Advertisement
Data Solutions
Subscribe to Data Solutions

The Lead

Sheepdogs use just two simple rules to round up large herds of sheep, scientists have discovered. The findings could lead to the development of robots that can gather and herd livestock, crowd control techniques, or new methods to clean up the environment

Sheepdogs Use Simple Rules to Herd Sheep

August 28, 2014 12:55 pm | by Swansea University | News | Comments

Sheepdogs use just two simple rules to round up large herds of sheep, scientists have discovered. The findings could lead to the development of robots that can gather and herd livestock, crowd control techniques, or new methods to clean up the environment.

Mars Rover Selfie

August 28, 2014 12:09 pm | News | Comments

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover used the camera at the end of its arm in April and May 2014 to take...

Robo Brain Teaches Robots Everything from the Internet

August 28, 2014 11:52 am | by Cornell University | News | Comments

Robo Brain — a large-scale computational system that learns from publicly available Internet...

Power of Mathematics Opens New Possibilities in Music

August 27, 2014 3:34 pm | by Steve Koppes, University of Chicago | News | Comments

Anthony Cheung’s formal mathematical training essentially ended with high school calculus. But...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

An example of a whole slide scan

Leica Microsystems Offers Slide Scanning and Image Hosting for Education

August 27, 2014 2:40 pm | by Leica Microsystems | News | Comments

Leica Microsystems is offering a custom slide scanning and image hosting service for teachers, which makes it possible to share images within the classroom and to expand learning outside the classroom. Glass slides sent to a scanning center are processed to create high-resolution digital image files, which then can be accessed online from a hosted server via any standard Internet browser for study by students anytime, anywhere.

Crocus Pollen and Stigmate -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Crocus Pollen and Stigmate

August 27, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

This 400X photo of crocus pollen and stigmate received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Frederic Labaune of Education Nationale in Auxonne, France, using episcopy and stacking.

Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is a method of producing renewable energy from two streams of a different salinity. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Renewable Energy: The Power of Salt

August 26, 2014 4:27 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

Where the river meets the sea, there is the potential to harness a significant amount of renewable energy, according to a team of mechanical engineers at MIT. The researchers evaluated an emerging method of power generation called pressure retarded osmosis, in which two streams of different salinity are mixed to produce energy. In principle, a PRO system would take in river water and seawater on either side of a semi-permeable membrane.

Advertisement
Mosaic of satellite images of Antarctica taken by RADARSAT-2. Courtesy of RADARSAT-2 Data and Products © MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd. (2008) – All Rights Reserved.  RADARSAT is an official mark of the Canadian Space Agency.

Most Complete Antarctic Map for Climate Research Publicly Available

August 26, 2014 4:18 pm | by University of Waterloo | News | Comments

The University of Waterloo has unveiled a new satellite image of Antarctica, and the imagery will help scientists all over the world gain new insight into the effects of climate change. The mosaic is free and fully accessible to the academic world and the public. Using Synthetic Aperture Radar with multiple polarization modes aboard the RADARSAT-2 satellite, the CSA collected more than 3,150 images of the continent.

Ph.D. students Giovanni Guccione (L) and Harry Slatyer examine their gold-coated silver gallium nanowire in the Quantum Optics labs. Courtesy of Quantum Optics Group, ANU

Laser Makes Atomic-force Microscopes 20 Times More Sensitive

August 26, 2014 4:12 pm | by Australian National University | News | Comments

Laser physicists have found a way to make atomic-force microscope probes 20 times more sensitive and capable of detecting forces as small as the weight of an individual virus. The technique, developed by researchers in the Quantum Optics Group of Australian National University’s Research School of Physics and Engineering, hinges on using laser beams to cool a nanowire probe to minus 265 degrees Celsius.

Voyager 2 Captures Images of Neptune -- Courtesy of NASA

25 Years Ago, Voyager 2 Captures Images of Neptune

August 26, 2014 3:16 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft gave humanity its first glimpse of Neptune and its moon Triton in the summer of 1989. This picture of Neptune was produced from the last whole planet images taken through the green and orange filters on the Voyager 2 narrow angle camera. The images were taken on August  20, 1989, at a range of 4.4 million miles from the planet, 4 days and 20 hours before closest approach on August 25.

