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As the Earth rotates every 24 hours, the orientation of the ions in the quantum computer/detector changes with respect to the Sun’s rest frame. If space were squeezed in one direction and not another, the energies of the electrons in the ions would have s

Quantum Computer’s Extremely Precise Measurements Show Space is Not Squeezed

January 29, 2015 3:19 pm | by Robert Sanders, UC Berkeley | News | Comments

Ever since Einstein proposed his special theory of relativity, physics and cosmology have been based on the assumption that space looks the same in all directions — that it’s not squeezed in one direction relative to another. A new experiment used partially entangled atoms — identical to the qubits in a quantum computer — to demonstrate more precisely than ever before that this is true, to one part in a billion billion.

Building a Better Weather Forecast? Fine-scale Soil Moisture Data will Soon Help

January 29, 2015 12:50 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

If you were trying to forecast tomorrow's weather, you would probably look up at the sky rather...

Laser Co-creator and Nobel Laureate Charles Townes dies at 99

January 29, 2015 8:37 am | by Lisa Leff, Associated Press | News | Comments

Charles H. Townes' inspiration for the predecessor of the laser came to him while sitting on a...

Improving Data Mobility and Management for International Cosmology Workshop

January 28, 2015 3:06 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | Events

Registration is now open for a workshop on “Improving Data Mobility and Management for...

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ANSYS 16.0 Simulation Software

ANSYS 16.0 Simulation Software

January 28, 2015 2:15 pm | Ansys, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

ANSYS 16.0 simulation software delivers capabilities to verify electronics reliability and performance throughout the design process and complex electronics industry supply chains.The single-window, integrated Electronics Desktop interface brings electromagnetic, circuit and systems analysis into a seamless working environment to maximize productivity and ensure users are following simulation best practices.

A combination of the day-night band and high resolution infrared imagery from the NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed the historic blizzard near peak intensity as it moves over the New York through Boston Metropolitan areas at 06:45Z (1:45 a.m. EST) on

NASA Nighttime and Daytime Views of the Blizzard of 2015

January 28, 2015 2:07 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA and NOAA have provided nighttime and daytime views of the Blizzard of 2015. A combination of the day-night band and high-resolution infrared imagery showed the historic blizzard near peak intensity as it moves over the New York through Boston Metropolitan areas at 1:45 a.m. EST on January 27, 2015. Nighttime lights of the region were blurred by high cloud tops associated with the most intense parts of the storm.

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin in the Apollo 11 Lunar Module -- Courtesy of NASA

Astronaut Buzz Aldrin in the Apollo 11 Lunar Module

January 28, 2015 8:33 am | by NASA | News | Comments

This July 20, 1969, photograph of the interior view of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module shows astronaut Edwin E. “Buzz” Aldrin, Jr. during the lunar landing mission. The picture was taken by astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, prior to the landing. Aldrin was the second American to set foot on the lunar surface.

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The Software Sustainability Institute, a collaboration between the Universities of Southampton, Oxford, Edinburgh and Manchester, is spreading the word about its work in promoting greater use of software in research with an Android phone app, which is ava

New App Helping to Share World-class Software-enabled Research

January 27, 2015 10:04 am | by University of Southampton | News | Comments

Electronics and computer science researchers have helped to develop a new app to share world-class research and to receive the latest research news through a phone or tablet. The Software Sustainability Institute, a collaboration between the Universities of Southampton, Oxford, Edinburgh and Manchester, aims to spread the word about its work in promoting greater use of software in research.

Daisy Petal with Fungal Infection and Pollen Grains -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Daisy Petal with Fungal Infection and Pollen Grains

January 27, 2015 8:50 am | News | Comments

This 10x photo shows a daisy petal with fungal infection and pollen grains, whole mount, unstained. It won 10th Place in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope and was taken using confocal autofluorescence.

Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) quantum mechanics paradox

Extending Einstein's Spooky Actions for Use in Quantum Networks

January 26, 2015 4:18 pm | by Swinburne University of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers have demonstrated that the 1935 Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen quantum mechanics paradox may be extended to more than two optical systems, paving the way for exploration of larger quantum networks. The experiment also identified properties that may be useful in establishing secure quantum communication networks where shared sequences of numbers created between two parties need to be kept secret from a third party.

Researchers have developed 3-D maps of the age of the ice within the Greenland Ice Sheet. The new research will help scientists determine what may happen to the ice sheet as the climate changes.

3-D View of Greenland Ice Sheet Opens Window on History

January 26, 2015 3:53 pm | by Jackson School of Geosciences | News | Comments

Scientists using ice-penetrating radar data collected by NASA’s Operation IceBridge and earlier airborne campaigns have built the first comprehensive map of layers deep inside the Greenland Ice Sheet, opening a window on past climate conditions and the ice sheet’s potentially perilous future. This allows scientists to determine the age of large swaths of the second largest mass of ice on Earth.

