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Researchers found that people who played violent video games in 3-D showed more evidence of anger afterward than did people who played using traditional 2-D systems — even those with large screens. © lassedesignen / Fotolia

Violent 3-D Gaming Provokes More Anger

October 24, 2014 5:17 pm | by Jeff Grabmeier, The Ohio State University | News | Comments

Playing violent video games in 3-D makes everything seem more real — and that may have troubling consequences for players, a new study reveals. Researchers found that people who played violent video games in 3-D showed more evidence of anger afterward than did people who played using traditional 2-D systems — even those with large screens.

Imaging Extremely Distant Galaxies to Create New Window on Early Universe

October 23, 2014 3:18 pm | by University of Bonn | News | Comments

Scientists at the Universities of Bonn and Cardiff see good times approaching for...

New Software Algorithms Speed 3-D Printing, Reduce Waste

October 22, 2014 12:40 pm | by Emil Venere, Purdue University | News | Comments

New software algorithms have been shown to significantly reduce the time and...

Mathematical Model Solves Decades-old Question: How Brain Remains Stable during Learning

October 22, 2014 11:06 am | by RIKEN | News | Comments

Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the...

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LLNL researcher Monte LaBute was part of a Lab team that recently published an article in PLOS ONE detailing the use of supercomputers to link proteins to drug side effects. Courtesy of Julie Russell/LLNL

Supercomputers Link Proteins to Adverse Drug Reactions

October 21, 2014 10:40 am | by Kenneth K Ma, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | News | Comments

The drug creation process often misses many side effects that kill at least 100,000 patients a year. LLNL researchers have discovered a high-tech method of using supercomputers to identify proteins that cause medications to have certain adverse drug reactions, using high-performance computers to process proteins and drug compounds in an algorithm that produces reliable data outside of a laboratory setting for drug discovery.

The robot has a friction crawler-based drive system (such as the one in war tanks), ideal for all types of terrain. It also has motion sensors, cameras, a laser and an infrared system, allowing it to rebuild the environment and, thereby, find paths or cre

Robot Scans Rubble, Recognizes Humans in Disaster Situations

October 21, 2014 9:35 am | by Investigación y Desarrollo | News | Comments

Through a computational algorithm, researchers have developed a neural network that allows a small robot to detect different patterns, such as images, fingerprints, handwriting, faces, bodies, voice frequencies and DNA sequences. Nancy Guadalupe Arana Daniel focused on the recognition of human silhouettes in disaster situations.

Bathymetry image of Lake George: In 2014, a bathymetric and topographic survey conducted by boat and plane mapped the lake bed, shoreline and watershed. Now, within the data visualization center, scientists will be able to zoom in as close as half a meter

State-of-the-Art Visualization Lab to Display Streaming Data in Real-Time

October 20, 2014 10:00 am | by IBM | News | Comments

The Jefferson Project announced new milestones in a multimillion-dollar collaboration that seeks to understand and manage complex factors impacting Lake George. A new data visualization laboratory features advanced computing and graphics systems that allow researchers to visualize sophisticated models and incoming data on weather, runoff and circulation patterns. The lab will display streaming data from various sensors in real-time.

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A carbapenem molecule, a last resort antibiotic, enters the carbapenemase enzyme (blue arrow), where the crucial beta-lactam structure gets broken down. The ineffective molecule then leaves (orange arrow)

Nobel Prize-winning Technique Helps Design Antibiotics of Future

October 17, 2014 11:52 am | by Bristol University | News | Comments

Scientists have used computer simulations to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics — a breakthrough that will help develop drugs which can effectively tackle infections in the future. Researchers at the University of Bristol focused on the role of enzymes in the bacteria, which split the structure of the antibiotic and stop it from working, making the bacteria resistant.

Prescribed oceanic patterns are useful for predicting large weather anomalies. Prolonged dry or wet spells over certain regions can reliably tell you whether, for instance, North America will undergo an oceanic weather pattern such as the El Nino or La Ni

Time Machine Reveals Global Precipitation Role in Major Weather Events

October 16, 2014 2:53 pm | by Michael Price, San Diego State University | News | Comments

During the 1930s, North America endured the Dust Bowl, a prolonged era of dryness that withered crops and dramatically altered where the population settled. Land-based precipitation records from the years leading up to the Dust Bowl are consistent with the telltale drying-out period associated with a persistent dry weather pattern, but they can’t explain why the drought was so pronounced and long-lasting.

Urika-XA System for Big Data Analytics

Cray Urika-XA System for Big Data Analytics

October 16, 2014 9:53 am | Cray Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

The Cray Urika-XA System is an open platform for high-performance big data analytics, pre-integrated with the Apache Hadoop and Apache Spark frameworks. It is designed to provide users with the benefits of a turnkey analytics appliance combined with a flexible, open platform that can be modified for future analytics workloads.

Winning NVIDIA’s 2014 Early Stage Challenge helped GPU-powered startup Map-D bring interactivity to big data in vivid ways.

Hot Young Startups Vie for $100,000 GPU Challenge Prize

October 16, 2014 9:24 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

NVIDIA is looking for a dozen would-be competitors for next year’s Early Stage Challenge, which takes place as part of its Emerging Companies Summit (ECS). In this seventh annual contest, hot young startups using GPUs vie for a single $100,000 grand prize.

Phylogenetic tree constructed with the BEAST software and built on a subset of both contemporary and ancient samples. Courtesy of Oxford University Press

Treasure Trove of Ancient Genomes Helps Recalibrate Human Evolutionary Clock

October 14, 2014 4:18 pm | by Molecular Biology and Evolution, Oxford University Press | News | Comments

To improve the modeling and reading of the branches on the human tree of life, researchers compiled the most comprehensive DNA set to date, a new treasure trove of 146 ancient (including Neanderthal and Denisovian) and modern human full mitochondrial genomes (amongst a set of 320 available worldwide).

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While the upper part of the world’s oceans continue to absorb heat from global warming, ocean depths have not warmed measurably in the last decade. This image shows heat radiating from the Pacific Ocean as imaged by the NASA’s Clouds and the Earth's Radia

Unsolved Mystery: Earth’s Ocean Abyss has Not Warmed

October 14, 2014 2:47 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The cold waters of Earth’s deep ocean have not warmed measurably since 2005, according to a new NASA study, leaving unsolved the mystery of why global warming appears to have slowed in recent years. Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, analyzed satellite and direct ocean temperature data from 2005 to 2013 and found the ocean abyss below 1.24 miles (1,995 meters) has not warmed measurably.

The Oil and Gas High Performance Computing (HPC) Workshop, hosted annually at Rice University, is the premier meeting place for discussion of challenges and opportunities around high performance computing, information technology, and computational science

2015 Rice Oil & Gas High Performance Computing Workshop

October 13, 2014 2:45 pm | by Rice University | Events

The Oil and Gas High Performance Computing (HPC) Workshop, hosted annually at Rice University, is the premier meeting place for discussion of challenges and opportunities around high performance computing, information technology, and computational science and engineering.

Alaskan tundra is showing the effects of melting permafrost.

Shocking Results: Few Data, Urgent Need for more Arctic Carbon Measurements

October 13, 2014 12:32 pm | by Carol Rasmussen, NASA | News | Comments

As climate change grips the Arctic, how much carbon is leaving its thawing soil and adding to Earth's greenhouse effect? The question has long been debated by scientists. A new study conducted as part of NASA's Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) shows just how much work still needs to be done to reach a conclusion on this and other basic questions about the region where global warming is hitting hardest.

Named Ds3*(2860)ˉ, the particle, a new type of meson, was discovered by analyzing data collected with the LHCb detector at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Courtesy of the Science and Technology Facilities Council

New Subatomic Particle Sheds Light on Fundamental Force of Nature

October 13, 2014 12:24 pm | by University of Warwick | News | Comments

The discovery of a new particle will “transform our understanding” of the fundamental force of nature that binds the nuclei of atoms, researchers argue. Led by scientists from the University of Warwick, the discovery of the new particle will help provide greater understanding of the strong interaction, the fundamental force of nature found within the protons of an atom’s nucleus.

On Tuesday, October 7, in New York City, IBM Watson Group Senior Vice President Mike Rhodin and travel entrepreneur Terry Jones attended the opening of IBM Watson's global headquarters in New York City's Silicon Alley. Terry Jones is launching a new compa

IBM Watson Fuels Next Generation of Cognitive Computing

October 13, 2014 11:32 am | by IBM | News | Comments

Next-gen leaders push themselves every day to answer this key question: How can my organization make a difference? IBM is helping to deliver the answer with new apps powered by Watson to improve the quality of life. IBM's Watson is a groundbreaking platform with the ability to interact in natural language, process vast amounts of disparate forms of big data and learn from each interaction.

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NASA’s Traffic and Atmospheric Information for General Aviation (TAIGA) technology system is capable of showing pilots the altitude of nearby terrain via color. Yellow identifies terrain that is near the aircraft’s altitude and red shows the terrain that

New NASA Technology Brings Critical Data to Pilots over Remote Alaskan Territories

October 10, 2014 11:58 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA has formally delivered to Alaskan officials a new technology that could help pilots flying over the vast wilderness expanses of the northern-most state. The technology is designed to help pilots make better flight decisions, especially when disconnected from the Internet, telephone, flight services and other data sources normally used by pilots.

Crops growing in an Egyptian oasis, with the Pyramids of Giza in the background. Courtesy of Purdue University

Powerful Web-based Geospatial Data Project puts Major Issues on the Map

October 9, 2014 2:02 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Technology is putting complex topics like severe weather and climate change on the map — literally. Mapping data associated with specific geographic locations is a powerful way to glean new and improved knowledge from data collections and to explain the results to policymakers and the public. Particularly useful is the ability to layer different kinds of geospatial data on top of one another and see how they interact.

