Advertisement
Data Analysis
Subscribe to Data Analysis

The Lead

In New York City, Manju Malkani, IBM analytics consultant, and Paul Walsh, Vice President of Weather Analytics at The Weather Company, access real-time weather data through IBM Watson Analytics.

The Weather Company Migrates Data Services to IBM Cloud, Plans to Advance Internet of Things Solutions

March 31, 2015 1:43 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM and The Weather Company have announced a global strategic alliance to integrate real-time weather insights into business to improve operational performance and decision-making. As part of the alliance, The Weather Company, including its global B2B division WSI, will shift its massive weather data services platform to the IBM Cloud and integrate its data with IBM analytics and cloud services.

U.S., Japan Bring Big Data and Data Analytics to Disaster Response

March 31, 2015 12:29 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

When disaster strikes, it is critical that experts, decision makers and emergency personnel have...

Citizen Scientists Map Global Forests with Unprecedented Accuracy

March 31, 2015 11:34 am | by International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) | News | Comments

New global forest maps combine citizen science with multiple data sources, for an unprecedented...

How a Long-dead Mathematician called Maxwell can Speed up your Internet

March 30, 2015 1:48 pm | by Jason Cole, Imperial College London | Articles | Comments

Electromagnetic radiation – it might sound like something that you’d be better off avoiding, but...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

MOVIA Big Data Analytics Platform

MOVIA Big Data Analytics Platform

March 30, 2015 1:38 pm | by Modus Operandi, Inc. | Modus Operandi, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

MOVIA Big Data Analytics Platform is designed to help organizations watch for important patterns in their data and generate instant alerts to users or other systems. The software enables improved prediction of trends through advanced data modeling that captures situational context, so decisions are not ‘made in a vacuum.’

Dr. Jurgen Kohler, Head of NVH CAE and Vehicle Concepts, Daimler AG

Dr. Jurgen Kohler

March 27, 2015 2:35 pm | Biographies

Jürgen Kohler studied Aerospace Engineering at the University of Stuttgart. In 1992 he started his career at the Mercedes Benz AG and became Manager of Crash-Simulation in 1997. From 2001 to 2005 he was Senior Manager for CAE Passive Safety, Durability and NVH, from 2006 to 2010 for CAE Passive Safety, Durability and Stiffness CAE and Test

Yin-yang haplotypes arise when a stretch of DNA evolves to present two divergent forms. A group of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis showed a massive yin-yang haplotype pair encompassing the gene gephyrin on human chromosome 14. This image s

Mining Public Big Data yields Genetic Clues in Complex Human Diseases

March 27, 2015 11:35 am | by Beth Miller, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Big data: It’s a term we read and hear about often, but is hard to grasp. Computer scientists tackled some big data about an important protein and discovered its connection in human history as well as clues about its role in complex neurological diseases. Through a novel method of analyzing these big data, they discovered a region encompassing the gephyrin gene on chromosome 14 that underwent rapid evolution after splitting in two...

Advertisement
Hamlin, left, and Webb with a book about breaking the Nazi Enigma code, which was also the subject of the recent film, The Imitation Game. Courtesy of Rebecca Phillips, WSU

Mathematicians adapt Knapsack Code to take on Quantum-level Cyber Attacks

March 27, 2015 11:24 am | by Rebecca Phillips, Washington State University | News | Comments

Mathematicians have designed an encryption code capable of fending off the phenomenal hacking power of a quantum computer. Using high-level number theory and cryptography, the researchers reworked an infamous old cipher called the knapsack code to create an online security system better prepared for future demands.

The Living Heart Project’s goal is to enable creation of a customized 3-D heart.

Highly Realistic Human Heart Simulations Transforming Medical Care

March 26, 2015 5:03 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Articles | Comments

The World Health Organization reports that cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death globally. Working to address this imperative public health problem, researchers world-wide are seeking new ways to accelerate research, raise the accuracy of diagnoses and improve patient outcomes. Several initiatives have utilized ground-breaking new simulations to advance research into aspects such as rhythm disturbances and ...

