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Tri-TON, an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) that U.S. and Japanese researchers will use for the real-time verification of their search olfactory algorithms. Courtesy of Tamer Zaki, Johns Hopkins University

U.S., Japan Bring Big Data and Data Analytics to Disaster Response

March 31, 2015 12:29 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

When disaster strikes, it is critical that experts, decision makers and emergency personnel have access to real-time information in order to assess the situation and respond appropriately. It is equally critical that individuals and organizations have the capacity to analyze the wealth of data generated in the midst of the disaster and its immediate aftermath in order to produce accurate, customized warnings.

Physicists Succeed in Linking Two Completely Different Quantum Systems

March 31, 2015 12:22 pm | by University of Bonn | News | Comments

Physicists at the Universities of Bonn and Cambridge have succeeded in linking two completely...

From Genes to Screens: Molecular Backbone of Super-Slim, Bendable Digital Displays Developed

March 31, 2015 11:44 am | by Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

A new study suggests that a novel DNA-peptide structure can be used to produce thin, transparent...

Citizen Scientists Map Global Forests with Unprecedented Accuracy

March 31, 2015 11:34 am | by International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) | News | Comments

New global forest maps combine citizen science with multiple data sources, for an unprecedented...

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Cushion Starfish Gills -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Cushion Starfish Gills

March 30, 2015 3:00 pm | News | Comments

This 50x photo shows a side view of cushion starfish (Asterina gibbosa) gills (ampullae). It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photograph was taken under water with a prism in a small tank ...

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using Mira to study the magnetic state of iron selenide, a known high-temperature superconductor, at varying levels of pressure. Courtesy of Lucas Wagner, University of Illinois at Urbana

Mira sheds Light on Mysterious Nature of High-temperature Superconductors

March 30, 2015 2:52 pm | by Jim Collins | News | Comments

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using supercomputing resources at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, to shed light on the mysterious nature of high-temperature superconductors. With critical temperatures ranging from 30 Kelvin to 130 Kelvin, this relatively new class of superconductors is high-temperature in name only.

The fact that the neutron is slightly more massive than the proton is the reason why atomic nuclei have exactly those properties that make our world and ultimately our existence possible. Courtesy of Bergische Universität Wuppertal

Supercomputer Calculates Mass Difference between Neutron and Proton, confirms Theory of Strong Interaction

March 30, 2015 2:45 pm | by Forschungszentrum Jülich | News | Comments

The fact that the neutron is slightly more massive than the proton is the reason why atomic nuclei have exactly those properties that make our world and ultimately our existence possible. Eighty years after the discovery of the neutron, a team of physicists has finally calculated the tiny neutron-proton mass difference. The findings confirm the theory of the strong interaction.

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Matt Pugh (left) and Phil Hughes on board a Friends of Cardigan Bay dingy

Computer Vision, Machine Learning give New Perspective on Seabed Videos

March 30, 2015 2:02 pm | by Aberystwyth University | News | Comments

Scientists have been working with marine conservation group to develop better techniques for studying the seabed, which is vital for marine conservation and fisheries management. Cardigan Bay is renowned for its populations of dolphins and porpoises. Until recently the work of mapping and recording the seabed had been done using the traditional “researcher and clipboard” technique, which is costly and time consuming.

“The things I do for my housemates' downloading habit…” Maths by Sergey Nivens

How a Long-dead Mathematician called Maxwell can Speed up your Internet

March 30, 2015 1:48 pm | by Jason Cole, Imperial College London | Articles | Comments

Electromagnetic radiation – it might sound like something that you’d be better off avoiding, but electromagnetic waves of various kinds underpin our senses and how we interact with the world – from the light emissions through which your eyes perceive these words, to the microwaves that carry the Wi-Fi signal to your laptop or phone on which you’re reading it.

Pine Island, the Largest Glacier in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet -- Courtesy of Hogg/University of Leeds, Centre for Polar Observation and Modelling (CPOM) Copernicus data (2015)/ESA/A – click to enlarge

Pine Island, the Largest Glacier in the West Antarctic Ice Sheet

March 27, 2015 10:45 am | by ESA | News | Comments

This image combining two scans by Sentinel-1A’s radar shows that parts of the Pine Island glacier flowed about 100 meters (in pink) between March 3 and March 15, 2015. Light blue represents stable ice on either side of the stream.

Testing the reins in a smoke filled area Courtesy of Sheffield Hallam University

Robot Guide Dogs could be Firefighters’ Eyes

March 26, 2015 10:59 am | by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) | News | Comments

Firefighters moving through smoke-filled buildings could save vital seconds and find it easier to identify objects and obstacles, thanks to revolutionary reins that enable robots to act like guide dogs. The small mobile robot — equipped with tactile sensors — would lead the way, with the firefighter following a meter or so behind holding a rein. The robot would help the firefighter move swiftly in ‘blind’ conditions.

