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Nuclear Engineer Receives E.O. Lawrence Award for Groundbreaking Computational Theory

April 16, 2014 2:01 pm | by Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Oak Ridge National Laboratory researcher John Wagner has been named a 2013 recipient of the Department of Energy’s Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award for his work in advancing computer, information and knowledge sciences. Wagner, a nuclear engineer who serves as national technical director for DOE’s Nuclear Fuels Storage and Transportation Planning Project, was recognized for his leadership in the field of computational radiation transport.

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know about Brookhaven National Laboratory

April 16, 2014 1:49 pm | by Ben Dotson, Brookhaven National Lab | News | Comments

Founded on the former site of the U.S. Army’s Camp Upton in New York in 1947, the Energy...

New Study Outlines Water World Theory of Life's Origins

April 16, 2014 12:37 pm | by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory | News | Comments

Life took root more than four billion years ago on our nascent Earth, a wetter and harsher place...

Three Atmospheric Dragons: Low Pressure Areas around US

April 16, 2014 12:26 pm | by Rob Gutro, NASA | News | Comments

There are three low pressure systems around the U.S. and they resemble dragons on satellite...

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Costas Bekas

April 16, 2014 3:23 pm | Biographies

Costas Bekas is managing the Foundations of Cognitive Computing group at IBM Research-Zurich. He received his B. Eng., Msc and PhD, all from the Computer Engineering & Informatics Department, University of Patras, Greece, in 1998, 2001 and 2003 respectively. Between 2003-2005, he worked as a postdoctoral associate with prof. Yousef Saad at the Computer Science & Engineering Department, University of Minnesota

Nuclear Engineer Receives E.O. Lawrence Award for Groundbreaking Computational Theory

April 16, 2014 2:01 pm | by Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Oak Ridge National Laboratory researcher John Wagner has been named a 2013 recipient of the Department of Energy’s Ernest Orlando Lawrence Award for his work in advancing computer, information and knowledge sciences. Wagner, a nuclear engineer who serves as national technical director for DOE’s Nuclear Fuels Storage and Transportation Planning Project, was recognized for his leadership in the field of computational radiation transport.

Top 10 Things You Didn't Know about Brookhaven National Laboratory

April 16, 2014 1:49 pm | by Ben Dotson, Brookhaven National Lab | News | Comments

Founded on the former site of the U.S. Army’s Camp Upton in New York in 1947, the Energy Department's Brookhaven National Laboratory was originally created out of a post-war desire to explore the peaceful applications of atomic energy. Over the years, its mission has grown to encompass basic and applied research on many frontiers of science — from nuclear physics to nano-science and beyond.

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New Study Outlines Water World Theory of Life's Origins

April 16, 2014 12:37 pm | by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory | News | Comments

Life took root more than four billion years ago on our nascent Earth, a wetter and harsher place than now, bathed in sizzling ultraviolet rays. What started out as simple cells ultimately transformed into slime molds, frogs, elephants, humans and the rest of our planet's living kingdoms. How did it all begin?

Three Atmospheric Dragons: Low Pressure Areas around US

April 16, 2014 12:26 pm | by Rob Gutro, NASA | News | Comments

There are three low pressure systems around the U.S. and they resemble dragons on satellite imagery. This NOAA GOES-13 and GOES-15 satellite image from March 31, 2014, shows the low pressure systems in the eastern Pacific Ocean, over the nation's Heartland, and in the eastern Atlantic Ocean. All three lows have the signature comma shape that make them appear to be curled up dragons.

Richard Membarth, Full professor for Computer Graphics, Intel Visual Computing Institute, Saarland Universit

Richard Membarth

April 16, 2014 10:26 am | Biographies

Richard Membarth is a full professor for Computer Graphics at Intel Visual Computing Institute, Saarland Universit. His research projects include Multi-core Architectures and Programming; InvasIC: Invasive Algorithms, Architectures, and Programming; ExaStencils: Advanced Stencil-Code Engineering; and Heterogeneous Image Systems.

Damian Rouson, Managing Director, Center for Computational Earth & Environmental Sciences at Stanford University

Damian Rouson

April 16, 2014 9:25 am | Biographies

Damian Rouson is the Managing Director of the Center for Computational Earth and Environmental Sciences at Stanford University.  He holds a Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering from Howard University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in mechanical engineering from Stanford University. His professional interests relate primarily to software engineering for computational science and engineering and turbulence in classical, quantum, and magnetohydrodynamic flows.

Francisco José Rodrigo Duro

April 16, 2014 8:38 am | Biographies
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Investigating Use of Google Glass in Surgical Settings

April 16, 2014 6:36 am | by International Journal of Surgery | News | Comments

An article shows the potential applications for Google Glass in the surgical setting, particularly in relation to training. Personal portable information technology is advancing at a breathtaking speed. The authors of the study obtained a Glass device through Google's Explorer Program and have tested its applicability in their daily pediatric surgical practice.

Richard Kenway, Professor, University of Edinburgh

Richard Kenway

April 15, 2014 7:10 pm | Biographies

Professor Kenway was appointed to the Tait Chair of Mathematical Physics at the University of Edinburgh in 1994. His research explores non-perturbative aspects of theories of elementary particles using computer simulation of lattice gauge theories, particularly the strong interactions of quarks and gluons described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD).

Paolo Carloni, Head of Laboratory Computational Biophysics, German Research School for Simulation Science (GRS)

Prof. Dr. Paolo Carloni

April 15, 2014 7:08 pm | Biographies

Paolo Carloni obtained his PhD in Chemistry (majoring in computational biophysics) at the University of Florence in 1993 with a thesis entitled “Theoretical Studies on Metalloproteins'. He was supervised by Lucia Banci, Pier Luigi Orioli (University of Florence, Itay) and Michele Parrinello (then IBM Zurich Research Laboratory, Switzerland).

Christian Lang, Professor, University Graz

Christian Lang

April 15, 2014 6:21 pm | Biographies

Christian Lang is a theoretical physicist. His interest lies in elementary particle physics and statistical physics, in particular Lattice Field Theory.

Ben Moore

April 15, 2014 6:17 pm | Biographies

Ben Moore is Professor of Astrophysics at the University of Zurich. His research is centered on understanding the origin and evolution of the Universe and how stars, planets and galaxies form. Custom built supercomputers are often used, such as the in-house constructed zBox.

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Ad Emmen

April 15, 2014 6:07 pm | Biographies

Ad Emmen studied physics at the University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands. From 1980 until 1995, he worked in several positions at the foundation for Academic Computing Services Amsterdam (SARA). He has published papers on supercomputing and publishing technology and co-founded the journal "Supercomputer".

Wolfgang E. Nagel, Director of the Center for Information Services & High Performance Computing (ZIH) Technische Universität Dresden, Germany

Dr. Wolfgang E. Nagel

April 15, 2014 4:26 pm | Biographies

Dr. Wolfgang E. Nagel is full professor of Computer Architecture at the Institute for Computer Engineering at Technical University (TU) Dresden. He graduated from  RWTH Aachen University with a PhD, and has worked in the field of parallel programming since 1980s. He has published more than 100 papers

Thomas Ludwig, Professor of Computer Engineering, University of Hamburg, Germany

Thomas Ludwig

April 15, 2014 4:17 pm | Biographies

Thomas Ludwig received his doctoral degree and the German habilitation degree at the Technische Universität München, where he conducted research on HPC from 1988 to 2001. From 2001 to 2009 he had a chair for parallel computing at the Universität Heidelberg. Since 2009 he is the director of the German Climate Computing Centre (DKRZ) and professor at the Universität Hamburg.

Karl Kaiser, Professor of Computer Engineering, University of Hamburg, Germany

Dr. Karl Kaiser

April 15, 2014 4:13 pm | Biographies

Dr. Karl Kaiser has been a professor of Computer Engineering (with focus on Industrial Data Processing and Autonomous Mobile Systems) at the Department of Computer Science of the University of Hamburg. He was also the dean of the department from 1985-1988 and the Director of the Regional Computing Center (RRZ) of the University of Hamburg

Jack Dongarra, University Distinguished Professor of Computer Science, University of Tennessee

Jack Dongarra

April 15, 2014 4:09 pm | Biographies

Jack Dongarra specializes in numerical algorithms in linear algebra, parallel computing, use of advanced-computer architectures, programming methodology, and tools for parallel computers. He was awarded the IEEE Sid Fernbach Award in 2004 and in 2008 he was the recipient of the first IEEE Medal of Excellence in Scalable Computing

Frank Baetke, Global HPC-Technology Program, HP

Dr. Frank Baetke

April 15, 2014 3:58 pm | Biographies

Dr. Baetke manages HP's Global HPC-Technology Program for academic and research institutions. Dr. Baetke is a director & board member of HP-CAST, the world-wide user group of HP-HPC; he is an advisory board member of the International Supercomputing Conference (ISC); a member of the Indian Supercomputing Conference (HiPC) steering committee; he also serves on the committees of several international High Performance Computing conferences.

Prof. Dr. Klaus Schulten, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Prof. Dr. Klaus Schulten

April 15, 2014 3:35 pm | Biographies

Klaus Schulten is the leader in the field of computational biophysics, having devoted over 40 years to establishing the physical mechanisms underlying processes and organization in living systems from the atomic to the organism scale. Schulten is a strong proponent of the use of simulations as a "computational microscope", to augment experimental research

Robot Sub Returns to Water after 1st Try Cut Short

April 15, 2014 3:01 pm | by Margie Mason, Associated Press | News | Comments

A robotic submarine looking for the lost Malaysian jet began its second mission on April 15, 2014, after cutting short its first because the ocean waters where it was sent were too deep, officials said. Its first planned 16-hour search lasted just six and none of the data collected by the U.S. Navy's Bluefin 21 submarine offered clues to the whereabouts of the plane.

NASA Images May Reveal Birth of New Saturn Moon

April 15, 2014 2:57 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has documented the formation of a small icy object within the rings of Saturn that may be a new moon, and may also provide clues to the formation of the planet's known moons. Images taken with Cassini's narrow angle camera on April 15, 2013 show disturbances at the very edge of Saturn's A ring  the outermost of the planet's large, bright rings.

Computational Record on SuperMUC: Earthquake Simulation Tops One Quadrillion Flops

April 15, 2014 2:50 pm | by Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) | News | Comments

A team of computer scientists, mathematicians and geophysicists have optimized the SeisSol earthquake simulation software on the SuperMUC high performance computer to push its performance beyond the “magical” one petaflop/s mark — one quadrillion floating point operations per second.

Satellite Ready for Launch from Cape Canaveral

April 15, 2014 11:57 am | by NASA | News | Comments

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket with NASA's Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS-L) spacecraft on board arrives at the launch pad at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station's Launch Complex 41. The TDRS-L spacecraft is the second of three new satellites designed to ensure vital operational continuity for NASA by expanding the lifespan of the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) fleet

Karlheinz Meier

April 15, 2014 11:17 am | Biographies
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