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Pine Island, the Largest Glacier in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet -- Courtesy of Hogg/University of Leeds, Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM) Copernicus data (2015)/ESA/A – click to enlarge

Pine Island, the Largest Glacier in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

March 27, 2015 10:45 am | by ESA | News | Comments

This image combining two scans by Sentinel-1A’s radar shows that parts of the Pine Island glacier flowed about 100 meters (in pink) between March 3 and March 15, 2015. Light blue represents stable ice on either side of the stream.

Robot Guide Dogs could be Firefighters’ Eyes

March 26, 2015 10:59 am | by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) | News | Comments

Firefighters moving through smoke-filled buildings could save vital seconds and find it easier...

Expedition 43 Soyuz Rolls Out for Launch

March 26, 2015 9:12 am | by NASA | News | Comments

The Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft is rolled out by train to the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome...

Lights in Over 7,000 Cities will go out for Earth Hour this Saturday

March 25, 2015 5:26 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

The World Wildlife Fund’s ninth annual Earth Hour is set to roll across the globe at 8:30 pm...

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Mouse Heart Muscle Cells -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Mouse Heart Muscle Cells

March 25, 2015 2:02 pm | News | Comments

This 400x photo of mouse cardiac ventricular myocytes (isolated heart muscle cells) received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using confocal microscopy.

Online negotiations can be improved if computer programs take social values, such as honesty and trust into account when bargaining with human counterparts. © tatniz

Solving the Trust Equation: Socially Intelligent Computers can turn Difficult Negotiations into Win-win Situations

March 25, 2015 12:19 pm | by A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing | News | Comments

Programming fundamental social intelligence skills into software agents can make humans substantially more trusting of online negotiations, which can lead to superior outcomes in e-commerce transactions, finds a team of technology researchers, business experts and cognitive scientists. People are naturally skeptical of negotiations lacking face-to-face contact...

"The Web of Space" sculpture by John Safer. A miniature version of this sculpture is given to the National Air and Space Museum Trophy Award winners every year. Courtesy of Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

Kepler Wins National Air and Space Museum Trophy

March 25, 2015 11:55 am | by NASA | News | Comments

The team in charge of NASA's Kepler mission, responsible for history's first detection of Earth-sized planets orbiting other suns in their temperate "habitable zone," received the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum's highest group honor at a ceremony in Washington on March 25. Kepler was awarded the 2015 Trophy for Current Achievement, which honors outstanding endeavors in the fields of aerospace science and technology.

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Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi helped to outline the first-ever computer simulation for research purposes — of a one-dimensional vibrating nonlinear string. Courtesy of Department of Energy

Mathematicians Solve 60-year-old Fermi-Pasta-Ulam Problem

March 24, 2015 3:05 pm | by University of East Anglia | News | Comments

A 60-year-old math problem first put forward by Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi has been solved. In 1955, a team of scientists led by Fermi used a computer for the first time to try to solve a numerical experiment. The outcome wasn’t what they were expecting, and the complexity of the problem underpinned the then-new field of non-linear physics and paved the way for six decades of new thinking. Chaos theory is just one of the theories...  

President Barack Obama tries out a wheelchair with a design modification by Kaitlin Reed, 16, of Dover, MA, next to Mohammed Sayed, 16, of Cambridge, MA, who is originally from Afghanistan, during a tour of the White House Science Fair at the White House

Obama, Wowed by Young Scientists, Announces New STEM Pledges

March 24, 2015 2:43 pm | by Jim Kuhnhenn, Associated Press | News | Comments

The small Lego machine inside the White House whirred, and in a moment it was turning the pages of a story book. One page flipped, then another, ever faster as President Barack Obama marveled at its efficiency. The contraption's eventual aim would be to allow paralyzed or arthritic patients to read books despite their disabilities. "How did you figure this out?" Obama, impressed, asked its inventors.

Galactic Pair -- Courtesy of NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) – click to enlarge

Galactic Pair: Porpoise or Penguin?

March 24, 2015 2:16 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

What do you see in this image: a porpoise or a penguin? Amateur astronomers have nicknamed this pretty galactic pair after both of these creatures — the graceful curve of a dolphin or porpoise can be seen in the blue- and red-tinged shape towards the bottom of the frame, and when paired with the pale, glowing orb just beneath it, the duo bear a striking resemblance to a bird or penguin guarding an egg.

LPW POWDERSOLVE Metal Powder Characterization Management System

LPW POWDERSOLVE Metal Powder Characterization Management System

March 24, 2015 2:08 pm | LPW Technology, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

LPW POWDERSOLVE software is designed to enable higher efficiency and better quality control in additive manufacturing (AM). It is a secure, online, fully searchable metal powder characterization management system that handles all the analytical data required to assess the performance of AM metal powders.

Kuebler and his students used direct laser writing, a kind of nanoscale 3-D printing, to create the miniature lattices. The team then ran light beams through the lattices and confirmed that they could flow light without loss through turns that are twice a

New Light-bending Record Critical for Next-gen Supercomputing

March 24, 2015 1:32 pm | by University of Central Florida | News | Comments

A device resembling a plastic honeycomb yet much smaller than a bee’s stinger can steer light beams around tighter curves than ever before possible, while keeping the integrity and intensity of the beam intact. The work introduces a more effective way to transmit data rapidly on electronic circuit boards by using light.

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London and the River Thames -- Courtesy of ESA/Copernicus data (2015)  - click to enlarge

London and the River Thames

March 23, 2015 12:01 pm | News | Comments

London appears as a cluster of bright radar reflections along the River Thames in this radar image from Sentinel-1A. The satellite captured this image on March 4, 2015, in its Interferometric Wide Swath mode and dual polarization, from which the artificial color composite was generated.

The desktop software application is free and can be used on any basic desktop or laptop computer. Amateur astronomers may take images from their telescopes and analyze them with the application. The application will tell the user whether a matching astero

Help NASA Explore the Universe with Free Asteroid Data Hunter App

March 23, 2015 11:35 am | by NASA | News | Comments

During a panel at the South by Southwest Festival, NASA representatives discussed how citizen scientists have made a difference in asteroid hunting and announced the release of a desktop software application developed by NASA. The application is based on an Asteroid Data Hunter-derived algorithm that analyzes images for potential asteroids. It’s a tool that can be used by amateur astronomers and citizen scientists.

Future quantum technologies promise to deliver secure communications and superfast computing applications. Courtesy of NASA/Sonoma State University/Aurore Simonnet

Fastest-ever Quantum Switch achieved with Silicon

March 23, 2015 11:17 am | by University of Surrey | News | Comments

Research has demonstrated laser control of quantum states in an ordinary silicon wafer and observation via a conventional electrical measurement. The findings mark a crucial step toward future quantum technologies, which promise to deliver secure communications and superfast computing. The team demonstrated a quantum on/off switching time of about a millionth of a millionth of a second — over a thousand times faster than previous attempts

The Einstein Papers Project is dedicated to collecting, editing, translating and publishing the tens of thousands of pages of speeches, letters and other documents Albert Einstein left behind. Those collected papers are available in a free digital edition

Albert Einstein, in his Own Words: Einstein Papers Project Publishes Free Digital Edition

March 23, 2015 11:09 am | by NSF | News | Comments

Albert Einstein is known in popular culture for his famous E = mc2 formula. Scientists know him for revolutionizing physics with his general theory of relativity. But is it possible to know the man behind the big ideas? Yes, thanks to the massive body of written work and correspondence he left behind, which the Einstein Papers Project is dedicated to collecting, editing, translating and publishing.

The winning teams from those tournaments join the global competition at FIRST Championship, bringing skills, enthusiasm, infectious good will and, of course, hundreds of amazing robots of all sizes to engage in friendly competition.

FIRST Championship: The Ultimate Sport for the Mind

March 20, 2015 2:43 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

FIRST Championship is an annual three-and-a-half-day robotics competition that is the culmination of several FIRST programs. The high-tech spectator event brings together three separate robotics competitions. The winning teams from those tournaments join the global competition at FIRST Championship, bringing skills, enthusiasm, infectious good will and, of course, hundreds of amazing robots.

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Air Pearl in Soldier Fly Larva Respiratory Fringe-- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Air Pearl in Soldier Fly Larva Respiratory Fringe

March 20, 2015 12:17 pm | News | Comments

This 30x photo of an air pearl in a soldier fly larva respiratory fringe received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using stereomicroscopy.

Smart grids — power grids that adapt to changes in demand and reconfigure as needed to avoid overloads and other problems — can reduce energy costs, help avoid blackouts and deter cyber attacks. They also pose new challenges. A team led by researchers at

Developing Smarter Smart Grids

March 20, 2015 11:11 am | by NSF | News | Comments

Smart grids help avoid blackouts and deter cyber attacks. They also pose new challenges. As power generation — and the communication and information processing associated with it — shifts from centralized power stations to distributed, heterogeneous systems, massive amounts of sensor data from stations must be transmitted efficiently and effectively analyzed in real time.

Researchers used a “pixon” image enhancement technique, originally designed to peer into the distant Universe, to sharpen the map and reveal the enormous size of the thorium deposit from the volcanic eruption.

Lunar Volcano’s Enormous Eruption Reached Hundreds of Miles

March 20, 2015 11:01 am | by Durham University | News | Comments

Scientists have produced a new map of the Moon’s most unusual volcano showing that its explosive eruption spread debris over an area much greater than previously thought. A team of astronomers and geologists studied an area of the lunar surface in the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex. By mapping the radioactive element thorium, which spewed out during the eruption, they discovered debris was able to cover an area the size of Scotland.