A comparison of two weather forecast models for the New Jersey area. At left shows the forecast that doesn't distinguish local hazardous weather. At right shows the High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) model that clearly depicts where local thunderstorms,

Weather Service Storm Forecasts Get More Localized

October 8, 2014 11:53 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The next time some nasty storms are heading your way, the National Weather Service says it will have a better forecast of just how close they could come to you. The weather service started using a new high-resolution computer model that officials say will dramatically improve forecasts for storms up to 15 hours in advance. It should better pinpoint where and when tornadoes, thunderstorms and blizzards are expected.

A new principle, called data smashing, estimates the similarities between streams of arbitrary data without human intervention, and without access to the data sources.

Data Smashing Could Unshackle Automated Discovery

October 8, 2014 11:45 am | by Cornell University | News | Comments

A little-known secret in data mining is that simply feeding raw data into a data analysis algorithm is unlikely to produce meaningful results. New discoveries often begin with comparison of data streams to find connections and spot outliers. But most data comparison algorithms today have one major weakness — somewhere, they rely on a human expert. But experts aren’t keeping pace with the complexities of big data.

On Tuesday, October 7, IBM Watson Group Vice President, Client Experience Centers, Ed Harbour opens the IBM Watson global headquarters in New York City's Silicon Alley. (Courtesy Jon Simon/Feature Photo Service for IBM)

IBM Watson Global Headquarters Opens for Business in Silicon Alley

October 8, 2014 10:33 am | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM Watson Group's global headquarters, at 51 Astor Place in New York City's Silicon Alley, is open for business. The Watson headquarters will serve as a home base for more than 600 IBM Watson employees, just part of the more than 2,000 IBMers dedicated to Watson worldwide. In addition to a sizeable employee presence, IBM is opening its doors to area developers and entrepreneurs, hosting industry workshops, seminars and networking.

NASA satellite data of the marine environment will be used in prototype marine biodiversity observation networks to be established in four U.S. locations, including the Florida Keys, pictured here. Courtesy of USF/WHOI/MBARI/NASA

U.S. Initiates Prototype System to Gauge National Marine Biodiversity

October 7, 2014 3:43 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA are funding three demonstration projects that will lay the foundation for the first national network to monitor marine biodiversity at scales ranging from microbes to whales. The U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) also plans to contribute.

IBM has announced new capabilities for its System z mainframe.

IBM Delivers New Analytics Offerings for the Mainframe to Provide Real-Time Customer Insights

October 7, 2014 2:09 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

Building on client demand to integrate real-time analytics with consumer transactions, IBM has announced new capabilities for its System z mainframe. The integration of analytics with transactional data can provide businesses with real-time, actionable insights on commercial transactions as they occur to take advantage of new opportunities to increase sales and help minimize loss through fraud prevention.

Error-correcting codes are one of the glories of the information age: They’re   what guarantee the flawless transmission of digital information over the   airwaves or through copper wire, even in the presence of the corrupting   influences that engineers

Reaching the Limit of Error-Correcting Codes

October 2, 2014 3:44 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Error-correcting codes are one of the glories of the information age: They’re what guarantee the flawless transmission of digital information over the airwaves or through copper wire, even in the presence of the corrupting influences that engineers call “noise.”

In popular culture, mathematics is often deemed inaccessible or esoteric. Yet in the modern world, it plays an ever more important role in our daily lives and a decisive role in the discovery and development of new ideas — often behind the scenes.

At the Interface of Math and Science

October 1, 2014 3:44 pm | by Julie Cohen, UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

In popular culture, mathematics is often deemed inaccessible or esoteric. Yet in the modern world, it plays an ever more important role in our daily lives and a decisive role in the discovery and development of new ideas — often behind the scenes.

Engineers have completed the first comprehensive numerical simulation of   skeletal muscle tissue using a method that uses the pixels in an image as   data points for the computer simulation — a method known as mesh-free   simulation.

Mesh-free Numerical Simulation of Skeletal Muscle Tissue Completed

October 1, 2014 3:03 pm | by UC San Diego | News | Comments

Engineers have completed the first comprehensive numerical simulation of skeletal muscle tissue using a method that uses the pixels in an image as data points for the computer simulation — a method known as mesh-free simulation.      

Mathematicians have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might

Adding Natural Uncertainty Improves Mathematical Models

September 30, 2014 3:39 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

Mathematicians have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might ultimately lead to mathematical models that better reflect the inherent uncertainties of the natural world.

Researchers have developed a scaling law that predicts a human’s risk of brain injury, based on previous studies of blasts’ effects on animal brains. The method may help the military develop more protective helmets, as well as aid clinicians in diagnosing

Modeling Shockwaves through the Brain

September 30, 2014 3:07 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a scaling law that predicts a human’s risk of brain injury, based on previous studies of blasts’ effects on animal brains. The method may help the military develop more protective helmets, as well as aid clinicians in diagnosing traumatic brain injury — often referred to as the “invisible wounds” of battle.

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