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A team of MIT neuroscientists has found that some computer programs can identify the objects in these images just as well as the primate brain. Courtesy of the researchers

Deep Computer Neural Networks Catch Up to Primate Brain

December 18, 2014 4:53 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

For decades, neuroscientists have been trying to design computer networks that can mimic visual skills such as recognizing objects. Until now, no computer model has been able to match the primate brain at visual object recognition during a brief glance. However, a new study from MIT neuroscientists has found that one of the latest generation of these so-called “deep neural networks” matches the primate brain.

COMSOL Server

December 18, 2014 4:41 pm | Product Releases | Comments

COMSOL Server was developed specifically for running applications built with the Application...

Optimized Algorithms Give Combustion Simulations a Boost

December 18, 2014 4:32 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Turbulent combustion simulations, which provide input to the design of more fuel-efficient...

Global High-resolution Models Fuel New Golden Age of Climate Science

December 18, 2014 4:14 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Not long ago, it would have taken several years to run a high-resolution simulation on a global...

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The species used in a Rice University genetic study of mice were collected from 15 locations in Europe and Africa. The green region indicates the range of Mus spretus, the Algerian mouse, while the blue region indicates the range of Mus musculus domesticu

Big Data Analysis Reveals Shared Genetic Code between Species

December 18, 2014 11:32 am | by Mike Williams, Rice University | News | Comments

Researchers have detected at least three instances of cross-species mating that likely influenced the evolutionary paths of “old world” mice, two in recent times and one in the distant past. They think these instances of introgressive hybridization are only the first of many needles waiting to be found in a very large genetic haystack. The finding suggests that hybridization in mammals may not be an evolutionary dead end.

Watson will make it possible for VHA physicians to interact with medical data in natural language, process millions of pages of patient information and medical literature to uncover patterns and insights, and learn from each interaction.

VA Clinical Reasoning System Based on Watson Cognitive Capabilities

December 17, 2014 3:45 pm | News | Comments

IBM announced that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs is using Watson technology in a pilot to assist physicians in helping accelerate the process of evidence-based medical decision making. The VA joins leading healthcare organizations that are working with IBM Watson to help improve efficiency and quality of care being delivered. The VHA will also work with Watson for a clinical focus supporting veterans with PTSD.

In theoretical math, the term "moonshine" refers to an idea so seemingly impossible that it seems like lunacy.

Mathematicians prove Umbral Moonshine Conjecture

December 17, 2014 3:08 pm | by Carol Clark, Emory University | News | Comments

Monstrous moonshine, a quirky pattern of the monster group in theoretical math, has a shadow — umbral moonshine. Mathematicians have proved this insight, known as the Umbral Moonshine Conjecture, offering a formula with potential applications for everything from number theory to geometry to quantum physics.

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SFU computer scientist Richard Zhang holds a Christmas tree, left, that was 3D-printed in the traditional manner, and the same tree, right, printed with assistance from a new algorithm he developed with Ph.D. student Ruizhen Hu. The Christmas tree on the

New Algorithm Prints with Zero Material Waste

December 16, 2014 11:09 am | by Diane Luckow, Simon Fraser University | News | Comments

Just in time for Christmas, Richard Zhang reveals how to print a 3-D Christmas tree efficiently and with zero material waste, using the world’s first algorithm for automatically decomposing a 3-D object into what are called pyramidal parts. The algorithm promises to become a big deal in the world of 3-D printing, and also has applications for designing molds and for casting.

NASA flight engineer Roy Roper (left) reviews laptop displays showing the ASTAR data with Boeing principal investigator Gabe Brewer during a ground simulation. Courtesy of Boeing

NASA Software May Help Increase Flight Efficiency, Decrease Aircraft Noise

December 16, 2014 11:03 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA researchers began flight tests of computer software that shows promise in improving flight efficiency and reducing environmental impacts of aircraft, especially on communities around airports. Known as ASTAR, or Airborne Spacing for Terminal Arrival Routes, the software is designed to give pilots specific speed information and guidance so that planes can be more precisely spaced, enabling pilots to fly a "follow the leader" approach.

Big Data and genetic complexity: HotNet2 helps define the terrain for complex genetic associations involved in cancer. “The next step,” says researcher Ben Raphael, “is translating all of this information from cancer sequencing into clinically actionable

Big Data v. Cancer: Algorithm Identifies Genetic Changes across Cancers

December 15, 2014 4:00 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

Using a computer algorithm that can sift through mounds of genetic data, researchers from Brown University have identified several networks of genes that, when hit by a mutation, could play a role in the development of multiple types of cancer. The algorithm, called Hotnet2, was used to analyze genetic data from 12 different types of cancer assembled as part of the pan-cancer project of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

For the family of bee-eaters (on the photo Merops bullocki), the study revealed a close relationship to oscine birds, parrots, and birds of prey. Courtesy of Peter Houde

Bird Tree of Life Reproduced using Gene Analysis, Supercomputing

December 15, 2014 1:57 pm | by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology | News | Comments

About 95 percent of the more than 10,000 bird species known only evolved upon the extinction of dinosaurs about 66 million years ago. According to computer analyses of the genetic data, today's diversity developed from a few species at a virtually explosive rate after 15 million years. Scientists designed the algorithms for the comprehensive analysis of the evolution of birds; a computing capacity of 300 processor-years was required.

