Advertisement
Data Solutions
Subscribe to Data Solutions

The Lead

The Carrington-L5 mission concept. Courtesy of Airbus Defence and Space (UK)

Continuous 5-day Space Weather Forecasts Proposed

July 7, 2015 2:09 pm | by Royal Astronomical Society | News | Comments

Coronal mass ejections, billion-ton solar plasma eruptions moving toward the Earth at up to 2500 kilometers per second, can cause extensive and expensive disruption by damaging power, satellite and communication networks. A consortium is proposing an operational mission, Carrington-L5, to give a five-day warning of hazardous solar activity that could inflict severe damage to our infrastructure.

Fascinating New Color Images Reveal Evenly-spaced Spots along Pluto Equator

July 7, 2015 12:34 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

New color images from NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft show two very different faces of the...

Catalan Coast and Barcelona, Spain

July 7, 2015 12:30 pm | News | Comments

This radar image captures part of Catalonia in northeastern Spain, including the city of...

DT7816 Real Time ARM-Based Data Acquisition Module

July 7, 2015 12:23 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The DT7816, a real-time ARM-based, high throughput, high accuracy, simultaneous data acquisition...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

The 200X image shows a calcite chip infested with Mastigocoleus testarum strain BC008 (euendolithic cyanobacterium), in-situ. The photograph received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes ex

Calcite Chip infested with Cyanobacteria

July 6, 2015 12:35 pm | News | Comments

The 200X image shows a calcite chip infested with euendolithic cyanobacterium, in-situ. The photograph received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using a Leica SP5 LASER confocal microscope.

The Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) is a major core capability within NASA’s Earth Science Data Systems Program. EOSDIS ingests, processes, archives and distributes data from a large number of Earth observing satellites. EOSDIS

NASA Awards $240 Million for Earth Science Data System

July 6, 2015 12:28 pm | by Raytheon | News | Comments

ASA's Goddard Space Flight Center has awarded the Raytheon Company a five year contract valued at up to $240 million to continue its support of the Earth Observing Systems Data and Information System (EOSDIS). This system ingests, archives and makes earth science data available to the scientific community worldwide. EOSIDS is NASA's portal for earth science data provided by both NASA and upcoming international satellite missions.

Gravitational lensing: Neronov and colleagues used a star sitting between their target and Earth to ‘zoom in’ to the black hole and measure the size of the jet-emitting region — the first time this method has ever been used with gamma rays.

Astronomers use Cosmic Gravity to Create Black Hole Scope

July 6, 2015 12:02 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

The Integral, Fermi and Swift space observatories have used the magnifying power of a cosmic lens to explore the inner regions of a supermassive black hole. Researchers used a star sitting between their target and Earth to ‘zoom in’ to the black hole and measure the size of the jet-emitting region — the first time this method has ever been used with gamma rays

Advertisement
Dan Rockmore, director of the Neukom Institute for Computational Science, is seeking artificial intelligence algorithms that create “human-quality” short stories, sonnets and dance music sets that will be pitted against human-produced literature, poetry a

Artificial Intelligence Contests Showcase Computer-generated Creativity

July 6, 2015 11:51 am | by Holly Ramer, Associated Press | News | Comments

Can an algorithm pass for an author? Can a robot rock the house? A series of contests is about to find out. Dartmouth is seeking AI algorithms that create human-quality short stories, sonnets and dance music that will be pitted against human-produced literature, poetry and music. Judges won't know which is which. The goal is to determine whether people can distinguish between the two and maybe even prefer computer-generated creativity.

William Weaver is an associate professor in the Department of Integrated Science, Business, and Technology at La Salle University.

If These Walls Could Talk: The Internet of Things will save lives, time and treasure

July 6, 2015 9:02 am | by William Weaver, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

On April 15, 2014, a Wilmington, DE, business owner, was driving home on the I-495 bypass, as he had done for 25 years. While traveling on the twin three-lane bridges that span the Christiana River, he noticed that the normally parallel bridges were offset by nearly 18 inches in height and the apparent listing of one of the lanes had created a large gap between the bridges through which the ground was visible, some four stories below.

What your Clothes may say about You

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — June 26-July 2

July 2, 2015 11:55 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

Heading into the Independence Day weekend, materials that compute — what your clothes may say about you; Sandia’s Z machine solving an 80-year-old puzzle; an amazing satellite view of the San Francisco Bay area; a monster black hole waking after 26 years; a tactical toss camera that sends panoramic images back to a smartphone; and breaking key barriers that limit the distance information can travel in fiber optic cables, are all top hits.

Unlike other parts of the United States, summer thunderstorms across the Great Plains are most common after sunset.

NASA Takes to the Skies to Study Nighttime Thunderstorms

July 2, 2015 9:16 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA has joined a multi-agency field campaign studying summer storm systems in the U.S. Great Plains to find out why they often form after the sun goes down instead of during the heat of the day. Participants from eight research laboratories and 14 universities are collecting storm data to find out how and why they form. NASA’s DC-8 airborne laboratory began research flights June 30, 2015, from the Salina Regional Airport, Salina, KS.

