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In this illustration, two protons collide at high energy, producing a Higgs boson that instantly decays, producing two tau particles. The rest of the energy from the collision sprays outward in two jets (pink cones). Measuring the angle between these jets

Is Higgs Boson a Piece of the Matter-Antimatter Puzzle?

December 17, 2014 3:00 pm | by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory | News | Comments

Several experiments, including the BaBar experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, have helped explain some — but not all — of the imbalance between matter and antimatter in the universe. Now, a SLAC theorist and his colleagues have laid out a possible method for determining if the Higgs boson is involved.

Interstellar Space: NASA Voyager in Midst of Tsunami Wave

December 17, 2014 2:43 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A "tsunami wave" that NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft began experiencing earlier this year is still...

Intel Provides Open Access to Hawking’s Advanced Communications Platform

December 10, 2014 4:09 pm | by Intel | News | Comments

Intel demonstrated for the first time with Professor Stephen Hawking a new Intel-created...

Hiding in Plain Sight: Detecting Elusive Dark Matter with GPS

November 21, 2014 5:21 pm | by Mike Wolterbeek, University of Nevada, Reno | News | Comments

The everyday use of a GPS device might be to find your way around town or even navigate a hiking...

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This artist's concept shows the Comet Siding Spring approaching Mars with NASA’s orbiters preparing to make science observations of this unique encounter. A pristine distant comet created a once-in-eight-million-year fireworks show on Mars and no humans w

Comet Creates Once-in-8-million-year Fireworks Show above Mars

November 10, 2014 12:37 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

A pristine distant comet created a once-in-8-million-year fireworks show above Mars last month. But no one got to see it live. New NASA data from satellites circling Mars shows that when the comet named Siding Spring skimmed the red planet, tons of comet dust bombarded the Martian sky with thousands of fireballs an hour. It warped the Martian atmosphere leaving all sorts of metals and an eerie yellow afterglow.

A time-lapse photograph of the CIBER rocket launch, taken from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia in 2013. This was the last of four launches of the Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER). Sub-orbital rockets are smaller than those that boo

Rocket Experiment Finds Surprising Cosmic Light

November 7, 2014 3:37 pm | by Kathy Svitil, Caltech | News | Comments

Using an experiment carried into space on a NASA suborbital rocket, astronomers have detected a diffuse cosmic glow that appears to represent more light than that produced by known galaxies in the universe. The researchers say the best explanation is that the cosmic light originates from stars that were stripped away from their parent galaxies and flung out into space as those galaxies collided and merged with other galaxies.

The world’s most advanced bionic hand was tested with the help of amputee Dennis Aabo Sørensen who was able to grasp objects intuitively and identify what he was touching, while blindfolded. © LifeHand2

Neural Interface allows Natural Control of World’s Most Advanced Bionic Hand

November 7, 2014 3:27 pm | by European Commission | News | Comments

A prosthetic hand, which provides a sense of touch acute enough to handle an egg, has been completed and is now exploited by the NEBIAS project after 10 years of EU-funded research. The world’s most advanced bionic hand was tested with the help of amputee Dennis Aabo Sørensen who was able to grasp objects intuitively and identify what he was touching, while blindfolded.

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UW students Darby Losey (shown) and Jose Ceballos were positioned in two different buildings on campus. The sender thinks about firing a cannon at various points throughout a computer game. That signal is sent over the Web directly to the brain of the rec

Direct Brain-to-brain Interface Operates between Humans in Real Time

November 6, 2014 4:05 pm | by Michelle Ma, University of Washington | News | Comments

Sometimes, words just complicate things. What if our brains could communicate directly with each other, bypassing the need for language? Researchers have successfully replicated a direct brain-to-brain connection between pairs of people as part of a scientific study following the team’s initial demonstration a year ago.

A new algorithm can, with high accuracy, determine whether a patient is suffering from emphysema or heart failure based on readings from a capnograph — a machine that measures the concentration of carbon dioxide in a patient’s exhalations. Courtesy of Chr

Diagnostic Exhalations: Algorithm Analyzes CO2, could Help Determine Treatment

November 6, 2014 3:41 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Paramedics respond to a 911 call to find an elderly patient who’s having difficulty breathing. Anxious and disoriented, the patient has trouble remembering all the medications he’s taking, and with his shortness of breath, speaking is difficult. Is he suffering from acute emphysema or heart failure? The symptoms look the same, but initiating the wrong treatment regimen will increase the patient’s risk of severe complications.

A remote-controlled roving camera camouflaged as a penguin chick in Adelie Land, Antarctica. The device is so convincing that penguins don't scamper away and sometimes even sing to it with trumpet-like sounds. Emperor penguins are notoriously shy. When re

Roving Robotic Spy Keeps Tabs on Shy Penguins

November 4, 2014 12:42 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The newest tool for biologists is the baby penguin robotic spy. It's pretty darn cute, and so convincing that penguins essentially talk to it, as if it is a potential mate for their chicks. Emperor penguins are notoriously shy. When researchers approach, these penguins normally back away and their heart rate goes up. That's not what the scientists need when they want to check heart rate, health and other penguin parameters.

Combined map showing holidays and working periods

Mobile Phone Mapping Proves Reliable

October 28, 2014 1:58 pm | by University of Southampton | News | Comments

A study by an international team, including the University of Southampton, has shown population maps based on anonymous mobile phone call record data can be as accurate as those based on censuses. Their findings show maps made using mobile records are detailed, reliable and flexible enough to help inform infrastructure and emergency planners; particularly in low income countries, where recent population density information is often scarce.

High in the atmosphere of Titan, large patches of two trace gases glow near the north pole, on the dusk side of the moon, and near the south pole, on the dawn side. Brighter colors indicate stronger signals from the two gases, HNC (left) and HC3N (right);

Astrochemists Discover Titan Glows at Dusk and Dawn

October 24, 2014 3:49 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

New maps of Saturn’s moon Titan reveal large patches of trace gases shining brightly near the north and south poles. These regions are curiously shifted off the poles, to the east or west, so that dawn is breaking over the southern region while dusk is falling over the northern one.

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The sun emitted a significant solar flare on October 19, 2014-- Courtesy of NASA/Solar Dynamics Observatory

Significant Solar Flare in Extreme Ultraviolet

October 24, 2014 3:35 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The sun emitted a significant solar flare on October 19, 2014, peaking at 1:01 a.m. EDT. NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, which is always observing the sun, captured this image of the event in extreme ultraviolet wavelength of 131 Angstroms — a wavelength that can see the intense heat of a flare and that is typically colorized in teal.

Beach goers cooling off during the 2014 Southern California heat wave, in Huntington Beach, CA. It sounds like a broken record, but last month again set a new mark for global heat. And meteorologists say Earth is now on pace to tie the hottest year ever

Warming Earth Heading for Hottest Year on Record

October 21, 2014 11:35 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Earth is on pace to tie or even break the mark for the hottest year on record, federal meteorologists say. That's because global heat records have kept falling in 2014, with September the latest example. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced October 20, 2014, that last month the globe averaged 60.3 degrees Fahrenheit (15.72 degrees Celsius). That was the hottest September in 135 years of record keeping.

Bathymetry image of Lake George: In 2014, a bathymetric and topographic survey conducted by boat and plane mapped the lake bed, shoreline and watershed. Now, within the data visualization center, scientists will be able to zoom in as close as half a meter

State-of-the-Art Visualization Lab to Display Streaming Data in Real-Time

October 20, 2014 10:00 am | by IBM | News | Comments

The Jefferson Project announced new milestones in a multimillion-dollar collaboration that seeks to understand and manage complex factors impacting Lake George. A new data visualization laboratory features advanced computing and graphics systems that allow researchers to visualize sophisticated models and incoming data on weather, runoff and circulation patterns. The lab will display streaming data from various sensors in real-time.

Hurricane Gonzalo -- Courtesy of Alexander Gerst/ESA/NASA

Major Hurricane Gonzalo Approaches Bermuda

October 20, 2014 9:19 am | by NASA | News | Comments

This image of Hurricane Gonzalo was taken from the International Space Station by European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst on October 16, 2014. In addition to the crew Earth observations from the space station, NASA and NOAA satellites provided continuous coverage of Hurricane Gonzalo as it moved toward Bermuda.

A sketch (not to scale) showing axions (blue) streaming out from the Sun, converting in the Earth's magnetic field (red) into X-rays (orange), which are then detected by the XMM-Newton observatory.  Copyright: University of Leicester

Dark Matter: Inexplicable Signal from Unseen Universe Provides Tantalizing Clue

October 17, 2014 12:08 pm | by University of Leicester | News | Comments

A cutting-edge paper has provided the first potential indication of direct detection of Dark Matter — something that has been a mystery in physics for over 30 years. Space scientists at the University of Leicester have detected a curious signal in the X-ray sky — one that provides a tantalizing insight into the nature of mysterious Dark Matter.

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IceBridge DMS L0 Raw Courtesy of the Digital Mapping System (DMS) team/NASA DAAC at the National Snow and Ice Data Center

Operation IceBridge Turns Five

October 17, 2014 9:45 am | by Kathryn Hansen, NASA | News | Comments

In May 2014, two new studies concluded that a section of the land-based West Antarctic ice sheet had reached a point of inevitable collapse. Meanwhile, fresh observations from September 2014 showed sea ice around Antarctica had reached its greatest extent since the late 1970s. To better understand such dynamic and dramatic differences in the region's land and sea ice, researchers are travelling south to Antarctica.

Milky Way Glitters Brightly -- Courtesy of ESO/B. Tafreshi

Milky Way Glitters Brightly over Chile

October 16, 2014 8:46 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

The Milky Way glitters brightly over the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array’s (ALMA) antennas, in this image taken by the ESO Ultra High Definition Expedition team as they capture the site in 4K quality. Currently under construction in the thin, dry air of northern Chile's Atacama desert at an altitude of 5,000 meters above sea level, ALMA will initially be composed of 66 high-precision antennas

The new technology merges a proven, wearable computer system with situational awareness capabilities to create an enhanced real-time view of the battlefield for commanders and their troops.

Raytheon Unveils Wearable Computers for Tactical Edge in Battlefield Intelligence Ops

October 15, 2014 3:44 pm | by Raytheon Company | News | Comments

Raytheon Company has unveiled its wearable computing Intel-Ops solution at the AUSA 2014 Meeting and Exposition. The new technology merges a proven, wearable computer system with situational awareness capabilities to create an enhanced real-time view of the battlefield for commanders and their troops.

While the upper part of the world’s oceans continue to absorb heat from global warming, ocean depths have not warmed measurably in the last decade. This image shows heat radiating from the Pacific Ocean as imaged by the NASA’s Clouds and the Earth's Radia

Unsolved Mystery: Earth’s Ocean Abyss has Not Warmed

October 14, 2014 2:47 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The cold waters of Earth’s deep ocean have not warmed measurably since 2005, according to a new NASA study, leaving unsolved the mystery of why global warming appears to have slowed in recent years. Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, analyzed satellite and direct ocean temperature data from 2005 to 2013 and found the ocean abyss below 1.24 miles (1,995 meters) has not warmed measurably.

The PLANTOID prototype was designed with two functional roots: one root demonstrates bending capabilities, responding to input from the sensors at the tip of the root. A second root demonstrates artificial growth. Courtesy of PLANTOID

Revolutionary Robotic Solutions are Inspired by Plants

October 10, 2014 12:42 pm | by European Commission | News | Comments

Researchers are demonstrating revolutionary robotic techniques inspired by plants, featuring a 3-D-printed ‘trunk,’ ‘leaves’ that sense the environment and ‘roots’ that grow and change direction. Humans naturally understand problems and solutions from an animal’s perspective, tending to see plants as passive organisms that don’t ‘do’ much of anything, but plants do move, and they sense, and they do so in extremely efficient ways.

NASA’s Traffic and Atmospheric Information for General Aviation (TAIGA) technology system is capable of showing pilots the altitude of nearby terrain via color. Yellow identifies terrain that is near the aircraft’s altitude and red shows the terrain that

New NASA Technology Brings Critical Data to Pilots over Remote Alaskan Territories

October 10, 2014 11:58 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA has formally delivered to Alaskan officials a new technology that could help pilots flying over the vast wilderness expanses of the northern-most state. The technology is designed to help pilots make better flight decisions, especially when disconnected from the Internet, telephone, flight services and other data sources normally used by pilots.

UN-SCAN-IT Gel 7.1 Gel Analysis Software

UN-SCAN-IT Gel 7.1 Gel Analysis Software

October 9, 2014 9:32 am | Silk Scientific, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

UN-SCAN-IT Gel 7.1 gel analysis software converts virtually any scanner, digital camera or other image input device into an accurate high‑speed densitometer and digitizer system. Features include a zoomable and scalable analysis screen, lane analysis, segment analysis, dot blot analysis, color and grayscale gel analysis, clone drawing mode, MW calculation and calibration curves.

NASA satellite data of the marine environment will be used in prototype marine biodiversity observation networks to be established in four U.S. locations, including the Florida Keys, pictured here. Courtesy of USF/WHOI/MBARI/NASA

U.S. Initiates Prototype System to Gauge National Marine Biodiversity

October 7, 2014 3:43 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA are funding three demonstration projects that will lay the foundation for the first national network to monitor marine biodiversity at scales ranging from microbes to whales. The U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) also plans to contribute.

Researchers of the Color Imaging Lab Group, from the Optics Department at the University of Granada. Miguel Ángel Martínez Domingo is on the right of the photo.

Imaging System Capable of Obtaining 12 Times More Information than Human Eye

October 7, 2014 3:35 pm | by University of Granada | News | Comments

Researchers have designed a new imaging system capable of obtaining up to 12 times more color information than the human eye and conventional cameras, which implies a total of 36 color channels. This important development will facilitate the easy capture of multispectral images in real time, and in the not too distant future it could also be used to develop new assisted vehicle driving systems, or to obtain more accurate medical images.

Gravity model of the N. Atlantic; red dots are earthquakes. Quakes are often related to seamounts. Courtesy of David Sandwell, SIO

Satellite Data Offer Foundation for New High-resolution Version of Google Ocean Maps

October 6, 2014 3:42 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Scientists have created a new map of the world's seafloor, offering a more vivid picture of the structures that make up the deepest, least-explored parts of the ocean. The feat was accomplished by accessing two untapped streams of satellite data. Thousands of previously uncharted mountains rising from the seafloor, called seamounts, have emerged through the map, along with new clues about the formation of the continents.

Indian Space Research Organisation scientists watch screens display the graphics explaining Mars Orbiter Mission at their Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network complex in Bangalore, India, Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. India triumphed in its first interpla

Mars Mission Opens India for Space Business

September 24, 2014 2:22 pm | by Katy Daigle, Associated Press | News | Comments

India celebrated putting a spacecraft into orbit around Mars on September 24, 2014, hoping the rare feat will show the world it is open for business in space exploration and inspire a new generation of homegrown scientists to help drive growth. Those motivations help explain why India, a poor country of 1.2 billion, even invests in a space program when so many of its people lack access to proper toilets, electricity and health care.

Armed with the GelSight sensor, a robot can grasp a freely hanging USB cable and plug it into a USB port. Courtesy of Melanie Gonick/MIT

Fingertip Sensor Gives Robot Unprecedented Dexterity

September 23, 2014 3:37 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers have equipped a robot with a novel tactile sensor that lets it grasp a USB cable draped freely over a hook and insert it into a USB port. The sensor is an adaptation of a technology called GelSight, which was developed at MIT. The new sensor isn’t as sensitive as the original GelSight sensor, which could resolve details on the micrometer scale. But it’s smaller, and its processing algorithm is faster.

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