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Suresh Venkatasubramanian, left, and Matt Might, both associate professors of computer science at the University of Utah, have received a $3 million government grant to produce software that can sniff out the next generation of computer vulnerabilities. T

Algorithmic Attacks: Fighting Next-gen Cyber Threats

April 17, 2015 3:45 pm | by University of Utah | News | Comments

The next generation of cyberattacks will be more sophisticated, more difficult to detect and more capable of wreaking untold damage on the nation’s computer systems. So, the DoD has given a $3 million grant to a team of computer scientists to develop software that can hunt down a new kind of vulnerability nearly impossible to find with today’s technology. The team is tasked with creating an analyzer that can thwart algorithmic attacks.

COMSOL 5.1 Multiphysics Modeling Software

April 17, 2015 12:52 pm | Product Releases | Comments

COMSOL 5.1 is a major upgrade that delivers new and enhanced functionality across all products,...

Protecting Nature on the Fly: Computer Algorithms, Laser Technology Characterize Biodiversity

April 16, 2015 12:50 pm | by Technische Universität Wien | News | Comments

Simply declaring a region as a nature protection area is not enough, regular monitoring of its...

How Twitter Can Help Predict Emergency Room Visits

April 16, 2015 12:16 pm | by Alexis Blue, University of Arizona | News | Comments

A predictive model using machine learning algorithms is able to predict with 75 percent accuracy...

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Ryft One

Ryft One

April 16, 2015 10:34 am | Ryft Systems, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Ryft One is an open platform to analyze streaming, historical, unstructured, and multi-structured data in real-time. It is a commercial 1U platform capable of providing fast and actionable business insights by analyzing both historical and streaming data at an unprecedented 10 Gigabytes/second or faster.

While our understanding of how the aurora's shimmering curtains of colour are formed, scientists have struggled to explain the black patches between the bright beams. Now Swedish and British scientists have discovered what happens at the heart of these so

How Do 'Black' Auroras Do That

April 15, 2015 4:23 pm | by David Callahan, KTH The Royal Institute of Technology | News | Comments

While our understanding of how the aurora's shimmering curtains of color are formed, scientists have struggled to explain the black patches between the bright beams. Now Swedish and British scientists have discovered what happens at the heart of these so-called "black aurora."

Simply declaring a region as a nature protection area is not enough, regular monitoring of its ecological condition is also necessary. New methods are being developed to monitor Europe’s vast number of nature protection areas from the air. Short laser pul

Protecting Nature on the Fly

April 15, 2015 3:16 pm | by Vienna University of Technology | News | Comments

Simply declaring a region as a nature protection area is not enough, regular monitoring of its ecological condition is also necessary. New methods are being developed to monitor Europe’s vast number of nature protection areas from the air. Short laser pulses are sent to the ground, and information on the status of the habitat can be deduced from the reflected light signals using elaborate computer algorithms.

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Research using cutting edge computer analysis reveals that despite mutating, Ebola hasn’t evolved to become deadlier since the first outbreak 40 years ago.

Ebola Analysis Finds Virus Hasn't Become Deadlier, Yet

April 14, 2015 4:21 pm | by University of Manchester | News | Comments

Research using cutting edge computer analysis reveals that despite mutating, Ebola hasn’t evolved to become deadlier since the first outbreak 40 years ago.

Imagine your computer screen could change shape. Imagine if that screen could spring to life at the touch of a fingertip, translating numbers and trends into shapes and gradients you can reach out and touch.

Shape-Changing Display is the End of 2D Graphing

April 14, 2015 3:37 pm | by Lancaster University | News | Comments

Imagine your computer screen could change shape. Imagine if that screen could spring to life at the touch of a fingertip, translating numbers and trends into shapes and gradients you can reach out and touch. 

A key handwritten scientific document by Alan Turing in which he works on the foundations of mathematical notation and computer science was sold for $1,025,000 in the Fine Books & Manuscripts Sale at Bonhams New York.

