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New observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile have revealed alignments over the largest structures ever discovered in the Universe. A European research team has found that the rotation axes of the central supermassive black holes in a sample o

Spooky Alignment of Quasars Crosses Billions of Light-years

November 20, 2014 3:39 pm | by ESO | News | Comments

New observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile have revealed alignments over the largest structures ever discovered in the Universe. A European research team has found that the rotation axes of the central supermassive black holes in a sample of quasars are parallel to each other over distances of billions of light-years.

Shaved Titanium

November 20, 2014 2:56 pm | News | Comments

This 100x image of Titanium Shavings received an Image of Distinction designation in the...

Snug Ride Home from ISS

November 19, 2014 2:32 pm | News | Comments

The Soyuz TMA-13M crew, European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Alexander Gerst, Roscosmos...

High Performance Computing for All (Yes, You Too…)

November 19, 2014 1:34 pm | by Gilad Shainer, HPC Advisory Council | Blogs | Comments

High-performance computing can help a business to become more efficient and more productive. And...

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This 4x image of Aphaenogaster senilis (ant worker) received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photo was compose

Ant at Work

November 18, 2014 3:33 pm | News | Comments

This 4x image of Aphaenogaster senilis (ant worker) received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photo was composed using image stacking by Dimitri Seeboruth of Paris, France.

Nexio simulation is a French SME located in Toulouse and specialized in electromagnetic simulation software for marine, space, defense and aeronautics domains applications.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Nexio

November 17, 2014 6:19 pm | Award Winners

Nexio simulation is a French SME located in Toulouse and specialized in electromagnetic simulation software for marine, space, defense and aeronautics domains applications.

To heat fusion plasmas to the millions of degrees Celsius needed for fusion reactions scientists inject megawatts of electromagnetic energy from carefully engineered radiofrequency antennas. The generated electromagnetic waves interact with the fusion pla

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Tech-X Corporation

November 17, 2014 5:23 pm | Award Winners

To heat magnetically confined plasmas to the millions of degrees needed for fusion reactions, scientists inject megawatts of electromagnetic energy from carefully engineered radiofrequency antennas. The generated electromagnetic waves interact with the plasma in complex ways.

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This 100x image of Polypodium virginianum (fern) sorus received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The confocal image

What’s On a Fern

November 17, 2014 3:46 pm | News | Comments

This 100x image of Polypodium virginianum (fern) sorus received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The confocal image was taken by Dr. Igor Siwanowicz of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Janelia Farm Research Campus in Ashburn, Virginia.

Pollen -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Pollen Close-up

November 14, 2014 2:43 pm | News | Comments

This 40X photo shows a close-up of pollen. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken by Shamuel Silberman ofNeve Monosson, Israel, using reflected light and fiber optic illumination.

Steve Conway is Research VP, HPC at IDC.

Small and Medium Enterprises Enter the Limelight

November 14, 2014 11:43 am | by Steve Conway | Articles | Comments

A decade of close scrutiny has shed much more light on the technical computing needs of small and medium enterprises (SMEs), but they are still shrouded in partial darkness. That’s hardly surprising for a diverse global group with millions of members ranging from automotive suppliers and shotgun genomics labs to corner newsstands and strip mall nail salons.

IBM and Pathway Genomics are aiming to revolutionize the health and wellness industry by leveraging the natural language processing and cognitive capabilities of Watson. For the first time consumers will be able to ask the Pathway Panorama app questions t

IBM Watson Group Invests in Pathway Genomics

November 13, 2014 2:28 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

Cognitive apps are in market today and continue to change the way professionals and consumers make decisions. To help accelerate this transformation, the IBM Watson Group announced an investment in Pathway Genomics, a clinical laboratory that offers genetic testing services globally, to help deliver the first-ever cognitive consumer-facing app based on genetics from a user’s personal makeup.

Microscopic Clam Larva -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Microscopic Clam Larva

November 13, 2014 1:47 pm | News | Comments

This 60X photo shows microscopic clam larva (glochidia). It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using confocal microscopy and autofluorescence.

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John Joyce is a laboratory informatics specialist based in Richmond, VA.

