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Diver collecting microbial samples from Australian seaweeds for Uncovering Genome Mysteries

Crowdsourced Supercomputing Examines Big Genomic Data

October 21, 2014 9:31 am | by IBM | News | Comments

What do the DNA in Australian seaweed, Amazon River water, tropical plants, and forest soil all have in common? Lots, say scientists. And understanding the genetic similarities of disparate life forms could enable researchers to produce compounds for new medicines, eco-friendly materials, more resilient crops, and cleaner air, water and energy.

Planet’s First Sex Act: Ancient Armored Fish did it Sideways

October 20, 2014 12:11 pm | by Flinders University | News | Comments

A profound new discovery reveals how the intimate act of sexual intercourse first evolved in our...

Bizarre Ancient Fossils Confirmed as Strange Human Cousins

October 16, 2014 2:50 pm | by University of Adelaide | News | Comments

More than 100 years since they were first discovered, some of the world's most bizarre fossils...

Treasure Trove of Ancient Genomes Helps Recalibrate Human Evolutionary Clock

October 14, 2014 4:18 pm | by Molecular Biology and Evolution, Oxford University Press | News | Comments

To improve the modeling and reading of the branches on the human tree of life, researchers...

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“The collective expertise of NeuroLINCS investigators provides a unique opportunity to increase our knowledge of what makes brain cells unique and what happens during neurodegenerative diseases," said UC Irvine's Leslie M. Thompson.

Novel NIH Program will Create Database of Human Brain Cell Activity

October 10, 2014 12:08 pm | by UC Irvine | News | Comments

UC Irvine will receive $8 million from the NIH to establish one of six national centers dedicated to creating a database of human cellular responses that will accelerate efforts to develop new therapies for many diseases. The center will partner with researchers from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center’s Regenerative Medicine Institute, the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease, UC San Francisco, Johns Hopkins University and MIT.

Tom Conte is President-elect, IEEE Computer Society; Professor of Computer Science and Electrical & Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology; and Elie Track is President, IEEE Council on Superconductivity; CEO, nVizix.

Technology Time Machine Looks Far Ahead at Future of Processing

October 7, 2014 3:25 pm | by Tom Conte and Elie Track, IEEE | Blogs | Comments

The IEEE Technology Time Machine (TTM) is going further into the future. Now in its third year, the annual two-day IEEE meeting is mixing things up a little in terms of format and topics. Rather than just looking at how some technologies might evolve in the next decade, experts and visionaries are going to look out to 2035 and beyond.

This 600X photograph of a Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) seminal vesicle received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microsc

Fruit Fly Privates

October 3, 2014 2:57 pm | News | Comments

This 600X photograph of a Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) seminal vesicle received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The confocal image was created by Barbara Laurinyecz of University of Szeged, Department of Genetics, Szeged, Hungary using fluorescence.

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Caris Life Sciences is accelerating precision medicine for cancer treatment using IBM technical computing and software defined storage solutions.  Courtesy of Caris Life Science

Accelerating Use of Molecular Profiling in Cancer Treatment Selection

September 25, 2014 4:43 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM announced that Caris Life Sciences is using IBM technical computing and storage technology to accelerate the company’s molecular profiling services for cancer patients. The Caris tumor profiling database is one of the largest datasets in the application of advanced molecular profiling technologies to support clinicians in delivering personalized treatment recommendations — or precision oncology.

Scaffolded DNA origami utilizes numerous chemically synthesized, short DNA strands (staple strands) to direct the folding of a larger, biologically derived strand of DNA (scaffold strand). Molecular recognition (base pairing, i.e., A binds to T and G bind

Researchers Create World’s Largest DNA Origami

September 11, 2014 4:48 pm | by North Carolina State University | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University, Duke University and the University of Copenhagen have created the world’s largest DNA origami, which are nanoscale constructions with applications ranging from biomedical research to nanoelectronics. The standard for DNA origami has long been limited to a scaffold strand that is made up of 7,249 bases. The research team has now created DNA origami consisting of 51,466 bases

University of Chicago Paleontologist Paul C. Sereno looks inside the jaws of a 50-foot life-size model of a Spinosaurus dinosaur at the National Geographic Society exhibit in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Bizarre, Alien-like Giant Dinosaur Unveiled

September 11, 2014 4:33 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Picture the fearsome creatures of "Jurassic Park" crossed with the shark from "Jaws." Then, super-size to the biggest predator ever to roam Earth. Now, add a crocodile snout as big as a person and feet like a duck's. The result gives you some idea of a bizarre dinosaur scientists unveiled September 11, 2014. This patchwork of critters, a 50-foot predator, is the only known dinosaur to live much of its life in the water.

Parents and physicians and scientists from the Neuroblastoma and Medulloblastoma Translational Research Consortium and TGen have teamed to launch a groundbreaking personalized medicine clinical trial investigation for pediatric cancer.

