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Reddish Bands on Europa -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute

Reddish Bands on Europa

July 22, 2014 3:33 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

This colorized image of Jupiter's moon Europa is a product of clear-filter grayscale data from one orbit of NASA's Galileo spacecraft, combined with lower-resolution color data taken on a different orbit. The blue-white terrains indicate relatively pure water ice, whereas the reddish areas contain water ice mixed with hydrated salts, potentially magnesium sulfate or sulfuric acid.

World Breaks Monthly Heat Record Twice in a Row

July 22, 2014 3:30 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The globe is on a hot streak, setting a heat record in June. That's after the world broke a...

New Spongelike Structure Converts Solar Energy into Steam

July 22, 2014 3:28 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

A new material structure developed at MIT generates steam by soaking up the sun. The structure...

Astronauts to Test Free-flying “Housekeeper” Robots

July 21, 2014 2:30 pm | by Maria Alberty, NASA's Ames Research Center | News | Comments

Inspired by science fiction, three bowling ball-size free-flying Synchronized Position Hold,...

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Birdsongs Automatically Decoded by Computer Scientists

July 21, 2014 2:25 pm | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found a successful way of identifying bird sounds from large audio collections, which could be useful for expert and amateur bird-watchers alike. The analysis used recordings of individual birds and of dawn choruses to identify characteristics of bird sounds. It took advantage of large datasets of sound recordings provided by the British Library Sound Archive, and online sources.

The Eagle Prepares to Land

July 21, 2014 2:00 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The Apollo 11 Lunar Module Eagle, in a landing configuration was photographed in lunar orbit from the Command and Service Module Columbia. Inside the module were Commander Neil A. Armstrong and Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin. The long rod-like protrusions under the landing pods are lunar surface sensing probes. Upon contact with the lunar surface, the probes sent a signal to the crew to shut down the descent engine.

Peering into Giant Planets: Diamond vaporized in less than 10 billionths of a second

July 21, 2014 11:39 am | by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists for the first time have experimentally re-created the conditions that exist deep inside giant planets, such as Jupiter, Uranus and many of the planets recently discovered outside our solar system. Researchers can now re-create and accurately measure material properties that control how these planets evolve over time. This study focused on carbon, which has an important role in many types of planets ...

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Computer Models Reveal Quantum Effects in Biological Oxygen Transport

July 18, 2014 3:41 pm | by Trinity College | News | Comments

Physicists have created a unique combination of computer models, based on the theory of quantum mechanics, and applied them to a previously well-characterized protein found in muscle to develop a new picture of how biomolecules transport and store oxygen (O2). In doing so, the team has shown how the process of respiration, which is fundamental in humans and other vertebrates, exploits quantum mechanical effects working on tiny scales.

Deep-sea Amphipod

July 18, 2014 3:29 pm | News | Comments

This photo of a deep-sea amphipod received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Mr. David Forest and Alison Sweeney ofUC Santa Barbara, Neuroscience Research Institute in Santa Barbara, CA, using a brightfield technique.

Buzz Aldrin: Where were you when I Walked on Moon?

July 17, 2014 2:19 pm | by Marcia Dunn, AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

On July 20, 1969, Buzz Aldrin was "out of town" when the world united and rejoiced in a way never seen before or since. He and Neil Armstrong were on the moon. They missed the whole celebration 45 years ago this Sunday. So did Michael Collins, orbiting solo around the moon in the mother ship.

Two Burs Locked Together

July 17, 2014 11:27 am | News | Comments

This 15x photo of two burs locked together received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Mr. Neil James Egan of PPG Industries, Electro-coat Quality Assurance in Cleveland, OH, using a brightfield technique.

NASA's Van Allen Probes Show How to Accelerate Electrons

July 16, 2014 11:55 am | by Karen C. Fox, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

One of the great, unanswered questions for space weather scientists is just what creates two gigantic donuts of radiation surrounding Earth, called the Van Allen radiation belts. Recent data from the Van Allen Probes — two nearly identical spacecraft that launched in 2012 — address this question.

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Fundamental Chemistry Findings Could Help Extend Moore’s Law

July 16, 2014 11:49 am | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Over the years, computer chips have gotten smaller, thanks to advances in materials science and manufacturing technologies. This march of progress, the doubling of transistors on a microprocessor roughly every two years, is called Moore’s Law. But there’s one component of the chip-making process in need of an overhaul if Moore’s law is to continue: the chemical mixture called photoresist.

Dassault Systèmes Acquires Multi-body Simulation Technology Company SIMPACK

July 16, 2014 10:15 am | by Dassault Systèmes | News | Comments

Dassault Systèmes announced the acquisition of SIMPACK, a multi-body simulation technologies and solutions company. With the acquisition of SIMPACK, based near Munich, Germany, Dassault Systèmes is expanding its SIMULIA realistic multiphysics simulation technology portfolio to include multi-body mechatronic systems, from virtual concept validation to the real-time experience.

Cray Awarded Contract to Install India's First Cray XC30 Supercomputer

July 16, 2014 3:33 am | by Cray | News | Comments

The Cray XC30 system will be used by a nation-wide consortium of scientists called the Indian Lattice Gauge Theory Initiative (ILGTI). The group will research the properties of a phase of matter called the quark-gluon plasma, which existed when the universe was approximately a microsecond old. ILGTI also carries out research on exotic and heavy-flavor hadrons, which will be produced in hadron collider experiments.

Phytoplankton Bloom off the Coast of Iceland

July 15, 2014 4:42 pm | News | Comments

A spring bloom of phytoplankton lingered in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Iceland in early June, 2014. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this true-color image on June 5. At that time, swirling jewel tones of a vast bloom were visible between banks of white clouds.

Scientists Track Quantum Errors in Real Time, Step Toward Age of Quantum Computing

July 15, 2014 4:33 pm | by Holly Lauridsen, Yale University | News | Comments

Scientists have demonstrated the ability to track real quantum errors as they occur, a major step in the development of reliable quantum computers. Quantum computers could significantly improve the computational power of modern computers, but a major problem stands in the way: information loss, or quantum errors. To combat errors, physicists must be able to detect that an error has occurred and then correct it in real time.

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NASA Finds Friction from Tides Could Help Distant Earths Survive

July 15, 2014 4:28 pm | by Elizabeth Zubritsky, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

As anybody who has started a campfire by rubbing sticks knows, friction generates heat. Now, computer modeling by NASA scientists shows that friction could be the key to survival for some distant Earth-sized planets traveling in dangerous orbits. The findings are consistent with observations that Earth-sized planets appear to be very common in other star systems.

Drones: Next Big Thing in Aviation is Really Small

July 15, 2014 4:23 pm | by Danica Kirka, Associated Press | News | Comments

With some no bigger than a hummingbird, the hottest things at this week's Farnborough International Airshow are tiny compared with the titans of the sky, such as the Airbus 380 or the Boeing Dreamliner. What's got aviation geeks salivating at Farnborough, this year's biggest aviation jamboree that features participants from 40 countries, are the commercial possibilities of unmanned aerial vehicles — drones to most of us.

Inventor Pushes Solar Panels for Roads, Highways

July 15, 2014 12:06 pm | by Nicholas K. Geranios, Associated Press | News | Comments

The solar panels that Idaho inventor Scott Brusaw has built aren't meant for rooftops. They are meant for roads, driveways, parking lots, bike trails and, eventually, highways. Brusaw, an electrical engineer, says the hexagon-shaped panels can withstand the wear and tear that comes from inclement weather and vehicles, big and small, to generate electricity.

Liftoff! Orbiting Carbon Observatory Heads to Orbit

July 15, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

On July 2, 2014, a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket launched with the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite onboard from Space Launch Complex 2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base, CA. OCO-2 is now in orbit. It is NASA's first mission dedicated to studying global distribution of atmospheric carbon dioxide, the leading human-produced greenhouse gas driving changes in Earth's climate.

On the Trail of Paradigm-Shifting Methods for Solving Mathematical Models

July 15, 2014 10:11 am | by Hengguang Li | Blogs | Comments

How using CPU/GPU parallel computing is the next logical step - My work in computational mathematics is focused on developing new, paradigm-shifting ideas in numerical methods for solving mathematical models in various fields. This includes the Schrödinger equation in quantum mechanics, the elasticity model in mechanical engineering, the Navier-Stokes equation in fluid mechanics, Maxwell’s equations in electromagnetism...

Billionaire Elon Musk giving $1M to Tesla Museum

July 14, 2014 9:56 am | by AP | News | Comments

SHOREHAM, NY (AP) — The billionaire owner of Tesla Motors is giving $1 million to a New York museum dedicated to preserving the legacy of the inventor who inspired its name. The Tesla Science Center announced Elon Musk's donation on what would have been Nikola Tesla's 158th birthday.

New Paths into the World of Quasiparticles

July 11, 2014 4:53 pm | by University of Innsbruck | News | Comments

Quasiparticles can be used to explain physical phenomena in solid bodies even though they are not actual physical particles. Physicists in Innsbruck have now realized quasiparticles in a quantum system and observed quantum mechanical entanglement propagation in a many-body system.

Nano-pixels Promise Thin, Flexible High-res Displays

July 11, 2014 4:44 pm | by Oxford University | News | Comments

A new discovery will make it possible to create pixels just a few hundred nanometers across that could pave the way for extremely high-resolution and low-energy thin, flexible displays for applications such as 'smart' glasses, synthetic retinas and foldable screens.

The Massive Perseus Cluster

July 11, 2014 4:35 pm | News | Comments

This image is Chandra’s latest view of the Perseus Cluster, where red, green, and blue show low, medium, and high-energy X-rays respectively. It combines data equivalent to more than 17 days’ worth of observing time taken over a decade with Chandra.

Astronomers Bring Third Dimension to Doomed Star's Outburst

July 11, 2014 4:31 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

In the middle of the 19th century, the massive binary system Eta Carinae underwent an eruption that ejected at least 10 times the sun's mass and made it the second-brightest star in the sky. Now, a team of astronomers has used extensive new observations to create the first high-resolution 3-D model of the expanding cloud produced by this outburst.

Making Quantum Connections: Speed of Information in a Spin Network

July 11, 2014 4:09 pm | by E. Edwards, Joint Quantum Institute | News | Comments

In quantum mechanics, interactions between particles can give rise to entanglement, which is a strange type of connection that could never be described by a non-quantum, classical theory. These connections, called quantum correlations, are present in entangled systems even if the objects are not physically linked. Entanglement is at the heart of what distinguishes purely quantum systems from classical ones — why they are potentially useful.

Speeding up Data Storage 1000x with Spin Current

July 11, 2014 3:52 pm | by Eindhoven University of Technology | News | Comments

The storage capacity of hard drives is increasing explosively, but the speed with which all that data can be written has reached its limits. Researchers presented a promising new technology which potentially allows data to be stored 1,000 times as fast in Nature Communications. The technology, in which ultra-short laser pulses generate a ‘spin current,’ also opens the way to future optical computer chips.

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