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In this January 25, 1955, photo, Charles Hard Townes, Columbia University professor and Nobel laureate, explains his invention the maser during a news conference in New York City. Townes, who did most of the work that would make him one of three scientist

Laser Co-creator and Nobel Laureate Charles Townes dies at 99

January 29, 2015 8:37 am | by Lisa Leff, Associated Press | News | Comments

Charles H. Townes' inspiration for the predecessor of the laser came to him while sitting on a park bench, waiting for a restaurant to open for breakfast. On the tranquil morning of April 26, 1951, Townes scribbled a theory on scrap paper that would lead to the laser, the invention he's known for and which transformed everyday life and led to other scientific discoveries. The 99-year-old Nobel Prize-winning physicist died January 27, 2015.

Improving Data Mobility and Management for International Cosmology Workshop

January 28, 2015 3:06 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | Events

Registration is now open for a workshop on “Improving Data Mobility and Management for...

SciNet Search Engine Helps Find Relevant, Diverse Results Faster

January 28, 2015 2:52 pm | by Alto University | News | Comments

A new search engine outperforms current ones, and helps people to do searches more efficiently....

Needle in a Haystack: Finding the Right Genes in Tens of Thousands

January 28, 2015 2:45 pm | by TACC | News | Comments

Scientists using supercomputers found genes sensitive to cold and drought in a plant help it...

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The Biosurveillance Gateway site offers a variety of Los Alamos-developed biosurveillance tools that can be used for decision support in disease surveillance.

Biosurveillance Gateway Supports Centralized Global Disease Response

January 28, 2015 2:21 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

A new online resource, called the Biosurveillance Gateway, is in place at Los Alamos National Laboratory, providing a centralized portal for all news, information, resources and research related to biosurveillance at the laboratory. The goal of the site is to support global disease surveillance, providing useful tools for professionals around the world to reference from a single location.

The intelligent keyboard records each letter touched, but also captures information about the amount of force applied to the key and the length of time between one keystroke and the next. Such typing style is unique to individuals, and so could provide a

Self-powered Intelligent Keyboard could Provide New Layer of Biometric Security

January 27, 2015 10:12 am | by John Toon, Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

By analyzing such parameters as the force applied by key presses and the time interval between them, a new self-powered non-mechanical intelligent keyboard could provide a stronger layer of security for computer users. The self-powered device generates electricity when a user’s fingertips contact the multi-layer plastic materials that make up the device.

The Software Sustainability Institute, a collaboration between the Universities of Southampton, Oxford, Edinburgh and Manchester, is spreading the word about its work in promoting greater use of software in research with an Android phone app, which is ava

New App Helping to Share World-class Software-enabled Research

January 27, 2015 10:04 am | by University of Southampton | News | Comments

Electronics and computer science researchers have helped to develop a new app to share world-class research and to receive the latest research news through a phone or tablet. The Software Sustainability Institute, a collaboration between the Universities of Southampton, Oxford, Edinburgh and Manchester, aims to spread the word about its work in promoting greater use of software in research.

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In his doctoral thesis, Baaij describes the world-wide production of microchips through the years.

Massive Chip Design Savings on the Horizon

January 26, 2015 4:35 pm | by University of Twente | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a programming language making the massive costs associated with designing hardware more manageable. Chip manufacturers have been using the same chip design techniques for 20 years. The current process calls for extensive testing after each design step. The newly developed, functional programming language makes it possible to prove, in advance, that a design transformation is 100-percent error-free.

Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) quantum mechanics paradox

Extending Einstein's Spooky Actions for Use in Quantum Networks

January 26, 2015 4:18 pm | by Swinburne University of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers have demonstrated that the 1935 Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen quantum mechanics paradox may be extended to more than two optical systems, paving the way for exploration of larger quantum networks. The experiment also identified properties that may be useful in establishing secure quantum communication networks where shared sequences of numbers created between two parties need to be kept secret from a third party.

