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Mobile Phone Mapping Proves Reliable

October 28, 2014 1:58 pm | by University of Southampton | News | Comments

A study by an international team, including the University of Southampton, has shown population maps based on anonymous mobile phone call record data can be as accurate as those based on censuses. Their findings show maps made using mobile records are detailed, reliable and flexible enough to help inform infrastructure and emergency planners; particularly in low income countries, where recent population density information is often scarce.

Astrochemists Discover Titan Glows at Dusk and Dawn

October 24, 2014 3:49 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

New maps of Saturn’s moon Titan reveal large patches of trace gases shining brightly near the...

Significant Solar Flare in Extreme Ultraviolet

October 24, 2014 3:35 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The sun emitted a significant solar flare on October 19, 2014, peaking at 1:01 a.m. EDT. NASA's...

Warming Earth Heading for Hottest Year on Record

October 21, 2014 11:35 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Earth is on pace to tie or even break the mark for the hottest year on record, federal...

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Bathymetry image of Lake George: In 2014, a bathymetric and topographic survey conducted by boat and plane mapped the lake bed, shoreline and watershed. Now, within the data visualization center, scientists will be able to zoom in as close as half a meter

State-of-the-Art Visualization Lab to Display Streaming Data in Real-Time

October 20, 2014 10:00 am | by IBM | News | Comments

The Jefferson Project announced new milestones in a multimillion-dollar collaboration that seeks to understand and manage complex factors impacting Lake George. A new data visualization laboratory features advanced computing and graphics systems that allow researchers to visualize sophisticated models and incoming data on weather, runoff and circulation patterns. The lab will display streaming data from various sensors in real-time.

Hurricane Gonzalo -- Courtesy of Alexander Gerst/ESA/NASA

Major Hurricane Gonzalo Approaches Bermuda

October 20, 2014 9:19 am | by NASA | News | Comments

This image of Hurricane Gonzalo was taken from the International Space Station by European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst on October 16, 2014. In addition to the crew Earth observations from the space station, NASA and NOAA satellites provided continuous coverage of Hurricane Gonzalo as it moved toward Bermuda.

A sketch (not to scale) showing axions (blue) streaming out from the Sun, converting in the Earth's magnetic field (red) into X-rays (orange), which are then detected by the XMM-Newton observatory.  Copyright: University of Leicester

Dark Matter: Inexplicable Signal from Unseen Universe Provides Tantalizing Clue

October 17, 2014 12:08 pm | by University of Leicester | News | Comments

A cutting-edge paper has provided the first potential indication of direct detection of Dark Matter — something that has been a mystery in physics for over 30 years. Space scientists at the University of Leicester have detected a curious signal in the X-ray sky — one that provides a tantalizing insight into the nature of mysterious Dark Matter.

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IceBridge DMS L0 Raw Courtesy of the Digital Mapping System (DMS) team/NASA DAAC at the National Snow and Ice Data Center

Operation IceBridge Turns Five

October 17, 2014 9:45 am | by Kathryn Hansen, NASA | News | Comments

In May 2014, two new studies concluded that a section of the land-based West Antarctic ice sheet had reached a point of inevitable collapse. Meanwhile, fresh observations from September 2014 showed sea ice around Antarctica had reached its greatest extent since the late 1970s. To better understand such dynamic and dramatic differences in the region's land and sea ice, researchers are travelling south to Antarctica.

Milky Way Glitters Brightly -- Courtesy of ESO/B. Tafreshi

Milky Way Glitters Brightly over Chile

October 16, 2014 8:46 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

The Milky Way glitters brightly over the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array’s (ALMA) antennas, in this image taken by the ESO Ultra High Definition Expedition team as they capture the site in 4K quality. Currently under construction in the thin, dry air of northern Chile's Atacama desert at an altitude of 5,000 meters above sea level, ALMA will initially be composed of 66 high-precision antennas

The new technology merges a proven, wearable computer system with situational awareness capabilities to create an enhanced real-time view of the battlefield for commanders and their troops.

Raytheon Unveils Wearable Computers for Tactical Edge in Battlefield Intelligence Ops

October 15, 2014 3:44 pm | by Raytheon Company | News | Comments

Raytheon Company has unveiled its wearable computing Intel-Ops solution at the AUSA 2014 Meeting and Exposition. The new technology merges a proven, wearable computer system with situational awareness capabilities to create an enhanced real-time view of the battlefield for commanders and their troops.

While the upper part of the world’s oceans continue to absorb heat from global warming, ocean depths have not warmed measurably in the last decade. This image shows heat radiating from the Pacific Ocean as imaged by the NASA’s Clouds and the Earth's Radia

Unsolved Mystery: Earth’s Ocean Abyss has Not Warmed

October 14, 2014 2:47 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The cold waters of Earth’s deep ocean have not warmed measurably since 2005, according to a new NASA study, leaving unsolved the mystery of why global warming appears to have slowed in recent years. Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, analyzed satellite and direct ocean temperature data from 2005 to 2013 and found the ocean abyss below 1.24 miles (1,995 meters) has not warmed measurably.

The PLANTOID prototype was designed with two functional roots: one root demonstrates bending capabilities, responding to input from the sensors at the tip of the root. A second root demonstrates artificial growth. Courtesy of PLANTOID

Revolutionary Robotic Solutions are Inspired by Plants

October 10, 2014 12:42 pm | by European Commission | News | Comments

Researchers are demonstrating revolutionary robotic techniques inspired by plants, featuring a 3-D-printed ‘trunk,’ ‘leaves’ that sense the environment and ‘roots’ that grow and change direction. Humans naturally understand problems and solutions from an animal’s perspective, tending to see plants as passive organisms that don’t ‘do’ much of anything, but plants do move, and they sense, and they do so in extremely efficient ways.

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NASA’s Traffic and Atmospheric Information for General Aviation (TAIGA) technology system is capable of showing pilots the altitude of nearby terrain via color. Yellow identifies terrain that is near the aircraft’s altitude and red shows the terrain that

New NASA Technology Brings Critical Data to Pilots over Remote Alaskan Territories

October 10, 2014 11:58 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA has formally delivered to Alaskan officials a new technology that could help pilots flying over the vast wilderness expanses of the northern-most state. The technology is designed to help pilots make better flight decisions, especially when disconnected from the Internet, telephone, flight services and other data sources normally used by pilots.

UN-SCAN-IT Gel 7.1 Gel Analysis Software

UN-SCAN-IT Gel 7.1 Gel Analysis Software

October 9, 2014 9:32 am | Silk Scientific, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

UN-SCAN-IT Gel 7.1 gel analysis software converts virtually any scanner, digital camera or other image input device into an accurate high‑speed densitometer and digitizer system. Features include a zoomable and scalable analysis screen, lane analysis, segment analysis, dot blot analysis, color and grayscale gel analysis, clone drawing mode, MW calculation and calibration curves.

NASA satellite data of the marine environment will be used in prototype marine biodiversity observation networks to be established in four U.S. locations, including the Florida Keys, pictured here. Courtesy of USF/WHOI/MBARI/NASA

U.S. Initiates Prototype System to Gauge National Marine Biodiversity

October 7, 2014 3:43 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA are funding three demonstration projects that will lay the foundation for the first national network to monitor marine biodiversity at scales ranging from microbes to whales. The U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) also plans to contribute.

Researchers of the Color Imaging Lab Group, from the Optics Department at the University of Granada. Miguel Ángel Martínez Domingo is on the right of the photo.

Imaging System Capable of Obtaining 12 Times More Information than Human Eye

October 7, 2014 3:35 pm | by University of Granada | News | Comments

Researchers have designed a new imaging system capable of obtaining up to 12 times more color information than the human eye and conventional cameras, which implies a total of 36 color channels. This important development will facilitate the easy capture of multispectral images in real time, and in the not too distant future it could also be used to develop new assisted vehicle driving systems, or to obtain more accurate medical images.

Gravity model of the N. Atlantic; red dots are earthquakes. Quakes are often related to seamounts. Courtesy of David Sandwell, SIO

Satellite Data Offer Foundation for New High-resolution Version of Google Ocean Maps

October 6, 2014 3:42 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Scientists have created a new map of the world's seafloor, offering a more vivid picture of the structures that make up the deepest, least-explored parts of the ocean. The feat was accomplished by accessing two untapped streams of satellite data. Thousands of previously uncharted mountains rising from the seafloor, called seamounts, have emerged through the map, along with new clues about the formation of the continents.

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Indian Space Research Organisation scientists watch screens display the graphics explaining Mars Orbiter Mission at their Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network complex in Bangalore, India, Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. India triumphed in its first interpla

Mars Mission Opens India for Space Business

September 24, 2014 2:22 pm | by Katy Daigle, Associated Press | News | Comments

India celebrated putting a spacecraft into orbit around Mars on September 24, 2014, hoping the rare feat will show the world it is open for business in space exploration and inspire a new generation of homegrown scientists to help drive growth. Those motivations help explain why India, a poor country of 1.2 billion, even invests in a space program when so many of its people lack access to proper toilets, electricity and health care.

Armed with the GelSight sensor, a robot can grasp a freely hanging USB cable and plug it into a USB port. Courtesy of Melanie Gonick/MIT

Fingertip Sensor Gives Robot Unprecedented Dexterity

September 23, 2014 3:37 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers have equipped a robot with a novel tactile sensor that lets it grasp a USB cable draped freely over a hook and insert it into a USB port. The sensor is an adaptation of a technology called GelSight, which was developed at MIT. The new sensor isn’t as sensitive as the original GelSight sensor, which could resolve details on the micrometer scale. But it’s smaller, and its processing algorithm is faster.

Researchers performed a test of the Finding Individuals for Disaster and Emergency Response (FINDER) prototype technology — which can locate individuals buried in disasters — at the Virginia Task Force 1 Training Facility in Lorton, VA. The device uses ra

NASA Technology Can Detect Heartbeats in Rubble

September 19, 2014 4:46 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

When natural disasters or human-made catastrophes topple buildings, search and rescue teams immediately set out to find victims trapped beneath the wreckage. During these missions, time is imperative, and the ability to quickly detect living victims greatly increases the chances of rescue and survival.

Associate Professor Federico Lauro (left) and his wife Rachelle Jensen holding a sample cartridge

Building a Global Network of Citizen Oceanographers

September 12, 2014 3:00 pm | by Nanyang Technological University (NTU) | News | Comments

NTU is working with other international universities to build a global network of ‘citizen scientists’ on a free-to-access database for oceanographic data. To gain a better understanding of marine microbes that support the nutrient cycle and form the foundation of the food web, NTU scientists have embarked on a pilot project to crowd-source the collection of oceanographic data globally.

The position and structure at the micron- and nano-scales of the compound eyes of flies provide them a wide angular field of view. Courtesy of D.P. Pulsifer/PSU

Pesky Insect Inspires Practical Technology

September 9, 2014 3:41 pm | by American Institute of Physics (AIP) | News | Comments

In our vain struggle to kill flies, hands and swatters often come up lacking. This is due to no fault of our own, but rather to flies’ compound eyes. Arranged in a hexagonal, convex pattern, compound eyes consist of hundreds of optical units called ommatidia, which together bestow upon flies a nearly 360-degree field of vision. With this capability in mind, researchers are drawing on this structure to create miniature light-emitting devices

Eugenia Cheng, visiting senior lecturer in mathematics and a concert pianist, specializes in category theory, which she characterizes as 'the mathematics of mathematics.' Courtesy of Robert Kozloff

Power of Mathematics Opens New Possibilities in Music

August 27, 2014 3:34 pm | by Steve Koppes, University of Chicago | News | Comments

Anthony Cheung’s formal mathematical training essentially ended with high school calculus. But as a musician and composer, he has explored mathematical phenomena in new ways, especially through their influence on harmony and timbre. “Through technology and thinking about acoustics, we can change sounds on the computer in innumerable ways,” says Cheung, whose musical composition earned him a 2012 Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome.