Expedition 43 Soyuz Rolls Out for Launch -- Courtesy of NASA/Bill Ingalls – click to enlarge

Expedition 43 Soyuz Rolls Out for Launch

March 26, 2015 9:12 am | by NASA | News | Comments

The Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft is rolled out by train to the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, on March 25, 2015. NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly, and Russian Cosmonauts Mikhail Kornienko, and Gennady Padalka of the Russian Federal Space Agency are scheduled to launch to the International Space Station in the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on March 28.

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Lights go out at Singapore’s 2014 flagship Earth Hour event

Lights in Over 7,000 Cities will go out for Earth Hour this Saturday

March 25, 2015 5:26 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

The World Wildlife Fund’s ninth annual Earth Hour is set to roll across the globe at 8:30 pm local time on Saturday, March 28, 2015. The world’s largest grassroots movement will range across six continents and the world’s 24 time zones in order to unify a global community bound by individual actions on climate. As in past years, many of the world's most famous landmarks and other non-essential lights will go dark for one hour.

Mouse Heart Muscle Cells -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Mouse Heart Muscle Cells

March 25, 2015 2:02 pm | News | Comments

This 400x photo of mouse cardiac ventricular myocytes (isolated heart muscle cells) received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using confocal microscopy.

Online negotiations can be improved if computer programs take social values, such as honesty and trust into account when bargaining with human counterparts. © tatniz

Solving the Trust Equation: Socially Intelligent Computers can turn Difficult Negotiations into Win-win Situations

March 25, 2015 12:19 pm | by A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing | News | Comments

Programming fundamental social intelligence skills into software agents can make humans substantially more trusting of online negotiations, which can lead to superior outcomes in e-commerce transactions, finds a team of technology researchers, business experts and cognitive scientists. People are naturally skeptical of negotiations lacking face-to-face contact...

"The Web of Space" sculpture by John Safer. A miniature version of this sculpture is given to the National Air and Space Museum Trophy Award winners every year. Courtesy of Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

Kepler Wins National Air and Space Museum Trophy

March 25, 2015 11:55 am | by NASA | News | Comments

The team in charge of NASA's Kepler mission, responsible for history's first detection of Earth-sized planets orbiting other suns in their temperate "habitable zone," received the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum's highest group honor at a ceremony in Washington on March 25. Kepler was awarded the 2015 Trophy for Current Achievement, which honors outstanding endeavors in the fields of aerospace science and technology.

Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi helped to outline the first-ever computer simulation for research purposes — of a one-dimensional vibrating nonlinear string. Courtesy of Department of Energy

Mathematicians Solve 60-year-old Fermi-Pasta-Ulam Problem

March 24, 2015 3:05 pm | by University of East Anglia | News | Comments

A 60-year-old math problem first put forward by Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi has been solved. In 1955, a team of scientists led by Fermi used a computer for the first time to try to solve a numerical experiment. The outcome wasn’t what they were expecting, and the complexity of the problem underpinned the then-new field of non-linear physics and paved the way for six decades of new thinking. Chaos theory is just one of the theories...  

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President Barack Obama tries out a wheelchair with a design modification by Kaitlin Reed, 16, of Dover, MA, next to Mohammed Sayed, 16, of Cambridge, MA, who is originally from Afghanistan, during a tour of the White House Science Fair at the White House

Obama, Wowed by Young Scientists, Announces New STEM Pledges

March 24, 2015 2:43 pm | by Jim Kuhnhenn, Associated Press | News | Comments

The small Lego machine inside the White House whirred, and in a moment it was turning the pages of a story book. One page flipped, then another, ever faster as President Barack Obama marveled at its efficiency. The contraption's eventual aim would be to allow paralyzed or arthritic patients to read books despite their disabilities. "How did you figure this out?" Obama, impressed, asked its inventors.

Galactic Pair -- Courtesy of NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) – click to enlarge

Galactic Pair: Porpoise or Penguin?

March 24, 2015 2:16 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

What do you see in this image: a porpoise or a penguin? Amateur astronomers have nicknamed this pretty galactic pair after both of these creatures — the graceful curve of a dolphin or porpoise can be seen in the blue- and red-tinged shape towards the bottom of the frame, and when paired with the pale, glowing orb just beneath it, the duo bear a striking resemblance to a bird or penguin guarding an egg.

LPW POWDERSOLVE Metal Powder Characterization Management System

LPW POWDERSOLVE Metal Powder Characterization Management System

March 24, 2015 2:08 pm | LPW Technology, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

LPW POWDERSOLVE software is designed to enable higher efficiency and better quality control in additive manufacturing (AM). It is a secure, online, fully searchable metal powder characterization management system that handles all the analytical data required to assess the performance of AM metal powders.

