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Hunting from a distance of 27,000 light years, astronomers have discovered an unusual carbon-based molecule – one with a branched structure – contained within a giant gas cloud in interstellar space. Like finding a molecular needle in a cosmic haystack, a

Space Molecule Leads to Life's Interstellar Origins

September 30, 2014 4:08 pm | by Blaine Friedlander, Cornell university | News | Comments

Hunting from a distance of 27,000 light years, astronomers have discovered an unusual carbon-based molecule – one with a branched structure – contained within a giant gas cloud in interstellar space. Like finding a molecular needle in a cosmic haystack, astronomers have detected radio waves emitted by isopropyl cyanide. The discovery suggests that the complex molecules needed for life may have their origins in interstellar space.

Robotic Fabric Could Bring about Wearable Robots

September 30, 2014 3:20 pm | by Purdue University | News | Comments

Researchers are developing a robotic fabric that moves and contracts and is embedded with...

Butterfly Eggs Reclining

September 30, 2014 2:27 pm | News | Comments

This 5x photo of pipevine swallowtail butterfly (Battus philenor) eggs on stem of host...

Cheap Hydrogen Fuel from the Sun – Without Rare Metals

September 29, 2014 4:14 pm | by EPFL | News | Comments

By combining a pair of solar cells made with a mineral called perovskite and low cost...

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Recently, at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, researchers unveiled an oval-shaped submersible robot, a little smaller than a football, with a flattened panel on one side that it can slide along an underwater surface to perfo

Underwater Robot Secures Our Ports

September 29, 2014 3:13 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Recently, at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, researchers unveiled an oval-shaped submersible robot, a little smaller than a football, with a flattened panel on one side that it can slide along an underwater surface to perform ultrasound scans.

The Soyuz TMA-14M rocket is launched with Expedition 41 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos, and Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, Friday, September 26, 2014

Expedition 41 Crew is ISS Bound

September 29, 2014 2:59 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The Soyuz TMA-14M rocket is launched with Expedition 41 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos) Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos, and Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, Friday, September 26, 2014 at the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

People who practice yoga and meditation long term can learn to control a computer with their minds faster and better than people with little or no yoga or meditation experience, new research shows. The research could have major implications for treatments

Meditation may Help People Control Computers with Their Mind

September 26, 2014 12:32 pm | by University of Minnesota | News | Comments

New research by biomedical engineers at the University of Minnesota shows that people who practice yoga and meditation long-term can learn to control a computer with their minds faster and better than people with little or no yoga or meditation experience. The research could have major implications for treatments of people who are paralyzed or have neurodegenerative diseases.

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Magnetic states at oxide interfaces controlled by electricity. Top image shows magnetic state with -3 volts applied, and bottom image shows nonmagnetic state with 0 volts applied.

New Discovery Could Pave the Way for Spin-based Computing

September 26, 2014 11:12 am | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

Electricity and magnetism rule our digital world. Semiconductors process electrical information, while magnetic materials enable long-term data storage. A University of Pittsburgh research team has discovered a way to fuse these two distinct properties in a single material, paving the way for new ultrahigh density storage and computing architectures.

Fusion research simulated with supercomputers. Courtesy of KTH PDC

Computationally Intensive Research to get Boost, Break Petaflop Barrier

September 26, 2014 10:21 am | by KTH Royal Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Computationally intensive research in Sweden will soon get a boost from the fastest academic supercomputer in the Nordic countries, to be installed in October 2014 at KTH Royal Institute of Technology. KTH is due to begin using the fastest academic supercomputer of any university in Scandinavia. A Cray XC30 with 1,676 nodes and a memory of 104.7 terabytes will be installed at KTH’s PDC Center for High Performance Computing.

Star-shaped Algae -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Star-shaped Algae

September 26, 2014 9:36 am | News | Comments

This 40X photo shows the star-shaped algae Micrasterias radiosa. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken by Rogelio Moreno Gill.

King Fire in Eldorado National Forest -- NASA Earth Observatory image by Jesse Allen, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey

King Fire in Eldorado National Forest, California

September 25, 2014 4:33 pm | by Adam Voiland, NASA | News | Comments

On September 19, 2014, the Operational Land Imager on the Landsat 8 satellite captured these images of the King fire in Eldorado National Forest. In the false-color image, burned forest appears red; unaffected forests are green; cleared forest is beige; and smoke is blue. As of September 23, the blaze had charred 89,571 acres.

This solar flare was shot with one of the cameras on the NASA SDO satellite on June 10, 2014. Courtesy of NASA/SDO

Solar Explosions inside a Computer: Predicting Solar Flares

September 25, 2014 4:30 pm | by Barbara Vonarburg, ETH | News | Comments

Strong solar flares can bring down communications and power grids on Earth. By demonstrating how these gigantic eruptions are caused, physicists are laying the foundations for future predictions. The shorter the interval between two explosions in the solar atmosphere, the more likely it is that the second flare will be stronger than the first one.

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A drone prepares to land after flying over the scene of an explosion that leveled two apartment buildings in East Harlem in New York. When government officials designed a new air traffic control system, they neglected to take something into account — dron

Drones Left Out of Air Traffic Plans

September 25, 2014 4:20 pm | by Joan Lowy, Associated Press | News | Comments

Designers of the ambitious U.S. air traffic control system of the future neglected to take drones into account, raising questions about whether it can handle the escalating demand for the unmanned aircraft and predicted congestion in the sky.

Computer modeling provides policymakers with essential information on such data as global sea surface temperatures related to specific currents. Image courtesy Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Developing the Most Advanced Earth System Computer Model Yet Created

September 25, 2014 4:16 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

With President Obama announcing climate-support initiatives at the 2014 United Nations Climate Summit, the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories are teaming with academia and the private sector to develop the most advanced climate and Earth system computer model yet created. For Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers, it is a welcome advance for an already vibrant high-performance computing community.

"Diamond nanothreads" promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymers. The core of the nanothreads is a long, thin strand of carbon atoms arranged just like the fundamental u

Smallest Possible Diamonds Form What may be World’s Strongest Material

September 24, 2014 2:36 pm | by Penn State University | News | Comments

For the first time, scientists have discovered how to produce ultra-thin "diamond nanothreads" that promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymers. The core of the nanothreads is a long, thin strand of carbon atoms arranged just like the fundamental unit of a diamond's structure.

Indian Space Research Organisation scientists watch screens display the graphics explaining Mars Orbiter Mission at their Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network complex in Bangalore, India, Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. India triumphed in its first interpla

Mars Mission Opens India for Space Business

September 24, 2014 2:22 pm | by Katy Daigle, Associated Press | News | Comments

India celebrated putting a spacecraft into orbit around Mars on September 24, 2014, hoping the rare feat will show the world it is open for business in space exploration and inspire a new generation of homegrown scientists to help drive growth. Those motivations help explain why India, a poor country of 1.2 billion, even invests in a space program when so many of its people lack access to proper toilets, electricity and health care.

The research center’s first director, Jeff Moulton, will be charged with attracting major research contracts by leveraging the university’s unique strengths in such disciplines as supercomputing, cybersecurity and nanotechnology.

Cyber Research Center Announced at LSU

September 24, 2014 1:52 pm | by Louisiana Economic Development | News | Comments

Governor Jindal and LSU President and Chancellor Alexander announced creation of the LSU Transformational Technology and Cyber Research Center, which will pursue major federal and commercial research projects in applied technology fields, leveraging the university’s unique strengths in such disciplines as supercomputing, cybersecurity and nanotechnology.

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Sunrise at the Soyuz Launch Pad -- Courtesy of NASA/Joel Kowsky

Sunrise at the Soyuz Launch Pad

September 24, 2014 12:05 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The sun rises as the Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft is rolled out by train to the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, September 23, 2014. Launch of the Soyuz rocket is scheduled for September 25 and will carry Expedition 41 Soyuz Commander Alexander Samokutyaev of the Russian Federal Space Agency (Roscosmos), Flight Engineer Barry Wilmore of NASA, and Flight Engineer Elena Serova of Roscosmos into orbit

Bernie Spang is Vice President of Software Defined Strategy at IBM.

Scientific Research and Big Data: It Starts with Storage

September 24, 2014 11:52 am | by Bernie Spang, IBM | Blogs | Comments

For centuries, scientific research has been about data, and as data in research continues to grow exponentially, so does the importance of how it’s stored. A key example of how the scientific field can tackle Big Data storage is DESY, a scientific research organization dedicated to providing scientists worldwide faster access to insights into samples, making optimal data management in a high-volume environment extremely critical.

The flux of cosmic ray particles as a function of their energy. Courtesy of Sven Lafebre

Latest Measurements Unveil New Territories in Flux of Cosmic Rays

September 23, 2014 4:17 pm | by CERN | News | Comments

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer collaboration has presented its latest results based on analysis of 41 billion particles detected with the space-based AMS detector aboard the International Space Station. The results, presented during a seminar at CERN, provide new insights into the nature of the mysterious excess of positrons observed in the flux of cosmic rays. 

Armed with the GelSight sensor, a robot can grasp a freely hanging USB cable and plug it into a USB port. Courtesy of Melanie Gonick/MIT

Fingertip Sensor Gives Robot Unprecedented Dexterity

September 23, 2014 3:37 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers have equipped a robot with a novel tactile sensor that lets it grasp a USB cable draped freely over a hook and insert it into a USB port. The sensor is an adaptation of a technology called GelSight, which was developed at MIT. The new sensor isn’t as sensitive as the original GelSight sensor, which could resolve details on the micrometer scale. But it’s smaller, and its processing algorithm is faster.

Graphic representation of a seaborgium hexacarbonyl molecule on the silicon dioxide covered detectors of a COMPACT detector array. Courtesy of Alexander Yakushev (GSI) / Christoph E. Düllmann (JGU)

Chemistry of Superheavy Elements: New Vistas for Studying Effects of Einstein's Relativity

September 23, 2014 3:27 pm | by Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz | News | Comments

An international collaboration has achieved the synthesis of a new class of chemical compounds for superheavy elements. For the first time, a chemical bond was established between a superheavy element — seaborgium (element 106) in the present study — and a carbon atom.

Mouse Adipose (Fat) Tissue -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Fat Tissue from a Mouse

September 23, 2014 9:53 am | News | Comments

This 25X photo shows mouse adipose tissue. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken byDaniela Malide of the National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

Do it yourself: A new resource provides both experienced and aspiring researchers with the intellectual raw materials needed to design, build and operate robots made from soft, flexible materials. Courtesy of Eliza Grinnell, Harvard SEAS

Soft Robotics Toolkit Features Everything a Robot-maker Needs

September 22, 2014 3:18 pm | by Harvard SEAS | News | Comments

A new resource unveiled by researchers from several Harvard University labs, in collaboration with Trinity College Dublin, provides both experienced and aspiring researchers with the intellectual raw materials needed to design, build and operate robots made from soft, flexible materials.

Crystals that contain the information of light after the teleportation. © GAP, University of Geneva (UNIGE)

From Light into Matter, Nothing Seems to Stop Quantum Teleportation

September 22, 2014 3:05 pm | by University of Geneva | News | Comments

Physicists have succeeded in teleporting the quantum state of a photon to a crystal over 25 kilometers of optical fiber. The experiment constitutes a first, and simply pulverizes the previous record of 6 kilometers achieved 10 years ago by the same team. Passing from light into matter, using teleportation of a photon to a crystal, shows that, in quantum physics, it's not the composition of a particle that is important, but rather its state

The ARCAS project has designed a range of different flying robots with multi-joint manipulator arms to work together on grasping, transporting and depositing parts safely and efficiently. The autonomy and skills of the robots is being developed to build o

Flying Robots Go Where Humans Can’t

September 22, 2014 2:57 pm | by European Commission, CORDIS | News | Comments

There are many situations where it’s impossible, complicated or too time-consuming for humans to enter and carry out operations. Think of contaminated areas following a nuclear accident, or the need to erect structures such as antennae on mountain tops. These are examples of where flying robots could be used. The EU’s ARCAS project has designed a range of different flying robots with multi-joint manipulator arms

Described by The Washington Post as "the single best explainer of abstruse concepts in the world today," Brian Greene is one of the world's leading theoretical physicists and a brilliant, entertaining communicator of cutting-edge scientific concepts.

Physicist and Best-selling author Brian Greene to Keynote SC14

September 22, 2014 2:13 pm | by SC14 | News | Comments

Physicist, string theorist and best-selling author Brian Greene will talk about the intersection of science, computing and society as he delivers the keynote address at SC14 this November. Described by The Washington Post as "the single best explainer of abstruse concepts in the world today," Brian Greene is one of the world's leading theoretical physicists and a brilliant, entertaining communicator of cutting-edge scientific concepts.

This mosaic of images from the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile shows two dramatic star formation regions in the southern Milky Way. The first is of these, on the left, is dominated by the star cl

Spectacular Landscape of Star Formation

September 22, 2014 11:51 am | by European Southern Observatory - ESO | News | Comments

This image, captured by the Wide Field Imager at La Silla Observatory, shows two dramatic star formation regions in the southern Milky Way. The first of these, on the left, is dominated by the star cluster NGC 3603, located 20,000 light-years away, in the Carina-Sagittarius spiral arm of the Milky Way galaxy. The second object, on the right, is a collection of glowing gas clouds known as NGC 3576 that lies only about half as far from Earth.

Richard Lamb, right, discusses artificial neural networks with WSU College of Education colleague Andy Cavagnetto.

Video Games could Dramatically Streamline Education Research

September 19, 2014 4:59 pm | by C. Brandon Chapman, Washington State University | News | Comments

“Seeking educational curriculum researchers. Humans need not apply.” A Washington State University professor has figured out a dramatically easier and more cost-effective way to do research on science curriculum in the classroom — and it could include playing video games. Called “computational modeling,” it involves a computer “learning” student behavior and then “thinking” as students would.

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