Scroll being prepared for scanning in its container at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. Courtesy of Brent Seales

First-of-its-kind Software Enables Major Breakthrough in Reading Ancient Scrolls

January 26, 2015 2:39 pm | by University of Kentucky | News | Comments

After working for more than 10 years on unlocking an ancient piece of history, what lies inside damaged Herculaneum scrolls, UK Department of Computer Science Chair and Professor Brent Seales will accomplish the next step in allowing the world to read the scrolls, which cannot be physically opened. A major development in the venture, Seales is building software that will visualize the scrolls' writings as they would be if unrolled.

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LE-OFETs are being used to develop flexible, transparent computer screens. Copyright RDECOM/CC

Transistor Improvements on Track to make Flexible Plastic Computers a Reality

January 26, 2015 2:03 pm | by National Institute for Materials Science | News | Comments

Researchers at Japan’s National Institute for Materials Science revealed that improvements should soon be expected in the manufacture of transistors that can be used to make flexible, paper-thin computer screens.The scientists reviewed the latest developments in research on photoactive organic field-effect transistors; devices that incorporate organic semi-conductors, amplify weak electronic signals, and either emit or receive light.

Actor John Heffernan poses with old photographs and a signature of Robert Oppenheimer, at a rehearsal studio in London. Heffernan is playing the part of Robert Oppenheimer in a new play the Royal Shakespeare Company is doing about the physicist, who led t

Science Fact Holds its Own with Even the Wildest Sci-fi Scenarios

January 26, 2015 1:45 pm | by Jill Lawless, Associated Press | News | Comments

Suddenly, scientists are sexy. With Benedict Cumberbatch nominated for multiple trophies as Alan Turing and Eddie Redmayne turning heads as Stephen Hawking, young British actors playing scientists are all the rage this season. So, it's good timing for the Royal Shakespeare Company, whose new play, Oppenheimer, features John Heffernan as American scientist J. Robert Oppenheimer, leader of the team that developed the first nuclear weapon.

Jupiter’s Cratered Moon Callisto -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL/DLR

Jupiter’s Cratered Moon Callisto

January 26, 2015 11:08 am | by European Space Agency (ESA) | News | Comments

The speckled object depicted here is Callisto, Jupiter’s second largest moon. This image was taken in May 2001 by NASA’s Galileo spacecraft, which studied Jupiter and its moons from 1995 until 2003. Similar in appearance to a golf ball, Callisto is covered almost uniformly with pockmarks and craters across its surface, evidence of relentless collisions.

Kennette Benedict, executive director, Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, stands beside the old Doomsday Clock which showed five minutes until midnight during a news conference to announce the new clock reads three minutes until midnight. The clock advanc

We're Two Minutes Closer to Doomsday

January 23, 2015 2:49 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists says Earth is now closer to human-caused doomsday than it has been in more than 30 years because of global warming and nuclear weaponry. But other experts say that's way too gloomy. The advocacy group, founded by the creators of the atomic bomb, moved their famed "Doomsday Clock" ahead two minutes on January 22, 2015. It said the world is now three minutes from a catastrophic midnight.

This simulation, which models a rheometer with particles, can help determine how well a rheometer design works at characterizing a fluid. The NIST team is performing a number of simulations like this one, varying the shape and number of blades to better i

Predicting Concrete Flow Properties from Simple Measurements

January 23, 2015 2:44 pm | by NIST | News | Comments

Just because concrete is the most widely used building material in human history doesn’t mean it can’t be improved. A recent study using DOE Office of Science supercomputers has led to a new way to predict concrete’s flow properties from simple measurements. The results should help accelerate the design of a new generation of high-performance and eco-friendly cement-based materials by reducing time and costs associated with R&D.

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This sequence of graphs illustrates the application of the researchers' technique to a real-world computer vision problem. The solution to each successive problem (red balls) is used to initialize (green arrows) the search for a solution to the next. Cour

Optimizing Optimization Algorithms: How to Get the Best Results

January 23, 2015 2:36 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Optimization algorithms, which try to find the minimum values of mathematical functions, are everywhere in engineering. Among other things, they’re used to evaluate design tradeoffs, to assess control systems, and to find patterns in data. One way to solve a difficult optimization problem is to first reduce it to a related but much simpler problem, then gradually add complexity back in ...

OnSight uses real rover data to create a 3-D simulation of the Martian environment where mission scientists can "meet" to discuss rover operations. Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

Holographic Computing will allow Scientists to Work on Mars

January 23, 2015 2:24 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA and Microsoft have teamed up to develop software called OnSight, a new technology that will enable scientists to work virtually on Mars using wearable technology called Microsoft HoloLens. Developed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, OnSight will give scientists a means to plan and, along with the Mars Curiosity rover, conduct science operations on the Red Planet.

The Brightest Comet in Earth's Sky -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

The Brightest Comet in Earth's Sky

January 23, 2015 1:55 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) is one of more than 32 comets imaged by NASA's NEOWISE mission from December 2013 to December 2014. This image combines a series of observations made in November 2013, when Lovejoy was 1.7 astronomical units from the sun. The image spans half of one degree. It shows the comet moving in a mostly west and slightly south direction.