Holiday Shopping? 25 Gifts Sheldon and Friends would Love

November 13, 2014 8:40 am | by John R. Joyce, Ph.D. | Blogs | Comments

Welcome to Scientific Computing's annual holiday gift guide. In this section, we've focused on identifying gifts suitable for the true Geeks out there. However, I believe everyone has a little geek in them, it just needs to be properly nurtured for it to catch fire.

Specific bits of a digital image file that have been replaced with the bits of a secret steganographic payload permit a covert agent to post top-secret documents on their Facebook wall by simply uploading what appear to be cute images of kittens on any ty

Leading the Eyewitness: Digital Image Forensics in a Megapixel World

November 12, 2014 3:42 pm | by William Weaver, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

Current research in the area of digital image forensics is developing better ways to convert image files into frequencies, such as using wavelet transforms in addition to more traditional cosine transforms and more sensitive methods for determining if each area of an image belongs to the whole.

By using a technique called ion doping, the team of researchers have discovered a material that could use light to bring together different computing functions into one component, leading to all-optical systems.

Lighting the Way for Super-fast Computers

November 12, 2014 3:28 pm | by University of Surrey | News | Comments

Findings demonstrate how glass can be manipulated to create a material that will enable computers to transfer information using light. This development could significantly increase computer processing speeds and power in the future. The findings show that it’s possible to change the electronic properties of amorphous chalcogenides, a glass material integral to data technologies such as CDs and DVDs.

Buckling Hydrogel Bilayer -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Buckling Hydrogel Bilayer

November 12, 2014 3:23 pm | News | Comments

This 10X photo shows the buckling of a hydrogel bilayer due to swelling. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using fluorescence.

University of Waikato Master of Engineering student Pinwei Jin with his Snake Robot prototype at the Carter Holt Harvey Pulp & Paper Engineering Design Show.

Snake Robot to the Rescue

November 11, 2014 3:17 pm | by University of Waikato | News | Comments

Pinwei Jin has designed and built a remote control robotic snake, which he hopes will be used in the future for rescue operations. Differing from the existing mobile rescue robot systems currently in the market place, Jin says his Snake Robot provides the flexibility of movement needed in cluttered and irregular environments created by disasters.

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The USS Macon inside Hangar One at Moffett Field on October 15, 1933 — following a transcontinental flight from Lakehurst, New Jersey.

Google Signs 60-year, $1 Billion NASA Lease

November 11, 2014 3:07 pm | by Brandon Bailey, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Google has signed a long-term lease for part of a historic Navy air base, where it plans to renovate three massive hangars and use them for projects involving aviation, space exploration and robotics. The giant Internet company will pay $1.16 billion in rent over 60 years for the property, which also includes a working air field, golf course and other buildings. The 1,000-acre site is part of the former Moffett Field Naval Air Station.

Parasitic Snails on a Featherstar -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Parasitic Snails on a Featherstar

November 11, 2014 2:30 pm | News | Comments

This 10X photo shows parasitic snails (Annulobalcis maculatus) on an echinoderm featherstar (Comanthus wahlbergi). It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using a stereomicroscope with LED light and strobes

This simulation depicts two electron bunches — containing 5 billion to 6 billion electrons each — that were accelerated by a laser-generated column of plasma inside an oven of hot lithium gas during experiments at SLAC. Courtesy of SLAC National Accelerat

Milestone in Accelerating Particles with Plasma Powerful Enough to Drive Future Accelerators

November 10, 2014 12:40 pm | by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists from the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and the University of California, Los Angeles have shown that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators. This could greatly expand their use in areas such as medicine, national security, industry and high-energy physics research.

This artist's concept shows the Comet Siding Spring approaching Mars with NASA’s orbiters preparing to make science observations of this unique encounter. A pristine distant comet created a once-in-eight-million-year fireworks show on Mars and no humans w

Comet Creates Once-in-8-million-year Fireworks Show above Mars

November 10, 2014 12:37 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

A pristine distant comet created a once-in-8-million-year fireworks show above Mars last month. But no one got to see it live. New NASA data from satellites circling Mars shows that when the comet named Siding Spring skimmed the red planet, tons of comet dust bombarded the Martian sky with thousands of fireballs an hour. It warped the Martian atmosphere leaving all sorts of metals and an eerie yellow afterglow.

