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Cardiovascular diseases are the largest cause of death in Europe and responsible for two million deaths per year. According to WHO, they are the number one cause of death in the world, accounting for 30 percent of deaths worldwide and 42 percent in the EU

Novel 3-D Computer Model brings Insight to Cardiovascular Diseases

February 26, 2015 12:56 pm | by Lappeenranta University of Technology, LUT | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a novel three-dimensional, multiscale and multicomponent model of the endothelial cell monolayer, the inner lining of the artery, to identify the cellular mechanisms involved in cardiovascular diseases. New research based on the model is able to identify the main cellular pathways involved in the initiation and progression of the disease.

Developing Simulation Software to Combat Humanity’s Biggest Issues

February 25, 2015 12:36 pm | by Queen’s University Belfast | News | Comments

Researchers are creating ground-breaking computer software, which has the potential to develop...

Artificial Intelligence Performs Real Magic Tricks

February 25, 2015 11:41 am | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Researchers gave a computer program the outline of how a magic jigsaw puzzle and a mind-reading...

Statistical Technique Traces Languages Back to Oldest Spoken Words

February 24, 2015 12:42 pm | by Current Biology | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a statistical technique that sorts out when changes to words’...

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Tsunami impact map provides more precise estimates of the areas that might face tsunami-induced flooding.

Study Maps Major Tsunami Impact on Columbia River

February 24, 2015 12:19 pm | by Oregon State University | News | Comments

Engineers at Oregon State University have completed one of the most precise evaluations yet done about the impact of a major tsunami event on the Columbia River, what forces are most important in controlling water flow and what areas might be inundated.

Model of ion (Cl) collision with atomically thin semiconductor (MoSe2). Collision region is shown in blue and zoomed in; red points show initial positions of Cl. The simulation calculates the energy loss of the ion based on the incident and emergent veloc

Algorithm Enables Simulation of Ultrafast Processes

February 20, 2015 12:07 pm | by Rachel Berkowitz, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new algorithm which increases the small time step required by ultrafast phenomena from about one attosecond to about half a femtosecond. This allows them to simulate ultrafast phenomena for systems of around 100 atoms.

Scientists at the University of Valencia have developed a research methodology called Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), based on network analysis mathematical tools for studying anatomy. Courtesy of Asociación RUVID

Modular Anatomical Structure of Human Head Described for First Time

February 18, 2015 10:03 am | by Asociación RUVID | News | Comments

A new mathematical analysis tool has allowed a deeper understanding of the anatomy of the human head, describing the skull as an extended network structured in 10 modules. Researchers have developed a research methodology called Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), based on network analysis mathematical tools for studying anatomy.

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A message-carrying "golden record" that NASA's Voyager probe carries, a 12-inch gold-plated copper disk containing sounds and images selected to portray the diversity of life and culture on Earth. (AP Photo/NASA)

Should we call the Cosmos Seeking ET? Hawking, Brin think It's Crazy

February 17, 2015 3:19 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Astronomers have their own version of the single person's dilemma: Do you wait by the phone for a call? Or do you make the call yourself and risk getting shot down? Instead of love, of course, astronomers are looking for alien life and, for decades, they have sat by their telescopes waiting to hear from E.T. It didn't happen. Now, some want to beam messages out into the void and invite the closest few thousand worlds to chat or even visit.

A computer simulation explores the impact of measles outbreaks in cities across the U.S. Users can see how an outbreak would play out if their city had high or low vaccination rates.

Simulation Brings Facts to Measles Outbreak and Vaccination Debate

February 17, 2015 2:28 pm | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

To bring facts and clarity to the public debate about immunization in light of the recent measles outbreak, the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health unveiled a computer simulation that explores the impact of measles outbreaks in cities across the U.S. Users can see how an outbreak would play out if their city had high or low vaccination rates.

3-D marine seascapes are zoned using statistical analysis to identify distinct geomorphological terrains.

Biodiversity Hotspots found by Mapping Seascapes in the Deep Ocean

February 17, 2015 2:05 pm | by National Oceanography Centre | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new, automated method for classifying hundreds of kilometers of the deep sea floor, in a way that is more cost efficient, quicker and more objective than previously possible, estimating geographic distribution of life on the sea floor using a combination of submarine mapping technology, statistics and a landscape ecology technique called Niche Theory.

NASA scientists used tree rings to understand past droughts and climate models incorporating soil moisture data to estimate future drought risk in the 21st century.

Unprecedented Megadroughts Likely for Western US: Driest Period in 1,000 Years

February 13, 2015 3:47 pm | by Earth Institute at Columbia University | News | Comments

During the second half of the 21st century, the U.S. Southwest and Great Plains will face persistent drought worse than anything seen in times ancient or modern, with the drying conditions “driven primarily” by human-induced global warming, a new study predicts. The research says the drying would surpass in severity any of the decades-long “megadroughts” that occurred much earlier during the past 1,000 years.

Qian and colleagues found that the topological phases in the TMDC materials can be turned on and off by simply applying a vertical electric field that is perpendicular to the atomic plane of the material. That's shown here in calculations by the red cross

Exotic States Materialize with Supercomputers

February 13, 2015 11:26 am | by Jorge Salazar, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

Scientists used supercomputers to find a new class of materials that possess an exotic state of matter known as the quantum spin Hall effect. The researchers published their results in the journal Science in December 2014, where they propose a new type of transistor made from these materials.

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Researchers found most of the sound produced from the violin and its ancestors flows through a sound hole's perimeter, not its interior. Courtesy of the researchers

Acoustic Dynamics: Modeling Power Efficiency in the Violin

February 13, 2015 11:16 am | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

Some of the most prized violins in the world were crafted in the Italian workshops of Amati, Stradivari and Guarneri — master violinmaking families from the 17th and 18th centuries who produced increasingly powerful instruments in the renaissance and baroque musical eras. These violins, worth millions of dollars today, represent the Cremonese period — what is now considered the golden age of violinmaking.

Omics Explorer 3.1 Advanced Data Analysis Software

Omics Explorer 3.1 Advanced Data Analysis Software

February 12, 2015 1:32 pm | Qlucore AB | Product Releases | Comments

Qlucore Omics Explorer 3.1 advanced data analysis software features a well-defined open interface to R. The interface allows users to utilize a broad range of statistical tests, to use existing tests in R, and to write new ones. The inbuilt statistical functions of the bioinformatics program are extended with the R interface to include the full suite of statistical methods available in R.

Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source

Helping to Save Lives of Critically Ill Children

February 12, 2015 10:17 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Articles | Comments

For those on the front lines of treating cancer, speed and precision are key to patients’ survival. Pediatric cancer researchers have been making incredible strides in accelerating delivery of new diagnostic and treatment options. Supercomputer-powered genetic diagnosis is being used to harness the power of high throughput genomic and proteomic methods and is playing a key role in improving the outcome for children with genetic diseases.

Static example of the experimental Potential Storm Surge Inundation Map, here for the Texas Gulf Coast, outside of Houston. The final product will be interactive with pan and zoom capabilities. Courtesy of the National Hurricane Center (NHC)

Communicating Hurricanes’ Real Risks

February 11, 2015 12:08 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

A hurricane is heading toward the coast. Weather forecasters predict strong winds, massive waves and intense rainfall. But what does that mean for you? Will your neighborhood be flooded? Should you evacuate?

Origin Viewer 9.2

Origin Viewer 9.2

February 11, 2015 11:24 am | Originlab Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

Origin Viewer 9.2 is a standalone application that allows viewing, copying and sharing of graph or worksheet information from Origin Project (OPJ) files and Origin window (OGG, OGW, OGM) files on computers that do not have Origin installed. Features include extra-large icon view, mouseover graph preview, icon or details view of windows and the capability to show or hide columns of details view.

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Seahorse Scientific Workbench

Seahorse Scientific Workbench

February 10, 2015 12:07 pm | BSSN Software GmbH | Product Releases | Comments

Seahorse Scientific Workbench is a vendor-neutral software suite for capturing, analyzing and sharing analytical data. The software consolidates raw and result data from multiple experimental techniques in a single tool, based on the emerging ASTM AnIML Data Standard. It captures each step of the workflow and presents it in its entirety.

The World Wide Lightning Location Network Web site features “an amazing new visualization of global lightning.”

World Thunderstorm Map Provides Continuous Coverage of Thunderstorms All over the Planet

February 10, 2015 12:00 pm | by Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

New research will likely be crucial to measuring the impact of climate change on thunderstorms — one of the weather occurrences most problematic for human life on the planet. The varying frequency and intensity of thunderstorms have direct repercussions for the public, agriculture and industry.

John Wass is a statistician based in Chicago, IL.

Explorations of Mathematical Models in Biology with Maple

February 10, 2015 9:29 am | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

The author of this wonderful text delivers a brief, easy-to-absorb, yet very comprehensive text on modeling real-world data with Maple. Maple is software for performing mathematics, with a none-too-steep learning curve. In the introduction, the author is quick to point out that this is neither a detailed textbook of mathematical modeling, nor Maple. It is, however, a very well-written manual of introductory modeling and use of Maple.

ENIGMA cipher machine  Rotor Set Courtesy of Andy L.

