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What your Clothes may say about You

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — June 26-July 2

July 2, 2015 11:55 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

Heading into the Independence Day weekend, materials that compute — what your clothes may say about you; Sandia’s Z machine solving an 80-year-old puzzle; an amazing satellite view of the San Francisco Bay area; a monster black hole waking after 26 years; a tactical toss camera that sends panoramic images back to a smartphone; and breaking key barriers that limit the distance information can travel in fiber optic cables, are all top hits.

1st Heart Transplant a Success after using Experimental 50cc Artificial Heart

July 2, 2015 9:07 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

A petite 44-year-old woman has received a successful heart transplant thanks to an experimental...

Survey: US Political and Generation Gaps on Science Issues

July 1, 2015 3:58 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Age divides Americans on science issues just as much as political ideology, a new analysis of...

Solar Superstorms show Highlights Extremely Powerful Computer Simulation, Visualization

July 1, 2015 3:35 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

A 24-minute, high-resolution science documentary narrated Benedict Cumberbatch about the...

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Human chromosomes. Courtesy of Jane Ades, NHGRI

Speeding Up Genome Assembly, from Months to Minutes

June 30, 2015 12:23 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Computing Sciences | News | Comments

By applying some novel algorithms, computational techniques and the innovative programming language Unified Parallel C (UPC) to the cutting-edge de novo genome assembly tool Meraculous, a team of scientists simplified and sped up genome assembly, reducing a months-long process to mere minutes. This was primarily achieved by “parallelizing” the code to harness the processing power of supercomputers.

The Mars Rover game introduces educational content in a fun and rewarding 3-D gaming experience.

Pentagon, Lockheed Martin Researchers create Math and Programming Learning Platform

June 30, 2015 8:17 am | by Aaron Dubrow, NSF | News | Comments

The Pentagon's Office of Force Readiness and Training recently teamed with Lockheed Martin and NSF to create a new platform for distributed, immersive training applications: Virtual World Framework. The platform makes it easier, faster, and less expensive to develop training games and simulations that can reach users around the world. The team demonstrated a prototype game designed to run on the platform: The Mars Game.

A simulation of vortex-induced motion shows how ocean currents affect offshore oil rigs.

Supercomputing the Vortex: Simulation improves Offshore Drill Rig Safety

June 29, 2015 2:00 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

LANL researchers’ efforts to solve the complex problem of how ocean currents affect the infrastructure of floating oilrigs and their computational fluid dynamics numerical simulations has received recognition from ANSYS. Vortex-induced motion is a complex problem that occurs when there are highly turbulent flow and fluid-solid interaction phenomena. The available experimental data are very limited, especially from field measurements.

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Results from Sandia National Laboratories’ Z machine provides hard data for an 85-year-old theory that could correct mistaken estimates of the planet Saturn’s age. Courtesy of NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Sandia's Z Machine helps solve Saturn's 2-billion-year Age Gap

June 29, 2015 1:50 pm | by Sandia National Labs | News | Comments

Planets tend to cool as they get older, but Saturn is hotter than astrophysicists say it should be without some additional energy source. The unexplained heat has caused a 2-billion-year discrepancy for computer models estimating Saturn’s age. Experiments at Sandia’s Z machine verified an 80-year-old untested proposition that molecular hydrogen, normally an insulator, becomes metallic if squeezed by enough pressure...

In response to public concerns about cryptographic security, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has formally revised its recommended methods for generating random numbers, a crucial element in protecting private messages and other t

NIST Revises Computer Security Publication on Random Number Generation

June 26, 2015 3:14 pm | by NIST | News | Comments

In response to public concerns about cryptographic security, the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has formally revised its recommended methods for generating random numbers, a crucial element in protecting private messages and other types of electronic data. The action implements changes to the methods that were proposed by NIST last year in a draft document issued for public comment.  

Are you a Tau-ist? Pi Day is Under Attack

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — June 19-25

June 26, 2015 12:41 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

As we entered our first week of summer, the week’s biggest hits included a strong bent toward several “lighter” mathematical topics: learning how math drives Formula 1 and launches Angry Birds, inspiring young minds at MoMATH, and Pi Day under attack. You also won’t want to miss molecules exhibiting strange, exotic states, hot lava flows on Venus, and some of the coolest experimental technology showcased at this year’s Paris Air Show.

A three-dimensional spatial structure of mixing in an idealized ocean simulation, computed using Lagrangian particle statistics.

Vast Eddies swirl across Open Ocean, pull Carbon Emissions into the Deep

June 25, 2015 9:11 am | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a computer model that clarifies the complex processes driving ocean mixing in the vast eddies that swirl across hundreds of miles of open ocean. The model is a first-of-its-kind tool because of its ability to exploit the power available from today’s supercomputers. Global climate simulations are beginning to be able to resolve the largest mesoscale eddies, which are considered the “weather” of the ocean.