In April 2014, researchers flew over a site in southwest Greenland to find that a sub-glacial lake had drained away. This photo shows the crater left behind, as well as a deep crack in the ice. Photo by Stephen Price, Los Alamos National Lab, courtesy of

Two Mysterious Lakes beneath Greenland Ice Sheet Gone within Weeks

January 22, 2015 2:38 pm | by Pam Frost Gorder, The Ohio State University | News | Comments

Researchers who are building the highest-resolution map of the Greenland Ice Sheet to date have made a surprising discovery: two lakes of meltwater that pooled beneath the ice and rapidly drained away. One lake once held billions of gallons of water and emptied to form a mile-wide crater in just a few weeks. The other lake has filled and emptied twice in the last two years.

Micro Algae -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Micro Algae

January 22, 2015 2:08 pm | News | Comments

This 40x photo of micro algae won 17th Place in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Rogelio Moreno of Panama using polarized light and lambda plate.

Princeton University researchers have built a rice grain-sized microwave laser, or "maser," powered by single electrons that demonstrates the fundamental interactions between light and moving electrons, and is a major step toward building quantum-computin

Rice-sized Laser, Powered One Electron at a Time, Bodes Well for Quantum Computing

January 21, 2015 1:19 pm | by Catherine Zandonella, Princeton University | News | Comments

Researchers have built a rice-grain-sized laser powered by single electrons tunneling through artificial atoms known as quantum dots. The tiny microwave laser, or "maser," is a demonstration of the fundamental interactions between light and moving electrons. The researchers built the device — which uses about one-billionth the electric current needed to power a hair dryer — while exploring how to use quantum dots.

Shubham Banerjee works on his lego robotics braille printer. Banerjee launched a company to develop a low-cost machine to print Braille materials for the blind based on a prototype he built with his Lego robotics kit. Last month, Intel invested in his sta

Eighth-grader Builds Braille Printer with Legos, Launches Company

January 21, 2015 1:02 pm | by Terence Chea, Associated Press | News | Comments

In Silicon Valley, it's never too early to become an entrepreneur. Just ask 13-year-old Shubham Banerjee. The California eighth-grader has launched a company to develop low-cost machines to print Braille, the tactile writing system for the visually impaired. Tech giant Intel recently invested in his startup, Braigo Labs.

Training for Spacewalks – Courtesy of ESA

Training for Spacewalks at NASA's Johnson Space Center

January 21, 2015 12:34 pm | News | Comments

European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Pesquet training for spacewalks at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, USA, with ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano. Pesquet will fly to the International Space Station in 2016. Parmitano finished his six-month Volare mission in November 2013.

This artist's rendering provided by the European Space Agency shows the Beagle-2 lander. The spacecraft went missing on Christmas Day, 2003, when it was supposed to land on Mars and start transmitting data back to Earth. On Friday, Jan. 16, 2015, more tha

Mystery Solved: Missing Beagle-2 Finally Located on Mars, Deployment Failed in Final Stage

January 20, 2015 2:47 pm | by Gregory Katz, Associated Press | News | Comments

It turns out the Beagle has landed after all — but it never called home. The gone-but-not-forgotten spacecraft Beagle-2 went AWOL on Christmas Day, 2003, when it was supposed to land on Mars and start transmitting data back to Earth. Instead, the British-built craft went dark. After several months, it was declared lost — presumed to have been destroyed during its approach or while trying to land on the red planet.

Venus’ south pole -- Courtesy of ESA/VIRTIS/INAF-IASF/Obs. de Paris-LESIA/Univ. Oxford

Venus Express Snaps Swirling Vortex

January 20, 2015 2:09 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

This ghostly puff of smoke is actually a mass of swirling gas and cloud at Venus’ south pole, as seen by the Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer aboard ESA’s Venus Express spacecraft. Venus has a very choppy and fast-moving atmosphere — although wind speeds are sluggish at the surface, they reach dizzying speeds of around 400 km/h at the altitude of the cloud tops, some 70 km above the surface.

Mouse Brain Vasculature -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Mouse Brain Vasculature

January 16, 2015 2:14 pm | News | Comments

This 2x photo of mouse brain vasculature won 14th Place in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using light-sheet fluorescent microscopy.

The University of Texas at Austin took home top honors with a new app called CallScout, designed to give Texas residents fast and easy access to information about social services in their area.

IBM Watson Group Awards UT Austin $100K to Bring Social Services App to Residents

January 16, 2015 2:08 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM has announced the first winner of its Watson University Competition, part of the company's partnership with top universities through its cognitive computing academic initiative. The winning team of student entrepreneurs from the University of Texas at Austin will receive $100,000 in total in seed funding to help launch a business based on their Watson app, which offers the promise of improved citizen services.

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