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Robot Sub Returns to Water after 1st Try Cut Short

April 15, 2014 3:01 pm | by Margie Mason, Associated Press | News | Comments

A robotic submarine looking for the lost Malaysian jet began its second mission on April 15, 2014, after cutting short its first because the ocean waters where it was sent were too deep, officials said. Its first planned 16-hour search lasted just six and none of the data collected by the U.S. Navy's Bluefin 21 submarine offered clues to the whereabouts of the plane.

NASA Images May Reveal Birth of New Saturn Moon

April 15, 2014 2:57 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has documented the formation of a small icy object within the rings of...

Computational Record on SuperMUC: Earthquake Simulation Tops One Quadrillion Flops

April 15, 2014 2:50 pm | by Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) | News | Comments

A team of computer scientists, mathematicians and geophysicists have optimized the SeisSol...

Satellite Ready for Launch from Cape Canaveral

April 15, 2014 11:57 am | by NASA | News | Comments

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket with NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-L)...

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Ad Emmen

April 15, 2014 6:07 pm | Biographies

Ad Emmen studied physics at the University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands. From 1980 until 1995, he worked in several positions at the foundation for Academic Computing Services Amsterdam (SARA). He has published papers on supercomputing and publishing technology and co-founded the journal "Supercomputer".

Dr. Wolfgang E. Nagel

April 15, 2014 4:26 pm | Biographies

Dr. Wolfgang E. Nagel is full professor of Computer Architecture at the Institute for Computer Engineering at Technical University (TU) Dresden. He graduated from  RWTH Aachen University with a PhD, and has worked in the field of parallel programming since 1980s. He has published more than 100 papers

Thomas Ludwig

April 15, 2014 4:17 pm | Biographies

Thomas Ludwig received his doctoral degree and the German habilitation degree at the Technische Universität München, where he conducted research on HPC from 1988 to 2001. From 2001 to 2009 he had a chair for parallel computing at the Universität Heidelberg. Since 2009 he is the director of the German Climate Computing Centre (DKRZ) and professor at the Universität Hamburg.

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Dr. Karl Kaiser

April 15, 2014 4:13 pm | Biographies

Dr. Karl Kaiser has been a professor of Computer Engineering (with focus on Industrial Data Processing and Autonomous Mobile Systems) at the Department of Computer Science of the University of Hamburg. He was also the dean of the department from 1985-1988 and the Director of the Regional Computing Center (RRZ) of the University of Hamburg

Jack Dongarra

April 15, 2014 4:09 pm | Biographies

Jack Dongarra specializes in numerical algorithms in linear algebra, parallel computing, use of advanced-computer architectures, programming methodology, and tools for parallel computers. He was awarded the IEEE Sid Fernbach Award in 2004 and in 2008 he was the recipient of the first IEEE Medal of Excellence in Scalable Computing

Dr. Frank Baetke

April 15, 2014 3:58 pm | Biographies

Dr. Baetke manages HP's Global HPC-Technology Program for academic and research institutions. Dr. Baetke is a director & board member of HP-CAST, the world-wide user group of HP-HPC; he is an advisory board member of the International Supercomputing Conference (ISC); a member of the Indian Supercomputing Conference (HiPC) steering committee; he also serves on the committees of several international High Performance Computing conferences.

Prof. Dr. Klaus Schulten

April 15, 2014 3:35 pm | Biographies

Klaus Schulten is the leader in the field of computational biophysics, having devoted over 40 years to establishing the physical mechanisms underlying processes and organization in living systems from the atomic to the organism scale. Schulten is a strong proponent of the use of simulations as a "computational microscope", to augment experimental research

Robot Sub Returns to Water after 1st Try Cut Short

April 15, 2014 3:01 pm | by Margie Mason, Associated Press | News | Comments

A robotic submarine looking for the lost Malaysian jet began its second mission on April 15, 2014, after cutting short its first because the ocean waters where it was sent were too deep, officials said. Its first planned 16-hour search lasted just six and none of the data collected by the U.S. Navy's Bluefin 21 submarine offered clues to the whereabouts of the plane.

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NASA Images May Reveal Birth of New Saturn Moon

April 15, 2014 2:57 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has documented the formation of a small icy object within the rings of Saturn that may be a new moon, and may also provide clues to the formation of the planet's known moons. Images taken with Cassini's narrow angle camera on April 15, 2013 show disturbances at the very edge of Saturn's A ring  the outermost of the planet's large, bright rings.

Computational Record on SuperMUC: Earthquake Simulation Tops One Quadrillion Flops

April 15, 2014 2:50 pm | by Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) | News | Comments

A team of computer scientists, mathematicians and geophysicists have optimized the SeisSol earthquake simulation software on the SuperMUC high performance computer to push its performance beyond the “magical” one petaflop/s mark — one quadrillion floating point operations per second.

Satellite Ready for Launch from Cape Canaveral

April 15, 2014 11:57 am | by NASA | News | Comments

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket with NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-L) spacecraft on board arrives at the launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Launch Complex 41. The TDRS-L spacecraft is the second of three new satellites designed to ensure vital operational continuity for NASA by expanding the lifespan of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) fleet

Karlheinz Meier

April 15, 2014 11:17 am | Biographies

Cosmic Slurp: Using Supercomputers to Predict Black Holes Swallowing Stars

April 14, 2014 2:33 pm | by Aaron Dubrow, NSF | News | Comments

Somewhere out in the cosmos an ordinary galaxy spins, seemingly at slumber. Then all of a sudden, WHAM! A flash of light explodes from the galaxy's center. A star orbiting too close to the event horizon of the galaxy's central supermassive black hole has been torn apart by the force of gravity, heating up its gas and sending out a beacon to the far reaches of the universe.

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Hubble Extends Stellar Tape Measure 10X Farther into Space

April 14, 2014 2:25 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers now can precisely measure the distance of stars up to 10,000 light-years away — 10 times farther than previously possible. Scientists have developed yet another novel way to use the 24-year-old space telescope by employing a technique called spatial scanning, which dramatically improves Hubble's accuracy for making angular measurements.

A Look at Predictions of the 1964 World's Fair

April 14, 2014 2:19 pm | by AP | News | Comments

The New York World's Fair of 1964 introduced 51 million visitors to a range of technological innovations and predictions during its run. Fifty years later, some of those ideas have turned out to be commonplace in our world. Others? Not so much.

Embryo of Mature Tale Cress Plant

April 14, 2014 12:16 pm | News | Comments

An embryo sac of mature thale cress, a small flowering plant native to Eurasia, showing the central cell F-actin, the egg cell nucleus and the synergid cells. This 60x image received an honorable mention in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition. It was taken by Dr. Tomokazu Kawashima, of Temasek Life Sciences Laboratory in Singapore, using confocal microscopy and image stacking.

Four-Eyed Daddy Longlegs Fossil Shows Arachnid had Extra Set of Eyes

April 11, 2014 10:03 am | by American Museum of Natural History | News | Comments

Living harvestmen — a group of arachnids more commonly known as daddy longlegs — have a single pair of eyes that help them navigate habitats in every continent except Antarctica. But a newly described 305-million-year-old fossil found in eastern France shows that wasn’t always the case.

Robotic Arm Probes Chemistry of 3-D Objects

April 11, 2014 9:53 am | by Brett Israel, Georgia Tech | News | Comments

When life on Earth was first getting started, simple molecules bonded together into the precursors of modern genetic material. A catalyst would have been needed, but enzymes had not yet evolved. One theory is that the catalytic minerals on a meteorite’s surface could have jump-started life’s first chemical reactions. But scientists need a way to directly analyze these rough, irregularly shaped surfaces.

NASA Looks to Go Beyond Batteries for Space Exploration

April 11, 2014 9:17 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA is seeking proposals for the development of new, more capable, energy storage technologies to replace the battery technology that has long powered America's space program. The core technologies solicited in the call for proposals will advance energy storage solutions for the space program and other government agencies  through ongoing collaboration with NASA and industry.

Cosmic Clouds and Stellar Winds

April 11, 2014 8:45 am | by NASA | News | Comments

This esthetic close-up of cosmic clouds and stellar winds features LL Orionis, interacting with the Orion Nebula flow. Adrift in Orion's stellar nursery and still in its formative years, variable star LL Orionis produces a wind more energetic than the wind from our own middle-aged Sun.

Orienteering for Robots: Algorithm Could Aid Navigation, Scene Understanding

April 10, 2014 2:22 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Suppose you’re trying to navigate an unfamiliar section of a big city, and you’re using a particular cluster of skyscrapers as a reference point. Traffic and one-way streets force you to take some odd turns and, for a while, you lose sight of your landmarks. When they reappear, in order to use them for navigation, you have to be able to identify them as the same buildings you were tracking before — as well as your orientation...

New Catalog Brings NASA Software Down to Earth

April 10, 2014 2:18 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA has made available to the public, at no cost, more than 1,000 codes with its release on April 10, 2014, of a new online software catalog. Organized into 15 broad categories, the new catalog offers a wide variety of applications for use by industry, academia, other government agencies and the general public.

Monster El Gordo Most Massive Galaxy Cluster Ever Seen

April 10, 2014 2:14 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has weighed the largest known galaxy cluster in the distant universe, catalogued as ACT-CL J0102-4915, and found it definitely lives up to its nickname — El Gordo (Spanish for "the fat one"). By measuring how much the cluster's gravity warps images of galaxies in the distant background, a team of astronomers has calculated the cluster's mass to be as much as 3 million billion times the mass of our sun.

Unbreakable Security Codes Inspired by Nature

April 10, 2014 2:10 pm | by Lancaster University | News | Comments

A revolutionary new method of encrypting confidential information has been patented by scientists who were inspired by discoveries from human biology, which model how the heart and lungs coordinate their rhythms by passing information between each other.

Old World Monkey Kidney Cell

April 10, 2014 10:46 am | News | Comments

This 100x image shows detail of the microtubules and nucleus in a COS-7 old world monkey kidney, SV40 transformed cultured cell. It received an honorable mention in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition and was taken by Dr. Mariela Loschi of Buenos Aires, Argentina, using confocal microscopy.

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