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NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM Satellite provided a look under the hood of Hurricane Cristobal as it continues moving north and paralleling the U.S. East Coast. NASA's HS3 hurricane mission also investigated the storm. Cristobal is now

On a Mission to Analyze Hurricane Cristobal

August 28, 2014 2:59 pm | by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM Satellite provided a look under the hood of Hurricane Cristobal as it moved north and paralleling the U.S. East Coast. NASA's HS3 hurricane mission also investigated the storm. Cristobal is close enough to the coast to trigger high surf advisories.

Sheepdogs Use Simple Rules to Herd Sheep

August 28, 2014 12:55 pm | by Swansea University | News | Comments

Sheepdogs use just two simple rules to round up large herds of sheep, scientists have discovered...

Robo Brain Teaches Robots Everything from the Internet

August 28, 2014 11:52 am | by Cornell University | News | Comments

Robo Brain — a large-scale computational system that learns from publicly available Internet...

Power of Mathematics Opens New Possibilities in Music

August 27, 2014 3:34 pm | by Steve Koppes, University of Chicago | News | Comments

Anthony Cheung’s formal mathematical training essentially ended with high school calculus. But...

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Akselos' software running in a Web browser for 2.01x. This app shows the stresses in the landing gear for a solar-powered airplane. Courtesy of Akselos

Simulation Software Drastically Increases Speed of 3-D Engineering Simulations

August 25, 2014 12:40 pm | by Rob Matheson, MIT | News | Comments

MIT spinout Akselos has developed novel software, based on years of research at the Institute, which uses precalculated supercomputer data for structural components — like simulated “Legos” — to solve FEA models in seconds. Hundreds of engineers in the mining, power-generation, and oil and gas industries are now using Akselos software.

Sandia National Laboratories managers Alex Roesler, left, and Luke Purvis, center, and systems analyst Jarret Lafleur shown inside a Bank of Italy vault in a historic Livermore, California, building, studied 23 high-value heists that occurred in the last

National Security: Lessons Learned Drawn from Perfect Heists

August 25, 2014 12:00 pm | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

The Antwerp Diamond Center theft and other sophisticated, high-value heists show that motivated criminals can find ways to overcome every obstacle between them and their targets. Can the Energy and Defense departments, responsible for analyzing, designing and implementing complex systems to protect vital national security assets, learn from security failures in the banking, art and jewelry worlds? Sandia Labs set out to answer that question

The study combined two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Does your Computer Know How You’re Feeling?

August 25, 2014 11:16 am | by Taylor & Francis | News | Comments

Researchers in Bangladesh have designed a computer program that can accurately recognize users’ emotional states as much as 87 percent of the time, depending on the emotion. Writing in the journal Behaviour & Information Technology, A.F.M. Nazmul Haque Nahin and his colleagues describe how their study combined — for the first time — two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

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Researchers from Argonne, in collaboration with Caterpillar Inc. and Convergent Science, carried out large internal combustion engine simulations involving fine spatial and temporal resolutions; high fidelity; and robust two-phase flow, spray, turbulence,

Argonne wins HPC Innovation Excellence Award

August 25, 2014 10:47 am | by Argonne National Laboratory | News | Comments

Argonne National Laboratory was one of seven new winners of the HPC Innovation Excellence Award. Announced by International Data Corporation at the ISC '14 supercomputer industry conference in Leipzig, Germany, the award recognizes noteworthy achievements by users of high-performance computing (HPC) technologies.

Once installed, the sensors would provide information about the condition of bridges that cannot be obtained by visual inspection alone and would allow authorities to identify and focus on bridges that need immediate attention. Courtesy of USchick

Wireless Sensors and Flying Robots Monitor Deteriorating Bridges

August 22, 2014 12:45 pm | by Tufts School of Engineering | News | Comments

As a report from the Obama administration warns that one in four bridges in the United States needs significant repair or cannot handle automobile traffic, Tufts University engineers are employing wireless sensors and flying robots that could have the potential to help authorities monitor the condition of bridges in real time.

The climate dataset is the first fine-scale work to correct for artificial trends within weather station data caused by changes in equipment or weather station locations. It also is the first to provide direct estimates of uncertainty and to provide open-

Improving Temperature Modeling across Mountainous Landscapes

August 21, 2014 4:28 pm | by University of Montana | News | Comments

New research by University of Montana doctoral student Jared Oyler provides improved computer models for estimating temperature across mountainous landscapes. Oyler provided a new climate dataset for ecological and hydrological research and natural resource management.

Ulrich Rabl measured the volume of the test subjects' hippocampi using computer-assisted techniques and analyzed the results in the context of the genetic and environmental data.

Genes Determine Traces Stress Leaves Behind on Our Brains

August 21, 2014 4:20 pm | by MedUni Vienna | News | Comments

Our individual genetic make-up determines the effect that stress has on our emotional centers. Not every individual reacts in the same way to life events that produce the same degree of stress. Some grow as a result of the crisis, whereas others break down and fall ill, for example with depression. The outcome is determined by a complex interaction between depression gene versions and environmental factors.

This still from a KIPAC visualization shows a jet of energy and particles streaming from a black hole. (Visualization: Ralf Kaehler / Simulation: Jonathan McKinney, Alexander Tchekhovskoy, and Roger Blandford)

Dramatically Intricate 3-D Universes Tell Important Stories about the Cosmos

August 21, 2014 3:16 pm | by Kelen Tuttle, Kavli Foundation | Articles | Comments

Recently, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics unveiled an unprecedented simulation of the universe’s development. Called the Illustris project, the simulation depicts more than 13 billion years of cosmic evolution across a cube of the universe that’s 350-million-light-years on each side. But why was it important to conduct such a simulation?

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MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory has released a data-visualization tool that lets users highlight aberrations and possible patterns in the graphical display; the tool then automatically determines which data sources are respon

Visual Control of Big Data: Recomputing Visualizations without Aberrant Results

August 20, 2014 10:44 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

In the age of big data, visualization tools are vital. With a single glance at a graphic display, a human being can recognize patterns that a computer might fail to find even after hours of analysis. But what if there are aberrations in the patterns? Or what if there’s just a suggestion of a visual pattern that’s not distinct enough to justify any strong inferences? Or what if the pattern is clear, but not what was to be expected?

Brookhaven theoretical physicist Swagato Mukherjee explains that 'invisible' hadrons are like salt molecules floating around in the hot gas of hadrons, making other particles freeze out at a lower temperature than they would if the 'salt' wasn't there.

Invisible Particles Provide First Indirect Evidence of Strange Baryons

August 20, 2014 10:17 am | by Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

New supercomputing calculations provide the first evidence that particles predicted by the theory of quark-gluon interactions, but never before observed, are being produced in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. These heavy strange baryons, containing at least one strange quark, still cannot be observed directly, but instead make their presence known by lowering the temperature at which other baryons "freeze out"

North Korea (the dark area) and South Korea at night. Courtesy of NASA

Citizen Science: Images of Earth at Night Crowdsourced for Science

August 19, 2014 2:59 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A wealth of images of Earth at night taken by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) could help save energy, contribute to better human health and safety and improve our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. But, scientists need your help to make that happen.

Albert-László Barabási, the Robert Gray Dodge Professor of Network Science and a Distinguished University Professor at Northeastern, co-authored a paper with visiting scholar Hua-Wei Shen that presented a new algorithm to determine how credit should be al

Scientific Research: New Algorithm Gives Credit Where Credit Is Due

August 19, 2014 2:51 pm | by Joe O'Connell, Northeastern University | News | Comments

It makes sense that the credit for sci­ence papers with mul­tiple authors should go to the authors who per­form the bulk of the research, yet that’s not always the case. Now, a new algo­rithm devel­oped at Northeastern’s Center for Com­plex Net­work Research helps sheds light on how to prop­erly allo­cate credit.

Florida Polytechnic University is the newest addition to the State University System of Florida and the only one dedicated exclusively to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

New Supercomputing Center to Support Big Data and Analytics, Cybersecurity and other STEM Skills

August 18, 2014 3:57 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

Florida Polytechnic University, Flagship Solutions Group and IBM have announced a new supercomputing center at the University composed of IBM high performance systems, software and cloud-based storage, to help educate students in emerging technology fields. Florida Polytechnic University is the newest addition to the State University System and the only one dedicated exclusively to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

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With their new method, computer scientists from Saarland University are able, for the first time, to compute all illumination effects in a simpler and more efficient way. Courtesy of AG Slusallek/Saar-Uni

Realistic Computer Graphics Technology Vastly Speeds Process

August 18, 2014 2:15 pm | by University Saarland | News | Comments

Creating a realistic computer simulation of how light suffuses a room is crucial not just for animated movies like Toy Story or Cars, but also in industry. Special computing methods should ensure this, but require great effort. Computer scientists from Saarbrücken have developed a novel approach that vastly simplifies and speeds up the whole calculating process.

The semester-long online course will include video lectures, quizzes, and homework assignments and will provide students with free access to the Blue Waters supercomputer.

Blue Waters Project to Offer Graduate Visualization Course in Spring 2015

August 18, 2014 12:12 pm | by NCSA | News | Comments

NCSA’s Blue Waters project will offer a graduate course on High Performance Visualization for Large-Scale Scientific Data Analytics in Spring 2015 and is seeking university partners who are interested in offering the course for credit to their students. This semester-long online course will include video lectures, quizzes and homework assignments and will provide students with free access to the Blue Waters supercomputer.

The Kilobots, a swarm of one thousand simple but collaborative robots. Courtesy of Mike Rubenstein and Science/AAAS

AI: Self-organizing Thousand-robot Swarm Forms Vast, Complex Shapes

August 18, 2014 12:03 pm | by Caroline Perry, Harvard SEAS | News | Comments

The first thousand-robot flash mob has assembled at Harvard University. Instead of one highly-complex robot, a “kilo” of robots collaborate, providing a simple platform for the enactment of complex behaviors. Called Kilobots, these extremely simple robots are each just a few centimeters across and stand on three pin-like legs.