Life reconstruction of Carnufex carolinensis. Copyright Jorge Gonzales

Before Dinosaurs, Carolina Butcher was Top Beast of Prey

March 20, 2015 10:26 am | by North Carolina State University | News | Comments

A newly discovered crocodilian ancestor may have filled one of North America's top predator roles before dinosaurs arrived on the continent. The "Carolina Butcher" was a nine-foot-long, land-dwelling crocodylomorph that walked on its hind legs and likely preyed upon smaller inhabitants of North Carolina ecosystems, such as armored reptiles and early mammal relatives.

John Renick is Director of Partner Solutions at Meridium.

3 Key Function Areas for Improved Asset Management and Industrial Success

March 19, 2015 5:18 pm | by John Renick, Director of Partner Solutions, Meridium | Blogs | Comments

Having a strategy in place for effective asset performance management (APM) is critical in today’s zero downtime world. To guarantee that you are fully utilizing your assets, you should consider implementing the three “M” strategy: Measure, Monitor and Manage. This allows you to best gauge the state and quality of your assets, make changes where needed before a problem arises and strategically plan for future production.

Leafy Liverwort Gametophyte -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Leafy Liverwort Gametophyte

March 19, 2015 3:04 pm | News | Comments

This 125x photo of a leafy liverwort (Nowellia curvifolia) gametophyte that is berberine stained received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

Giant beetles present a potential alternative to remote-controlled drones

Remote-controlled Cyborg Beetle Flies, Turns and Hovers

March 19, 2015 2:40 pm | by Nanyang Technological University | News | Comments

Breaking new grounds in the future of remote-controlled drone technology, researchers have developed a living machine whose flight can be wirelessly controlled with minimal human intervention. Mounted on top of a giant flower beetle, a tiny, electronic backpack with a built-in wireless receiver and transmitter converts radio signals received remotely into a variety of actions in the beetle.

Nonlinear metamaterials, which possess physical capabilities not found in nature, may be the building blocks that allow major companies like IBM and Intel to move from electronic to optical computing.

Novel Nanoscale Metamaterial is Breaking Digital Connectivity Barriers

March 19, 2015 2:26 pm | by American Friends of Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

From computers, tablets and smartphones to cars, homes and public transportation, our world is more digitally connected every day. The technology required to support the exchange of massive quantities of data is critical. That's why scientists are intent on developing faster computing units capable of supporting much larger amounts of data transfer and data processing. New optical materials could serve as the nuts and bolts of future ...

Pascal will offer better performance than Maxwell on key deep-learning tasks.

NVIDIA’s Next-Gen Pascal GPU Architecture to Provide 10X Speedup for Deep Learning Apps

March 18, 2015 12:24 pm | News | Comments

NVIDIA has announced that its Pascal GPU architecture, set to debut next year, will accelerate deep learning applications 10X beyond the speed of its current-generation Maxwell processors. NVIDIA CEO and co-founder Jen-Hsun Huang revealed details of Pascal and the company’s updated processor roadmap in front of a crowd of 4,000 during his keynote address at the GPU Technology Conference, in Silicon Valley.

Physicist Chien-Shiung Wu in 1963 at Columbia University, where she was a professor. Known as the First Lady of Physics, Wu worked on the Manhattan Project and helped disprove a widely-accepted law of theoretical physics. Later in her life, Wu researched

Paving the Way: 28 Amazing Women, Trailblazing Science

March 18, 2015 12:16 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Breakthrough science requires pioneers. People who combine brilliance with courage, even in the face of daunting opposition. The women who paved the way for modern scientific exploration exemplify this spirit; grappling not only with fundamental questions of the universe, but with discrimination and societal constraints that often stripped them of scientific credit.

Nano piano concept: Arrays of gold, pillar-supported bowtie nanoantennas (bottom left) can be used to record distinct musical notes, as shown in the experimentally obtained dark-field microscopy images (bottom right). These particular notes were used to c

Nano Piano's Lullaby could mean Nanotech Storage Breakthrough

March 18, 2015 11:39 am | by William Bowman | News | Comments

Researchers have demonstrated the first-ever recording of optically encoded audio onto a non-magnetic plasmonic nanostructure, opening the door to multiple uses in informational processing and archival storage.

By using the app, Citizen Scientists can examine photos from the Web and provide further context that does not typically exist with the image alone.

iPad App Game Uses Citizen Science to Track Endangered Species

March 18, 2015 11:12 am | by Aaron Mason, Wildsense, University of Surrey | News | Comments

A new app for the iPad could change the way wildlife is monitored. Wildsense, an initiative from a group of researchers at the University of Surrey, is designed to use citizen science, the concept of allowing people to get directly involved in science, to help in the conservation of rare and endangered species.

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