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Mathematicians have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might

Adding Natural Uncertainty Improves Mathematical Models

September 30, 2014 3:39 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

Mathematicians have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might ultimately lead to mathematical models that better reflect the inherent uncertainties of the natural world.

Modeling Shockwaves through the Brain

September 30, 2014 3:07 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a scaling law that predicts a human’s risk of brain injury, based on...

Simulations Reveal an Unusual Death for Ancient Stars

September 29, 2014 2:33 pm | by Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences | News | Comments

Certain primordial stars — those between 55,000 and 56,000 times the mass of our Sun, or...

Solar Explosions inside a Computer: Predicting Solar Flares

September 25, 2014 4:30 pm | by Barbara Vonarburg, ETH | News | Comments

Strong solar flares can bring down communications and power grids on Earth. By demonstrating how...

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Computer modeling provides policymakers with essential information on such data as global sea surface temperatures related to specific currents. Image courtesy Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Developing the Most Advanced Earth System Computer Model Yet Created

September 25, 2014 4:16 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

With President Obama announcing climate-support initiatives at the 2014 United Nations Climate Summit, the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories are teaming with academia and the private sector to develop the most advanced climate and Earth system computer model yet created. For Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers, it is a welcome advance for an already vibrant high-performance computing community.

Dr. Silvestre Pinho is leading development of a computer model that accurately predicts how composite materials behave when damaged will make it easier to design lighter, more fuel-efficient aircraft.

New Computer Codes Aid Greener, Leaner Aircraft Design

September 24, 2014 4:31 pm | by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council | News | Comments

A computer model that accurately predicts how composite materials behave when damaged will make it easier to design lighter, more fuel-efficient aircraft. Innovative computer codes form the basis of a computer model that shows in unprecedented detail how an aircraft's composite wing, for instance, would behave if it suffered small-scale damage, such as a bird strike.

Described by The Washington Post as "the single best explainer of abstruse concepts in the world today," Brian Greene is one of the world's leading theoretical physicists and a brilliant, entertaining communicator of cutting-edge scientific concepts.

Physicist and Best-selling author Brian Greene to Keynote SC14

September 22, 2014 2:13 pm | by SC14 | News | Comments

Physicist, string theorist and best-selling author Brian Greene will talk about the intersection of science, computing and society as he delivers the keynote address at SC14 this November. Described by The Washington Post as "the single best explainer of abstruse concepts in the world today," Brian Greene is one of the world's leading theoretical physicists and a brilliant, entertaining communicator of cutting-edge scientific concepts.

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Richard Lamb, right, discusses artificial neural networks with WSU College of Education colleague Andy Cavagnetto.

Video Games could Dramatically Streamline Education Research

September 19, 2014 4:59 pm | by C. Brandon Chapman, Washington State University | News | Comments

“Seeking educational curriculum researchers. Humans need not apply.” A Washington State University professor has figured out a dramatically easier and more cost-effective way to do research on science curriculum in the classroom — and it could include playing video games. Called “computational modeling,” it involves a computer “learning” student behavior and then “thinking” as students would.

Researchers have developed a math model that can predict the progression from nephritis — kidney inflammation — to interstitial fibrosis, scarring in the kidney that current treatments cannot reverse. Courtesy of Piotr Michał Jaworski

Math Model Replaces Invasive Kidney Biopsy for Lupus Patients

September 18, 2014 2:11 pm | by Emily Caldwell, Ohio State University | News | Comments

Mathematics might be able to reduce the need for invasive biopsies in patients suffering kidney damage related to the autoimmune disease lupus. Researchers have developed a math model that can predict the progression from kidney inflammation to scarring in the kidney that current treatments cannot reverse.

The team has taken a three-phase approach to a software emotion detector. Preliminary tests gave a 94 percent success rate. Courtesy of Steven Depolo

Emotion Detector: Software Accurately Classifies Facial Expressions

September 17, 2014 2:27 pm | by Inderscience Research | News | Comments

Face recognition software measures various parameters in a mug shot, such as the distance between the person’s eyes, the height from lip to top of their nose and various other metrics and then compares it with photos of people in the database that have been tagged with a given name. Now, research looks to take that one step further in recognizing the emotion portrayed by a face.

Mathematica Online

Mathematica Online

September 17, 2014 1:59 pm | Wolfram Research, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Mathematica Online operates completely in the cloud and is accessible through any modern Web browser, with no installation or configuration required, and is completely interoperable with Mathematicaon the desktop. Users can simply point a Web browser at Mathematica Online, then log in, and immediately start to use the Mathematica notebook interface

StarDrop 5.5 Software Suite

StarDrop 5.5 Software Suite

September 16, 2014 3:15 pm | Optibrium Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

StarDrop 5.5 is a suite of software for guiding decisions in drug discovery, helping project teams quickly identify high-quality compounds. It works by evaluating complex data, which is often uncertain because of experimental variability or predictive error.

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The team recently took the MIT cheetah-bot for a test run, where it bounded across the grass at a steady clip.  Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Algorithm Enables Untethered Cheetah Robot to Run and Jump

September 16, 2014 2:14 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

MIT researchers have developed an algorithm for bounding that they’ve successfully implemented in a robotic cheetah — a sleek, four-legged assemblage of gears, batteries and electric motors that weighs about as much as its feline counterpart. The team recently took the robot for a test run, where it bounded across the grass at a steady clip. The researchers estimate the robot may eventually reach speeds of up to 30 mph.

Close-ups of an experiment conducted by John Bush and his student Daniel Harris, in which a bouncing droplet of fluid was propelled across a fluid bath by waves it generated. Courtesy of Dan Harris

Fluid Mechanics: New Math Suggests Alternative to Quantum Orthodoxy

September 15, 2014 3:43 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

The central mystery of quantum mechanics is that small chunks of matter sometimes seem to behave like particles, sometimes like waves. For most of the past century, the prevailing explanation of this conundrum has been what’s called the “Copenhagen interpretation” — which holds that, in some sense, a single particle really is a wave, smeared out across the universe, which collapses into a determinate location only when observed.

Initial research focused on optimization of the PMEMD classical molecular dynamics code, part of the widely used AMBER Molecular Dynamics software, on multi-core Intel Xeon processors and “manycore” Intel Xeon Phi processors.

SDSC Joins Intel Parallel Computing Centers Program with Focus on Molecular Dynamics, Neuroscience and Life Sciences

September 12, 2014 2:44 pm | by San Diego Supercomputer Center | News | Comments

The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California, San Diego, is working with semiconductor chipmaker Intel to further optimize research software to improve the parallelism, efficiency, and scalability of widely used molecular and neurological simulation technologies.

Sentira Data Visualization Software

Sentira Data Visualization Software

September 12, 2014 2:36 pm | Optibrium Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

Sentira is a desktop application designed to provide elegant and dynamic visualization for compound data. The software is applicable across many fields of chemistry, enabling users to quickly find patterns in compound data, visualize structure-activity relationships and present and report results.

NeuroSolutions Infinity

NeuroSolutions Infinity

September 11, 2014 3:58 pm | Neurodimension, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

NeuroSolutions Infinity predictive data analytics and modeling software is designed to streamline data mining by automatically taking care of the entire data modeling process. It includes everything from accessing, cleaning and arranging data, to intelligently trying potential inputs, preprocessing and neural network architectures, to selecting the best neural network and verifying the results.

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This undated image provided by NASA shows the ozone layer over the years, September 17, 1979, top left, October 7, 1989, top right, October 9, 2006, lower left, and October 1, 2010, lower right. Earth’s protective but fragile ozone layer is finally starti

Scientists say Ozone Layer is Recovering

September 10, 2014 4:17 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Earth's protective but fragile ozone layer is beginning to recover, largely because of the phase-out since the 1980s of certain chemicals used in refrigerants and aerosol cans, a U.N. scientific panel reported September 10, 2014, in a rare piece of good news about the health of the planet. Scientists said the development demonstrates that, when the world comes together, it can counteract a brewing ecological crisis.

The software (the SAFE Project) uses artificial intelligence to allow a computer to perceive sounds like a human being.

Training Computers to Understand the Language of Musicians

September 10, 2014 4:07 pm | by Birmingham City University | News | Comments

New software launched by researchers at Birmingham City University aims to reduce the long periods of training and expensive equipment required to make music, while also giving musicians more intuitive control over the music that they produce. The developed software, showcased at the British Science Festival, trains computers to understand the language of musicians when applying effects to their music.

The Department of Energy’s Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamline 7.3.3 (SAXS/WAXS/GISAXS/GIWAXS) and endstation at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Courtesy of Roy Kaltschmidt

Tools for Reducing, Managing, Analyzing and Visualizing Data Transform Beamline Science

September 10, 2014 3:48 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Some mysteries of science can only be explained on a nanometer scale — even smaller than a single strand of human DNA, which is about 2.5 nanometers wide. At this scale, scientists can investigate the structure and behavior of proteins that help our bodies fight infectious microbes, and even catch chemical reactions in action. To resolve these very fine details, they rely on synchrotron light sources like the ALS at Berkeley Lab.

The top image shows how the new algorithm is able to identify an area (in red) where stress has created a weak spot in a small piece of plastic wrap. The older method (shown in the bottom half of the picture) is unable to pinpoint the place where the plas

Identifying Tiny Strains in Body Tissues before Injuries Occur

September 9, 2014 3:14 pm | by Jim Dryden, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have developed algorithms to identify weak spots in tendons, muscles and bones prone to tearing or breaking. The technology one day may help pinpoint minor strains and tiny injuries in the body’s tissues long before bigger problems occur.

Both whales and dolphins have pelvic (hip) bones, evolutionary remnants from when their ancestors walked on land more than 40 million years ago. Common wisdom has long held that those bones are simply vestigial, slowly withering away like tailbones on hum

Whale Hip Bones are Still Useful for Something

September 9, 2014 10:32 am | by Robert Perkins, University of Southern California | News | Comments

Both whales and dolphins have pelvic (hip) bones, evolutionary remnants from when their ancestors walked on land more than 40 million years ago. Common wisdom has long held that those bones are simply vestigial. But new research flies directly in the face of that assumption, finding that not only do those pelvic bones serve a purpose, but their size and possibly shape are influenced by the forces of sexual selection.

A laser-based instrument being developed for the International Space Station will provide a unique 3-D view of Earth’s forests, helping to fill in missing information about their role in the carbon cycle.

Probe Studies Earth’s Forests in 3-D

September 9, 2014 9:58 am | by Elizabeth Zubritsky, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

A laser-based instrument being developed for the International Space Station will provide a unique 3-D view of Earth’s forests, helping to fill in missing information about their role in the carbon cycle.             

It may look like fresh blood and flow like fresh blood, but the longer blood   is stored, the less it can carry oxygen into the tiny microcapillaries of the   body. Using advanced optical techniques, the researchers measured the stiffness of the membran

Stored Blood Grows Stiffer over Time

September 8, 2014 10:36 am | by Liz Ahlberg, University of Illinois | News | Comments

It may look like fresh blood and flow like fresh blood, but the longer blood is stored, the less it can carry oxygen into the tiny microcapillaries of the body. Using advanced optical techniques, the researchers measured the stiffness of the membrane surrounding red blood cells over time. 

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is an area of environmental concern between Hawaii and California where the ocean surface is marred by scattered pieces of plastic. Scientists believe the garbage patch is but one of at least five, each located in the cente

Giant Garbage Patches Help Redefine Ocean Boundaries

September 5, 2014 11:25 am | by Catherine Meyers, American institute of Physics | News | Comments

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is an area of environmental concern between Hawaii and California where the ocean surface is marred by scattered pieces of plastic. Scientists believe the garbage patch is but one of at least five, each located in the center of large, circular ocean currents called gyres that suck in and trap floating debris.

The Dreadnought of Dinosaurs

September 5, 2014 11:03 am | by Rachel Ewing, Drexel University | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered and described a new supermassive dinosaur species with the most complete skeleton ever found of its type. At 85 feet (26 m) long and weighing about 65 tons (59,300 kg) in life, Dreadnoughtus schrani is the largest land animal for which a body mass can be accurately calculated.

What if the taxi-service app on your cellphone had a button on it that let you indicate that you were willing to share a ride with another passenger? How drastically could cab-sharing reduce traffic, fares, and carbon dioxide emissions? Authoritatively an

Ride-Sharing Could Cut Cabs' Road Time by 30%

September 4, 2014 9:44 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

What if the taxi-service app on your cellphone had a button on it that let you indicate that you were willing to share a ride with another passenger? How drastically could cab-sharing reduce traffic, fares, and carbon dioxide emissions? Authoritatively answering that question requires analyzing huge volumes of data, which hasn’t been computationally feasible with traditional methods. 

University of Hawaii at Manoa astronomer R. Brent Tully has led an   international team of astronomers in defining the contours of the immense   supercluster of galaxies containing our own Milky Way. They have named the supercluster “Laniakea,” meaning

Mapping Laniakea, Our Home Supercluster of Galaxies

September 4, 2014 9:08 am | by Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii | News | Comments

University of Hawaii at Manoa astronomer R. Brent Tully has led an international team of astronomers in defining the contours of the immense supercluster of galaxies containing our own Milky Way. They have named the supercluster “Laniakea,” meaning “immense heaven” in Hawaiian.

Ion channels are involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes throughout the human body. A young team of researchers investigated how ion flux through a voltage gated sodium ion channel works in detail. Since this process is incredibly

Computer Simulations Visualize Ion Flux

September 3, 2014 9:24 am | by University of Vienna | News | Comments

Ion channels are involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes throughout the human body. A young team of researchers investigated how ion flux through a voltage gated sodium ion channel works in detail. Since this process is incredibly fast, computer simulations were performed to visualize sodium flux "in slow motion."

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