Akselos' software running in a Web browser for 2.01x. This app shows the stresses in the landing gear for a solar-powered airplane. Courtesy of Akselos

Simulation Software Drastically Increases Speed of 3-D Engineering Simulations

August 25, 2014 12:40 pm | by Rob Matheson, MIT | News | Comments

MIT spinout Akselos has developed novel software, based on years of research at the Institute, which uses precalculated supercomputer data for structural components — like simulated “Legos” — to solve FEA models in seconds. Hundreds of engineers in the mining, power-generation, and oil and gas industries are now using Akselos software.

The study combined two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Does your Computer Know How You’re Feeling?

August 25, 2014 11:16 am | by Taylor & Francis | News | Comments

Researchers in Bangladesh have designed a computer program that can accurately recognize users’ emotional states as much as 87 percent of the time, depending on the emotion. Writing in the journal Behaviour & Information Technology, A.F.M. Nazmul Haque Nahin and his colleagues describe how their study combined — for the first time — two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Advertisement
Mizapin -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Mizapin Antidepressant Drug Crystals

August 25, 2014 10:41 am | News | Comments

This 160X photo of Mizapin antidepressant drug crystals received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Robert Markus of Stockholm University using polarized light and differential interference contrast.

Once installed, the sensors would provide information about the condition of bridges that cannot be obtained by visual inspection alone and would allow authorities to identify and focus on bridges that need immediate attention. Courtesy of USchick

Wireless Sensors and Flying Robots Monitor Deteriorating Bridges

August 22, 2014 12:45 pm | by Tufts School of Engineering | News | Comments

As a report from the Obama administration warns that one in four bridges in the United States needs significant repair or cannot handle automobile traffic, Tufts University engineers are employing wireless sensors and flying robots that could have the potential to help authorities monitor the condition of bridges in real time.

DESY's 1.7 mile-long PETRA III accelerator is a super microscope that speeds up electrically charged particles nearly to the speed of light.

20 GB Data per Second Shared with 2000+ Scientists Worldwide

August 22, 2014 12:02 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM announced it is collaborating with DESY, a national research center in Germany, to speed up management and storage of massive volumes of x-ray data. The planned Big Data and Analytics architecture can handle more than 20 gigabyte per second of data at peak performance and help scientists worldwide gain faster insights into the atomic structure of novel semiconductors, catalysts, biological cells and other samples.

Supernova Seen in Two Lights -- Courtesy of NASA/ESA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC/IAFE

Supernova Seen in Two Lights

August 22, 2014 11:49 am | by NASA | News | Comments

The destructive results of a mighty supernova explosion reveal themselves in a delicate blend of infrared and X-ray light, as seen in this image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton. The bubbly cloud is an irregular shock wave, generated by a supernova that would have been witnessed on Earth 3,700 years ago.

Ulrich Rabl measured the volume of the test subjects' hippocampi using computer-assisted techniques and analyzed the results in the context of the genetic and environmental data.

Genes Determine Traces Stress Leaves Behind on Our Brains

August 21, 2014 4:20 pm | by MedUni Vienna | News | Comments

Our individual genetic make-up determines the effect that stress has on our emotional centers. Not every individual reacts in the same way to life events that produce the same degree of stress. Some grow as a result of the crisis, whereas others break down and fall ill, for example with depression. The outcome is determined by a complex interaction between depression gene versions and environmental factors.

Advertisement
This still from a KIPAC visualization shows a jet of energy and particles streaming from a black hole. (Visualization: Ralf Kaehler / Simulation: Jonathan McKinney, Alexander Tchekhovskoy, and Roger Blandford)

Dramatically Intricate 3-D Universes Tell Important Stories about the Cosmos

August 21, 2014 3:16 pm | by Kelen Tuttle, Kavli Foundation | Articles | Comments

Recently, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics unveiled an unprecedented simulation of the universe’s development. Called the Illustris project, the simulation depicts more than 13 billion years of cosmic evolution across a cube of the universe that’s 350-million-light-years on each side. But why was it important to conduct such a simulation?

Fruit Fly Larval Brain -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Fruit Fly Larval Brain

August 21, 2014 3:01 pm | News | Comments

This 25X photo of a fruit fly larval brain received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Dr. Christian Klämbt and Ann Christin Bauke of the University of Muenster using confocal microscopy.

MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory has released a data-visualization tool that lets users highlight aberrations and possible patterns in the graphical display; the tool then automatically determines which data sources are respon

Visual Control of Big Data: Recomputing Visualizations without Aberrant Results

August 20, 2014 10:44 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

In the age of big data, visualization tools are vital. With a single glance at a graphic display, a human being can recognize patterns that a computer might fail to find even after hours of analysis. But what if there are aberrations in the patterns? Or what if there’s just a suggestion of a visual pattern that’s not distinct enough to justify any strong inferences? Or what if the pattern is clear, but not what was to be expected?

