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The Ranger supercomputer, 2008-2013. Courtesy of TACC

Ranger Supercomputer Begins New Life, Makes Global Journey to Africa

July 30, 2014 3:57 pm | by Jorge Salazar, TACC | News | Comments

For all the money and effort poured into supercomputers, their life spans can be brutally short – on average about four years. So, what happens to one of the world's greatest supercomputers when it reaches retirement age? If it's the Texas Advanced Computer Center's (TACC) Ranger supercomputer, it continues making an impact in the world. If the system could talk, it might proclaim, "There is life after retirement!"

Vision-correcting Display Makes Reading Glasses So Yesterday

July 30, 2014 3:46 pm | by Sarah Yang, UC Berkeley | News | Comments

What if computer screens had glasses instead of the people staring at the monitors? That concept...

IBM to Make Free Supercomputing Power Available to Sustainability Scientists

July 30, 2014 2:06 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

In support of the updated Climate Data Initiative announced by the White House July 29, 2014,...

AMD Opteron 64-Bit ARM-Based Developer Kits

July 30, 2014 12:45 pm | Product Releases | Comments

The AMD Opteron A1100-Series developer kit features AMD's first 64-bit ARM-based processor,...

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PrecisionMDx LIS-LIMS Process Management Software Suite

PrecisionMDx LIS-LIMS Process Management Software Suite

July 30, 2014 11:37 am | Uniconnect | Product Releases | Comments

The PrecisionMDx (PMDx) System is designed for molecular laboratories. It supports molecular diagnostic requirements of entrepreneurial molecular test development companies and the institutional services of molecular pathology departments in community, private and academic medical centers.

A proof-of-concept technology reduces set up times for cloud-to-cloud connectivity from days to seconds. Courtesy of 百楽兎

Breakthrough Elastic Cloud-to-Cloud Networking Unveiled

July 30, 2014 9:32 am | by IBM | News | Comments

Scientists from AT&T, IBM and ACS announced a proof-of-concept technology that reduces set up times for cloud-to-cloud connectivity from days to seconds. This advance is a major step forward that could one day lead to sub-second provisioning time with IP and next-generation optical networking equipment and enables elastic bandwidth between clouds at high connection request rates using intelligent cloud data center orchestrators.

George Vacek is life sciences global director at DataDirect Networks.

Enabling Innovation and Discovery through Data-Intensive High Performance Cloud and Big Data Infrastructure

July 29, 2014 2:34 pm | by George Vacek, DataDirect Networks | Blogs | Comments

As the size and scale of life sciences datasets increases — think large-cohort longitudinal studies with multiple samples and multiple protocols — so does the challenge of storing, interpreting and analyzing this data. Researchers and data scientists are under increasing pressure to identify the most relevant and critical information within massive and messy data sets, so they can quickly make the next discovery.

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Grammatikopoulos simulated two palladium nanoparticles colliding at different temperatures. The hotter the temperature, the more homogenous the resulting product, and the further the atoms in the particle crystallize.

Simulating the Invisible

July 29, 2014 2:07 pm | by Poncie Rutsch, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) | News | Comments

Every trillionth of a second, Panagiotis Grammatikopoulos calculates the location of each individual atom in a particle based on where it is and which forces apply. He uses a computer program to make the calculations, and then animates the motion of the atoms using visualization software. The resulting animation illuminates what happens, atom-by-atom, when two nanoparticles collide.

Techniques known as dimensionality reduction can help find patterns in the recorded activity of thousands of neurons. Rather than look at all responses at once, these methods find a smaller set of dimensions — in this case three — that capture as much str

New Platform Enables Large-Scale Neuroscience

July 28, 2014 2:23 pm | by Howard Hughes Medical Institute | News | Comments

In an age of “big data,” a single computer cannot always find the solution a user wants. Computational tasks must instead be distributed across a cluster of computers that analyze a massive data set together. It's how Facebook and Google mine your Web history to present you with targeted ads, and how Amazon and Netflix recommend your next favorite book or movie. But big data is about more than just marketing.

The automatic placement of the albums by the algorithm was in agreement with the chronological order of the recording of each Beatles albums.

AI Reveals The Beatles’ Dramatic Musical Transformation

July 28, 2014 12:29 pm | by Lawrence Technological University | News | Comments

Music fans and critics know that the music of the Beatles underwent a dramatic transformation in just a few years. But, until now, there hasn’t been a scientific way to measure the progression. Computer scientists at Lawrence Technological University have developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that can analyze and compare musical styles, enabling research into their musical progression.

K computer installed in the computer room. Each computer rack is equipped with about 100 CPUs. In the Computer Building, 800 or more computer racks are installed for the K computer.  Courtesy of Riken

K Computer Runs Largest Ever Ensemble Simulation of Global Weather

July 25, 2014 2:25 pm | by RIKEN | News | Comments

Ensemble forecasting is a key part of weather forecasting. Computers typically run multiple simulations using slightly different initial conditions or assumptions, and then analyze them together to try to improve forecasts. Using Japan’s K computer, researchers have succeeded in running 10,240 parallel simulations of global weather, the largest number ever performed, using data assimilation to reduce the range of uncertainties.

Alan Turing in slate at Bletchley Park. Courtesy of Jon Callas

Can Machines Think? – Misidentification of Humans as Machines in Turing Test

July 25, 2014 2:09 pm | by Taylor & Francis | News | Comments

Alan Turing led a team of code breakers at Bletchley Park which cracked the German Enigma machine cypher during WWII  but that is far from being his only legacy. In the year of the 100th anniversary of his birth, researchers published a series of ‘Turing tests’ in the Journal of Experimental & Theoretical Artificial Intelligence; these entailed a series of five-minute conversations between human and machine or human and human.

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HPC-X Scalable Software Toolkit for High-Performance Computing Platforms and Applications

HPC-X Scalable Software Toolkit for High-Performance Computing Platforms and Applications

July 25, 2014 2:01 pm | Mellanox Technologies, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

HPC-X Scalable Software Toolkit  is a comprehensive software suite for high-performance computing environments that provides enhancements to significantly increase the scalability and performance of message communications in the network. The toolkit provides complete communication libraries to support MPI, SHMEM and PGAS programming languages, as well as performance accelerators that take advantage of Mellanox scalable interconnect solutions.

IBM Expands High Performance Computing Capabilities in the Cloud

July 24, 2014 2:18 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM is making high performance computing more accessible through the cloud for clients grappling with big data and other computationally intensive activities. A new option from SoftLayer will provide industry-standard InfiniBand networking technology to connect SoftLayer bare metal servers. This will enable very high data throughput speeds between systems, allowing companies to move workloads traditionally associated with HPC to the cloud.

2014 marks the 75th anniversary of NASA Ames Research Center.

NASA Ames Research Center to host First Open House in 17 Years

July 23, 2014 3:24 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Maybe you’ve sat on the lawn, even hung out on the flightline. Now, for the first time since 1997, NASA Ames Research Center is opening their house. An announcement posted on NASA.gov states: “For our 75th anniversary, we're inviting all of the Bay Area and Silicon Valley to come inside the gates and get to know NASA's center in Silicon Valley. Take a two-mile walking tour through the center and visit with Ames engineers and scientists..."

Measured signal during a reading operation for all eight possible states of a 110-nm, 3-bits, self-referenced MRAM cell. Courtesy of Quentin Stainer

Multi-Bit Spin for MRAM Storage may Rival Flash Memory

July 23, 2014 3:20 pm | by American Institute of Physics (AIP) | News | Comments

Interest in magnetic random access memory (MRAM) is escalating, thanks to demand for fast, low-cost, nonvolatile, low-consumption, secure memory devices. MRAM, which relies on manipulating the magnetization of materials for data storage rather than electronic charges, boasts all of these advantages as an emerging technology, but so far it hasn't been able to match flash memory in terms of storage density.

Breakthrough Laser May Play Crucial Role in Development of Quantum Computers

July 23, 2014 3:09 pm | by Joseph Blumberg, Dartmouth College | News | Comments

A team of Dartmouth scientists and their colleagues have devised a breakthrough laser that uses a single artificial atom to generate and emit particles of light — and may play a crucial role in the development of quantum computers, which are predicted to eventually outperform even today’s most powerful supercomputers.

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The researchers traced 95 percent of canvas fingerprinting scripts back to share buttons provided by AddThis, the world’s largest content sharing platform.

Share Button, Web Site Plug-Ins can be used to Track You against Your Will

July 22, 2014 3:24 pm | by KU Leuven | News | Comments

One in 18 of the world’s top 100,000 Web sites track users without their consent using a previously undetected cookie-like tracking mechanism embedded in ‘share’ buttons. A new study by researchers at KU Leuven and Princeton University provides the first large-scale investigation of the mechanism and is the first to confirm its use on actual Web sites.

Jeffrey Potoff is a professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, and Loren Schwiebert is an associate professor of Computer Science at Wayne State University.

Using Powerful GPU-Based Monte Carlo Simulation Engine to Model Larger Systems, Reduce Data Errors, Improve System Prototyping

July 22, 2014 8:33 am | by Jeffrey Potoff and Loren Schwiebert | Blogs | Comments

Recently, our research work got a shot in the arm because Wayne State University was the recipient of a complete high-performance compute cluster donated by Silicon Mechanics as part of its 3rd Annual Research Cluster Grant competition. The new HPC cluster gives us some state-of-the-art hardware, which will enhance the development of what we’ve been working on — a novel GPU-Optimized Monte Carlo simulation engine for molecular systems.

Study: Cloud Computing can make Business More Green

July 21, 2014 2:21 pm | by Andrew Purcell | News | Comments

A  case study published in The International Journal of Business Process Integration and Management demonstrates that the adoption of integrated cloud-computing solutions can lead to significant cost savings for businesses, as well as large reductions in the size of an organization's carbon footprint.

Internet of Things and Hadoop to be featured at ISC Big Data

July 21, 2014 2:07 pm | by ISC | News | Comments

The second ISC Big Data conference themed “From Data To Knowledge,” builds on the success of the inaugural 2013 event. A comprehensive program has been put together by the Steering Committee under the leadership of Sverre Jarp, who retired officially as the CTO of CERN openlab in March of this year.

No-wait Data Centers: System could reduce Transmission Delays by 99.6 Percent

July 18, 2014 3:59 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Big Web sites usually maintain their own “data centers,” banks of tens or even hundreds of thousands of servers, all passing data back and forth to field users’ requests. Like any big, decentralized network, data centers are prone to congestion: Packets of data arriving at the same router at the same time are put in a queue, and if the queues get too long, packets can be delayed.

Math Can Make the Internet 5 to 10 Times Faster

July 18, 2014 3:52 pm | by Aalborg University | News | Comments

Mathematical equations can make Internet communication via computer, mobile phone or satellite many times faster and more secure than today. Results with software developed by researchers from Aalborg University in collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and California Institute of Technology (Caltech) are attracting attention in the international technology media.

Internet Society to Measure, Display Quality of Connections around the World

July 18, 2014 3:47 pm | by Aalto University | News | Comments

Internet access is becoming increasingly mobile, and the next billion users will experience the Internet in new ways from those already online. The experience of Internet connectivity is far from uniform, and observing the variety of connectivity, and how it is changing over time is important. Smartphone users around the globe can download an app and contribute their measurements to a global picture of Internet diversity and evolution.

Fundamental Chemistry Findings Could Help Extend Moore’s Law

July 16, 2014 11:49 am | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Over the years, computer chips have gotten smaller, thanks to advances in materials science and manufacturing technologies. This march of progress, the doubling of transistors on a microprocessor roughly every two years, is called Moore’s Law. But there’s one component of the chip-making process in need of an overhaul if Moore’s law is to continue: the chemical mixture called photoresist.

Digital Crime-Fighters Face Technical Challenges with Cloud Computing

July 16, 2014 10:26 am | by NIST | News | Comments

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has issued for public review and comment a draft report summarizing 65 challenges that cloud computing poses to forensics investigators who uncover, gather, examine and interpret digital evidence to help solve crimes.

Cray Awarded Contract to Install India's First Cray XC30 Supercomputer

July 16, 2014 3:33 am | by Cray | News | Comments

The Cray XC30 system will be used by a nation-wide consortium of scientists called the Indian Lattice Gauge Theory Initiative (ILGTI). The group will research the properties of a phase of matter called the quark-gluon plasma, which existed when the universe was approximately a microsecond old. ILGTI also carries out research on exotic and heavy-flavor hadrons, which will be produced in hadron collider experiments.

Scientists Track Quantum Errors in Real Time, Step Toward Age of Quantum Computing

July 15, 2014 4:33 pm | by Holly Lauridsen, Yale University | News | Comments

Scientists have demonstrated the ability to track real quantum errors as they occur, a major step in the development of reliable quantum computers. Quantum computers could significantly improve the computational power of modern computers, but a major problem stands in the way: information loss, or quantum errors. To combat errors, physicists must be able to detect that an error has occurred and then correct it in real time.

Inventor Pushes Solar Panels for Roads, Highways

July 15, 2014 12:06 pm | by Nicholas K. Geranios, Associated Press | News | Comments

The solar panels that Idaho inventor Scott Brusaw has built aren't meant for rooftops. They are meant for roads, driveways, parking lots, bike trails and, eventually, highways. Brusaw, an electrical engineer, says the hexagon-shaped panels can withstand the wear and tear that comes from inclement weather and vehicles, big and small, to generate electricity.

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