3DEXCITE DELTAGEN 13

3DEXCITE DELTAGEN 13

June 24, 2015 1:47 pm | Dassault Systems | Product Releases | Comments

DELTAGEN 13 is designed to deliver a highly-realistic display of 3-D visualizations with real-time interaction. The high-performance software works with data from all professional CAD systems and features the 3DEXCITE STELLAR render engine, which intuitively navigates users toward achieving the most stunning visual results.

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Following their collaboration a year ago to develop a cognitive computing cooking app and test it with home cooks as part of a beta program, IBM and Bon Appetit have opened up the web app to anyone interested in expanding his or her imagination in the kit

Cognitive Computing App Taps 10,000 Bon Appétit Recipes, Suggests Creative Flavor Combinations

June 24, 2015 11:12 am | by IBM Watson | News | Comments

IBM and Bon Appétit have introduced a one-of-a-kind Chef Watson cognitive computing cooking app that is open to anyone interested in expanding his or her imagination in the kitchen. Created through a collaboration with Bon Appétit, the app inspires home cooks everywhere to discover unexpected flavor combinations to address everyday mealtime challenges in creative ways and bring new ideas to the kitchen.

GATK is already available for download at no cost to academic and non-profit users. In addition, business users can license GATK from the Broad. To date, more than 20,000 users have processed genomic data using GATK.

Broad Institute Genome Analysis Toolkit offered as part of Google Genomics

June 24, 2015 7:56 am | by Broad Institute | News | Comments

Broad Institute is teaming up with Google Genomics to explore how to break down major technical barriers that increasingly hinder biomedical research by addressing the need for computing infrastructure to store and process enormous datasets, and by creating tools to analyze such data. As a first step, Broad Institute’s Genome Analysis Toolkit, GATK, will be offered as a service on the Google Cloud Platform, as part of Google Genomics.

Tau proponents say that, for many mathematical problems, tau makes more sense and makes calculations easier.

Are you a Tau-ist? Pi Day is Under Attack

June 23, 2015 4:51 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

As June 28, 2015, approaches, the Internet is once again anticipating controversy as the mathematical constant pi comes under threat from a group of detractors who will be marking "Tau Day." Tau Day’s revelers are campaigning for a constant twice as large as pi (about 6.28) to take its place, hence the June 28 celebration. Tau proponents say that, for many mathematical problems, tau makes more sense and makes calculations easier.

Intelligent Operations Center for Emergency Management collects historical and sensor data from a variety of sources, and applies deep analytics, data visualization and real-time collaboration to help agencies coordinate and manage response efforts during

Intelligent Operations Center uses Real-time Weather Data to Help Predict and Prepare for Disasters

June 23, 2015 10:38 am | by IBM | News | Comments

As the Atlantic hurricane season gets underway, communities in severe weather-prone regions are anxiously tracking pending storms and working to create effective disaster response plans. IBM, through an alliance with The Weather Company, has announced a new emergency management solution featuring sophisticated analytics and use of real-time weather data to help communities predict and plan for natural disasters far more accurately.

This graphic representation shows how three active sources cloak an incoming circular wave (like ripples from a stone dropped in water), creating a quiet zone for the object to be cloaked. This is just for one frequency. Courtesy of Fernando Guevara Vasqu

Mathematicians Play Key Role in Developing Multi-Frequency Cloaking

June 23, 2015 9:47 am | by NSF | News | Comments

The idea of cloaking and rendering something invisible hit the small screen in 1966 when a Romulan Bird of Prey made an unseen, surprise attack on the Starship Enterprise. Not only did it make for a good storyline, it inspired budding scientists, offering a window of technology's potential. Today, pop culture has embraced the idea of hiding behind force fields, and mathematicians are looking at transforming science fiction into science.

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Researchers used high-resolution microscopy to examine owl feathers in fine detail. They observed that the flight feathers on an owl’s wing have a downy covering, which resembles a forest canopy when viewed from above. In addition to this fluffy canopy, o

How Owls could help make Computer Fans Quieter

June 20, 2015 9:46 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

A newly-designed material, which mimics the wing structure of owls, could help make wind turbines, computer fans and even planes much quieter. Early wind tunnel tests of the coating have shown a substantial reduction in noise without any noticeable effect on aerodynamics.

Pope Francis waves as he leaves at the end of his weekly general audience, in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Wednesday, June 17, 2015. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini) Pope Challenges World to Clean Up its Filth

Pope Challenges World to Clean Up its Filth

June 20, 2015 9:34 am | by Nicole Winfield, Rachel Zoll and Seth Borenstein, Associated Press | News | Comments

Pope Francis' plea to make the state of the environment a central moral issue of our age has been greeted with applause from climate activists and a wide range of church, science and government leaders, but dismissive shrugs from those who doubt climate change. In "Laudato Si," Francis addressed "every living person on this planet," urging them to hear "both the cry of the Earth and the cry of the poor."

Tapping at mobile phone games, waking up to sunlight on a pleasant morning or watching a Formula One race — such experiences are at the heart of modern life, and mathematics is working behind the scenes on all of them. Math is also used in many discipline

Free Online Course to teach how Math drives Formula One and launches Angry Birds

June 20, 2015 8:54 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

Tapping at mobile phone games, waking up to sunlight on a pleasant morning or watching a Formula One race — such experiences are at the heart of modern life, and mathematics is working behind the scenes on all of them. Math is also used in many disciplines — from economics to engineering, biology to geography. But many of us struggle with math, and find formulas and theories difficult to grasp. A free online course could help.

Applied Mathematician Theorizes what Happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — June 12-18

June 19, 2015 2:35 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

The top most-visited stories of the past week included an amazing image of Jupiter’s second largest moon, solving billions of equations in just minutes, relief and delight as Philae woke up, Einstein saving the Quantum Cat, a fundamental change in wireless communications, a 40-year-old algorithm problem put to rest, news that a black hole’s surface is no deadly firewall, and an applied mathematician’s theory on MA flight 370.

This image depicts the times at which different connections in the brain are used to spread information. In general, information appears to rapidly spread from a compact core of central pathways. Courtesy of Olaf Sporns/Bratislav Misic

Twitter Tracking Model Sheds Light on How Information Spreads in the Brain

June 19, 2015 1:49 pm | by Indiana University | News | Comments

Researchers are using data mapping methods created to track the spread of information on social networks to trace its dissemination across a surprisingly different system: the human brain. The research team found that applying social network models to the brain reveals specific connections and nodes that may be responsible for higher forms of cognition.

Harmony of the Spheres: More than 30 exhibits, created exclusively by MoMath, are designed to reveal the wonders of math in an “interactive, hands-on, engaging and fun” way.

MoMATH: Hands-on Mathematics Inspiring Young Minds

June 19, 2015 11:17 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

My first impression upon entering the National Museum of Mathematics could be described as complete mathematical mayhem. Pre-teenagers were swarming dozens of exhibits in what seemed more like a huge play area than a museum dedicated to the study of an abstract science of numbers, quantity and shapes. However, as I waded in and began to understand specific exhibits, it quickly became obvious that this was a special place.

Simulation apps can help organizations in every industry gain better R&D results, while saving both time and money.

It's Time to Revolutionize Simulation with Apps

June 18, 2015 3:40 pm | by Brianne Costa, COMSOL | Blogs | Comments

Throughout history, many revolutions have started with the desire for democracy, and the simulation revolution is no exception. Simulation is an effective way to test the design of a product virtually. It's now evolving into building simulation apps that can be shared across teams, departments and companies. Simulation apps can help organizations in every industry gain better R&D results, while saving both time and money. 

Short inverted repeat sequences of DNA nucleotides are enriched at human cancer breakpoints. Courtesy of Karen Vasquez, UT Austin

Researchers Surprisingly Link DNA Crosses to Cancer using Stampede and Lonestar

June 18, 2015 2:43 pm | by Jorge Salazar, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

Supercomputers have helped scientists find a surprising link between cross-shaped (or cruciform) pieces of DNA and human cancer. The study found that small DNA cruciforms are mutagenic, altering DNA in a way that can increase risk of cancer in yeast, monkeys and in humans. Researchers found short inverted repeats of 30 base pairs and under in a reference database of mutations in human cancer that are somatic, meaning not inherited.

Network scientists have developed a new computational method that can leverage any body of knowledge to aid in the complex human task of fact-checking. In multiple experiments, the automated system consistently matched the assessment of human fact-checker

Computational Algorithm Checks the Facts

June 17, 2015 3:59 pm | by Indiana University | News | Comments

Network scientists have developed a new computational method that can leverage any body of knowledge to aid in the complex human task of fact-checking. In multiple experiments, the automated system consistently matched the assessment of human fact-checkers in terms of their certitude about the accuracy of these statements.

For several years now, researchers have been investigating techniques for amplifying movements captured by video but indiscernible to the human eye. Earlier this month, they presented a new version of the algorithm that can amplify small motions even when

Video-Processing Algorithm Amplifies Small Motions in Large Motions

June 17, 2015 1:49 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

For several years now, researchers have been investigating techniques for amplifying movements captured by video but indiscernible to the human eye. Earlier this month, they presented a new version of the algorithm that can amplify small motions even when they’re contained within objects executing large motions.

Complex models that let you look at the combined action of many different variants have, until now, involved so much computation that it would take a year to run a single complex query.

Complex, Large-scale Genome Analysis made Easier

June 16, 2015 12:45 pm | by European Molecular Biology Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new approach to studying the effect of multiple genetic variations on different traits. The new algorithm makes it possible to perform genetic analysis of up to 500,000 individuals — and many traits at the same time. Complex models that let you look at the combined action of many different variants have, until now, involved so much computation that it would take a year to run a single complex query.

This year’s winning research poster

ISC Announces 2015 PRACE, GAUSS and Poster Winners

June 16, 2015 11:28 am | by ISC | News | Comments

ISC has announced that the 2015 PRACE ISC Award and Gauss Award will be given to two deserving European researchers reporting on their work focused on the development of energy-efficient supercomputers. These two research papers were selected by the respective award committees from the 37 submissions accepted for presentation at the 2015 ISC High Performance Research Paper Session. This year’s winning research poster...

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