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Researchers have developed 3-D maps of the age of the ice within the Greenland Ice Sheet. The new research will help scientists determine what may happen to the ice sheet as the climate changes.

3-D View of Greenland Ice Sheet Opens Window on History

January 26, 2015 3:53 pm | by Jackson School of Geosciences | News | Comments

Scientists using ice-penetrating radar data collected by NASA’s Operation IceBridge and earlier airborne campaigns have built the first comprehensive map of layers deep inside the Greenland Ice Sheet, opening a window on past climate conditions and the ice sheet’s potentially perilous future. This allows scientists to determine the age of large swaths of the second largest mass of ice on Earth.

Computer Model Creates Dragnet for Epilepsy Genes

January 26, 2015 3:07 pm | by University of Bonn | News | Comments

Scientists have taken a new path in the research into causes of epilepsy: They determined the...

First-of-its-kind Software Enables Major Breakthrough in Reading Ancient Scrolls

January 26, 2015 2:39 pm | by University of Kentucky | News | Comments

After working for more than 10 years on unlocking an ancient piece of history, what lies inside...

British Code Breaker Alan Turing's Notebook Goes to Auction

January 26, 2015 1:33 pm | by AP | News | Comments

A handwritten notebook by Alan Turing, the World War II code-breaking genius depicted by...

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Kennette Benedict, executive director, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, stands beside the old Doomsday Clock which showed five minutes until midnight during a news conference to announce the new clock reads three minutes until midnight. The clock advanc

We're Two Minutes Closer to Doomsday

January 23, 2015 2:49 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists says Earth is now closer to human-caused doomsday than it has been in more than 30 years because of global warming and nuclear weaponry. But other experts say that's way too gloomy. The advocacy group, founded by the creators of the atomic bomb, moved their famed "Doomsday Clock" ahead two minutes on January 22, 2015. It said the world is now three minutes from a catastrophic midnight.

This simulation, which models a rheometer with particles, can help determine how well a rheometer design works at characterizing a fluid. The NIST team is performing a number of simulations like this one, varying the shape and number of blades to better i

Predicting Concrete Flow Properties from Simple Measurements

January 23, 2015 2:44 pm | by NIST | News | Comments

Just because concrete is the most widely used building material in human history doesn’t mean it can’t be improved. A recent study using DOE Office of Science supercomputers has led to a new way to predict concrete’s flow properties from simple measurements. The results should help accelerate the design of a new generation of high-performance and eco-friendly cement-based materials by reducing time and costs associated with R&D.

This sequence of graphs illustrates the application of the researchers' technique to a real-world computer vision problem. The solution to each successive problem (red balls) is used to initialize (green arrows) the search for a solution to the next. Cour

Optimizing Optimization Algorithms: How to Get the Best Results

January 23, 2015 2:36 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Optimization algorithms, which try to find the minimum values of mathematical functions, are everywhere in engineering. Among other things, they’re used to evaluate design tradeoffs, to assess control systems, and to find patterns in data. One way to solve a difficult optimization problem is to first reduce it to a related but much simpler problem, then gradually add complexity back in ...

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OnSight uses real rover data to create a 3-D simulation of the Martian environment where mission scientists can "meet" to discuss rover operations. Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

Holographic Computing will allow Scientists to Work on Mars

January 23, 2015 2:24 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA and Microsoft have teamed up to develop software called OnSight, a new technology that will enable scientists to work virtually on Mars using wearable technology called Microsoft HoloLens. Developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, OnSight will give scientists a means to plan and, along with the Mars Curiosity rover, conduct science operations on the Red Planet.

This puzzle of a material which seems solid to any observer while appearing fluid under the microscope is an old one. And, even with the help of today's supercomputers, it seems impossible to verify in simulations whether a glass ever stops flowing. Court

Puzzle: Does Glass Ever Stop Flowing?

January 22, 2015 2:15 pm | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Is glass a true solid? Researchers have combined computer simulation and information theory, originally invented for telephone communication and cryptography, to answer this puzzling question. This puzzle of a material which seems solid to any observer while appearing fluid under the microscope is an old one. And, even with the help of today's supercomputers, it seems impossible to verify in simulations whether a glass ever stops flowing.

Partek Flow 4.0 for NGS Analysis

Partek Flow 4.0 for NGS Analysis

January 22, 2015 1:51 pm | Partek Incorporated | Product Releases | Comments

Partek Flow 4.0 is designed specifically for the analysis needs of next-generation sequencing applications including RNA, small RNA and DNA sequencing. With the ability to either build custom analysis pipelines or download pre-built pipelines, users can perform alignment, quantification, quality control, statistics and visualization.

Mark Anawis is a Principal Scientist and ASQ Six Sigma Black Belt at Abbott.