Scroll being prepared for scanning in its container at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. Courtesy of Brent Seales

First-of-its-kind Software Enables Major Breakthrough in Reading Ancient Scrolls

January 26, 2015 2:39 pm | by University of Kentucky | News | Comments

After working for more than 10 years on unlocking an ancient piece of history, what lies inside damaged Herculaneum scrolls, UK Department of Computer Science Chair and Professor Brent Seales will accomplish the next step in allowing the world to read the scrolls, which cannot be physically opened. A major development in the venture, Seales is building software that will visualize the scrolls' writings as they would be if unrolled.

LE-OFETs are being used to develop flexible, transparent computer screens. Copyright RDECOM/CC

Transistor Improvements on Track to make Flexible Plastic Computers a Reality

January 26, 2015 2:03 pm | by National Institute for Materials Science | News | Comments

Researchers at Japan’s National Institute for Materials Science revealed that improvements should soon be expected in the manufacture of transistors that can be used to make flexible, paper-thin computer screens.The scientists reviewed the latest developments in research on photoactive organic field-effect transistors; devices that incorporate organic semi-conductors, amplify weak electronic signals, and either emit or receive light.

A notebook by Alan Turing, the World War II code-breaking genius depicted by Benedict Cumberbatch in the Oscar-nominated "The Imitation Game," is shown in a special preview at Bonhams auctioneers. The 56-page manuscript, containing Turing's complex mathem

British Code Breaker Alan Turing's Notebook Goes to Auction

January 26, 2015 1:33 pm | by AP | News | Comments

A handwritten notebook by Alan Turing, the World War II code-breaking genius depicted by Benedict Cumberbatch in the Oscar-nominated The Imitation Game, is going on the auction block. The 56-page manuscript was written at the time the British mathematician and computer science pioneer was working to break the seemingly unbreakable Enigma codes used by the Germans throughout World War II. It is expected to bring at least $1 million.

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This simulation, which models a rheometer with particles, can help determine how well a rheometer design works at characterizing a fluid. The NIST team is performing a number of simulations like this one, varying the shape and number of blades to better i

Predicting Concrete Flow Properties from Simple Measurements

January 23, 2015 2:44 pm | by NIST | News | Comments

Just because concrete is the most widely used building material in human history doesn’t mean it can’t be improved. A recent study using DOE Office of Science supercomputers has led to a new way to predict concrete’s flow properties from simple measurements. The results should help accelerate the design of a new generation of high-performance and eco-friendly cement-based materials by reducing time and costs associated with R&D.

Dream it. Code it. Win it. is different from traditional competitions or hackathons, which focus on coding. The contest is judged on the quality of the problem being tackled, as well as the solution.

Dream it. Code it. Win it. Programming Competition Launches

January 23, 2015 2:15 pm | by TradingScreen | News | Comments

The MIT Enterprise Forum of New York and TradingScreen have announced the launch of the second annual award-winning “ Dream it. Code it. Win it. “ contest. The $50,000 student coding competition rewards and promotes creativity, diversity and literacy in the field of computer science.

This puzzle of a material which seems solid to any observer while appearing fluid under the microscope is an old one. And, even with the help of today's supercomputers, it seems impossible to verify in simulations whether a glass ever stops flowing. Court

Puzzle: Does Glass Ever Stop Flowing?

January 22, 2015 2:15 pm | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Is glass a true solid? Researchers have combined computer simulation and information theory, originally invented for telephone communication and cryptography, to answer this puzzling question. This puzzle of a material which seems solid to any observer while appearing fluid under the microscope is an old one. And, even with the help of today's supercomputers, it seems impossible to verify in simulations whether a glass ever stops flowing.

Clemson University associate professor of genetics and biochemistry Alex Feltus is co-principal investigator on the Tripal Gateway project award.

