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In simulations, algorithms using the new data structure continued to demonstrate performance improvement with the addition of new cores, up to a total of 80 cores. Courtesy of Christine Daniloff/MIT

Parallelizing Common Algorithms: Priority Queue Implemention Keeps Pace with New Cores

January 30, 2015 3:49 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Every undergraduate computer-science major takes a course on data structures, which describes different ways of organizing data in a computer’s memory. Every data structure has its own advantages: Some are good for fast retrieval, some for efficient search, some for quick insertions and deletions, and so on.

Alan Turing Institute Positioned to Break New Big Data, Online Security Boundaries

January 30, 2015 11:41 am | by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council | News | Comments

The five universities have been selected to lead the new Alan Turing Institute. The Institute...

Quantum Chemistry Closing in on Quantum Mechanics of Living Cells

January 30, 2015 11:19 am | by Yngve Vogt, University of Oslo | News | Comments

Quantum chemical calculations have been used to solve big mysteries in space. Soon the same...

Forecasting the Flu: Big and Traditional Data Combo Improves Prediction

January 30, 2015 11:06 am | by Inga Kiderra, University of California, San Diego | News | Comments

Researchers say they can predict the spread of flu a week into the future with as much accuracy...

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TERATEC Forum 2015 - 10th Anniversary

TERATEC Forum 2015: The International Meeting for Simulation and High Performance Computing

January 29, 2015 3:36 pm | by TERATEC Forum | Events

TERATEC brings together top international experts in high performance numerical design and simulation, making it the major event in France and in Europe in this area. It emphasizes again the strategic importance of these technologies for developing industrial competitiveness and innovation capacity.

SMAP's soil moisture measurements will help with forecasts of precipitation and temperature. Courtesy of UCAR

Building a Better Weather Forecast? Fine-scale Soil Moisture Data will Soon Help

January 29, 2015 12:50 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

If you were trying to forecast tomorrow's weather, you would probably look up at the sky rather than down at the ground. But if you live in the U.S. Midwest or someplace with a similar climate, one key to a better weather forecast may lie beneath your feet. Better soil moisture observations lead to better land-atmosphere interaction in weather forecasting models and ultimately to a better prediction of temperature and precipitation.

Dr. Jan Camenisch, cryptographer and data privacy scientist at IBM Research holds a piece of the IBM identity Mixer algorithm.

Sophisticated Cryptographic Algorithm Prevents Unwanted Sharing of Personal Data

January 29, 2015 9:23 am | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM researchers have announced a cloud-based technology that holds potential to help consumers better protect online personal data, including date of birth, home address and credit card numbers. The technology, called Identity Mixer, uses a cryptographic algorithm to encrypt the certified identity attributes of a user in a way that allows the user to reveal only selected pieces to third parties.

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Improving Data Mobility and Management for International Cosmology

Improving Data Mobility and Management for International Cosmology Workshop

January 28, 2015 3:06 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | Events

Registration is now open for a workshop on “Improving Data Mobility and Management for International Cosmology” to be held February 10-11, 2015, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. The workshop, one in a series of Cross-Connects workshops, is sponsored the by the Deptartment of Energy’s ESnet and Internet2. Early registration is encouraged, as attendance is limited.

SciNet displays a range of keywords and topics in a topic radar. With the help of the directions on the radar, the engine displays how these topics are related to each other. The relevance of each keyword is displayed as its distance from the center point

SciNet Search Engine Helps Find Relevant, Diverse Results Faster

January 28, 2015 2:52 pm | by Alto University | News | Comments

A new search engine outperforms current ones, and helps people to do searches more efficiently. The SciNet search engine is different because it changes Internet searches into recognition tasks, by showing keywords related to the user’s search in topic radar. People using SciNet can get relevant and diverse search results faster, especially when they do not know exactly what they are looking for or how to formulate a query to find it.

Arabidopsis thaliana, a model flowering plant studied by biologists, has climate-sensitive genes whose expression was found to evolve. Courtesy of Penn State

Needle in a Haystack: Finding the Right Genes in Tens of Thousands

January 28, 2015 2:45 pm | by TACC | News | Comments

Scientists using supercomputers found genes sensitive to cold and drought in a plant help it survive climate change. The computational challenges were daunting, involving thousands of individual strains of the plant with hundreds of thousands of markers across the genome and testing for a dozen environmental variables. Their findings increase basic understanding of plant adaptation and can be applied to improve crops.

Production of growth factors (IGF-II) as public goods game network: this microscopic image shows how cancer cells (colorless cells) that do not produce IGF-II but need it for their growth reproduce in a population of cancer cells that produces and consume

Game Theory Explains Social Interactions of Cancer Cells

January 28, 2015 2:33 pm | by University of Basel | News | Comments

Researchers were able to predict the interactions of cancer cells using a part of game theory known as the public goods game, suggesting that work on the social interactions among cancer cells may provide insight into the dynamics of cancer. Researchers applied this model to the cooperation between producing and non-producing members of a cancer cell population, in order to examine if the model is also applicable to biological processes.