Brookhaven theoretical physicist Swagato Mukherjee explains that 'invisible' hadrons are like salt molecules floating around in the hot gas of hadrons, making other particles freeze out at a lower temperature than they would if the 'salt' wasn't there.

Invisible Particles Provide First Indirect Evidence of Strange Baryons

August 20, 2014 10:17 am | by Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

New supercomputing calculations provide the first evidence that particles predicted by the theory of quark-gluon interactions, but never before observed, are being produced in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. These heavy strange baryons, containing at least one strange quark, still cannot be observed directly, but instead make their presence known by lowering the temperature at which other baryons "freeze out"

Testing Electric Propulsion -- Courtesy of NASA Langley/David C. Bowman

Greased Lightning Tests Electric Propulsion

August 20, 2014 9:35 am | by NASA | News | Comments

On August 19, 2014, National Aviation Day, a lot of people reflected on how far aviation has come in the last century. Could this be the future — a plane with many electric motors that can hover like a helicopter and fly like a plane, and that could revolutionize air travel?

Fossil Hallucigenia sparsa from the Burgess Shale Courtesy of M. R. Smith / Smithsonian Institute

Strangest Creature of Ancient Earth linked to Modern Animals

August 19, 2014 3:08 pm | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

The spines along its back were thought to be legs, its legs thought to be tentacles along its back, and its head was mistaken for its tail. The animal, known as Hallucigenia due to its otherworldly appearance, had been considered an ‘evolutionary misfit’ as it was not clear how it related to modern animal groups. Researchers have discovered an important link...

North Korea (the dark area) and South Korea at night. Courtesy of NASA

Citizen Science: Images of Earth at Night Crowdsourced for Science

August 19, 2014 2:59 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A wealth of images of Earth at night taken by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) could help save energy, contribute to better human health and safety and improve our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. But, scientists need your help to make that happen.

US Gulf Coast at Night -- Courtesy of NASA

US Gulf Coast at Night

August 19, 2014 12:05 pm | News | Comments

One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the International Space Station photographed this nighttime image showing city lights in at least half a dozen southern states from some 225 miles above the home planet. Lights from areas in the Gulf Coast states of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, as well as some of the states that border them on the north, are visible.

The Kilobots, a swarm of one thousand simple but collaborative robots. Courtesy of Mike Rubenstein and Science/AAAS

AI: Self-organizing Thousand-robot Swarm Forms Vast, Complex Shapes

August 18, 2014 12:03 pm | by Caroline Perry, Harvard SEAS | News | Comments

The first thousand-robot flash mob has assembled at Harvard University. Instead of one highly-complex robot, a “kilo” of robots collaborate, providing a simple platform for the enactment of complex behaviors. Called Kilobots, these extremely simple robots are each just a few centimeters across and stand on three pin-like legs.

Guanidine Hydrochloride -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Guanidine Hydrochloride, Chaotropic Salt

August 18, 2014 10:12 am | News | Comments

This 200X photo of guanidine hydrochloride, a chaotropic salt used to denature proteins, received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Dr. Christopher Benjamin Jackson of IKELOS GmbH in Berne, Switzerland, using polarized light.

A picokeystone extracted from an aerogel tile from the Stardust interstellar dust collector. Scientists said seven microscopic particles collected by NASA's comet-chasing spacecraft, Stardust, appear to have originated outside our solar system. The dust c

Specks Returned from Space may be Alien Visitors

August 15, 2014 2:28 pm | by Marcia Dunn, AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

There may be itsy-bitsy aliens among us. Scientists say seven microscopic particles collected by NASA's comet-chasing spacecraft, Stardust, appear to have originated outside our solar system. If confirmed, this would be the world's first sampling of contemporary interstellar dust.

Users can use the tool to focus on images in which President Obama appears over Stephen Colbert’s shoulder, and then observe Colbert’s typical body posture among those results. Courtesy of Jun-Yan Zhu, Yong Jae Lee and Alexei Efros, UC Berkeley

Single Picture worth 1000 — and More — Images

August 15, 2014 12:38 pm | by Sarah Yang, UC Berkeley | News | Comments

A photo is worth a thousand words, but what if the image could also represent thousands of other images? New software seeks to tame the vast amount of visual data in the world by generating a single photo that can represent massive clusters of images. This tool can give users the photographic gist of a kid on Santa’s lap or housecats. It works by generating an image that literally averages the key features of the other photos.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading