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Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — May 15-21

May 22, 2015 11:56 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

In case you haven’t caught them yet, here's a recap of this week's most popular stories. Looking at the universe as a hologram; diesel fuel from carbon dioxide and water; first observations of a rare subatomic process; a big data history of music charts; secrets of colossal, invisible waves; perceptions of dress colors; and more are among the top hits.

Quantum-mechanical Models Predict New Phase of Matter

May 22, 2015 10:27 am | by Academy of Finland | News | Comments

Computer simulations have predicted a new phase of matter, an atomically thin two-dimensional...

Deriving Real Time Value from Big Data

May 22, 2015 9:51 am | by Pat McGarry, Ryft Systems | Blogs | Comments

Everyone has heard the old adage that time is money. In today’s society, business moves at the...

SC15 Scientific Visualization Showcase Submissions due July 31

May 21, 2015 2:53 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

SC15’s Visualization and Data Analytics Showcase Program will provide a forum for the year's...

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Hack Crash was identified as a computer-based event, initiated by sophisticated algorithms designed to identify and evaluate Internet content that could influence markets. Those algorithms launched what amounted, in human terms, to a panicked trading spre

With One False Tweet, Computer-based Hack Crash Led to Real Panic

May 21, 2015 9:30 am | by Bert Gambini, University at Buffalo | News | Comments

A false tweet from a hacked account owned by the Associated Press in 2013 sent financial markets into a tailspin. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 143.5 points and the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index lost more than $136 billion of its value in the seconds that immediately followed the post. Once the nature of the tweet was discovered, markets corrected themselves, but the Hack Crash event demonstrates the need...

drafted some smart algorithms to prevent information leaks. The techniques have initially been developed for hardware, but can also be used in software. They are based on multi-party computation.

Smart Algorithms Secure Chip Cards against Hackers

May 21, 2015 8:47 am | by University of Twente | News | Comments

Scientists have succeeded in securing chip cards against leaking confidential information. Through the use of smart algorithms, it is now possible to better secure bank cards, public transport chip cards and electronic keys of buildings and cars against hackers. Begül Bilgin developed clever ways to make chip cards more secure against the leaking of confidential information, drafting smart algorithms based on multi-party computation.

President Barack Obama said May 20, 2015, the threat posed by climate change is evident all around and that those who deny the "indisputable" science that it is real are putting at risk the security of the United States and the military sworn to defend it

Obama: Climate Change Deniers Endanger National Security

May 20, 2015 2:26 pm | by Nancy Benac, Associated Press | News | Comments

President Barack Obama said May 20, 2015, the threat posed by climate change is evident all around and that those who deny the "indisputable" science that it is real are putting at risk the security of the United States and the military sworn to defend it. Obama said refusing to act to slow the effects of global warming, including rising seas, amounts to a "dereliction of duty" and undermines the readiness of U.S. forces.

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Scientifically accurate 3-D heart model accelerates device testing and research for treatment of heart disease

Dassault Systèmes Announces Commercial Availability of Its First Simulated Human Heart

May 20, 2015 1:58 pm | by Dassault Systèmes | News | Comments

Dassault Systèmes announced that the first heart model from its “Living Heart Project” will be commercially available on May 29, 2015. Powered by Dassault Systèmes’ 3DEXPERIENCE platform’s realistic simulation applications, the commercial, high-fidelity scientifically validated 3-D simulator of a four-chamber human heart is the first product of its kind.

Investigators have applied NetGestalt to data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) colorectal cancer cohort, the first tumor dataset with complete molecular measurements at DNA, RNA and protein levels.

User-friendly Data Query, Visualization Tools Enable Omics Data Integration

May 19, 2015 4:21 pm | by Leigh MacMillan, Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

Advances in technology have generated vast amounts of “omics” data: genomic, epigenomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolomic changes for all types of specimens. Bridging the gap between data generation and investigators’ ability to retrieve and interpret data is essential to realize the biological and clinical value of this wealth of information.

Satellite image of the South China Sea with colors added to indicate the calculated vertical displacement of ocean layers near 200 meters deep, based on simulated model data and calculations run by Harper Simmons at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks a

Researchers Unravel Secrets of Colossal, Invisible Waves in Earth’s Oceans

May 18, 2015 11:10 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT | News | Comments

Detailed new field studies, laboratory experiments and simulations of the largest known “internal waves” in the Earth’s oceans — phenomena that play a key role in mixing ocean waters, greatly affecting ocean temperatures — provide a comprehensive new view of how these colossal, invisible waves are born, spread and die off. The paper is co-authored by 42 researchers from 25 institutions in five countries.

Emphasizing the less common classes in datasets leads to improved accuracy in feature selection.

Counterintuitive Approach Yields Big Benefits for High-dimensional, Small-sized Problems

May 15, 2015 3:04 pm | by Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) | News | Comments

Extracting meaningful information out of clinical datasets can mean the difference between a successful diagnosis and a protracted illness. However, datasets can vary widely both in terms of the number of ‘features’ measured and number of independent observations taken. Now, researchers have developed an approach for targeted feature selection from datasets with small sample sizes, which tackles the so-called class imbalance problem.

Tecplot 360 EX 2015 Release 2 Visual Data Analysis Software

Tecplot 360 EX 2015 Release 2 Visual Data Analysis Software

May 15, 2015 10:07 am | Tecplot, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Tecplot 360 EX 2015 Release 2 is 10 times faster than the legacy (2013) version of Tecplot 360 at computational analysis and graphics rendering. Features include customizable color maps that allow users to understand variations in their data through the use of graphical point and click color options.

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Illustration of the Fermi Gamma ray Space Telescope (FGST) map of the sky with the central band removed to block out gamma rays originating in the Milky Way. Gamma rays of different energies are represented by dots of various colors — red dots represent a

Left-handed Cosmic Magnetic Field could Explain Missing Antimatter

May 14, 2015 12:20 pm | by The Royal Astronomical Society | News | Comments

The discovery of a 'left-handed' magnetic field that pervades the universe could help explain a long standing mystery — the absence of cosmic antimatter. Planets, stars, gas and dust are almost entirely made up of 'normal' matter of the kind we are familiar with on Earth. But theory predicts that there should be a similar amount of antimatter, like normal matter, but with the opposite charge.

The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a novel computer-aided detection system for acute stroke using computer intelligence technology. Reading 80 to 100 computer images, the system is able to detect whether the patient was struck by i

Novel Computer Intelligence System Detects Acute Strokes

May 14, 2015 12:06 pm | by Hong Kong Polytechnic University | News | Comments

PolyU has developed a novel computer-aided detection system for acute stroke using computer intelligence technology. Reading 80 to 100 computer images, the system is able to detect whether the patient was struck by ischemic stroke or haemorrhagic stroke. The detection accuracy is 90 percent, which is as high as that conducted by specialists, but at a much reduced time from 10 to 15 minutes to just three minutes.

BigNeuron, a new project led by the Allen Institute for Brain Science, aims to streamline scientist’s ability to create 3-D digital models of neurons. Courtesy of Allen Institute for Brain Science

Digitizing Neurons: Project will convert 2-D Microscope Images into 3-D Models

May 14, 2015 9:46 am | by Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

A new initiative designed to advance how scientists digitally reconstruct and analyze individual neurons in the human brain will receive support from the supercomputing resources at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Led by the Allen Institute for Brain Science, the BigNeuron project aims to create a common platform for analyzing the three-dimensional structure of neurons.

Researchers used methods from signal processing and text-mining to analyze the musical properties of songs. Their system automatically grouped the thousands of songs by patterns of chord changes and tone, allowing them to statistically identify trends wit

Big Data Analysis of Sounds Creates 50-year Evolutionary History of Music Charts

May 14, 2015 9:18 am | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Evolutionary biologists and computer scientists have come together study the evolution of pop music. Their analysis of 17,000 songs from the US Billboard Hot 100 charts, 1960 to 2010, is the most substantial scientific study of the history of popular music to date. They studied trends in style, the diversity of the charts, and the timing of musical revolutions.

Using Chombo-Crunch to study turbulent flow past a sphere could help aerospace engineers optimize takeoff and landing patterns through more accurate prediction of aircraft wakes. Simulation: David Trebotich; VisIt

High-performance CFD: Novel New Code for Energy, Aerospace, Oil and Gas

May 13, 2015 2:57 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

For more than a decade, mathematicians and computational scientists have been collaborating with earth scientists to break new ground in modeling complex flows in energy and oil and gas applications. Their work has yielded a high-performance computational fluid dynamics and reactive transport code dubbed Chombo-Crunch that could enhance efforts to develop carbon sequestration as a way to address Earth’s growing carbon dioxide challenges.

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The research team examined blood samples from 33 survivors of car or motorcycle accidents or falls for multiple markers of inflammation, including interleukin-6 (IL-6), and segregated the patients into one of three (low to high) categories of trauma sever

Computer Simulation Accurately Replicates Real-life Trauma Outcomes

May 13, 2015 2:03 pm | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

Computer simulation of the body’s inflammatory response to traumatic injury accurately replicated known individual outcomes and predicted population results. Researchers examined blood samples from 33 survivors of car or motorcycle accidents or falls for multiple markers of inflammation, including interleukin-6, and segregated the patients into categories of trauma severity. They were able to validate model predictions.

Researchers have detected that the random changes in the direction of Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) follow mathematical patterns, which are a mixture of Gaussian and Pareto distributions. Courtesy of Lek Khauv

Ants’ Movements Hide Mathematical Patterns

May 13, 2015 12:41 pm | by SINC | News | Comments

When ants go exploring in search of food they end up choosing collective routes that fit statistical distributions of probability. This has been demonstrated by a team of mathematicians after analyzing the trails of a species of Argentine ant. Studies like this could be applied to coordinate the movement of micro-robots in cleaning contaminated areas for example.

In what marks a significant step forward for artificial intelligence, researchers at UC Santa Barbara have demonstrated the functionality of a simple artificial neural circuit. For the first time, a circuit of about 100 artificial synapses was proved to p

Important Step in AI: Making Computer Brains More like our Own

May 12, 2015 2:06 pm | by Sonia Fernandez, UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

In what marks a significant step forward for artificial intelligence, researchers at UC Santa Barbara have demonstrated the functionality of a simple artificial neural circuit. For the first time, a circuit of about 100 artificial synapses was proved to perform a simple version of a typical human task: image classification.

Tablet and robot system: A person taps the tablet to control where the beam of light appears on a floor. The swarm robots then roll toward the illumination, constantly communicating with each other and deciding how to evenly cover the lit area.

Controlling Robot Swarms with the Swipe of a Finger

May 12, 2015 12:28 pm | by Georgia Tech | News | Comments

Using a smart tablet and a red beam of light, researchers have created a system that allows people to control a fleet of robots with the swipe of a finger. A person taps the tablet to control where the beam of light appears on a floor. The swarm robots then roll toward the illumination, constantly communicating with each other and deciding how to evenly cover the lit area.

Each horizontal line in this computer display represents a different line of evidence that could be used to argue for or against the presence of gene in a DNA sequence. The student, seeing a discrepancy, must drill down deeper to try to find its source. C

Massively Parallel Genomics Students: Publication has 940 Undergraduate Authors

May 11, 2015 12:04 pm | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

The list of authors for an article on comparative genomics of a fruit fly chromosome runs three single-spaced pages. Large author lists are the norm in high-energy physics, but a novelty in biology. What is going on? The 1,014 authors include 940 undergraduates from 63 institutions, all working in parallel to solve mysteries embedded in the DNA sequences of the unusual dot chromosome in fruit flies. A large collaboration is providing...

The German Climate Computing Center is managing the world's largest climate simulation data archive, used by leading climate researchers worldwide. The archive currently consists of more than 40 petabytes of data and is projected to grow by roughly 75 pet

Managing the World's Largest Trove of Climate Data

May 8, 2015 9:10 am | by IBM | News | Comments

The German Climate Computing Center is managing the world's largest climate simulation data archive, used by climate researchers worldwide. The archive consists of more than 40 petabytes of data and is projected to grow by roughly 75 petabytes annually over the next five years. As climate simulations are carried out on increasingly powerful supercomputers, massive amounts of data are produced that must be effectively stored and analyzed.

The new program builds on IBM Research advancements in analytics and existing Watson collaborations to develop a genome data analysis solution for clinicians. Partners involved in the program will use Watson Genomic Analytics, a new solution specifically

14 Leading Cancer Institutes Collaborate to Advance Personalized Medicine for Cancer Patients

May 6, 2015 12:33 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM Watson is collaborating with more than a dozen leading cancer institutes to accelerate the ability of clinicians to identify and personalize treatment options for their patients. The institutes will apply Watson's advanced cognitive capabilities to reduce from weeks to minutes the ability to translate DNA insights, understand a person's genetic profile and gather relevant information from medical literature to personalize treatment.

Michael Morris is General Manager at Appirio.

How Crowdsourcing can Solve Even Interstellar Problems

May 5, 2015 2:16 pm | by Michael Morris, Appirio | Blogs | Comments

Protecting the world from destruction by asteroids sounds like superhuman power, but NASA scientists work tirelessly to ensure that humans today are protected from this potential harm. Asteroids need to be hunted in order to identify which ones may endanger Earth, and analyzing the big data puzzle of asteroid detection has been an arduous process. That is, until the power of crowdsourcing was discovered.

The surface of rendered objects in computer games often looks unrealistic. A new method creates much more realistic images, imitating the complex scattering processes under the surface. Left: the new method, top right: without subsurface scattering, botto

New Mathematical Method makes Computer Game Surface Rendering Much More Realistic

May 5, 2015 12:24 pm | by TU Wien (Vienna) | News | Comments

Overturning cars, flying missiles and airplanes speeding across the screen — on modern computers, 3-D objects can be calculated in a flash. However, many surfaces still look unnatural. Whether it is skin, stone or wax — on the computer screen, all materials look alike, as if the objects had all been cut out of the same opaque material. A new mathematical method takes into account light scattering that occurs below the surface...

NYU has installed a new computing system for next-generation deep learning research — called “ScaLeNet” — that will allow researchers to significantly increase the size of deep learning models that can be trained and number of models that can be tested.

NYU to Advance Deep Learning Research with Multi-GPU Cluster

May 5, 2015 11:37 am | by Kimberly Powell, NVIDIA | News | Comments

Self-driving cars. Computers that detect tumors. Real-time speech translation. Just a few years ago, deep learning — training computers to identify patterns and objects, much like the way humans do — was the domain of a few artificial intelligence and data science researchers. No longer. Today, top experts use it to do amazing things. And they continue to push the bounds of what’s possible.

Subjects in the study viewed images while wearing an EEG headset. Courtesy of Neuromatters

Computer Vision, Brain-computer Interface Speed Mine Detection

May 5, 2015 9:44 am | by University of California - San Diego | News | Comments

Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, have combined sophisticated computer vision algorithms and a brain-computer interface to find mines in sonar images of the ocean floor. The study shows that the new method speeds detection considerably, when compared to existing methods — mainly visual inspection by a mine detection expert.

Researchers have developed an algorithm for generating panoramic video from unstructured camera arrays. Courtesy of Disney Research

Algorithm Combines Videos from Unstructured Camera Arrays into Panoramas

May 4, 2015 4:14 pm | by Disney Research | News | Comments

Even non-professionals may someday be able to create high-quality video panoramas using multiple cameras with the help of an algorithm developed by a team of Disney researchers. Their method smooths out the blurring, ghosting and other distortions that routinely occur when video feeds from unstructured camera arrays are combined to create a single panoramic video.

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