CEEDS — Collective Experience of Empathic Data Systems — is trying to make the subconscious ‘visible’ by gauging our sensory and physiological reactions to the flow of Big Data before us. © CEEDS

CEEDS Project: New Ways of Exploring Big Data

August 14, 2014 3:36 pm | by European Commission, CORDIS | News | Comments

In a society that has to understand increasingly big and complex datasets, EU researchers are turning to the subconscious for help in unraveling the deluge of information. Big Data refers to large amounts of data produced very quickly by a high number of diverse sources. Data can either be created by people or generated by machines, such as sensors gathering climate information, satellite imagery, digital pictures and videos...

Michael J. Fox speaks at Lotusphere 2012. The potential to collect and analyze data from thousands of individuals on measurable features of Parkinson's, such as slowness of movement, tremor and sleep quality, could enable researchers to assemble a better

Intel, Michael J. Fox Foundation Start Smartwatch Study

August 14, 2014 3:25 pm | by Intel | News | Comments

The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research (MJFF) and Intel have announced a collaboration aimed at improving research and treatment for Parkinson's disease — a neurodegenerative brain disease second only to Alzheimer's in worldwide prevalence. The collaboration includes a multiphase research study using a new big data analytics platform that detects patterns in participant data collected from wearable technologies.

Maryam Mirzakhani is the first woman to ever win the Fields Medal — known as the "Nobel Prize of Mathematics" — in recognition of her contributions to the understanding of the symmetry of curved surfaces. Courtesy of Maryam Mirzakhani

Maryam Mirzakhani is First Woman Fields Medalist

August 14, 2014 2:44 pm | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford University | News | Comments

Maryam Mirzakhani is the first woman to ever win the Fields Medal — known as the "Nobel Prize of Mathematics" — in recognition of her contributions to the understanding of the symmetry of curved surfaces. Officially known as the International Medal for Outstanding Discoveries in Mathematics, the Fields Medal will be presented by the International Mathematical Union ...

Bain de Japonais Spring, an intertidal hydrothermal vent on Prony Bay. Courtesy of Roy Price, NASA

Our Ancestor’s Leaky Membrane answers Big Biology Questions

August 13, 2014 2:34 pm | by University College London | News | Comments

All life on Earth came from one common ancestor — a single-celled organism — but what it looked like, how it lived, and how it evolved into today’s modern cells is a four-billion-year-old mystery being solved by researchers using mathematical modeling. Findings suggest for the first time that life’s Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) had a ‘leaky’ membrane, which helps scientists answer two of biology’s biggest questions...

With an emphasis on HPC applications in science, engineering and large-scale data analytics; the Gordon Bell Prize tracks the overall progress in parallel computing.

Finalists Compete for Coveted ACM Gordon Bell Prize in High Performance Computing

August 13, 2014 12:01 pm | by SC14 | News | Comments

With five technical papers contending for one of the highest honored awards in high performance computing (HPC), the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) awards committee has four months left to choose a winner for the prestigious 2014 Gordon Bell Prize. The winner of this prize will have demonstrated an outstanding achievement in HPC that helps solve critical science and engineering problems.

SOLIDWORKS Education Edition 2014-2015

SOLIDWORKS Education Edition 2014-2015

August 12, 2014 3:51 pm | Dassault Systems | Product Releases | Comments

SOLIDWORKS Education Edition 2014-2015 is an integrated applications portfolio that includes tools and enhancements designed to improve teacher efficiency, shorten student design processes, increase team collaboration and enable educational productivity across numerous areas.

The Bloch sphere, a representation of a qubit, the fundamental building block of quantum computers. Courtesy of Glosser

Quantum Simulators Explained

August 12, 2014 12:36 pm | by Springer Science+Business Media | News | Comments

Just about everything you ever wanted to know about quantum simulators is summed up in a new review. As part of a Thematic Series on Quantum Simulations, the open access journal European Physical Journal Quantum Technology has published an overview of just what a quantum simulator is, namely a device that actively uses quantum effects to answer questions on model systems.

This 3-D map shows how HCN molecules (made of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen) are released from the nucleus of comet Lemmon and then spread evenly throughout the atmosphere, or coma. Similar maps revealed that HNC and formaldehyde are produced in the coma,

3-D Comet Study Reveals Chemical Factory at Work

August 12, 2014 12:05 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A NASA-led team of scientists has created detailed 3-D maps of the atmospheres surrounding comets, identifying several gases and mapping their spread at the highest resolution ever achieved. Almost unheard of for comet studies, the 3-D perspective provides deeper insight into which materials are shed from the nucleus of the comet and which are produced within the atmosphere, or coma.

Cuts through a hybrid CFD mesh for NASA's CRM configuration show the new hexahedral layer (in green) generation capabilities in Pointwise V17.2 R2.

Pointwise 17.2 R2 Computational Fluid Dynamics Meshing Software

August 12, 2014 9:57 am | Pointwise, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Pointwise 17.2 R2 eponymous computational fluid dynamics (CFD) meshing software provides the ability to rapidly generate layers of hexahedral cells. Near-wall and near-wake hex layer generation capability is part of T-Rex (anisotropic tetrahedral extrusion), one of Pointwise's hybrid meshing techniques.

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