The Power of Regular Expressions

January 22, 2015 10:49 am | by Mark A. Anawis | Blogs | Comments

A.J. Jacobs wrote: “I think there's something to the idea that the divine dwells more easily in text than in images.” Since there has been an explosion in the amount of text, sacred and secular, available to anyone with an Internet connection, the need for processing tools has grown. Regular expressions can be used to extract specific text from documents due to their ability to replace many lines of code with as little as one line.

An international team of roughly 300 scientists pooled brain scans and genetic data worldwide to pinpoint genes that enhance or break down key brain regions in people from 33 countries. This is the first high-profile study since the NIH launched its Big D

Global Consortium Cracks Part of Brain’s Genetic Code

January 21, 2015 4:05 pm | by Alison Trinidad, Keck Medicine of USC | News | Comments

In the largest collaborative study of the brain to date, researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) led a global consortium of 190 institutions to identify eight common genetic mutations that appear to age the brain an average of three years. The discovery could lead to targeted therapies and interventions for Alzheimer’s disease, autism and other neurological conditions.

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Using Pythagoras’ theorem helps to identify the point at which a patient has improved with more consistency and accuracy than other methods commonly used.

2500-year-old Pythagoras Theorem Helps Show when Patient Turns Corner

January 20, 2015 2:35 pm | by University of Warwick | News | Comments

A medical researcher has found the 2,500 year-old Pythagoras theorem could be the most effective way to identify the point at which a patient’s health begins to improve. The discovery was made after looking at data from ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) curves. These curves were initially developed during World War II for the analysis of signals to help operators decide whether a blip on the screen was an enemy target

This live panel discussion looks at how big data and data science have fast become the next frontier for innovation, competition and productivity.

Big Data Insights: Accelerating Discovery in Medicine, Research & More

January 20, 2015 11:51 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

On Wednesday, January 21, Scientific Computing will host a live panel discussion that looks at how big data and data science have fast become the next frontier for innovation, competition and productivity. One of today’s significant advances in data science introduces us to the Next Generation Cyber Capability (NGCC) at Arizona State University (ASU)...

One aspect of the user-assistance software that distinguishes it from previous planning systems is that it assesses risk. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Software that Knows the Risks: Planning Algorithms Evaluate Probability of Success, Suggest Low-risk Alternatives

January 16, 2015 1:57 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Imagine that you could tell your phone that you want to drive from your house in Boston to a hotel in upstate New York, that you want to stop for lunch at an Applebee’s around 12:30, and that you don’t want the trip to take more than four hours. Then imagine that your phone tells you that you have only a 66 percent chance of meeting those criteria — but that if you can wait until 1:00 for lunch, or if you’re willing to eat at TGI Friday...

Developing a more efficient vision system for household robots. Courtesy of Christine Daniloff and Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

MIT Algorithm Helps Household Robots Identify Items Concealed in Clutter

January 15, 2015 9:49 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

For household robots to be practical, they need to be able to recognize the objects they’re supposed to manipulate. While object recognition is one of the most widely studied topics in AI, even the best detectors still fail much of the time. Researchers believe the robots should take advantage of their mobility, imaging objects from multiple perspectives. Matching up objects in the different images, however, poses computational challenges.

MapViewer 8 Mapping and Spatial Analysis Software

MapViewer 8 Mapping and Spatial Analysis Software

January 15, 2015 9:23 am | Golden Software, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

MapViewer 8 is a mapping and spatial analysis software package for producing publication-quality thematic maps. Designed for scientists, engineers, business professionals and those in academia, MapViewer offers 16 unique and fully customizable map types. Users can overlay maps on multiple layers and add graticule lines, scale bars, legends and title bars to create a professional and visually striking display.

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The top image shows an office building that is to be remodeled. Below, a virtual image based on 3-D BIM data is superimposed. © Fraunhofer FIT

Virtual Reality Enables On-Site Visualization of Architectural Plans

January 14, 2015 11:50 am | by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft | News | Comments

A new virtual reality system allows architects to view 3-D models of buildings in their intended shape, precisely where the buildings will be constructed. This provides a much clearer, realistic impression of the design. Digitization is fundamentally changing the work processes in architectural design, planning and construction work. Increasingly, CAD drawings are transferred to a central 3-D Building Information Model...

Terence Tao, a professor of mathematics at UCLA, is very interested in solving the Navier-Stokes equations, which are among the most difficult tackled by mathematicians. Understanding them could help with modeling weather, ocean currents, the flow of wate

Can Wave Equations Explode? Computer Algorithms may Provide the Answer

January 13, 2015 1:43 pm | by Marlene Cimons, National Science Foundation | News | Comments

Wave equations help describe waves of light, sound and water as they occur in physics. Also known as partial differential equations, they have valuable potential for predicting weather or earthquakes, or certain types of natural disasters. Tao is interested in the theoretical side of these equations, seeking to discover with computer algorithms whether they can behave in a way that typically is the opposite of what occurs in the real world.

The Chern-number measurement using an external force

Magic Numbers of Quantum Matter Revealed by Cold Atoms

January 13, 2015 11:19 am | by Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics | News | Comments

Topology, a branch of mathematics classifying geometric objects, has been exploited by physicists to predict and describe unusual quantum phases: the topological states of matter. These intriguing phases, generally accessible at very low temperature, exhibit unique conductivity properties, which are particularly robust against external perturbations, suggesting promising technological applications.

IBM broke the U.S. patent record in 2014, becoming the first company to exceed 7,000 patents in a single year. More than 8,500 IBM inventors around the world, including researcher Stacy Hobson (pictured), produced 7,534 patents for IBM in 2014.

IBM Breaks U.S. Patent Record

January 13, 2015 10:35 am | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM has announced that it received a record 7,534 patents in 2014 — marking the 22nd consecutive year that the company topped the annual list of U.S. patent recipients. IBM inventors earned an average of more than 20 patents per day in 2014, propelling the company to become the first to surpass more than 7,000 patents in a single year.

The results show that, by mining Facebook Likes, the computer model was able to predict a person's personality more accurately than most of their friends and family.

AI: Computers Know the Real You Better than Friends, Family

January 13, 2015 10:01 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Researchers have found that, based on enough Facebook Likes, computers can judge your personality traits better than your friends, family and even your partner. Using a new algorithm, researchers have calculated the average number of Likes artificial intelligence (AI) needs to draw personality inferences about you as accurately as your partner or parents.

John Wass is a statistician based in Chicago, IL.

Book Review: Applied Bayesian Modelling, 2nd Edition

January 13, 2015 8:59 am | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

This is not a text for the novice. However, for those math/statistics aficionados, there is much to be had. The book’s great strength lies in two areas: the first is Peter Congdon’s generation of an excellent bibliography of the most modern techniques available, and the other is his (slightly) more straightforward explanations of the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques and suggestions for optimizing the results.

IEEE Computer Society has announced the top 10 most important technology trends for 2015 and explores how these technologies will be integrated into daily life.

IEEE Unveils Top 10 Technology Trends for 2015

January 12, 2015 12:10 pm | by IEEE | News | Comments

In the coming year, while consumers will be treated to a dizzying array of augmented reality, wearables, and low-cost 3-D printers, computer researchers will be tackling the underlying technology issues that make such cutting-edge consumer electronics products possible. IEEE Computer Society has announced the top 10 most important technology trends for 2015 and explores how these technologies will be integrated into daily life.

Map of diffuse interstellar bands Courtesy of T.W. Lan, G. Zasowski, B. Ménard, SDSS and 2MASS/UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF

Astronomers Map Mysterious Molecules in our Galaxy

January 12, 2015 10:20 am | by Phil Sneiderman, Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

By analyzing the light of hundreds of thousands of celestial objects, astronomers have created a unique map of enigmatic molecules in our galaxy that are responsible for puzzling features in the light from stars, called diffuse interstellar bands. DIBs have been a mystery ever since they were discovered in 1922 — exactly which of the many thousands of possible molecules are responsible for these features?

William Weaver is an associate professor in the Department of Integrated Science, Business, and Technology at La Salle University.

By Any Other Name: The Central Role of Informatics in STEM Education

January 9, 2015 3:05 pm | by William Weaver, Ph.D. | Blogs | Comments

The human lament that things in the past were much simpler is an accurate observation made from the perspective of riding along an exponentially increasing complexity curve. Examining the present or looking into the future can be a confusing torrent of concepts, vocabulary and technologies that appear to be spiraling out-of-control. At the First IEEE Integrated STEM Education Conference, Professor Steve Zilora reflected on this increase...

Visual-Environment 10.0

Visual-Environment 10.0

January 9, 2015 11:15 am | Esi Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

Visual-Environment 10.0 is a comprehensive simulation platform designed to enable the swift integration of calculations using the open source CFD modules of OpenFOAM. It allows engineers to accelerate preparation of most common CFD calculations, including airflow for external aerodynamics, internal airflow for underhood and climate control, and investigation of flow around rotating bodies.

Hole cards in a game of Texas Hold 'em. A computer program that taught itself to play poker has created nearly the best possible strategy for one version of the game, showing the value of techniques that may prove useful for real-world challenges Courtesy

Game Theory: Self-taught Program Finds Ideal Poker Strategy

January 9, 2015 10:14 am | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

A computer program that taught itself to play poker has created nearly the best possible strategy for one version of the game, showing the value of techniques that may prove useful to help decision-making in medicine and other areas. The program considered 24 trillion simulated poker hands per second for two months, probably playing more poker than all humanity has ever experienced.

John Wass is a statistician based in Chicago, IL

Qlucore Omics Explorer: Analysis in an Instant

January 8, 2015 4:00 pm | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

Qlucore is a software platform for the analysis of genomics, proteomics and related data. As with most statistical and genomics software, it generates an immediate graphic for most analyses. Its specific areas of use include gene expression, protein arrays, DNA methylation, miRNA, proteomics, and pattern and structure identification in multivariate data.

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