Providing Critical Child-cancer Research Tools to Speed Development of Personalized Treatments

September 11, 2014 3:25 pm | by TGen | News | Comments

Dell, Terascala and the Translational Genomics Research Institute are installing state-of-the-art computing and programing specialized for human genome investigations at the National Cancer Institute. The mission of the Oncogenomics Section at the NCI is to harness the power of high throughput genomic and proteomic methods to improve the outcome of children with high-risk metastatic, refractory and recurrent cancers.

The industry's preeminent event on Molecular Medicine, focusing on Drug Discovery, Genomics, Diagnostics and Information Technology.

22nd International Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference

August 28, 2014 3:17 pm | Events

The 22nd International Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference is the industry's Preeminent Event on Molecular Medicine, focusing on Drug Discovery, Genomics, Diagnostics and Information Technology. Spanning six days this year, the Tri-Conference includes an expanded program that includes 6 symposia, over 20 short courses, and 17 conference programs.

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As advances in technology allow researchers to gather more and more morphological and image-based data, it has become increasingly important to be able to analyze and interpret those data quickly, accurately, consistently, and objectively. Biometric and b

Humans and Computers Figure Out the Plant World Together

August 28, 2014 1:30 pm | by American Journal of Botany | News | Comments

As advances in technology allow researchers to gather more and more morphological and image-based data, it has become increasingly important to be able to analyze and interpret those data quickly, accurately, consistently, and objectively. Biometric and bioinformatic methods make this possible, and reveal the potential of data collected from the shape and form of plants to be as rich of a data source as genetic data.

Pathogenic bacteria (red) live side-by-side with benign species (green) in a healthy mouth. Scientists are beginning to understand what causes bacterial communities to shift from health to diseases like periodontitis, diabetes, and Crohn's disease. Courte

Mouth Bacteria Can Change its Diet, Supercomputers Reveal

August 22, 2014 12:28 pm | by Jorge Salazar, TACC | News | Comments

Bacteria inside your mouth drastically change how they act when you're diseased. Scientists say these surprising findings might lead to better ways to prevent or even reverse the gum disease periodontitis, diabetes and Crohn's disease. UT Austin researchers used shotgun metagenomic sequencing, a non-targeted way to study the all the genetic material of the bacterial communities. They analyzed the RNA collected with  Lonestar and Stampede.

Fossil Hallucigenia sparsa from the Burgess Shale Courtesy of M. R. Smith / Smithsonian Institute

Strangest Creature of Ancient Earth linked to Modern Animals

August 19, 2014 3:08 pm | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

The spines along its back were thought to be legs, its legs thought to be tentacles along its back, and its head was mistaken for its tail. The animal, known as Hallucigenia due to its otherworldly appearance, had been considered an ‘evolutionary misfit’ as it was not clear how it related to modern animal groups. Researchers have discovered an important link...

Geneticist Assistant NGS Interpretative Workbench

Geneticist Assistant NGS Interpretative Workbench

August 18, 2014 3:42 pm | SoftGenetics, LLC | Product Releases | Comments

Geneticist Assistant NGS Interpretative Workbench features an Operational Management function with a unique workflow builder that permits users to mimic their physical workflow in “silico,” providing real‐time status tracking of samples throughout the workflow; operational statistics by department or function and automated e-mail notification of status changes.

George Vacek is life sciences global director at DataDirect Networks.

Enabling Innovation and Discovery through Data-Intensive High Performance Cloud and Big Data Infrastructure

July 29, 2014 2:34 pm | by George Vacek, DataDirect Networks | Blogs | Comments

As the size and scale of life sciences datasets increases — think large-cohort longitudinal studies with multiple samples and multiple protocols — so does the challenge of storing, interpreting and analyzing this data. Researchers and data scientists are under increasing pressure to identify the most relevant and critical information within massive and messy data sets, so they can quickly make the next discovery.

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Genes that are active only in the testes have double the harmful mutation rate of those that are active in both sexes. Courtesy of Archaeogenetics

Mutations from Venus, Mutations from Mars: A Sex-difference Approach to Harmful Mutation

July 28, 2014 5:36 pm | by Weizmann Institute of Science | News | Comments

Some 15 percent of adults suffer from fertility problems, many of these due to genetic factors. This is something of a paradox: We might expect such genes, which reduce an individual's ability to reproduce, to disappear from the population. Recent research may have solved the riddle. Not only can it explain the high rates of male fertility problems, it may open new avenues in understanding the causes of genetic diseases and their treatment.

SLAS2015

July 11, 2014 10:24 am | by SLAS | Events

SLAS is a global organization that provides forums for education and information exchange to encourage study and professional collaboration aimed at advancing laboratory science and technology for the drug discovery, biotechnology, chemical, data informatics, clinical diagnostic, consumer product, pharmaceutical, and other industries.

Bottom-up Proteomics: Supercomputer helps Researchers Interpret Genomes

July 9, 2014 3:30 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Tandem protein mass spectrometry is one of the most widely used methods in proteomics, the large-scale study of proteins, particularly their structures and functions. Researchers in the Marcotte group at the University of Texas at Austin are using the Stampede supercomputer to develop and test computer algorithms that let them more accurately and efficiently interpret proteomics mass spectrometry data.

Neuronal Differentiation

July 2, 2014 11:21 am | News | Comments

This 20x image of neuroprecursor stem cells undergoing neuronal differentiation received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The confocal photo was taken by Regis Grailhe and Arnaud Ogier of Institut Pasteur Korea in Seongnam, Gyeonggi-do, South Korea.

Scientists discover and describe a new species of spider from Mexico. The new species belongs to the enigmatic family Paratropididae that is distinguished by representatives who possess unique camouflaging abilities.

New Spider Species Uses Dirt Camouflage

June 25, 2014 10:06 am | by Pensoft Publishers | News | Comments

Scientists discover and describe a new species of spider from Mexico. The new species belongs to the enigmatic family Paratropididae that is distinguished by representatives who possess unique camouflaging abilities.         

One of the newly discovered species surprises with a size larger than a ping-pong ball. Another special characteristic of the genus is that its species have the largest chirping organs of any millipede, which are most probably used during mating.

New Species of Ancient Chirping Giant Pill-Millipedes found in Madagascar

June 16, 2014 12:52 pm | by Pensoft Publishers | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered seven new species of chirping giant pill-millipedes. The species discovered all belong to the genus Sphaeromimus, which is Latin for 'small ball animal.' However, the designation 'small' is not always true for members of the genus, as one of the newly discovered species surprises with a size larger than a ping-pong ball. Another special characteristic is the largest chirping organs of any millipede.

A blind huntsman spider, the first of its kind in the world without any eyes, something scientists say is attributable to living permanently without daylight, found in Laos. The WWF said Thursday, June 5, 2014 some of the more remarkable and charismatic

Blind Huntsman Spider, Dragon Fish among Dozens of New Species in Myanmar

June 5, 2014 5:33 pm | by AP | News | Comments

A dragon fish with intricate, maze-like markings on every scale, a frog with rough, chocolate-colored skin and a ginger plant are among more than two dozen flora and fauna species found in Myanmar since it emerged from a half-century of military rule and isolation.

Gregorio Valdez and his team designed a search engine – called EvoCor – that quickly sifts through the evolutionary history of all mapped genes – human and otherwise.

Search Engine finds Functionally Linked Genes

June 4, 2014 7:47 pm | by Ashley WennersHerron, Virginia Tech | News | Comments

A frontier lies deep within our cells. Our bodies are as vast as oceans and space, composed of a dizzying number of different types of cells. Exploration reaches far, yet the genes that make each cell and tissue unique have remained largely obscure. That’s changing with a search engine called EvoCor that identifies functionally linked genes.

The U6 crystal structure was imaged using the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science's Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory.

Most Detailed Images Yet of Tiny Cellular Machines Captured

June 2, 2014 7:37 pm | by Kelly April Tyrrell, University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

A grandfather clock is, on its surface, a simple yet elegant machine. Tall and stately, its job is to steadily tick away the time. But a look inside reveals a much more intricate dance of parts, from precisely-fitted gears to cable-embraced pulleys and bobbing levers. Like exploring a clock's the inner workings, researchers are digging into the inner workings of the tiny cellular machines that help make all of the proteins our bodies need.

A Clarion nightsnake slithers on the ground in the Revillagigedo Islands, over 400 miles off Mexico's Pacific coast. The first and only spotting of the species was made by American naturalist William Beebe in a visit to Clarion island in 1936.

Lost Snake Species found on Mexican Island

May 27, 2014 12:34 pm | by Mark Stevenson, Associated Press | News | Comments

A species of snake that had been "lost" for almost 80 years has been re-discovered on a remote Mexican island. The Clarion nightsnake was found again on one of the Revillagigedo Islands, more than 400 miles (650 kilometers) off Mexico's Pacific coast, according to a study published in the PLOS ONE scientific journal.

Divers Alberto Nava and Susan Bird transport the Hoyo Negro skull to an underwater turntable so that it can be photographed to create a 3-D model in an underwater cave in Mexico's Yucatan Peninsula. Thousands of years ago, a teenage girl fell into this

Ancient Skeleton Shedding Light on First Americans

May 16, 2014 3:11 pm | by Malcolm Ritter, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Thousands of years ago, a teenage girl toppled into a deep hole in a Mexican cave and died. Now, her skeleton and her DNA are bolstering the long-held theory that humans arrived in the Americas by way of a land bridge from Asia. The girl's nearly complete skeleton was discovered by chance by expert divers who were mapping water-filled caves.

Cross-section of fossil ostracod sperm. The nuclei in each sperm (dark spot) are indicated by arrows. Courtesy of R. Matzke-Karasz

17-Million-Year-Old Giant Sperm Found

May 16, 2014 10:47 am | by University of New South Wales Australia | News | Comments

Preserved giant sperm from tiny shrimps that lived at least 17 million years ago have been discovered at the Riversleigh World Heritage Fossil Site in north Queensland, Australia, by a team including University of New South Wales (UNSW) Australia researchers.

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