Mosaic of satellite images of Antarctica taken by RADARSAT-2. Courtesy of RADARSAT-2 Data and Products © MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd. (2008) – All Rights Reserved.  RADARSAT is an official mark of the Canadian Space Agency.

Most Complete Antarctic Map for Climate Research Publicly Available

August 26, 2014 4:18 pm | by University of Waterloo | News | Comments

The University of Waterloo has unveiled a new satellite image of Antarctica, and the imagery will help scientists all over the world gain new insight into the effects of climate change. The mosaic is free and fully accessible to the academic world and the public. Using Synthetic Aperture Radar with multiple polarization modes aboard the RADARSAT-2 satellite, the CSA collected more than 3,150 images of the continent.

The study combined two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Does your Computer Know How You’re Feeling?

August 25, 2014 11:16 am | by Taylor & Francis | News | Comments

Researchers in Bangladesh have designed a computer program that can accurately recognize users’ emotional states as much as 87 percent of the time, depending on the emotion. Writing in the journal Behaviour & Information Technology, A.F.M. Nazmul Haque Nahin and his colleagues describe how their study combined — for the first time — two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Once installed, the sensors would provide information about the condition of bridges that cannot be obtained by visual inspection alone and would allow authorities to identify and focus on bridges that need immediate attention. Courtesy of USchick

Wireless Sensors and Flying Robots Monitor Deteriorating Bridges

August 22, 2014 12:45 pm | by Tufts School of Engineering | News | Comments

As a report from the Obama administration warns that one in four bridges in the United States needs significant repair or cannot handle automobile traffic, Tufts University engineers are employing wireless sensors and flying robots that could have the potential to help authorities monitor the condition of bridges in real time.

In this August 6, 2014, photo provided by Catlin Seaview Survey, Catlin's Christophe Bailhache surveys "Christ of the Abyss," with the SVII cameras off the coast of Key Largo, Fla. U.S. government scientists hope people will soon be able to go online and

Street View goes Undersea to Map Reefs, Wonders

August 13, 2014 2:16 pm | by Jennifer Kay, Associated Press | News | Comments

It's easy to go online and get a 360-degree, ground-level view of almost any street in the US and throughout the world. Soon, scientists hope to do the same with coral reefs and other underwater wonders. They are learning to use specialized fisheye lenses underwater in the Florida Keys in hopes of applying "street view" mapping to research and management plans in marine sanctuaries nationwide. Some of the images will be available online...

Hurricanes Iselle and Julio -- Courtesy of NASA; image by Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE/EOSDIS Rapid Response

Hurricanes Iselle and Julio Nearing the Hawaiian Islands

August 11, 2014 11:38 am | by Mike Carlowicz, NASA | News | Comments

In early August 2014, not one but two hurricanes were headed for the Hawaiian Islands. Storms arriving from the east are a relative rarity, and landfalling storms are also pretty infrequent. This image is a composite of three satellite passes over the tropical Pacific Ocean in the early afternoon.

This July 2014 image provided by the Bureau of Land Management shows researchers in the interior of the Natural Trap Cave in north-central Wyoming. The cave holds the remains of tens of thousands of animals, including many now-extinct species, from the la

Dig This: Ancient Bones found in Wyoming Cave

August 8, 2014 4:36 pm | by Mead Gruver, Associated Press | News | Comments

North American lions, cheetahs and short-faced bears: Those are just a few fearsome critters from 25,000 years ago paleontologists already might have found in their first excavation of a bizarre northern Wyoming cave in 30 years. Good fossils also come in small packages: Exquisite rodent bones best examined by microscope, or even snippets of genetic material from long-extinct species, could be in their haul.

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