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MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory has released a data-visualization tool that lets users highlight aberrations and possible patterns in the graphical display; the tool then automatically determines which data sources are respon

Visual Control of Big Data: Recomputing Visualizations without Aberrant Results

August 20, 2014 10:44 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

In the age of big data, visualization tools are vital. With a single glance at a graphic display, a human being can recognize patterns that a computer might fail to find even after hours of analysis. But what if there are aberrations in the patterns? Or what if there’s just a suggestion of a visual pattern that’s not distinct enough to justify any strong inferences? Or what if the pattern is clear, but not what was to be expected?

Invisible Particles Provide First Indirect Evidence of Strange Baryons

August 20, 2014 10:17 am | by Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

New supercomputing calculations provide the first evidence that particles predicted by the...

Greased Lightning Tests Electric Propulsion

August 20, 2014 9:35 am | by NASA | News | Comments

On August 19, 2014, National Aviation Day, a lot of people reflected on how far aviation has...

Strangest Creature of Ancient Earth linked to Modern Animals

August 19, 2014 3:08 pm | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

The spines along its back were thought to be legs, its legs thought to be tentacles along its...

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North Korea (the dark area) and South Korea at night. Courtesy of NASA

Citizen Science: Images of Earth at Night Crowdsourced for Science

August 19, 2014 2:59 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A wealth of images of Earth at night taken by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) could help save energy, contribute to better human health and safety and improve our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. But, scientists need your help to make that happen.

US Gulf Coast at Night -- Courtesy of NASA

US Gulf Coast at Night

August 19, 2014 12:05 pm | News | Comments

One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the International Space Station photographed this nighttime image showing city lights in at least half a dozen southern states from some 225 miles above the home planet. Lights from areas in the Gulf Coast states of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, as well as some of the states that border them on the north, are visible.

The Kilobots, a swarm of one thousand simple but collaborative robots. Courtesy of Mike Rubenstein and Science/AAAS

AI: Self-organizing Thousand-robot Swarm Forms Vast, Complex Shapes

August 18, 2014 12:03 pm | by Caroline Perry, Harvard SEAS | News | Comments

The first thousand-robot flash mob has assembled at Harvard University. Instead of one highly-complex robot, a “kilo” of robots collaborate, providing a simple platform for the enactment of complex behaviors. Called Kilobots, these extremely simple robots are each just a few centimeters across and stand on three pin-like legs.

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Guanidine Hydrochloride -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Guanidine Hydrochloride, Chaotropic Salt

August 18, 2014 10:12 am | News | Comments

This 200X photo of guanidine hydrochloride, a chaotropic salt used to denature proteins, received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Dr. Christopher Benjamin Jackson of IKELOS GmbH in Berne, Switzerland, using polarized light.

A picokeystone extracted from an aerogel tile from the Stardust interstellar dust collector. Scientists said seven microscopic particles collected by NASA's comet-chasing spacecraft, Stardust, appear to have originated outside our solar system. The dust c

Specks Returned from Space may be Alien Visitors

August 15, 2014 2:28 pm | by Marcia Dunn, AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

There may be itsy-bitsy aliens among us. Scientists say seven microscopic particles collected by NASA's comet-chasing spacecraft, Stardust, appear to have originated outside our solar system. If confirmed, this would be the world's first sampling of contemporary interstellar dust.

Users can use the tool to focus on images in which President Obama appears over Stephen Colbert’s shoulder, and then observe Colbert’s typical body posture among those results. Courtesy of Jun-Yan Zhu, Yong Jae Lee and Alexei Efros, UC Berkeley

Single Picture worth 1000 — and More — Images

August 15, 2014 12:38 pm | by Sarah Yang, UC Berkeley | News | Comments

A photo is worth a thousand words, but what if the image could also represent thousands of other images? New software seeks to tame the vast amount of visual data in the world by generating a single photo that can represent massive clusters of images. This tool can give users the photographic gist of a kid on Santa’s lap or housecats. It works by generating an image that literally averages the key features of the other photos.

Advanced techniques such as "structured placement," shown here and developed by Markov's group, are currently being used to wring out optimizations in chip layout. Different circuit modules on an integrated circuit are shown in different colors. Algorithm

Reviewing Frontier Technologies to Determine Fundamental Limits of Computer Scaling

August 15, 2014 12:31 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Igor Markov reviews limiting factors in the development of computing systems to help determine what is achievable, identifying loose limits and viable opportunities for advancements through the use of emerging technologies. He summarizes and examines limitations in the areas of manufacturing and engineering, design and validation, power and heat, time and space, as well as information and computational complexity.​

NGC 3081 -- Courtesy of ESA/Hubble & NASA; acknowledgement: R. Buta (University of Alabama)

Magnificent Face-on Image of Golden Rings of Star Formation

August 15, 2014 11:39 am | by European Space Agency | News | Comments

Taking center stage in this new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image is a galaxy known as NGC 3081, set against an assortment of glittering galaxies in the distance. Located in the constellation of Hydra (The Sea Serpent), NGC 3081 is located over 86 million light-years from us. It is known as a type II Seyfert galaxy, characterized by its dazzling nucleus.

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Lily of the Valley Rhizome Section -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Lily of the Valley Rhizome Section

August 14, 2014 12:41 pm | News | Comments

This 40X photo of a lily of the valley rhizome section received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Dr. Guichuan Hou of the Dewel Microscopy Facility in Boone, NC.

In this August 6, 2014, photo provided by Catlin Seaview Survey, Catlin's Christophe Bailhache surveys "Christ of the Abyss," with the SVII cameras off the coast of Key Largo, Fla. U.S. government scientists hope people will soon be able to go online and

Street View goes Undersea to Map Reefs, Wonders

August 13, 2014 2:16 pm | by Jennifer Kay, Associated Press | News | Comments

It's easy to go online and get a 360-degree, ground-level view of almost any street in the US and throughout the world. Soon, scientists hope to do the same with coral reefs and other underwater wonders. They are learning to use specialized fisheye lenses underwater in the Florida Keys in hopes of applying "street view" mapping to research and management plans in marine sanctuaries nationwide. Some of the images will be available online...

An April memo from the EPA's chief of staff said that "unsolicited contacts" need to be "appropriately managed" and that committee members should refrain from directly responding to requests about committees' efforts to advise the agency.

Groups to EPA: Stop Muzzling Science Advisers

August 13, 2014 12:39 pm | by Dina Cappiello, Associated Press | News | Comments

Journalist and scientific organizations accused the EPA of attempting to muzzle its independent scientific advisers by directing them to funnel all outside requests for information through agency officials. In a letter on August 12, 2014, groups representing journalists and scientists urged the EPA to allow advisory board members to talk directly to news reporters, Congress and other outside groups without first asking for permission.

With an emphasis on HPC applications in science, engineering and large-scale data analytics; the Gordon Bell Prize tracks the overall progress in parallel computing.

Finalists Compete for Coveted ACM Gordon Bell Prize in High Performance Computing

August 13, 2014 12:01 pm | by SC14 | News | Comments

With five technical papers contending for one of the highest honored awards in high performance computing (HPC), the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) awards committee has four months left to choose a winner for the prestigious 2014 Gordon Bell Prize. The winner of this prize will have demonstrated an outstanding achievement in HPC that helps solve critical science and engineering problems.

Butterfly Tongue -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Butterfly Tongue

August 13, 2014 11:28 am | News | Comments

This 60X photo of a butterfly tongue received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Ms. Kata Kenesei and Barbara Orsolits of the Institute of Experimental Medicine - Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest, Hungary, using confocal microscopy.

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SOLIDWORKS Education Edition 2014-2015

SOLIDWORKS Education Edition 2014-2015

August 12, 2014 3:51 pm | Dassault Systems | Product Releases | Comments

SOLIDWORKS Education Edition 2014-2015 is an integrated applications portfolio that includes tools and enhancements designed to improve teacher efficiency, shorten student design processes, increase team collaboration and enable educational productivity across numerous areas.

The Bloch sphere, a representation of a qubit, the fundamental building block of quantum computers. Courtesy of Glosser

Quantum Simulators Explained

August 12, 2014 12:36 pm | by Springer Science+Business Media | News | Comments

Just about everything you ever wanted to know about quantum simulators is summed up in a new review. As part of a Thematic Series on Quantum Simulations, the open access journal European Physical Journal Quantum Technology has published an overview of just what a quantum simulator is, namely a device that actively uses quantum effects to answer questions on model systems.

An After Dark project robot in front of Jacob Epstein's The Visitation (1926) inside Tate Britain in London. The London art museum says that for five nights people from around the world can get an after-hours tour online thanks to four roaming robots fitt

Robots Guide "After Dark" Nights at Tate Britain

August 12, 2014 12:21 pm | by AP | News | Comments

Tate Britain is inviting art fans to a night at the museum — though robots, not T. rexes, will be roaming this time. The London art museum says, for five nights beginning August 12, 2014, people from around the world can get an after-hours tour online thanks to four roaming robots fitted with lights, cameras and sensors designed to let them move around the rooms in the dark.

This 3-D map shows how HCN molecules (made of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen) are released from the nucleus of comet Lemmon and then spread evenly throughout the atmosphere, or coma. Similar maps revealed that HNC and formaldehyde are produced in the coma,

3-D Comet Study Reveals Chemical Factory at Work

August 12, 2014 12:05 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A NASA-led team of scientists has created detailed 3-D maps of the atmospheres surrounding comets, identifying several gases and mapping their spread at the highest resolution ever achieved. Almost unheard of for comet studies, the 3-D perspective provides deeper insight into which materials are shed from the nucleus of the comet and which are produced within the atmosphere, or coma.

Lunar Transit -- Courtesy of NASA/SDO

Solar Dynamics Observatory Captures Images of Lunar Transit

August 12, 2014 11:55 am | by NASA | News | Comments

On July 26, 2014, from 10:57 a.m. to 11:42 a.m. EDT, the moon crossed between NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the sun, a phenomenon called a lunar transit. A lunar transit happens approximately twice a year, causing a partial solar eclipse that can only be seen from SDO's point of view.

LabVIEW 2014 software adds new capabilities to acquire, analyze and visualize data from anywhere, at any time.

LabVIEW 2014 System Design Software

August 12, 2014 11:06 am | National Instruments | Product Releases | Comments

LabVIEW 2014 system design software standardizes the way users interact with hardware through reuse of the same code and engineering processes across systems, which scales applications for the future. This saves time and money as technology advances, requirements evolve and time-to-market pressure increases.

Quantum dots make greens and reds pop on screens (left) compared with other types of displays (right).

The Grass Really Is Greener on Computer Screens, Thanks to Quantum Dots

August 11, 2014 1:06 pm | by ACS | News | Comments

High-tech specks called quantum dots could bring brighter, more vibrant color to mass market TVs, tablets, phones and other displays. A scientist has described a new technology, called 3M quantum dot enhancement film (QDEF), that efficiently makes liquid crystal display (LCD) screens more richly colored. His talk was given at the 248th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

Dr. Horst Punzmann (left) and Professor Michael Shats test their wave-generated tractor beam. Courtesy of Stuart Hay

Physicists Create Water Tractor Beam

August 11, 2014 12:57 pm | by Australian National University | News | Comments

Physicists have created a tractor beam on water, providing a radical new technique that could confine oil spills, manipulate floating objects or explain rips at the beach. The group discovered they can control water flow patterns with simple wave generators, enabling them to move floating objects at will. The new technique gives scientists a way of controlling things adrift on water in a way that resembles sci-fi tractor beams.

Four Seasons: A new algorithm developed by Brown computer scientists allows users to change the season and other “transient attributes” in outdoor photos.

Photo Editing Algorithm Changes Weather, Seasons Automatically

August 11, 2014 12:34 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

A computer algorithm being developed by Brown University researchers enables users to instantly change the weather, time of day, season, or other features in outdoor photos with simple text commands. Machine learning and a clever database make it possible.

Seamlessly marrying electronics and brain signaling could transform how we treat some of the most puzzling and devastating diseases. Courtesy of Janulla

On the Frontiers of Cyborg Science: Seamless Marriage between Electronics and Brain Signaling

August 11, 2014 12:22 pm | by ACS | News | Comments

No longer just fantastical fodder for sci-fi buffs, cyborg technology is bringing us tangible progress toward real-life electronic skin, prosthetics and ultraflexible circuits. Taking this human-machine concept to an unprecedented level, pioneering scientists are working on the seamless marriage between electronics and brain signaling, with the potential to transform our understanding of how to treat the brain's most devastating diseases.

Hurricanes Iselle and Julio -- Courtesy of NASA; image by Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE/EOSDIS Rapid Response

Hurricanes Iselle and Julio Nearing the Hawaiian Islands

August 11, 2014 11:38 am | by Mike Carlowicz, NASA | News | Comments

In early August 2014, not one but two hurricanes were headed for the Hawaiian Islands. Storms arriving from the east are a relative rarity, and landfalling storms are also pretty infrequent. This image is a composite of three satellite passes over the tropical Pacific Ocean in the early afternoon.

This July 2014 image provided by the Bureau of Land Management shows researchers in the interior of the Natural Trap Cave in north-central Wyoming. The cave holds the remains of tens of thousands of animals, including many now-extinct species, from the la

Dig This: Ancient Bones found in Wyoming Cave

August 8, 2014 4:36 pm | by Mead Gruver, Associated Press | News | Comments

North American lions, cheetahs and short-faced bears: Those are just a few fearsome critters from 25,000 years ago paleontologists already might have found in their first excavation of a bizarre northern Wyoming cave in 30 years. Good fossils also come in small packages: Exquisite rodent bones best examined by microscope, or even snippets of genetic material from long-extinct species, could be in their haul.

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