Alan Turing's Manuscript on Foundations of Mathematics and Computer Science Sold for $1,025,000

April 14, 2015 3:00 pm | by Bonhams | News | Comments

A key handwritten scientific document by Alan Turing in which he works on the foundations of mathematical notation and computer science was sold for $1,025,000 in the Fine Books & Manuscripts Sale at Bonhams New York.

Notorious gangsters Al Capone and Carlo Gambino were famously done in by tax evasion charges. John Gotti, the “Teflon Don” was given up by a confidant. While the criminal masterminds of today are conducting their nefarious business online, the key to taki

Formulas Drive Activity in Organized Cybercrime Forums

April 13, 2015 4:53 pm | by Drexel University | News | Comments

Notorious gangsters Al Capone and Carlo Gambino were famously done in by tax evasion charges. John Gotti, the “Teflon Don” was given up by a confidant. While the criminal masterminds of today are conducting their nefarious business online, the key to taking them down depends on understanding how they organize and where to squeeze them. Researchers are searching for that pressure point by studying the activity of cybercrime forums.

Most recent advances in artificial intelligence are the result of machine learning, in which computers are turned loose on huge data sets to look for patterns. To make machine-learning applications easier to build, computer scientists have begun developin

Probabilistic Programming Squeezes Code to Create Intuitive Modeling

April 13, 2015 3:03 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Most recent advances in artificial intelligence are the result of machine learning, in which computers are turned loose on huge data sets to look for patterns. To make machine-learning applications easier to build, computer scientists have begun developing so-called probabilistic programming languages, which let researchers mix and match machine-learning techniques that have worked well in other contexts.  

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The newly developed framework, IMPEx, allows scientists to better understand complex observational data, to fill gaps in observations with computer-simulated data and to compare observations and simulations.

Space Scientists Create Common Data Hub, Universal Language for Mission Data

April 10, 2015 9:40 am | by Austrian Academy of Science | News | Comments

A consortium of European space scientists has succeeded in establishing a common data hub that allows the comparison of data from numerous space missions. A task that until now was hampered by different data processing protocols of individual space missions. Furthermore, observational data can now easily be compared with theoretical numerical models — regardless of the protocols used.

Spiegelhalter unravels the web of exaggerations, misdirections and downright lies that surround sex in modern society.

Fifty Shades of Statistics: What they tell us about our intimate lives

April 9, 2015 11:55 am | by Wiley | News | Comments

As part of the 2015 Cambridge Science Festival, David Spiegelhalter, Winton Professor for the Understanding of of Risk at Cambridge University, has given an overview of the history of sex research using data going back to 1580, conducted by pioneering sexologists through to today’s ‘sexperts.’

Nurses practice taking blood pressure and collecting medical history with a traditional human patient simulator system. Its face is completely inexpressive, and its lips do not move when it "talks." Speech is either pre-recorded, or voiced by the clinical

Human Patient Simulators: How Robots can Help Build Better Doctors

April 9, 2015 9:53 am | by NSF | News | Comments

A young doctor leans over a patient who has been in a serious car accident and invariably must be experiencing pain. The doctor's trauma team examines the patient's pelvis and rolls her onto her side to check her spine. They scan the patient's abdomen with a rapid ultrasound machine, finding fluid. They insert a tube in her nose. Throughout the procedure, the patient's face remains rigid, showing no signs of pain.

One of the new drones of the UZH research group Courtesy of UZH

New Technology Making Drones Safer and Smarter

April 8, 2015 3:27 pm | by University of Zurich | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of Zurich have unveiled new technology enabling drones to recover stable flight from any position and land autonomously in failure situations. It will even be possible to launch drones by simply tossing them into the air like a baseball or recover stable flight after a system failure. Drones will be safer and smarter, with the ability to identify safe landing sites and land automatically when necessary.

The book assumes no formal statistical training on the part of the reader so the language is everyday plain. It seeks to clarify basic concepts and NOT teach the intricacies of the mathematics. Still, the book has much to recommend it.

Statistics Done Wrong: The Woefully Complete Guide

April 8, 2015 3:05 pm | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

This delightful and informative guide from my friends at No Starch Press comes with the following cover blurb: “Statistics Done Wrong is a pithy, essential guide to statistical blunders in modern Science that will show you how to keep your research blunder-free.” It is somewhat pithy, but as to blunder free, I will quote the old maxim that “nothing is foolproof, as fools are so very clever.” Still, the book has much to recommend it.

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The future of tropical rainforests in the Amazon and worldwide is the focus of a new research project that combines field experiments and predictive modeling.

Study Combines Field Experiments, Predictive Modeling to Look at How Forests Worldwide Respond to Climate Change

April 7, 2015 5:09 pm | by Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers from the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory will play key roles in an expansive new project that aims to bring the future of tropical forests and the climate system into much clearer focus by coupling field research with the development of a new ecosystem model.

The UCLA Biomechatronics Lab develops a language of touch that can be "felt" by computers and humans alike. Courtesy of the National Science Foundation

Artificial Haptic Intelligence: Giving Robots the Human Touch

April 7, 2015 4:56 pm | by Miles O'Brien, NSF | News | Comments

Researchers are designing artificial limbs to be more sensational, with the emphasis on sensation. They have developed a language of touch that can be "felt" by computers and humans alike. The engineers and students are constructing a language quantified with mechanical touch sensors that interact with objects of various shapes, sizes and textures.

To demonstrate how neuroelectro.org could be used, the researchers compared electrophysiological data from more than 30 neuron types that had been most heavily studied in the literature. The site was able to find many expected similarities between the dif

Researchers Create Wikipedia for Neurons

April 7, 2015 11:11 am | by Jocelyn Duffy, Carnegie Mellon University | News | Comments

The decades worth of data collected about the billions of neurons in the brain is astounding. To help scientists make sense of this “brain big data,” researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have used data mining to create a publicly available Web site that acts like Wikipedia, indexing physiological information about neurons. The site will help to accelerate the advance of neuroscience research by providing a centralized resource.

UNSW Professor Melissa Knothe Tate is leading the project, which is using semiconductor technology to explore osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. Courtesy of Grant Turner/Mediakoo.

Previously Top-secret Technology enables Whole-body “Google Maps”

April 7, 2015 11:00 am | by UNSW Australia | News | Comments

A world-first collaboration uses previously top-secret technology to zoom through the human body down to the level of a single cell and could be a game-changer for medicine. UNSW Australia's Professor Tate is first to use the system in humans. She has forged a pioneering partnership with the US-based Cleveland Clinic, Brown and Stanford Universities, as well as Zeiss and Google to help crunch terabytes of data gathered from human study.

A high resolution image of the data transition region on a CD-ROM taken with an Olympus OLS 4000 LEXT 3-D digital laser confocal microscope. The sharp points are data on a compact disk. Courtesy of Greg Gogolin, Ph.D., Information Security & Intelligence,

Restoring Lost Data: 3-D Digital Laser Microscopy Creates Visual Roadmap

April 6, 2015 4:12 pm | by Marlene Cimons, National Science Foundation | News | Comments

It can be disheartening to learn that something precious, such as a one-of-a-kind family photo, has disappeared from a scratched or broken CD or DVD. It also can become serious, dangerous and potentially costly if it happens to a disc containing criminal forensic evidence, corporate records or scientific data. But there may be a way in the future to bring the material back.

New research has demonstrated that an amputee can grasp with a bionic hand, powered only by his thoughts.

Bionic Hand is Powered only by Thoughts

April 2, 2015 9:53 am | by Jeannie Kever, University of Houston | News | Comments

Researchers have created an algorithm that allowed a man to grasp a bottle with a prosthetic hand powered only by his thoughts. The technique, demonstrated with a man whose right hand had been amputated, uses non-invasive brain monitoring, capturing brain activity to determine what parts of the brain are involved in grasping an object. A computer program, or brain-machine interface (BMI), harnessed the subject’s intentions...

Hubble telescope image of stars forming inside a cloud of cold hydrogen gas and dust in the Carina Nebula, 7,500 light-years away. Courtesy of Space Telescope Science Institute

Automation Provides Big Data Solution to Astronomy’s Data Deluge

April 2, 2015 9:40 am | by David Tenenbaum, University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

It’s almost a rite of passage in physics and astronomy. Scientists spend years scrounging up money to build a fantastic new instrument. Then, when the long-awaited device finally approaches completion, the panic begins: How will they handle the torrent of data? The Square Kilometer Array will have an unprecedented ability to deliver data on the location and properties of stars, galaxies and giant clouds of hydrogen gas.

We can now use a very fast and biologically relevant computational model to study deforming structures of the clots growing in blood flow. The new model may be adapted to study clot formation in blood vessels, which can pose the risk of detaching and migr

Simulating Biofilm Mechanical Behavior Aids Blood Clotting Studies

April 1, 2015 11:47 am | by Gene Stowe, University of Notre Dame | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new computational model that effectively simulates the mechanical behavior of biofilms. Their model may lead to new strategies for studying a range of issues from blood clots to waste treatment systems. The new model may be adapted to study clot formation in blood vessels, which can pose the risk of detaching and migrating to the lungs, a fatal event.

Omics Explorer 3.1 for Mac

Omics Explorer 3.1 for Mac

April 1, 2015 11:18 am | Qlucore AB | Product Releases | Comments

Qlucore Omics Explorer 3.1 for Mac is data analysis software designed to maximize the outcome of research by making it easy to analyze experiment data from a biological point-of-view. Examples of this are the inbuilt Gene Ontology (GO) Browser, a Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) function, and freedom to explore data using any variable identifier: variable collapse.

In New York City, Manju Malkani, IBM analytics consultant, and Paul Walsh, Vice President of Weather Analytics at The Weather Company, access real-time weather data through IBM Watson Analytics.

The Weather Company Migrates Data Services to IBM Cloud, Plans to Advance Internet of Things Solutions

March 31, 2015 1:43 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM and The Weather Company have announced a global strategic alliance to integrate real-time weather insights into business to improve operational performance and decision-making. As part of the alliance, The Weather Company, including its global B2B division WSI, will shift its massive weather data services platform to the IBM Cloud and integrate its data with IBM analytics and cloud services.

Tri-TON, an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) that U.S. and Japanese researchers will use for the real-time verification of their search olfactory algorithms. Courtesy of Tamer Zaki, Johns Hopkins University

U.S., Japan Bring Big Data and Data Analytics to Disaster Response

March 31, 2015 12:29 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

When disaster strikes, it is critical that experts, decision makers and emergency personnel have access to real-time information in order to assess the situation and respond appropriately. It is equally critical that individuals and organizations have the capacity to analyze the wealth of data generated in the midst of the disaster and its immediate aftermath in order to produce accurate, customized warnings.

A view of South America's forest cover from the new hybrid global forest map, viewed via the Geo-Wiki platform. Courtesy of IIASA, Geo-Wiki, Google Earth

Citizen Scientists Map Global Forests with Unprecedented Accuracy

March 31, 2015 11:34 am | by International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) | News | Comments

New global forest maps combine citizen science with multiple data sources, for an unprecedented level of accuracy about the location and extent of forestland worldwide. The maps rely on a combination of recent multisensory remote sensing data, statistics and crowdsourcing. By combining different data sources, and incorporating the input of trained citizen scientists, researchers were able to produce maps more accurate than any existing...

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