Kuebler and his students used direct laser writing, a kind of nanoscale 3-D printing, to create the miniature lattices. The team then ran light beams through the lattices and confirmed that they could flow light without loss through turns that are twice a

New Light-bending Record Critical for Next-gen Supercomputing

March 24, 2015 1:32 pm | by University of Central Florida | News | Comments

A device resembling a plastic honeycomb yet much smaller than a bee’s stinger can steer light beams around tighter curves than ever before possible, while keeping the integrity and intensity of the beam intact. The work introduces a more effective way to transmit data rapidly on electronic circuit boards by using light.

London and the River Thames -- Courtesy of ESA/Copernicus data (2015)  - click to enlarge

London and the River Thames

March 23, 2015 12:01 pm | News | Comments

London appears as a cluster of bright radar reflections along the River Thames in this radar image from Sentinel-1A. The satellite captured this image on March 4, 2015, in its Interferometric Wide Swath mode and dual polarization, from which the artificial color composite was generated.

The desktop software application is free and can be used on any basic desktop or laptop computer. Amateur astronomers may take images from their telescopes and analyze them with the application. The application will tell the user whether a matching astero

Help NASA Explore the Universe with Free Asteroid Data Hunter App

March 23, 2015 11:35 am | by NASA | News | Comments

During a panel at the South by Southwest Festival, NASA representatives discussed how citizen scientists have made a difference in asteroid hunting and announced the release of a desktop software application developed by NASA. The application is based on an Asteroid Data Hunter-derived algorithm that analyzes images for potential asteroids. It’s a tool that can be used by amateur astronomers and citizen scientists.

Future quantum technologies promise to deliver secure communications and superfast computing applications. Courtesy of NASA/Sonoma State University/Aurore Simonnet

Fastest-ever Quantum Switch achieved with Silicon

March 23, 2015 11:17 am | by University of Surrey | News | Comments

Research has demonstrated laser control of quantum states in an ordinary silicon wafer and observation via a conventional electrical measurement. The findings mark a crucial step toward future quantum technologies, which promise to deliver secure communications and superfast computing. The team demonstrated a quantum on/off switching time of about a millionth of a millionth of a second — over a thousand times faster than previous attempts

The Einstein Papers Project is dedicated to collecting, editing, translating and publishing the tens of thousands of pages of speeches, letters and other documents Albert Einstein left behind. Those collected papers are available in a free digital edition

Albert Einstein, in his Own Words: Einstein Papers Project Publishes Free Digital Edition

March 23, 2015 11:09 am | by NSF | News | Comments

Albert Einstein is known in popular culture for his famous E = mc2 formula. Scientists know him for revolutionizing physics with his general theory of relativity. But is it possible to know the man behind the big ideas? Yes, thanks to the massive body of written work and correspondence he left behind, which the Einstein Papers Project is dedicated to collecting, editing, translating and publishing.

The winning teams from those tournaments join the global competition at FIRST Championship, bringing skills, enthusiasm, infectious good will and, of course, hundreds of amazing robots of all sizes to engage in friendly competition.

FIRST Championship: The Ultimate Sport for the Mind

March 20, 2015 2:43 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

FIRST Championship is an annual three-and-a-half-day robotics competition that is the culmination of several FIRST programs. The high-tech spectator event brings together three separate robotics competitions. The winning teams from those tournaments join the global competition at FIRST Championship, bringing skills, enthusiasm, infectious good will and, of course, hundreds of amazing robots.

Air Pearl in Soldier Fly Larva Respiratory Fringe-- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Air Pearl in Soldier Fly Larva Respiratory Fringe

March 20, 2015 12:17 pm | News | Comments

This 30x photo of an air pearl in a soldier fly larva respiratory fringe received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using stereomicroscopy.

Smart grids — power grids that adapt to changes in demand and reconfigure as needed to avoid overloads and other problems — can reduce energy costs, help avoid blackouts and deter cyber attacks. They also pose new challenges. A team led by researchers at

Developing Smarter Smart Grids

March 20, 2015 11:11 am | by NSF | News | Comments

Smart grids help avoid blackouts and deter cyber attacks. They also pose new challenges. As power generation — and the communication and information processing associated with it — shifts from centralized power stations to distributed, heterogeneous systems, massive amounts of sensor data from stations must be transmitted efficiently and effectively analyzed in real time.

Researchers used a “pixon” image enhancement technique, originally designed to peer into the distant Universe, to sharpen the map and reveal the enormous size of the thorium deposit from the volcanic eruption.

Lunar Volcano’s Enormous Eruption Reached Hundreds of Miles

March 20, 2015 11:01 am | by Durham University | News | Comments

Scientists have produced a new map of the Moon’s most unusual volcano showing that its explosive eruption spread debris over an area much greater than previously thought. A team of astronomers and geologists studied an area of the lunar surface in the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex. By mapping the radioactive element thorium, which spewed out during the eruption, they discovered debris was able to cover an area the size of Scotland.

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