Galactic Pyrotechnics on Display -- Courtesy of NASA/CXC/JPL-Caltech/STScI/NSF/NRAO/VLA – Click to enlarge

Galactic Pyrotechnics on Display

July 2, 2015 8:59 am | by NASA | News | Comments

A galaxy 23 million light-years away is the site of impressive, ongoing, fireworks. Rather than paper, powder and fire, this galactic light show involves a giant black hole, shock waves and vast reservoirs of gas. This galactic fireworks display is taking place in a spiral galaxy like the Milky Way. The galaxy is famous, however, for something our galaxy doesn't have — two extra spiral arms that glow in X-ray, optical and radio light.

Advertisement
The software generates fictional mini-narratives or storylines, using natural language processing techniques and a database of facts mined from the Web. It then inverts or twists the facts to create ‘what-ifs’. The result is often incongruous, “What if th

Can Computers be Creative?

July 2, 2015 8:24 am | by European Commission | News | Comments

The EU-funded What-if Machine (WHIM) project not only generates fictional storylines, but also judges their potential usefulness and appeal. It represents a major advance in the field of computational creativity. Science rarely looks at the whimsical, but that is changing as a result of the aptly named WHIM project. The ambitious project is building a software system able to invent and evaluate fictional ideas.

A robot developed by Toshiba is demonstrated at its laboratory in Yokohama, near Tokyo. As Japan struggles in the early stages of decades-long cleanup of the Fukushima nuclear crisis, Toshiba has developed the robot that raises its tail like a scorpion an

Nuclear Scorpion Robot will look into Fukushima Reactor, Collect Data

July 1, 2015 4:07 pm | by Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press | News | Comments

A new robot that raises its tail like a scorpion is scheduled to look at melted nuclear fuel inside one of the three wrecked Fukushima reactors in Japan. Toshiba, co-developer of the "scorpion" crawler, said the robot will venture into the Unit 2 reactor's primary containment vessel in August after a month of training for its handlers. Officials hope the robot can see the fuel in the pressure vessel in the middle of the reactor.

A 24-minute, high-resolution science documentary narrated Benedict Cumberbatch about the dynamics of the sun that features data-driven visualizations produced by the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA) at the University of Illinois at U

Solar Superstorms show Highlights Extremely Powerful Computer Simulation, Visualization

July 1, 2015 3:35 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

A 24-minute, high-resolution science documentary narrated Benedict Cumberbatch about the dynamics of the sun that features data-driven visualizations produced by NCSA at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign debuted on June 30, 2015, at the Louisiana Art & Science Museum in Baton Rouge before rolling out to more than a dozen planetariums and science centers around the world.

Artist’s conception of a quantum frequency comb. Courtesy of Nicoletta Barolini

Quantum Entanglement Method Vastly Increases How Much Data can be carried in a Photon

July 1, 2015 3:03 pm | by Matthew Chin, UCLA | News | Comments

A team of researchers led by UCLA electrical engineers has demonstrated a new way to harness light particles, or photons, that are connected to each other and act in unison no matter how far apart they are — a phenomenon known as quantum entanglement. In previous studies, photons have typically been entangled by one dimension of their quantum properties — usually the direction of their polarization.

Flying over an Aurora -- Courtesy of NASA – Click to enlarge

Flying over an Aurora

July 1, 2015 2:32 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA astronaut Scott Kelly (@StationCDRKelly) captured photographs and video of auroras from the International Space Station on June 22, 2015. Kelly wrote, "Yesterday's aurora was an impressive show from 250 miles up. Good morning from the International Space Station! #YearInSpace

Advertisement
Live Human Mesothelial Cell -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlargeThis 600X image shows a live cultured human mesothelial cell activated to produce hyaluronan. It received an honorable mention in t

Live Human Mesothelial Cell

June 30, 2015 12:33 pm | News | Comments

This 600X image shows a live cultured human mesothelial cell activated to produce hyaluronan. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope and was taken using confocal microscopy.

Results from Sandia National Laboratories’ Z machine provides hard data for an 85-year-old theory that could correct mistaken estimates of the planet Saturn’s age. Courtesy of NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Sandia's Z Machine helps solve Saturn's 2-billion-year Age Gap

June 29, 2015 1:50 pm | by Sandia National Labs | News | Comments

Planets tend to cool as they get older, but Saturn is hotter than astrophysicists say it should be without some additional energy source. The unexplained heat has caused a 2-billion-year discrepancy for computer models estimating Saturn’s age. Experiments at Sandia’s Z machine verified an 80-year-old untested proposition that molecular hydrogen, normally an insulator, becomes metallic if squeezed by enough pressure...

 	http://www.scientificcomputing.com/sites/scientificcomputing.com/files/Stars_forming_in_the_Taurus_Molecular_Cloud.jpg

Stars forming in the Taurus Molecular Cloud

June 26, 2015 4:57 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

The intricate jumble depicted in this image from ESA’s Herschel space observatory shows the distribution of gas and dust in the Taurus Molecular Cloud, a giant stellar nursery about 450 light-years away in the constellation Taurus, the Bull. Dust is a minor but crucial ingredient in this diffuse mixture that provides the raw material for stars to form.

Are you a Tau-ist? Pi Day is Under Attack

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — June 19-25

June 26, 2015 12:41 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

As we entered our first week of summer, the week’s biggest hits included a strong bent toward several “lighter” mathematical topics: learning how math drives Formula 1 and launches Angry Birds, inspiring young minds at MoMATH, and Pi Day under attack. You also won’t want to miss molecules exhibiting strange, exotic states, hot lava flows on Venus, and some of the coolest experimental technology showcased at this year’s Paris Air Show.

g officers and rescuers a safe glimpse into the unknown.

Tactical Toss Camera sends Panoramic Images Back to Smartphone

June 26, 2015 11:18 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT | News | Comments

Unseen areas are troublesome for police and first responders: Rooms can harbor dangerous gunmen, while collapsed buildings can conceal survivors. In July, a startup will release its first line of tactical spheres, equipped with cameras and sensors that can be tossed into potentially hazardous areas to instantly transmit panoramic images of those areas back to a smartphone, giving officers and rescuers a safe glimpse into the unknown.

Live Zebrafish Embryo -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Live Zebrafish Embryo

June 26, 2015 10:33 am | News | Comments

The image shows an entire live zebrafish embryo at 22 hours post-fertilization and single-cell resolution, enabling an insightful view of its early morphogenetic development. The embryo’s cell nuclei were fluorescently labeled and imaged with a SiMView custom light-sheet microscope. Color encodes depth in the image.

Black hole with stellar companion

Monster Black Hole wakes after 26 Years

June 25, 2015 9:56 am | by ESA | News | Comments

Over the past week, ESA's Integral satellite has been observing an exceptional outburst of high-energy light produced by a black hole that is devouring material from its stellar companion. X-rays and gamma rays point to some of the most extreme phenomena in the Universe, such as stellar explosions, powerful outbursts and black holes feasting on their surroundings.

Developing so-called "materials that compute" addresses limitations inherent to the systems currently used by researchers to perform either chemical computing or oscillator-based computing, and the hybrid model points to the potential of designing synthet

What your Clothes may say about You

June 25, 2015 9:44 am | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

Moving closer to the possibility of "materials that compute" and wearing your computer on your sleeve, researchers have designed a responsive hybrid material that is fueled by an oscillatory chemical reaction and can perform computations based on changes in the environment or movement, and potentially even respond to human vital signs. The material system is sufficiently small and flexible to ultimately be integrated into a fabric.

The origami robot folds itself up from a flat sheet of plastic when heated. Courtesy of Christine Daniloff/MIT

Centimeter-long Origami Robot Climbs Inclines, Swims, Carries Loads Twice its Weight

June 25, 2015 8:46 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

At the recent International Conference on Robotics and Automation, researchers presented a printable origami robot that folds itself up from a flat sheet of plastic when heated and measures about 1 cm from front to back. Weighing only a third of a gram, the robot can swim, climb an incline, traverse rough terrain, and carry a load twice its weight. Other than the self-folding plastic sheet, the only component is a permanent magnet.

Jill M. Hruby was named the next president and director of Sandia National Laboratories, the country’s largest national lab, on June 22, 2015. When she steps into her new role July 17, she will be the first woman to lead a national security laboratory. A

Jill Hruby will be First Woman to Lead National Security Lab

June 25, 2015 8:34 am | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

Jill Hruby was named the next president and director of Sandia National Laboratories, the country’s largest national lab. When she steps into her new role July 17, she will be the first woman to lead a national security laboratory. A Sandia staff member and manager for the past 32 years, Hruby most recently oversaw Sandia efforts in nuclear, biological and chemical security, homeland security, counterterrorism and energy security.

Wandering Jew Leaf Stomata -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Wandering Jew Leaf Stomata

June 25, 2015 8:20 am | News | Comments

This 40x image of wandering jew leaf stomata — pores found in the epidermis that control gas exchange — received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photograph was taken using brightfield, epi illumination and image stacking.

From his hospital bed, a disabled patient is capable of controlling a telepresence robot and interacting with people he meets over Skype. Courtesy of Alain Herzog / EPFL

Quadriplegics Pilot Telepresence Robot Remotely with Thoughts

June 24, 2015 2:15 pm | by EPFL | News | Comments

For someone suffering from paralysis or limited mobility, visiting with other people is extremely difficult. Researchers have been working on a revolutionary brain-machine approach to restore a sense of independence to the disabled. The idea is to remotely control a robot from home with one's thoughts. The research, involving numerous subjects located in different countries, produced excellent results in both human and technical terms.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading