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SLAS2015

July 11, 2014 10:24 am | by SLAS | Events

SLAS is a global organization that provides forums for education and information exchange to encourage study and professional collaboration aimed at advancing laboratory science and technology for the drug discovery, biotechnology, chemical, data informatics, clinical diagnostic, consumer product, pharmaceutical, and other industries.

Pittcon 2015 Technical Program Places Emphasis on Energy and Fuels

July 8, 2014 4:05 pm | by Pittcon | News | Comments

The Program Committee has announced a call for papers for the Pittcon 2015 Technical Program....

Bigger than Big Data: The Key to Successful Translational Science

April 4, 2014 9:13 am | by Robin Munro, IDBS | Blogs | Comments

Is Big Data really the biggest challenge at the moment for translational science? Certainly...

Systems Docking Simulation Algorithms Help Speed Drug Discovery

February 20, 2014 6:50 am | by Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology - OIST | News | Comments

A large number of neglected diseases exist in which each disease has only a small number of...

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ScienceCloud by Accelrys

February 7, 2014 10:39 am | Accelrys | Product Releases | Comments

ScienceCloud is an SaaS-based information management and collaboration workspace for externalized life science research and development. It is designed to advance collaborative drug discovery with a new generation of integrated applications built on a scalable, cloud-based scientific platform.

Data Integrity in a Nutshell: Industry must take bold steps to assure the data used for drug quality decisions is trustworthy

January 7, 2014 12:31 pm | by Mark E. Newton | Articles | Comments

Regulatory inspectors have started digging much deeper into data, no longer accepting batch release data and supportive testing at face value. Even worse, this effort is justified: they have cited a number of firms for violations of data integrity, a most fundamental bond of trust between manufacturers and the regulators that inspect them. Industry must take bold steps to assure the data used for drug quality decisions is trustworthy...

Stanford, Google Team Up to Simulate Key Drug Receptor

December 20, 2013 4:04 pm | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford University | News | Comments

Researchers at Stanford and Google have conducted an unprecedented, atom-scale simulation of the receptor site's transformation, a feat that could have significant impact on drug design.                   

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Computer Models Predict More Effective Therapies

June 27, 2013 8:14 am | by AlphaGalileo | News | Comments

Scientist at Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin have used a computer simulation for predicting the effectiveness of various combination therapies for colon tumors. In most tumors, the communication between the individual cells is disturbed and the cells permanently receive growth and survival signals. For this reason, drugs are increasingly used in modern tumor therapy that targets those molecules to shut down these faulty signals.

But What Does It Do?

May 14, 2013 10:55 am | by European Molecular Biology Laboratory | News | Comments

Although we know the tool's general purpose, it can sometimes be difficult to tell if a specific pair of precision tweezers belongs to a surgeon or a master jeweller. It is now easier to solve similar conundrums about a type of protein that allows cells to react to their environment, thanks to scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL). Published in Science Signaling,...

Certara Signs Partnership Agreement with ChemAxon

March 22, 2013 2:07 pm | News | Comments

Certara, a leading provider of software and scientific consulting services to improve productivity and decision-making from drug discovery through clinical development, announced that Certara and ChemAxon have signed a partnership agreement.  The partnership will focus on providing seamless access to ChemAxon’s MarvinSketch and JChem Cartridge for Oracle via Certara’s D360.

FieldStere V3.0

December 7, 2011 6:40 am | Cresset Group | Product Releases | Comments

The bioisostere replacement tool, FieldStere is a fast and powerful software tool that uses innovative field-point technology, together with a database of molecular fragments, to help guide drug discovery projects and generate new intellectual property.

Analysis Reveals Patterns of Bacteria-Virus Infection Networks

June 28, 2011 8:43 am | by Abby Robinson | News | Comments

Bacteria are common sources of infection, but these microorganisms can themselves be infected by even smaller agents: viruses. A new analysis of the interactions between bacteria and viruses has revealed patterns that could help scientists working to understand which viruses infect which bacteria in the microbial world

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Coffee: wake up with an Alzheimer’s preventative

June 22, 2011 10:03 am | News | Comments

A yet unidentified component of coffee interacts with the beverage’s caffeine, which could be a surprising reason why daily coffee intake protects against Alzheimer’s disease. A new Alzheimer’s mouse study found that this interaction boosts blood levels of a critical growth factor that seems to fight off the Alzheimer’s disease process

Arctic Snow Harbors Deadly Assassin

June 22, 2011 6:56 am | Articles | Comments

A new international study confirms that whilst snow has an insulating effect which helps plants to grow bigger, heavy and prolonged snow can, in certain circumstances, also encourage the rapid and extensive growth of killer fungal strains. The snowfall can bring about unexpected conditions that encourage fungal growth, leading to the death of plants in the Arctic

Deadly Amphibian Disease in the Last Disease-free Region of Central America

June 14, 2011 6:49 am | News | Comments

Scientists have confirmed that chytridiomycosis, a rapidly spreading amphibian disease, has reached a site near Panama’s Darien region. This was the last area in the entire mountainous neotropics to be free of the disease

Deadly Bacteria may Mimic Human Proteins

June 8, 2011 4:58 am | News | Comments

Deadly bacteria may be evolving antibiotic resistance by mimicking human proteins, according to a new study. This process of “molecular mimicry” may help explain why bacterial human pathogens, many of which were at one time easily treatable with antibiotics, have re-emerged in recent years as highly infectious public health threats

Potential Treatment for Deadly E. coli Poisoning

June 7, 2011 7:52 am | News | Comments

A potential life-saving treatment for severe E. coli food poisoning outbreaks — developed more than a decade ago — hasn't gone forward into clinical trials because of lack of commercial interest. Researchers produced a "designer" probiotic bacterium which binds and neutralizes the toxin produced by E. coli

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LifeScope 2.0

May 31, 2011 10:34 am | Life Technologies Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

LifeScope 2.0 Genomic Analysis Software is a bioinformatics system for analyzing data from genomic sequencing instruments to study human disease such as cancer. The product features secure project management, pushbutton workflows and an intuitive user interface

‘E-waste Pollution’ Threat to Human Health

May 31, 2011 7:15 am | News | Comments

In addition to its damaging effect on the environment researchers have now linked e-waste to adverse effects on human health, such as inflammation and oxidative stress – precursors to cardiovascular disease, DNA damage and possibly cancer. Researchers took air samples from one of the largest e-waste dismantling areas in China and examined their effects on human lung epithelial cells

Reindeer see a Wonderful World of Ultraviolet Light

May 26, 2011 11:24 am | News | Comments

Seeing ultraviolet light allows reindeer to take in live-saving information in conditions where normal mammalian vision would make them vulnerable to starvation, predators and territorial conflict. It also raises the question of how reindeer protect their eyes from being damaged by UV

Access to Personal Medical Records Increases Satisfaction

May 23, 2011 9:55 am | News | Comments

A new analysis has found that allowing full access to personal medical records increases satisfaction without increasing anxiety in newly diagnosed cancer patients. The study indicates that providing accurate information to patients through medical records can be a beneficial complement to verbal communication with their physicians

Genomics in Drug Discovery and Development

May 16, 2011 9:58 am | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

This month’s column reviews a book from three of my former colleagues at Abbott Laboratories. Their areas of expertise are toxicogenomics, pharmacogenomics and oncology. Naturally, the subject matter reflects the authors’ research interests.

Crimson Project Addresses Critical Samples Shortage

May 12, 2011 8:39 am | by John R. Joyce, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

John R. Joyce, Ph.D. The Crimson Project is about the development of an application, called Crimson, designed to address the always critical shortage of samples in clinical research

No Safety in Numbers for Moths

May 10, 2011 10:04 am | News | Comments

Scientists are to investigate how lethal viruses attack differently sized populations of moths in research that may help develop new methods of pest control. The project will study the grain-infesting Indian meal moth ( Plodia interpunctella ) and a virus it carries that is sometimes deadly to its host and sometimes not

Could Superantigens be Behind Several Illnesses?

November 29, 2010 9:07 am | News | Comments

Superantigens, the toxins produced by staphylococcus bacteria, are more complex than previously believed, reveals a team of researchers. Their discovery shows that the body's immune system can cause more illnesses than realized

Hearing Colors, Seeing Sounds: Synesthesia Explored

November 17, 2010 7:55 am | News | Comments

About two percent of the population has a condition called synesthesia, in which two different sensations, like color and sound, are experienced at once. Although this condition is rare, the new findings suggest the brain is wired in complex and sometimes overlapping ways to help people interpret and understand their environments

New Dry Powder Antibiotic Targets Tuberculosis

November 17, 2010 4:15 am | News | Comments

The new inhalable antibiotic is a dry powder, comprised of fine particles of antibiotics. These particles are targeted to the deep lung where TB enters in early stages of infection

Beak Deformities Increase in Northwest

November 11, 2010 8:16 am | by Dan Joling | News | Comments

Scientists have observed the highest rate of beak abnormalities ever recorded in wild bird populations in Alaska and the Northwest. The study on beak deformities in northwestern crows in Alaska, Washington and British Columbia follows a trend found earlier in Alaska's black-capped chickadees

Microchip Separates and Extracts Tumor Cells in the Blood

October 22, 2010 9:24 am | News | Comments

The patented microchip has the size of a one euro coin, incorporating a small channel along which a sample of blood containing the patient's tumor cells flows. By means of ultrasonic waves focused on a specific zone, these cells, having a density and size different from the rest, concentrate at the point from where they are gathered

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