Michael Boruta is Optical Spectroscopy Product Manager at ACD/Labs

Accessibility of Data and Application of Algorithms to Provide Insights in Predictive Analytics

December 15, 2014 11:56 am | by Michael Boruta, ACD/Labs | Blogs | Comments

Although there are a diverse range of applications for predictive analytics in R&D, two common basic requirements are data and insight. Data may be generated by running experiments/analyses, or re-applied from previous work when available. Insights come from application of knowledge — both explicitand tacit. There are a variety of roles for informatics in predictive analytics...

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Professor Tandy Warnow developed a new statistical method that sorts genetic data to construct better species trees detailing genetic lineage. Courtesy of L. Brian Stauffer

Sophisticated New Statistical Technique helps Map Species' Genetic Heritage

December 12, 2014 5:50 pm | by Liz Ahlberg, University of Illinois | News | Comments

Where did the songbird get its song? What branch of the bird family tree is closer to the flamingo — the heron or the sparrow? These questions seem simple, but are actually difficult for geneticists to answer. A new, sophisticated statistical technique can help researchers construct more accurate species trees detailing the lineage of genes and the relationships between species.

Madhu Sudan and his colleagues have begun to describe theoretical limits on the degree of imprecision that communicating computers can tolerate, with very real implications for the design of communication protocols. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

New Theory could Yield More Reliable Communication Protocols

December 12, 2014 5:23 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Communication protocols for digital devices are very efficient but also very brittle: They require information to be specified in a precise order with a precise number of bits. If sender and receiver — say, a computer and a printer — are off by even a single bit relative to each other, communication between them breaks down entirely.

Results of large-scale simulations showing the Alnico alloy separates into FeCo-rich and NiAl-rich phases at low temperatures and is a homogenized phase at high temperatures.

Solving the Shaky Future of Super-strong Rare Earth Magnets

December 11, 2014 4:15 pm | by Katie Elyce Jones, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

The US Department of Energy is mining for solutions to the rare earth problem — but with high-performance computing instead of bulldozers. Researchers are using the hybrid CPU-GPU, 27-petaflop Titan supercomputer managed by the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to discover alternative materials that can substitute for rare earths.

A black hole as depicted in the movie Interstellar -- Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

A Supermassive Black Hole Comes to the Big Screen

December 11, 2014 3:34 pm | by University of Arizona | News | Comments

What does a black hole look like up close? As the sci-fi movie Interstellar wows audiences with its computer-generated views of one of most enigmatic and fascinating phenomena in the universe, University of Arizona (UA) astrophysicists Chi-kwan Chan, Dimitrios Psaltis and Feryal Ozel are likely nodding appreciatively and saying something like, "Meh, that looks nice, but check out what we've got."

Galactic gas from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulation. Represented here is a Milky Way mass halo, with colors denoting different densities.

Interstellar Mystery Solved by Supercomputer Simulations

December 10, 2014 4:25 pm | by Jorge Salazar, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

An interstellar mystery of why stars form has been solved thanks to the most realistic supercomputer simulations of galaxies yet made. Theoretical astrophysicist Philip Hopkins led research that found that stellar activity — like supernova explosions or even just starlight — plays a big part in the formation of other stars and the growth of galaxies.

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The ancient Antikythera relic was rescued from a shipwreck. Courtesy of Giovanni Dall Orto

World's Oldest Computer, Ancient Greek Antikythera Mechanism, 100 Years Older than Previously Believed

December 9, 2014 2:10 pm | by University of Puget Sound | News | Comments

An ancient Greek astronomical puzzle has one more piece in place. The new evidence results from research by James Evans, professor of physics at University of Puget Sound, and Christián Carman, history of science professor at University of Quilmes, Argentina. The two researchers published a paper advancing our understanding of the Antikythera Mechanism, an ancient Greek mechanism that modeled the known universe of 2,000 years ago. 

This tiny slice of silicon, etched in Jelena Vuckovic's lab at Stanford with a pattern that resembles a bar code, is one step on the way toward linking computer components with light instead of wires. Courtesy Vuckovic Lab

New Algorithm a Big Step toward Using Light to Transmit Data

December 9, 2014 1:38 pm | by Stanford University, Chris Cesare | News | Comments

Engineers have designed and built a prism-like device that can split a beam of light into different colors and bend the light at right angles, a development that could eventually lead to computers that use optics, rather than electricity, to carry data. The optical link is a tiny slice of silicon etched with a pattern that resembles a bar code. When a beam of light is shined at the link, two different wavelengths of light split off

Scientists have developed an ultrafast quantum chemical method, which allows rapid and accurate simulations of complex molecular systems consisting of thousands of molecules.

Cutting-up Molecules for Ultrafast Complex Molecular Simulations

December 8, 2014 5:38 pm | by Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM), Nagoya University | News | Comments

Scientists have developed an ultrafast quantum chemical method, which allows rapid and accurate simulations of complex molecular systems consisting of thousands of molecules.                     

An international competition using the wisdom of crowds has developed computer algorithms to detect, predict, and ultimately prevent epileptic seizures. A total of five-hundred and four teams competed in two challenges, one for Seizure Detection and a sec

Crowdsourcing Advances Epileptic Seizure Detection, Prediction

December 8, 2014 5:21 pm | by American Epilepsy Society | News | Comments

An international competition using the wisdom of crowds has developed computer algorithms to detect, predict, and ultimately prevent epileptic seizures. A total of five-hundred and four teams competed in two challenges, one for Seizure Detection and a second for Seizure Prediction.

Biological engineers have created a new computer model that allows them to design the most complex three-dimensional DNA shapes ever produced, including rings, bowls, and geometric structures such as icosahedrons that resemble viral particles.

Computer Model Enables Design of Complex DNA Shapes

December 3, 2014 3:45 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Biological engineers have created a new computer model that allows them to design the most complex three-dimensional DNA shapes ever produced, including rings, bowls, and geometric structures such as icosahedrons that resemble viral particles. 

A mathematician has developed a new way to uncover simple patterns that might underlie apparently complex systems, such as clouds, cracks in materials or the movement of the stockmarket.

Finding Simple Patterns in a Complex World

December 3, 2014 3:26 pm | by Australian National University | News | Comments

A mathematician has developed a new way to uncover simple patterns that might underlie apparently complex systems, such as clouds, cracks in materials or the movement of the stockmarket.                  

Technology has changed rapidly over the last few years with touch feedback, known as haptics, being used in entertainment, rehabilitation and even surgical training. New research, using ultrasound, has developed an invisible 3D haptic shape that can be se

Touchable Holograms Developed for Medical Uses and More

December 2, 2014 3:49 pm | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Technology has changed rapidly over the last few years with touch feedback, known as haptics, being used in entertainment, rehabilitation and even surgical training. New research, using ultrasound, has developed an invisible 3D haptic shape that can be seen and felt.

For their calculations, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) will now, starting in 2015, have access to the World’s second-fastest computer. The Dresden scientists are hoping that the computations will yield new insights that may

Titan Calculates for HZDR Cancer Research

December 2, 2014 3:21 pm | by HZDR | News | Comments

For their calculations, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) will now, starting in 2015, have access to the World’s second-fastest computer. The Dresden scientists are hoping that the computations will yield new insights that may prove useful in proton-based cancer therapy.

Engineers have designed and built a prism-like device that can split a beam of light into different colors and bend the light at right angles, a development that could eventually lead to computers that use optics, rather than electricity, to carry data.

Using Light Instead of Wires Inside Computers

December 2, 2014 3:01 pm | by Chris Cesare, Stanford University | News | Comments

Engineers have designed and built a prism-like device that can split a beam of light into different colors and bend the light at right angles, a development that could eventually lead to computers that use optics, rather than electricity, to carry data.

In 1997, IBM’s Deep Blue computer beat chess wizard Garry Kasparov. This year, a computer system developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison equaled or bested scientists at the complex task of extracting data from scientific publications and placing

Computer Equal To or Better Than Humans at Cataloging Science

December 2, 2014 2:53 pm | by David Tenenbaum, University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

In 1997, IBM’s Deep Blue computer beat chess wizard Garry Kasparov. This year, a computer system developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison equaled or bested scientists at the complex task of extracting data from scientific publications and placing it in a database that catalogs the results of tens of thousands of individual studies.

El Niño is not a contemporary phenomenon; it’s long been the Earth’s dominant source of year-to-year climate fluctuation. But as the climate warms and the feedbacks that drive the cycle change, researchers want to know how El Niño will respond.

Modeling the Growing Strength of El Niño

December 1, 2014 4:27 pm | by Kelly April Tyrrell, University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

El Niño is not a contemporary phenomenon; it’s long been the Earth’s dominant source of year-to-year climate fluctuation. But as the climate warms and the feedbacks that drive the cycle change, researchers want to know how El Niño will respond.

The Gecko has good sticking power thanks to the van der Waals force.

Van der Waals Force Re-measured, may Help Improve Fundamental Simulation Methods

November 26, 2014 10:16 am | by Forschungszentrum Jülich | News | Comments

Van der Waals forces act like a sort of quantum glue on all types of matter. Using a new measuring technique, scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich experimentally determined for the first time all of the key details of how strongly the single molecules bind to a surface. With an atomic force microscope, they demonstrated that the forces do not just increase with molecular size, but that they even grow disproportionately fast.

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