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Researchers have used an advanced model to simulate in unprecedented detail the workings of "resistance-switching cells" that might replace conventional memory for electronics applications, with the potential to bring faster and higher capacity computer m

Simulations Provide Insight Into Emerging Nanoelectronic Device

March 6, 2015 4:23 pm | by Purdue University | News | Comments

Researchers have used an advanced model to simulate in unprecedented detail the workings of "resistance-switching cells" that might replace conventional memory for electronics applications, with the potential to bring faster and higher capacity computer memory while consuming less energy.

Mathematicians Model Fluids at Mesoscale

March 6, 2015 3:52 pm | by Julie Chao, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

When it comes to boiling water—or the phenomenon of applying heat to a liquid until it...

Satellite Mission Puts Einstein to the Test

March 5, 2015 12:24 pm | by Heidelberg University | News | Comments

Researchers have gained new insights into dark energy and the theory of gravitation by analyzing...

3D Imaging Exposes Clogs, Jams, Avalanches, Earthquakes

March 5, 2015 11:23 am | by Robin A. Smith, Duke University | News | Comments

An international team of researchers have developed a new way to measure the forces inside...

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Researchers have assembled the largest and most accurate tree of life calibrated to time. Surprisingly, it reveals that life has been expanding at a constant rate, not slowing down.

Tree of Life Shows Clocklike Emergence of New Species

March 5, 2015 10:04 am | by Joseph Caspermeyer, Temple University | News | Comments

Researchers have assembled the largest and most accurate tree of life calibrated to time. Surprisingly, it reveals that life has been expanding at a constant rate, not slowing down.

Research has for the first time analyzed over 130,000 online news articles to find out how the 2012 US presidential election played out in the media.

Big Data Used to Understand Major Events

March 5, 2015 9:34 am | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Research has for the first time analyzed over 130,000 online news articles to find out how the 2012 US presidential election played out in the media.

Visualizations of future nano-transistors, clockwise starting at upper left: a) the organization of the atoms in an Ultra Thin Body (UTB) transistor and the amount of electric potential along the transistor. b) a visualization of the organization of the a

Designing the Building Blocks of Future Nano-computing Technologies

March 4, 2015 12:38 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

A relentless global effort to shrink transistors has made computers continually faster, cheaper and smaller over the last 40 years. This effort has enabled chipmakers to double the number of transistors on a chip roughly every 18 months — a trend referred to as Moore's Law. In the process, the U.S. semiconductor industry has become one of the nation's largest export industries, valued at more than $65 billion a year.

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Analysis of data from the Kepler space telescope has shown that roughly half of the dayside of the exoplanet Kepler-7b is covered by a large cloud mass. Statistical comparison of more than 1,000 atmospheric models show that these clouds are most likely ma

Cloudy, with a High of 1,700 Kelvins: Analyzing Clouds around Exoplanets

March 3, 2015 4:25 pm | by Helen Knight, MIT | News | Comments

Meteorologists sometimes struggle to accurately predict the weather here on Earth, but now we can find out how cloudy it is on planets outside our solar system. MIT Researchers describe a technique that analyzes data from NASA’s Kepler space observatory to determine the types of clouds on planets that orbit other stars. Their models indicate that the clouds on Kepler-7b are most likely made from liquid rock.

Familiar crowd patterns emerged from the new simulations: people walking on an on-coming collision course veer well in advance, but people traveling in the same direction tend to walk close together. Courtesy of Yoshikazu Takada

Predicting Human Crowds with Statistical Physics

March 3, 2015 10:36 am | by American Physical Society | News | Comments

For the first time, researchers have directly measured a general law of how pedestrians interact in a crowd. This law can be used to create realistic crowds in virtual reality games and to make public spaces safer. People intuitively know how to navigate through crowds in a way that both minimizes distance traveled and avoids collisions. But the 'force' that governs human interactions has been previously unknown.

Colorized scanning electron micrograph of filamentous Ebola virus particles (green) attached to and budding from a chronically infected VERO E6 cell (blue) (25,000x magnification). Courtesy of NIAID

Combatting the World’s Deadliest Ebola Outbreak

March 2, 2015 4:37 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that the 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest in history, affecting multiple countries in West Africa. As of February 26, 2015, the CDC had tracked 23,816 cases, and Ebola had already claimed nearly 10,000 lives. 

At their heart, the simulations are akin to modeling chemical reactions taking place between different elements and, in this case, we have four states a person can be in — human, infected, zombie or dead zombie — with approximately 300 million people. Cou

Statistical Mechanics Reveal Ideal Hideout to Save your Brains from the Undead

March 2, 2015 2:26 pm | by American Physical Society | News | Comments

Researchers focusing on a fictional zombie outbreak as an approach to disease modeling suggest heading for the hills, in the Rockies, to save your brains from the undead. Reading World War Z: An Oral History of the First Zombie War, and taking a graduate statistical mechanics class inspired a group of Cornell University researchers to explore how an "actual" zombie outbreak might play out in the U.S.

The University of Chicago’s Research Computing Center is helping linguists visualize the grammar of a given word in bodies of language containing millions or billions of words. Courtesy of Ricardo Aguilera/Research Computing Center

Billions of Words: Visualizing Natural Language

February 27, 2015 3:14 pm | by Benjamin Recchie, University of Chicago | News | Comments

Children don’t have to be told that “cat” and “cats” are variants of the same word — they pick it up just by listening. To a computer, though, they’re as different as, well, cats and dogs. Yet it’s computers that are assumed to be superior in detecting patterns and rules, not four-year-olds. Researchers are trying to, if not to solve that puzzle definitively, at least provide the tools to do so.

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Cardiovascular diseases are the largest cause of death in Europe and responsible for two million deaths per year. According to WHO, they are the number one cause of death in the world, accounting for 30 percent of deaths worldwide and 42 percent in the EU

Novel 3-D Computer Model brings Insight to Cardiovascular Diseases

February 26, 2015 12:56 pm | by Lappeenranta University of Technology, LUT | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a novel three-dimensional, multiscale and multicomponent model of the endothelial cell monolayer, the inner lining of the artery, to identify the cellular mechanisms involved in cardiovascular diseases. New research based on the model is able to identify the main cellular pathways involved in the initiation and progression of the disease.

Professor Dimitrios Nikolopoulos from the School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Queen’s University Belfast, is principal investigator for The Scalable, Energy-Efficient, Resilient and Transparent Software Adaptation (SERT)

Developing Simulation Software to Combat Humanity’s Biggest Issues

February 25, 2015 12:36 pm | by Queen’s University Belfast | News | Comments

Researchers are creating ground-breaking computer software, which has the potential to develop some of the world’s fastest supercomputers by increasing their ability to process masses of data at higher speeds than ever before. The new software has the potential to combat major global issues, including climate change and life-threatening diseases, by simulating detailed models of natural events.

While a member of the audience might have seen a variation on this trick before, the AI can now use psychological and mathematical principles to create lots of different versions and keep audiences guessing. Courtesy of Steven Depolo

Artificial Intelligence Performs Real Magic Tricks

February 25, 2015 11:41 am | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Researchers gave a computer program the outline of how a magic jigsaw puzzle and a mind-reading card trick work, as well the results of experiments into how humans understand magic tricks. With this information, the system created completely new variants on those tricks which can be delivered by a magician.

A mathematical will give researchers an opportunity to discover the earliest words and languages spoken to date, with the potential to go back thousands of years. Courtesy of woodleywonderworks

Statistical Technique Traces Languages Back to Oldest Spoken Words

February 24, 2015 12:42 pm | by Current Biology | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a statistical technique that sorts out when changes to words’ pronunciations most likely occurred in the evolutionary history of related languages. Their model gives researchers a renewed opportunity to trace words and languages back to their earliest common ancestor or ancestors — potentially thousands of years further into prehistory than previous techniques.

Tsunami impact map provides more precise estimates of the areas that might face tsunami-induced flooding.

Study Maps Major Tsunami Impact on Columbia River

February 24, 2015 12:19 pm | by Oregon State University | News | Comments

Engineers at Oregon State University have completed one of the most precise evaluations yet done about the impact of a major tsunami event on the Columbia River, what forces are most important in controlling water flow and what areas might be inundated.

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Model of ion (Cl) collision with atomically thin semiconductor (MoSe2). Collision region is shown in blue and zoomed in; red points show initial positions of Cl. The simulation calculates the energy loss of the ion based on the incident and emergent veloc

Algorithm Enables Simulation of Ultrafast Processes

February 20, 2015 12:07 pm | by Rachel Berkowitz, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new algorithm which increases the small time step required by ultrafast phenomena from about one attosecond to about half a femtosecond. This allows them to simulate ultrafast phenomena for systems of around 100 atoms.

Scientists at the University of Valencia have developed a research methodology called Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), based on network analysis mathematical tools for studying anatomy. Courtesy of Asociación RUVID

Modular Anatomical Structure of Human Head Described for First Time

February 18, 2015 10:03 am | by Asociación RUVID | News | Comments

A new mathematical analysis tool has allowed a deeper understanding of the anatomy of the human head, describing the skull as an extended network structured in 10 modules. Researchers have developed a research methodology called Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), based on network analysis mathematical tools for studying anatomy.

A message-carrying "golden record" that NASA's Voyager probe carries, a 12-inch gold-plated copper disk containing sounds and images selected to portray the diversity of life and culture on Earth. (AP Photo/NASA)

Should we call the Cosmos Seeking ET? Hawking, Brin think It's Crazy

February 17, 2015 3:19 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Astronomers have their own version of the single person's dilemma: Do you wait by the phone for a call? Or do you make the call yourself and risk getting shot down? Instead of love, of course, astronomers are looking for alien life and, for decades, they have sat by their telescopes waiting to hear from E.T. It didn't happen. Now, some want to beam messages out into the void and invite the closest few thousand worlds to chat or even visit.

A computer simulation explores the impact of measles outbreaks in cities across the U.S. Users can see how an outbreak would play out if their city had high or low vaccination rates.

Simulation Brings Facts to Measles Outbreak and Vaccination Debate

February 17, 2015 2:28 pm | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

To bring facts and clarity to the public debate about immunization in light of the recent measles outbreak, the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health unveiled a computer simulation that explores the impact of measles outbreaks in cities across the U.S. Users can see how an outbreak would play out if their city had high or low vaccination rates.

3-D marine seascapes are zoned using statistical analysis to identify distinct geomorphological terrains.

Biodiversity Hotspots found by Mapping Seascapes in the Deep Ocean

February 17, 2015 2:05 pm | by National Oceanography Centre | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new, automated method for classifying hundreds of kilometers of the deep sea floor, in a way that is more cost efficient, quicker and more objective than previously possible, estimating geographic distribution of life on the sea floor using a combination of submarine mapping technology, statistics and a landscape ecology technique called Niche Theory.

NASA scientists used tree rings to understand past droughts and climate models incorporating soil moisture data to estimate future drought risk in the 21st century.

Unprecedented Megadroughts Likely for Western US: Driest Period in 1,000 Years

February 13, 2015 3:47 pm | by Earth Institute at Columbia University | News | Comments

During the second half of the 21st century, the U.S. Southwest and Great Plains will face persistent drought worse than anything seen in times ancient or modern, with the drying conditions “driven primarily” by human-induced global warming, a new study predicts. The research says the drying would surpass in severity any of the decades-long “megadroughts” that occurred much earlier during the past 1,000 years.

Qian and colleagues found that the topological phases in the TMDC materials can be turned on and off by simply applying a vertical electric field that is perpendicular to the atomic plane of the material. That's shown here in calculations by the red cross

Exotic States Materialize with Supercomputers

February 13, 2015 11:26 am | by Jorge Salazar, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

Scientists used supercomputers to find a new class of materials that possess an exotic state of matter known as the quantum spin Hall effect. The researchers published their results in the journal Science in December 2014, where they propose a new type of transistor made from these materials.

Researchers found most of the sound produced from the violin and its ancestors flows through a sound hole's perimeter, not its interior. Courtesy of the researchers

Acoustic Dynamics: Modeling Power Efficiency in the Violin

February 13, 2015 11:16 am | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

Some of the most prized violins in the world were crafted in the Italian workshops of Amati, Stradivari and Guarneri — master violinmaking families from the 17th and 18th centuries who produced increasingly powerful instruments in the renaissance and baroque musical eras. These violins, worth millions of dollars today, represent the Cremonese period — what is now considered the golden age of violinmaking.

Omics Explorer 3.1 Advanced Data Analysis Software

Omics Explorer 3.1 Advanced Data Analysis Software

February 12, 2015 1:32 pm | Qlucore AB | Product Releases | Comments

Qlucore Omics Explorer 3.1 advanced data analysis software features a well-defined open interface to R. The interface allows users to utilize a broad range of statistical tests, to use existing tests in R, and to write new ones. The inbuilt statistical functions of the bioinformatics program are extended with the R interface to include the full suite of statistical methods available in R.

Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source

Helping to Save Lives of Critically Ill Children

February 12, 2015 10:17 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Articles | Comments

For those on the front lines of treating cancer, speed and precision are key to patients’ survival. Pediatric cancer researchers have been making incredible strides in accelerating delivery of new diagnostic and treatment options. Supercomputer-powered genetic diagnosis is being used to harness the power of high throughput genomic and proteomic methods and is playing a key role in improving the outcome for children with genetic diseases.

Static example of the experimental Potential Storm Surge Inundation Map, here for the Texas Gulf Coast, outside of Houston. The final product will be interactive with pan and zoom capabilities. Courtesy of the National Hurricane Center (NHC)

Communicating Hurricanes’ Real Risks

February 11, 2015 12:08 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

A hurricane is heading toward the coast. Weather forecasters predict strong winds, massive waves and intense rainfall. But what does that mean for you? Will your neighborhood be flooded? Should you evacuate?

Origin Viewer 9.2

Origin Viewer 9.2

February 11, 2015 11:24 am | Originlab Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

Origin Viewer 9.2 is a standalone application that allows viewing, copying and sharing of graph or worksheet information from Origin Project (OPJ) files and Origin window (OGG, OGW, OGM) files on computers that do not have Origin installed. Features include extra-large icon view, mouseover graph preview, icon or details view of windows and the capability to show or hide columns of details view.

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