Researchers get $1.4 Million to Advance Big Data for Genomic Research

January 22, 2015 2:04 pm | by Brian M. Mullen, Clemson University | News | Comments

A team of scientists has received a $1.4 million grant from the National Science Foundation to help meet the growing needs of the data-driven genomic science community. The Tripal Gateway project will build on existing cyberinfrastructure to enhance the capacity of genomic databases to manage, exchange and process “big data.”

Partek Flow 4.0 for NGS Analysis

Partek Flow 4.0 for NGS Analysis

January 22, 2015 1:51 pm | Partek Incorporated | Product Releases | Comments

Partek Flow 4.0 is designed specifically for the analysis needs of next-generation sequencing applications including RNA, small RNA and DNA sequencing. With the ability to either build custom analysis pipelines or download pre-built pipelines, users can perform alignment, quantification, quality control, statistics and visualization.

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An international team of roughly 300 scientists pooled brain scans and genetic data worldwide to pinpoint genes that enhance or break down key brain regions in people from 33 countries. This is the first high-profile study since the NIH launched its Big D

Global Consortium Cracks Part of Brain’s Genetic Code

January 21, 2015 4:05 pm | by Alison Trinidad, Keck Medicine of USC | News | Comments

In the largest collaborative study of the brain to date, researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) led a global consortium of 190 institutions to identify eight common genetic mutations that appear to age the brain an average of three years. The discovery could lead to targeted therapies and interventions for Alzheimer’s disease, autism and other neurological conditions.

Princeton University researchers have built a rice grain-sized microwave laser, or "maser," powered by single electrons that demonstrates the fundamental interactions between light and moving electrons, and is a major step toward building quantum-computin

Rice-sized Laser, Powered One Electron at a Time, Bodes Well for Quantum Computing

January 21, 2015 1:19 pm | by Catherine Zandonella, Princeton University | News | Comments

Researchers have built a rice-grain-sized laser powered by single electrons tunneling through artificial atoms known as quantum dots. The tiny microwave laser, or "maser," is a demonstration of the fundamental interactions between light and moving electrons. The researchers built the device — which uses about one-billionth the electric current needed to power a hair dryer — while exploring how to use quantum dots.

The Repository of Industrial Security Incidents is a database of incidents of a cybersecurity nature that have (or could have) affected process control, industrial automation or Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems.

Cybersecurity Expert Warns Not Enough Being Done to Prevent Highly Destructive Cyberattacks on Critical Infrastructure

January 21, 2015 1:13 pm | by International Society of Automation | News | Comments

Inadequate training and a culture of complacency among many owners and operators of critical infrastructure are significantly raising the risks of highly damaging cyberattack throughout the world. That’s the viewpoint expressed by Steve Mustard, an industrial cybersecurity subject-matter expert and consultant with extensive development and management experience in real-time embedded equipment and automation systems.

Shubham Banerjee works on his lego robotics braille printer. Banerjee launched a company to develop a low-cost machine to print Braille materials for the blind based on a prototype he built with his Lego robotics kit. Last month, Intel invested in his sta

Eighth-grader Builds Braille Printer with Legos, Launches Company

January 21, 2015 1:02 pm | by Terence Chea, Associated Press | News | Comments

In Silicon Valley, it's never too early to become an entrepreneur. Just ask 13-year-old Shubham Banerjee. The California eighth-grader has launched a company to develop low-cost machines to print Braille, the tactile writing system for the visually impaired. Tech giant Intel recently invested in his startup, Braigo Labs.

This live panel discussion looks at how big data and data science have fast become the next frontier for innovation, competition and productivity.

Big Data Insights: Accelerating Discovery in Medicine, Research & More

January 20, 2015 11:51 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

On Wednesday, January 21, Scientific Computing will host a live panel discussion that looks at how big data and data science have fast become the next frontier for innovation, competition and productivity. One of today’s significant advances in data science introduces us to the Next Generation Cyber Capability (NGCC) at Arizona State University (ASU)...

The conference will focus on High-Performance Computing essentials, new developments and emerging technologies, best practices and hands-on training.

HPC Advisory Council Switzerland Conference 2015

January 20, 2015 10:10 am | by HPC Advisory Council | Events

The HPC Advisory Council and the Swiss Supercomputing Centre will host the HPC Advisory Council Switzerland Conference 2015 in the Lugano Convention Centre, Lugano, Switzerland, from March 23 - March 25, 2015. The conference will focus on High-Performance Computing essentials, new developments and emerging technologies, best practices and hands-on training.

The aim of this conference is to bring together all stakeholders involved in solving the software challenges of the exascale – from application developers, through numerical library experts, programming model developers and integrators, to tools designers

EASC2015: Solving Software Challenges for Exascale

January 20, 2015 10:01 am | by University of Edinburg | Events

The aim of this conference is to bring together all of the stakeholders involved in solving the software challenges of the exascale — from application developers, through numerical library experts, programming model developers and integrators, to tools designers. EASC2015 is organised by EPCC at the University of Edinburgh.

The University of Texas at Austin took home top honors with a new app called CallScout, designed to give Texas residents fast and easy access to information about social services in their area.

IBM Watson Group Awards UT Austin $100K to Bring Social Services App to Residents

January 16, 2015 2:08 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM has announced the first winner of its Watson University Competition, part of the company's partnership with top universities through its cognitive computing academic initiative. The winning team of student entrepreneurs from the University of Texas at Austin will receive $100,000 in total in seed funding to help launch a business based on their Watson app, which offers the promise of improved citizen services.

One aspect of the user-assistance software that distinguishes it from previous planning systems is that it assesses risk. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Software that Knows the Risks: Planning Algorithms Evaluate Probability of Success, Suggest Low-risk Alternatives

January 16, 2015 1:57 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Imagine that you could tell your phone that you want to drive from your house in Boston to a hotel in upstate New York, that you want to stop for lunch at an Applebee’s around 12:30, and that you don’t want the trip to take more than four hours. Then imagine that your phone tells you that you have only a 66 percent chance of meeting those criteria — but that if you can wait until 1:00 for lunch, or if you’re willing to eat at TGI Friday...

President Barack Obama, right, walks with British Prime Minister David Cameron on the West Wing Colonnade of the White House, on Thursday, January 15, 2015, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

US, Britain to Stage Cyber War Games

January 16, 2015 12:02 pm | by Josh Lederman, Associated Press | News | Comments

The U.S. and U.K. will stage cyber "war games" together, starting this year, to boost both countries' resistance to cyberattacks, Britain's government said. The two Western powers have also agreed to launch a joint cyber cell to share information on cyberthreats, as both countries seek to ramp up their cyberdefenses in the wake of alarming attacks. The FBI and National Security Agency will be involved, along with Britain's GCHQ and MI5...

Rackform iServ R4420 and R4422 High-density Servers

Rackform iServ R4420 and R4422 High-density Servers

January 16, 2015 9:54 am | Silicon Mechanics | Product Releases | Comments

Rackform iServ R4420 and R4422 high-density servers are designed to deliver cost-effective, energy-efficient compute power in a small footprint. The 2U 4-node products provide high throughput and processing capabilities based on Supermicro TwinPro architecture.

Two particles are positioned between highly reflective mirrors and entangled with one another by means of a laser. Additional lasers encode quantum information in the ions and then transfer the information to a single photon. Courtesy of U. Innsbruck

Optimizing Information Transfer for a Quantum Internet

January 15, 2015 12:28 pm | by University of Innsbruck | News | Comments

A quantum network requires efficient interfaces over which information can be transferred from matter to light and back. Physicists have shown how this information transfer can be optimized by taking advantage of a collective quantum phenomenon. The collective interaction between the particles and the resonator can now be tuned in order to enhance the creation of single photons.

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