Integer overflows occur when a computer tries to store too large a number in the memory space reserved for it. The leading digits are discarded — much as they are when a car odometer turns over. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Better Debugger: Algorithm Automatically Finds Integer-overflow Bugs

March 26, 2015 9:52 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Integer overflows are one of the most common bugs in computer programs — not only causing programs to crash but, even worse, potentially offering points of attack for malicious hackers. A new algorithm for identifying integer-overflow bugs was tested on five common open-source programs, in which previous analyses had found three bugs. The new algorithm found all three known bugs — and 11 new ones.

Wolfram SystemModeler 4.1

Wolfram SystemModeler 4.1

March 26, 2015 9:27 am | Wolfram Research, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Wolfram SystemModeler 4.1 is a modeling and simulation environment for cyber-physical systems used in industries such as aerospace, automotive, pharmaceuticals, systems biology and electrical engineering. Key features include integration of Mathematica's complete suite for reliability analysis; import from tools such as Simulink, Flowmaster and IBM Rational Rhapsody enabled based on the FMI standard; and import of subsystems.

Nash and Nirenberg are two mathematical giants of the twentieth century. They are being recognized for their contributions to the field of partial differential equations (PDEs), which are equations involving rates of change that originally arose to descri

Two Mathematical Giants Share 2015 Abel Prize

March 26, 2015 9:03 am | by The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters | News | Comments

The Norwegian Academy of Sciences and Letters has decided to award the Abel Prize for 2015 to the American mathematicians John F. Nash Jr. and Louis Nirenberg “for striking and seminal contributions to the theory of nonlinear partial differential equations and its applications to geometric analysis.” They will receive the Abel Prize from His Majesty King Harald on May 19, 2015. The Abel Prize carries a cash award of about 1 million USD.

Advertisement
Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi helped to outline the first-ever computer simulation for research purposes — of a one-dimensional vibrating nonlinear string. Courtesy of Department of Energy

Mathematicians Solve 60-year-old Fermi-Pasta-Ulam Problem

March 24, 2015 3:05 pm | by University of East Anglia | News | Comments

A 60-year-old math problem first put forward by Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi has been solved. In 1955, a team of scientists led by Fermi used a computer for the first time to try to solve a numerical experiment. The outcome wasn’t what they were expecting, and the complexity of the problem underpinned the then-new field of non-linear physics and paved the way for six decades of new thinking. Chaos theory is just one of the theories...  

President Barack Obama tries out a wheelchair with a design modification by Kaitlin Reed, 16, of Dover, MA, next to Mohammed Sayed, 16, of Cambridge, MA, who is originally from Afghanistan, during a tour of the White House Science Fair at the White House

Obama, Wowed by Young Scientists, Announces New STEM Pledges

March 24, 2015 2:43 pm | by Jim Kuhnhenn, Associated Press | News | Comments

The small Lego machine inside the White House whirred, and in a moment it was turning the pages of a story book. One page flipped, then another, ever faster as President Barack Obama marveled at its efficiency. The contraption's eventual aim would be to allow paralyzed or arthritic patients to read books despite their disabilities. "How did you figure this out?" Obama, impressed, asked its inventors.

The simulations reveal insights into the physics of vortex shedding and VIM at different length and time scales. The immediate benefits include the improved process for design optimization for large floating structures, and possible strategies for vortex-

Numerical Simulations Improve Offshore Drill Rig Safety

March 24, 2015 2:33 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

Los Alamos National Laboratory mechanical and thermal engineering researchers’ efforts to solve the complex problem of how ocean currents affect the infrastructure of floating oil rigs and their computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations received recognition from ANSYS, a company that provides computer-based engineering simulation capabilities.

LPW POWDERSOLVE Metal Powder Characterization Management System

LPW POWDERSOLVE Metal Powder Characterization Management System

March 24, 2015 2:08 pm | LPW Technology, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

LPW POWDERSOLVE software is designed to enable higher efficiency and better quality control in additive manufacturing (AM). It is a secure, online, fully searchable metal powder characterization management system that handles all the analytical data required to assess the performance of AM metal powders.

Graphic of viruses attempting to "dock" on a microbial mat, using the tips of their tails. Courtesy of Blair Paul

Strange Viruses Discovered in Deep Ocean

March 23, 2015 11:51 am | by NSF | News | Comments

The intraterrestrials, they might be called. Strange creatures live in the deep sea, but few are odder than the viruses that inhabit deep ocean methane seeps and prey on single-celled microorganisms called archaea. The least understood of life's three primary domains, archaea thrive in the most extreme environments: near hot ocean rift vents, in acid mine drainage, in the saltiest of evaporation ponds and in petroleum deposits.

Advertisement
The desktop software application is free and can be used on any basic desktop or laptop computer. Amateur astronomers may take images from their telescopes and analyze them with the application. The application will tell the user whether a matching astero

Help NASA Explore the Universe with Free Asteroid Data Hunter App

March 23, 2015 11:35 am | by NASA | News | Comments

During a panel at the South by Southwest Festival, NASA representatives discussed how citizen scientists have made a difference in asteroid hunting and announced the release of a desktop software application developed by NASA. The application is based on an Asteroid Data Hunter-derived algorithm that analyzes images for potential asteroids. It’s a tool that can be used by amateur astronomers and citizen scientists.

The Einstein Papers Project is dedicated to collecting, editing, translating and publishing the tens of thousands of pages of speeches, letters and other documents Albert Einstein left behind. Those collected papers are available in a free digital edition

Albert Einstein, in his Own Words: Einstein Papers Project Publishes Free Digital Edition

March 23, 2015 11:09 am | by NSF | News | Comments

Albert Einstein is known in popular culture for his famous E = mc2 formula. Scientists know him for revolutionizing physics with his general theory of relativity. But is it possible to know the man behind the big ideas? Yes, thanks to the massive body of written work and correspondence he left behind, which the Einstein Papers Project is dedicated to collecting, editing, translating and publishing.

, Dr. Jürgen Kohler, the head of NVH CAE and Vehicle Concepts at Daimler AG, will talk about “High-Performance Computing – Highly Efficient Development – Mercedes-Benz Cars” at the opening keynote at this year’s ISC High Performance conference.

ISC 2015 Keynotes will focus on Latest Innovation and Future Challenges

March 20, 2015 12:08 pm | by ISC | News | Comments

World-renowned for automotive quality and safety, Daimler’s Mercedes-Benz cars are also highly innovative. To share the inside story, Dr. Jürgen Kohler, the head of NVH CAE and Vehicle Concepts at Daimler AG, will talk about “High-Performance Computing – Highly Efficient Development – Mercedes-Benz Cars” at the opening keynote at this year’s ISC High Performance conference.

Smart grids — power grids that adapt to changes in demand and reconfigure as needed to avoid overloads and other problems — can reduce energy costs, help avoid blackouts and deter cyber attacks. They also pose new challenges. A team led by researchers at

Developing Smarter Smart Grids

March 20, 2015 11:11 am | by NSF | News | Comments

Smart grids help avoid blackouts and deter cyber attacks. They also pose new challenges. As power generation — and the communication and information processing associated with it — shifts from centralized power stations to distributed, heterogeneous systems, massive amounts of sensor data from stations must be transmitted efficiently and effectively analyzed in real time.

Researchers used a “pixon” image enhancement technique, originally designed to peer into the distant Universe, to sharpen the map and reveal the enormous size of the thorium deposit from the volcanic eruption.

Lunar Volcano’s Enormous Eruption Reached Hundreds of Miles

March 20, 2015 11:01 am | by Durham University | News | Comments

Scientists have produced a new map of the Moon’s most unusual volcano showing that its explosive eruption spread debris over an area much greater than previously thought. A team of astronomers and geologists studied an area of the lunar surface in the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex. By mapping the radioactive element thorium, which spewed out during the eruption, they discovered debris was able to cover an area the size of Scotland.