Small Floating Sea Slug -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Small Floating Sea Slug

November 10, 2014 11:51 am | News | Comments

This 10X photo shows a small floating sea slug, Clione (Pteropoda:Gymnosomata). It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using stereomicroscopy.

A time-lapse photograph of the CIBER rocket launch, taken from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia in 2013. This was the last of four launches of the Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER). Sub-orbital rockets are smaller than those that boo

Rocket Experiment Finds Surprising Cosmic Light

November 7, 2014 3:37 pm | by Kathy Svitil, Caltech | News | Comments

Using an experiment carried into space on a NASA suborbital rocket, astronomers have detected a diffuse cosmic glow that appears to represent more light than that produced by known galaxies in the universe. The researchers say the best explanation is that the cosmic light originates from stars that were stripped away from their parent galaxies and flung out into space as those galaxies collided and merged with other galaxies.

The world’s most advanced bionic hand was tested with the help of amputee Dennis Aabo Sørensen who was able to grasp objects intuitively and identify what he was touching, while blindfolded. © LifeHand2

Neural Interface allows Natural Control of World’s Most Advanced Bionic Hand

November 7, 2014 3:27 pm | by European Commission | News | Comments

A prosthetic hand, which provides a sense of touch acute enough to handle an egg, has been completed and is now exploited by the NEBIAS project after 10 years of EU-funded research. The world’s most advanced bionic hand was tested with the help of amputee Dennis Aabo Sørensen who was able to grasp objects intuitively and identify what he was touching, while blindfolded.

This diagram shows how researchers compute average traffic flows through a wider system of highways. Courtesy of the researchers

New Model Provides Accurate Traffic Flow Predictions

November 7, 2014 2:46 pm | by David L. Chandler, MIT | News | Comments

A reliable way of predicting the flow of traffic could be a great convenience for commuters, as well as a significant energy-saver. During an emergency evacuation following a natural disaster, reliable predictions of the best routes could even be a lifesaver. Now a team of researchers from MIT, the University of Notre Dame, and elsewhere has devised what they say is an effective and relatively simple formula for making such predictions.

Mustard Weed Flower Embryo -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Mustard Weed Flower Embryo

November 7, 2014 12:20 pm | News | Comments

This 630X photo shows a mustard weed (Arabidopsis thaliana) embryo within its seed coat. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using confocal microscopy.

JMP 11: Remarkable Statistics, Graphics and Integration Designed for the Technician, Scientist, Engineer and Businessperson

JMP 11: Remarkable Statistics, Graphics and Integration

November 7, 2014 10:30 am | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

It should come as no surprise to readers of this column that JMP is a personal favorite and, along with SAS, one of my most-used programs. There are a number of reasons for this. Of the many advantages that most packages can offer, breadth and depth of the statistics offered, quality of the diagnostics, interconnectivity of graphics with both data and analyses, and ease-of-use issues are uppermost in my mind as most desirable.

Highly motivated to organize the Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing, Paul Messina reflects on what makes the program unique and a can’t-miss opportunity for the next generation of HPC scientists.

A Q&A with Paul Messina, Director of Science for the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

November 6, 2014 4:22 pm | by Brian Grabowski, Argonne National Laboratory | Articles | Comments

Highly motivated to organize the Argonne Training Program on Extreme-Scale Computing, Paul Messina reflects on what makes the program unique and a can’t-miss opportunity for the next generation of HPC scientists. ATPESC is an intense, two-week program that covers most of the topics and skills necessary to conduct computational science and engineering research on today’s and tomorrow’s high-end computers.

UW students Darby Losey (shown) and Jose Ceballos were positioned in two different buildings on campus. The sender thinks about firing a cannon at various points throughout a computer game. That signal is sent over the Web directly to the brain of the rec

Direct Brain-to-brain Interface Operates between Humans in Real Time

November 6, 2014 4:05 pm | by Michelle Ma, University of Washington | News | Comments

Sometimes, words just complicate things. What if our brains could communicate directly with each other, bypassing the need for language? Researchers have successfully replicated a direct brain-to-brain connection between pairs of people as part of a scientific study following the team’s initial demonstration a year ago.

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