ANSYS 16.0 Simulation Software

ANSYS 16.0 Simulation Software

January 28, 2015 2:15 pm | Ansys, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

ANSYS 16.0 simulation software delivers capabilities to verify electronics reliability and performance throughout the design process and complex electronics industry supply chains.The single-window, integrated Electronics Desktop interface brings electromagnetic, circuit and systems analysis into a seamless working environment to maximize productivity and ensure users are following simulation best practices.

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A combination of the day-night band and high resolution infrared imagery from the NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed the historic blizzard near peak intensity as it moves over the New York through Boston Metropolitan areas at 06:45Z (1:45 a.m. EST) on

NASA Nighttime and Daytime Views of the Blizzard of 2015

January 28, 2015 2:07 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA and NOAA have provided nighttime and daytime views of the Blizzard of 2015. A combination of the day-night band and high-resolution infrared imagery showed the historic blizzard near peak intensity as it moves over the New York through Boston Metropolitan areas at 1:45 a.m. EST on January 27, 2015. Nighttime lights of the region were blurred by high cloud tops associated with the most intense parts of the storm.

Researchers have developed 3-D maps of the age of the ice within the Greenland Ice Sheet. The new research will help scientists determine what may happen to the ice sheet as the climate changes.

3-D View of Greenland Ice Sheet Opens Window on History

January 26, 2015 3:53 pm | by Jackson School of Geosciences | News | Comments

Scientists using ice-penetrating radar data collected by NASA’s Operation IceBridge and earlier airborne campaigns have built the first comprehensive map of layers deep inside the Greenland Ice Sheet, opening a window on past climate conditions and the ice sheet’s potentially perilous future. This allows scientists to determine the age of large swaths of the second largest mass of ice on Earth.

The researchers determined the networks of the active genes and — like a dragnet — looked for the "main perpetrators" using a computer model. Courtesy of Atramos

Computer Model Creates Dragnet for Epilepsy Genes

January 26, 2015 3:07 pm | by University of Bonn | News | Comments

Scientists have taken a new path in the research into causes of epilepsy: They determined the networks of the active genes and — like a dragnet — looked for the "main perpetrators" using a computer model. In doing so, they discovered the molecule sestrin-3 as a central switch. In animal models, the scientists were able to demonstrate that inhibition of sestrin-3 leads to a reduction in seizures.

Scroll being prepared for scanning in its container at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. Courtesy of Brent Seales

First-of-its-kind Software Enables Major Breakthrough in Reading Ancient Scrolls

January 26, 2015 2:39 pm | by University of Kentucky | News | Comments

After working for more than 10 years on unlocking an ancient piece of history, what lies inside damaged Herculaneum scrolls, UK Department of Computer Science Chair and Professor Brent Seales will accomplish the next step in allowing the world to read the scrolls, which cannot be physically opened. A major development in the venture, Seales is building software that will visualize the scrolls' writings as they would be if unrolled.

A notebook by Alan Turing, the World War II code-breaking genius depicted by Benedict Cumberbatch in the Oscar-nominated "The Imitation Game," is shown in a special preview at Bonhams auctioneers. The 56-page manuscript, containing Turing's complex mathem

British Code Breaker Alan Turing's Notebook Goes to Auction

January 26, 2015 1:33 pm | by AP | News | Comments

A handwritten notebook by Alan Turing, the World War II code-breaking genius depicted by Benedict Cumberbatch in the Oscar-nominated The Imitation Game, is going on the auction block. The 56-page manuscript was written at the time the British mathematician and computer science pioneer was working to break the seemingly unbreakable Enigma codes used by the Germans throughout World War II. It is expected to bring at least $1 million.

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Kennette Benedict, executive director, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, stands beside the old Doomsday Clock which showed five minutes until midnight during a news conference to announce the new clock reads three minutes until midnight. The clock advanc

We're Two Minutes Closer to Doomsday

January 23, 2015 2:49 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists says Earth is now closer to human-caused doomsday than it has been in more than 30 years because of global warming and nuclear weaponry. But other experts say that's way too gloomy. The advocacy group, founded by the creators of the atomic bomb, moved their famed "Doomsday Clock" ahead two minutes on January 22, 2015. It said the world is now three minutes from a catastrophic midnight.

This simulation, which models a rheometer with particles, can help determine how well a rheometer design works at characterizing a fluid. The NIST team is performing a number of simulations like this one, varying the shape and number of blades to better i

Predicting Concrete Flow Properties from Simple Measurements

January 23, 2015 2:44 pm | by NIST | News | Comments

Just because concrete is the most widely used building material in human history doesn’t mean it can’t be improved. A recent study using DOE Office of Science supercomputers has led to a new way to predict concrete’s flow properties from simple measurements. The results should help accelerate the design of a new generation of high-performance and eco-friendly cement-based materials by reducing time and costs associated with R&D.

This sequence of graphs illustrates the application of the researchers' technique to a real-world computer vision problem. The solution to each successive problem (red balls) is used to initialize (green arrows) the search for a solution to the next. Cour

Optimizing Optimization Algorithms: How to Get the Best Results

January 23, 2015 2:36 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Optimization algorithms, which try to find the minimum values of mathematical functions, are everywhere in engineering. Among other things, they’re used to evaluate design tradeoffs, to assess control systems, and to find patterns in data. One way to solve a difficult optimization problem is to first reduce it to a related but much simpler problem, then gradually add complexity back in ...

OnSight uses real rover data to create a 3-D simulation of the Martian environment where mission scientists can "meet" to discuss rover operations. Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

Holographic Computing will allow Scientists to Work on Mars

January 23, 2015 2:24 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA and Microsoft have teamed up to develop software called OnSight, a new technology that will enable scientists to work virtually on Mars using wearable technology called Microsoft HoloLens. Developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, OnSight will give scientists a means to plan and, along with the Mars Curiosity rover, conduct science operations on the Red Planet.

This puzzle of a material which seems solid to any observer while appearing fluid under the microscope is an old one. And, even with the help of today's supercomputers, it seems impossible to verify in simulations whether a glass ever stops flowing. Court

Puzzle: Does Glass Ever Stop Flowing?

January 22, 2015 2:15 pm | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Is glass a true solid? Researchers have combined computer simulation and information theory, originally invented for telephone communication and cryptography, to answer this puzzling question. This puzzle of a material which seems solid to any observer while appearing fluid under the microscope is an old one. And, even with the help of today's supercomputers, it seems impossible to verify in simulations whether a glass ever stops flowing.

Partek Flow 4.0 for NGS Analysis

Partek Flow 4.0 for NGS Analysis

January 22, 2015 1:51 pm | Partek Incorporated | Product Releases | Comments

Partek Flow 4.0 is designed specifically for the analysis needs of next-generation sequencing applications including RNA, small RNA and DNA sequencing. With the ability to either build custom analysis pipelines or download pre-built pipelines, users can perform alignment, quantification, quality control, statistics and visualization.

Mark Anawis is a Principal Scientist and ASQ Six Sigma Black Belt at Abbott.

The Power of Regular Expressions

January 22, 2015 10:49 am | by Mark A. Anawis | Blogs | Comments

A.J. Jacobs wrote: “I think there's something to the idea that the divine dwells more easily in text than in images.” Since there has been an explosion in the amount of text, sacred and secular, available to anyone with an Internet connection, the need for processing tools has grown. Regular expressions can be used to extract specific text from documents due to their ability to replace many lines of code with as little as one line.

An international team of roughly 300 scientists pooled brain scans and genetic data worldwide to pinpoint genes that enhance or break down key brain regions in people from 33 countries. This is the first high-profile study since the NIH launched its Big D

Global Consortium Cracks Part of Brain’s Genetic Code

January 21, 2015 4:05 pm | by Alison Trinidad, Keck Medicine of USC | News | Comments

In the largest collaborative study of the brain to date, researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) led a global consortium of 190 institutions to identify eight common genetic mutations that appear to age the brain an average of three years. The discovery could lead to targeted therapies and interventions for Alzheimer’s disease, autism and other neurological conditions.

Using Pythagoras’ theorem helps to identify the point at which a patient has improved with more consistency and accuracy than other methods commonly used.

2500-year-old Pythagoras Theorem Helps Show when Patient Turns Corner

January 20, 2015 2:35 pm | by University of Warwick | News | Comments

A medical researcher has found the 2,500 year-old Pythagoras theorem could be the most effective way to identify the point at which a patient’s health begins to improve. The discovery was made after looking at data from ROC (Receiver Operating Characteristic) curves. These curves were initially developed during World War II for the analysis of signals to help operators decide whether a blip on the screen was an enemy target

This live panel discussion looks at how big data and data science have fast become the next frontier for innovation, competition and productivity.

Big Data Insights: Accelerating Discovery in Medicine, Research & More

January 20, 2015 11:51 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

On Wednesday, January 21, Scientific Computing will host a live panel discussion that looks at how big data and data science have fast become the next frontier for innovation, competition and productivity. One of today’s significant advances in data science introduces us to the Next Generation Cyber Capability (NGCC) at Arizona State University (ASU)...

One aspect of the user-assistance software that distinguishes it from previous planning systems is that it assesses risk. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Software that Knows the Risks: Planning Algorithms Evaluate Probability of Success, Suggest Low-risk Alternatives

January 16, 2015 1:57 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Imagine that you could tell your phone that you want to drive from your house in Boston to a hotel in upstate New York, that you want to stop for lunch at an Applebee’s around 12:30, and that you don’t want the trip to take more than four hours. Then imagine that your phone tells you that you have only a 66 percent chance of meeting those criteria — but that if you can wait until 1:00 for lunch, or if you’re willing to eat at TGI Friday...

Developing a more efficient vision system for household robots. Courtesy of Christine Daniloff and Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

MIT Algorithm Helps Household Robots Identify Items Concealed in Clutter

January 15, 2015 9:49 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

For household robots to be practical, they need to be able to recognize the objects they’re supposed to manipulate. While object recognition is one of the most widely studied topics in AI, even the best detectors still fail much of the time. Researchers believe the robots should take advantage of their mobility, imaging objects from multiple perspectives. Matching up objects in the different images, however, poses computational challenges.

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