coast. Courtesy of J. Thomson/UW

Huge Waves Measured for First Time in Arctic Ocean

July 29, 2014 4:43 pm | by University of Washington | News | Comments

As the climate warms and sea ice retreats, the North is changing. An ice-covered expanse now has a season of increasingly open water which is predicted to extend across the whole Arctic Ocean before the middle of this century. Storms thus have the potential to create Arctic swell – huge waves that...

This July 11, 2014, aerial photo shows the coast of Barnegat Light, NJ, near where a plan to carry out seismic research on the ocean floor is being challenged by environmental and fishing groups. A federal appeals court on July 14, 2014, rejected New Jers

US Plans Wide Seismic Testing of Sea Floor

July 28, 2014 2:29 pm | by Wayne Parry, Associated Press | News | Comments

The federal government is planning to use sound blasting to conduct research on the ocean floor along most of the East Coast, using technology similar to that which spawned a court battle between environmentalists and researchers in New Jersey this summer. The U.S. Geological Survey plans this summer and next to map the outer limits of the continental shelf, and also study underwater landslides that would help predict tsunamis.

To celebrate Chandra's 15th anniversary, four new images of supernova remnants – the Crab Nebula, Tycho, G292.0+1.8, and 3C58 – are being released. These supernova remnants are very hot and energetic and glow brightly in X-ray light, which allows Chandra

NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory Celebrates 15th Anniversary

July 25, 2014 3:05 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Fifteen years ago, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory was launched into space aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. Since its deployment, Chandra has helped revolutionize our understanding of the universe through its unrivaled X-ray vision. Chandra, one of NASA's current "Great Observatories," along with the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope, is specially designed to detect X-ray emission from hot and energetic regions.

Using data from NASA's Kepler and Spitzer Space Telescopes, scientists have made the most precise measurement ever of the size of a world outside our solar system, as illustrated in this artist's conception. Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

Weird Worlds: Precisely Measuring an Alien World's Size

July 25, 2014 2:56 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Thanks to NASA's Kepler and Spitzer Space Telescopes, scientists have made the most precise measurement ever of the radius of a planet outside our solar system. The size of the exoplanet, dubbed Kepler-93b, is now known to an uncertainty of just 74 miles (119 kilometers) on either side of the planetary body.

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A photograph of the biologically-inspired microphone taken under a microscope, providing a top-side view. The tiny structure rotates and flaps about the pivots (labeled), producing an electric potential across the electrodes (labeled). Courtesy of N.Hall/

Sound Detector Based on Freakishly Acute Fly Hearing

July 24, 2014 2:55 pm | by American Institute of Physics (AIP) | News | Comments

Even within a phylum so full of mean little creatures, the yellow-colored Ormia ochracea fly is distinguished among other arthropods for its cruelty — at least to crickets. Native to the southeastern U.S. states and Central America, the fly is a most predatory sort of parasite. It swoops onto the back of a singing male cricket, deposits a smear of larvae, and leaves its wicked brood to invade, kill and consume the cricket from inside out.

Richard Hendrickson, 101, shows equipment he uses to collect temperature and precipitation data for the National Weather Service on Monday, July, 21, 2014, in Bridgehampton, NY. Hendrickson is being honored as the longest serving volunteer weather data co

Celebrating More than 80 years of Continuous Data from a Single Source

July 23, 2014 3:12 pm | by AP | News | Comments

It takes only a couple of minutes, twice a day, but 101-year-old Richard Hendrickson is fiercely proud that he has done the same thing for his country and community nearly every day since Herbert Hoover was in the White House in 1930. The retired chicken and dairy farmer has been recording daily readings of temperature and precipitation on eastern Long Island longer than any volunteer observer in the history of the National Weather Service.

Heat records in June broke on every continent but Antarctica, especially in New Zealand, northern South America, Greenland, central Africa and southern Asia.

World Breaks Monthly Heat Record Twice in a Row

July 22, 2014 3:30 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The globe is on a hot streak, setting a heat record in June. That's after the world broke a record in May. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced July 21, 2014, that last month's average global temperature was 61.2 degrees, which is 1.3 degrees higher than the 20th century average. It beat 2010's old record by one-twentieth of a degree.

Astronauts to Test Free-flying “Housekeeper” Robots

July 21, 2014 2:30 pm | by Maria Alberty, NASA's Ames Research Center | News | Comments

Inspired by science fiction, three bowling ball-size free-flying Synchronized Position Hold, Engage, Reorient, Experimental Satellites (SPHERES) have been flying inside the International Space Station since 2006. These satellites provide a test bed for development and research, each having its own power, propulsion, computer, navigation equipment, and physical and electrical connections for hardware and sensors for various experiments.

Birdsongs Automatically Decoded by Computer Scientists

July 21, 2014 2:25 pm | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found a successful way of identifying bird sounds from large audio collections, which could be useful for expert and amateur bird-watchers alike. The analysis used recordings of individual birds and of dawn choruses to identify characteristics of bird sounds. It took advantage of large datasets of sound recordings provided by the British Library Sound Archive, and online sources.

Schematic cross section of the Earth’s interior. The study by Steve Jacobsen and Brandon Schmandt used seismic waves to find magma generated at the base of the transition zone, around 410 miles deep. Dehydration melting at those conditions, also observed

New Evidence for Huge Water Reservoirs Deep in the Earth

June 18, 2014 3:18 pm | by Megan Fellman, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Researchers from Northwestern University and the University of New Mexico report evidence for potentially oceans worth of water deep beneath the United States. Though not in the familiar liquid form — the ingredients for water are bound up in rock deep in the Earth’s mantle — the discovery may represent the planet’s largest water reservoir.

A very early version of Google’s prototype self-driving car

Just Press Go: Google's New Self-Driving Car Has No Steering Wheel or Brake

May 29, 2014 9:10 am | by Chris Urmson, Director, Google Self-Driving Car Project | Blogs | Comments

Ever since we started the Google self-driving car project, we’ve been working toward the goal of vehicles that can shoulder the entire burden of driving. Just imagine: You can take a trip downtown at lunchtime without a 20-minute buffer to find parking. Seniors can keep their freedom even if they can’t keep their car keys. And drunk and distracted driving? History.

Simulating brain controlled flying at the Institute for Flight System Dynamics Courtesy of A. Heddergott/TU München

Brain Controlled Flight: Using Thoughts to Control Airplanes

May 28, 2014 12:27 pm | by Technische Universität München | News | Comments

Scientists have demonstrated the feasibility of flying via brain control — with astonishing accuracy. The pilot is wearing a white cap with myriad attached cables. His gaze is concentrated on the runway ahead of him. All of a sudden the control stick starts to move, as if by magic. The airplane banks and then approaches straight on towards the runway. The position of the plane is corrected time and again

March 29 X-class Flare: IBIS can focus in on different wavelengths of light, and so reveal different layers at different heights in the sun's lower atmosphere, the chromosphere. Courtesy of Lucia Kleint, BAER Institute; Paul Higgins, Trinity College

Astrophysicists Capture Rare Solar Eruption: An X-Class Solar Flare

May 15, 2014 3:40 pm | by Trinity College Dublin | News | Comments

Astrophysicists recently won the ‘solar science lottery’ as they were observing the skies just as one of the most energetic and rarest of solar eruptions took place. The international team, which included researchers from Trinity College Dublin, was able to record the rare event from multiple telescopes to build the most detailed picture yet of an ‘X-class solar flare.’ 

Symbiosis Technology Components manufactured by Spark Holland BV

Clarity Chromatography Software Adds Symbiosis Control Driver

May 12, 2014 11:32 am | by DataApex | News | Comments

DataApex has announced the release of a control driver for Symbiosis Technology Components manufactured by Spark Holland BV. The Symbiosis is SPARK's unique solution for fast integrated online SPE‐LC‐MS automation (XLC‐MS). Clarity can now control more than 470 instruments in total.

A U.S. U2 reconnaissance plane takes off at the U.S. airbase in Osan, south of Seoul, South Korea. The U-2 spy plane outlasted the Cold War, outlived its successor and helped avert the world’s nuclear annihilation a half century ago. Defense cuts now ...

U-2 Spy Plane Outlasts Cold War, but not Defense Cuts

April 25, 2014 11:11 am | by Donna Cassata, Associated Press | News | Comments

The U-2 spy plane outlasted the Cold War, outlived its successor and proved crucial a half-century ago when two superpowers were on the brink of nuclear war. But defense cuts now threaten to knock the high-flying reconnaissance aircraft out of the sky. The Air Force wants to gradually retire the fleet of 32 "Dragon Lady" planes, which can soar to an altitude of 70,000 feet, collect intelligence on North Korea and Russia and rapidly send ...

Developed in part with support from the National Science Foundation, the Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System works by bypassing damaged cells in the retina, transmitting images from a small camera to an implant in the back of the eye that sends electrical

How to Build a Brain-machine Interface

April 25, 2014 11:02 am | by Valerie Thompson, National Science Foundation | News | Comments

Devices that tap directly into the nervous system can restore sensation, movement or cognitive function. These technologies, called brain-machine interfaces or BMIs, are on the rise, increasingly providing assistance to people who need it most. But what exactly does it take to build a BMI?

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