Similar Statistics Play Role in Decision Making and World War II Code Breaking

February 9, 2015 11:22 am | by Cell Press | News | Comments

Statistical decision making resembles a process Alan Turning's team did in Bletchley Park to work out the settings of German enigma machines. In order to make use of the large clicking machine, Turing's team analyzed pairs of randomly intercepted German messages, aligned them one above the other to accumulate evidence from letter pairs until they reach a threshold level of certainty that the messages were sent on identical enigma machine.

Heatmap of the Pseudomonas genus, the most abundant genus found across the city. Hotspots are found in areas of high station density and traffic (i.e. lower Manhattan and parts of Brooklyn). Courtesy of Ebrahim Afshinnekoo

Researchers Produce 1st Map of NYC Subway System Microbes

February 9, 2015 10:52 am | by Weill Cornell Medical College | News | Comments

The microbes that call the New York City subway system home are mostly harmless, but include samples of disease-causing bacteria that are resistant to drugs — and even DNA fragments associated with anthrax and Bubonic plague. A pathogen map of a city provides a baseline assessment. Repeated sampling could be used for long-term, accurate disease surveillance, bioterrorism threat mitigation, and large-scale health management.

Hurricane Katrina Courtesy of NASA/Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

Comprehensive Database of Detailed Storm Surge Data Available for Download

February 6, 2015 3:03 pm | by National Oceanography Centre | News | Comments

A new online resource will help coastguards, meteorological organizations and scientific communities predict future storm surge patterns. The freely-accessible database has been compiled through the multi-partner, international eSurge project, which was launched in 2011 with the aim of making available observational data to improve the modeling and forecasting of storm surges around the world using advanced techniques and instruments.

Snow and icy conditions affect human decisions about transportation. These decisions can ripple through other infrastructure systems, causing widespread disruptions. Shown here are points of connectivity. Courtesy of Paul M. Torrens and Cheng Fu, Universi

Big Data Techniques More Accurately Model People in a Winter Wonderland

February 6, 2015 2:53 pm | by Cecile J. Gonzalez, NSF | News | Comments

For Paul Torrens, wintry weather is less about sledding and more about testing out models of human behavior. Torrens, a geographer at the University of Maryland, studies how snow and icy conditions affect human decisions about transportation. He also studies how these decisions ripple through other infrastructure systems.

Brain Researcher Marianne Fyhn receives computation help from, among others, Gaute Einevoll and Anders Malthe-Sørenssen to acquire an understanding of how the brain Works.

Mathematics to Reveal Secrets of the Brain

February 5, 2015 4:33 pm | by Yngve Vogt, University of Oslo | News | Comments

Top researchers are using mathematical modelling and heavy computations to understand how the brain can both remember and learn. Ten years ago, when the team of Marianne Fyhn and Torkel Hafting Fyhn cooperated with the Nobel Prize winning team of May-Britt and Edvard Moser at NTNU, they discovered the sense of orientation in the brain.

Devize Monte Carlo Simulation Software for Process Improvement

Devize Monte Carlo Simulation Software for Process Improvement

February 5, 2015 3:39 pm | Minitab Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Devize is cloud-based Monte Carlo simulation software designed to guide engineers through the entire simulation and optimization process. The Web-based application’s workflow allows users to simulate possible outcomes, and results are presented with straightforward explanations.

Artist’s depiction of light traveling through a photonic crystal superlattice, where holes have been randomly patterned. The result is a more narrow beam of light. Courtesy of Nicoletta Barolini

More Precise Information Transfer in Computer Chips Using Disorder to Control Light

February 4, 2015 2:56 pm | by Matthew Chin, UCLA | News | Comments

A breakthrough could lead to the more precise transfer of information in computer chips, as well as new types of optical materials for light emission and lasers. Researchers were able to control light at tiny lengths around 500 nanometers — smaller than the light’s own wavelength — by using random crystal lattice structures to counteract light diffraction. The discovery could begin a new phase in laser collimation.

Eve, the Robot Scientist Courtesy of University of Manchester

AI Robot Scientist ‘Eve’ could Boost Search for New Drugs

February 4, 2015 2:46 pm | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Eve, an artificially-intelligent ‘robot scientist’ could make drug discovery faster and much cheaper, say researchers. The team has demonstrated the success of the approach, as Eve discovered that a compound shown to have anti-cancer properties might also be used in the fight against malaria.

A code hidden in the arrangement of the genetic information of single-stranded RNA viruses tells the virus how to pack itself within its outer shell of proteins.

Molecular Warfare: Researchers Discover Viral "Enigma Machine"

February 4, 2015 2:21 pm | by University of Leeds | News | Comments

Researchers have cracked a code that governs infections by a major group of viruses, including the common cold and polio. The unnoticed code had been hidden in plain sight in the sequence of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) that makes up this type of viral genome. But researchers have unlocked its meaning and demonstrated that jamming the code can disrupt virus assembly. Stopping a virus assembling can stop it functioning.

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