Life reconstruction of Carnufex carolinensis. Copyright Jorge Gonzales

Before Dinosaurs, Carolina Butcher was Top Beast of Prey

March 20, 2015 10:26 am | by North Carolina State University | News | Comments

A newly discovered crocodilian ancestor may have filled one of North America's top predator roles before dinosaurs arrived on the continent. The "Carolina Butcher" was a nine-foot-long, land-dwelling crocodylomorph that walked on its hind legs and likely preyed upon smaller inhabitants of North Carolina ecosystems, such as armored reptiles and early mammal relatives.

John Renick is Director of Partner Solutions at Meridium.

3 Key Function Areas for Improved Asset Management and Industrial Success

March 19, 2015 5:18 pm | by John Renick, Director of Partner Solutions, Meridium | Blogs | Comments

Having a strategy in place for effective asset performance management (APM) is critical in today’s zero downtime world. To guarantee that you are fully utilizing your assets, you should consider implementing the three “M” strategy: Measure, Monitor and Manage. This allows you to best gauge the state and quality of your assets, make changes where needed before a problem arises and strategically plan for future production.

TeleGeography’s Submarine Cable Map has been updated for 2015. The latest edition depicts 299 cable systems that are currently active, under construction, or expected to be fully-funded by the end of 2015. Courtesy of TeleGeography

Whimsical Map Depicts All Undersea Telecommunication Cables Currently Crossing World’s Oceans

March 18, 2015 3:27 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

This year’s Submarine Cable Map pays tribute to pioneering mapmakers of the Age of Discovery, incorporating elements of medieval and renaissance cartography. In addition to serving as navigational aids, maps from this era were works of art, often adorned with fanciful illustrations of real and imagined dangers. TeleGeography’s 2015 map brings back the lost design aesthetic to provide a view of the network through the lens of a bygone era.

Physicist Chien-Shiung Wu in 1963 at Columbia University, where she was a professor. Known as the First Lady of Physics, Wu worked on the Manhattan Project and helped disprove a widely-accepted law of theoretical physics. Later in her life, Wu researched

Paving the Way: 28 Amazing Women, Trailblazing Science

March 18, 2015 12:16 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Breakthrough science requires pioneers. People who combine brilliance with courage, even in the face of daunting opposition. The women who paved the way for modern scientific exploration exemplify this spirit; grappling not only with fundamental questions of the universe, but with discrimination and societal constraints that often stripped them of scientific credit.

By using the app, Citizen Scientists can examine photos from the Web and provide further context that does not typically exist with the image alone.

iPad App Game Uses Citizen Science to Track Endangered Species

March 18, 2015 11:12 am | by Aaron Mason, Wildsense, University of Surrey | News | Comments

A new app for the iPad could change the way wildlife is monitored. Wildsense, an initiative from a group of researchers at the University of Surrey, is designed to use citizen science, the concept of allowing people to get directly involved in science, to help in the conservation of rare and endangered species.

Like a Chinese Finger Puzzle Trap, the bond between scaffolding proteins in the cellulosome strengthens when force is exerted on it and becomes one of the strongest found in living systems.

Solving Puzzle-Like Bond for Biofuels: First Look at One of Nature's Strongest Biomolecular Interactions

March 17, 2015 3:02 pm | by Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

One of life's strongest bonds has been discovered by a science team researching biofuels with the help of supercomputers. Their find could boost efforts to develop catalysts for biofuel production from non-food waste plants. Renowned computational biologist Klaus Schulten of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign led the analysis and modeling of the bond, which behaves like a Chinese Finger Trap puzzle.

Monocytes are immune cells present in the blood. They are consequently also found in tumors. In this setting, monocytes are known to promote the development of the tumoral blood vessels and to suppress the immune response directed at the tumor. Courtesy o

Mathematics Yields New Possibilities for Reprogramming Immune Response to Breast Cancer

March 17, 2015 2:55 pm | by Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics | News | Comments

A means of reprogramming a flawed immune response into an efficient anti-tumoral one was brought to light by the results of a translational trial relating to breast cancer. Thanks to the innovative combination of mathematical modeling and experimentation, only 20 tests were necessary, whereas traditional experimentation would have required 596 tests to obtain the same results.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading