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Suresh Venkatasubramanian, left, and Matt Might, both associate professors of computer science at the University of Utah, have received a $3 million government grant to produce software that can sniff out the next generation of computer vulnerabilities. T

Algorithmic Attacks: Fighting Next-gen Cyber Threats

April 17, 2015 3:45 pm | by University of Utah | News | Comments

The next generation of cyberattacks will be more sophisticated, more difficult to detect and more capable of wreaking untold damage on the nation’s computer systems. So, the DoD has given a $3 million grant to a team of computer scientists to develop software that can hunt down a new kind of vulnerability nearly impossible to find with today’s technology. The team is tasked with creating an analyzer that can thwart algorithmic attacks.

GPU4EO Challenge 2015: Stimulating Adoption of GPUs in Remote Sensing

April 17, 2015 3:11 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

GPU4EO Challenge 2015 is an international initiative which involves students, researchers and...

COMSOL 5.1 Multiphysics Modeling Software

April 17, 2015 12:52 pm | Product Releases | Comments

COMSOL 5.1 is a major upgrade that delivers new and enhanced functionality across all products,...

Opening Up Performance with OpenSpeedShop an Open Source Profiler

April 17, 2015 12:12 pm | by Rob Farber | Articles | Comments

There are a number of excellent commercial performance analysis tools on the market. Their big...

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New protocol a major step toward enabling international quantum communications networks over existing optical infrastructure.

Quantum Cryptography at the Speed of Light: First All-photonic Repeaters enable Quantum Teleportation

April 16, 2015 12:53 pm | by Marit Mitchell, University of Toronto | News | Comments

Imagine having your MRI results sent directly to your phone, with no concern over the security of your private health data. Or knowing your financial information was safe on a server halfway around the world. Or sending highly sensitive business correspondence, without worrying that it would fall into the wrong hands.

Researchers tracked asthma-related tweets around the world, shown in the visualization above, then zoomed in on a particular region to see how the social media posts, when analyzed alongside other data, could help them predict asthma-related emergency roo

How Twitter Can Help Predict Emergency Room Visits

April 16, 2015 12:16 pm | by Alexis Blue, University of Arizona | News | Comments

A predictive model using machine learning algorithms is able to predict with 75 percent accuracy how many asthma-related emergency room visits a hospital could expect on a given day. Twitter users who post information about their personal health online might be considered by some to be "over-sharers," but new research suggests that health-related tweets may have the potential to be helpful for hospitals.

Ryft One

Ryft One

April 16, 2015 10:34 am | Ryft Systems, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Ryft One is an open platform to analyze streaming, historical, unstructured, and multi-structured data in real-time. It is a commercial 1U platform capable of providing fast and actionable business insights by analyzing both historical and streaming data at an unprecedented 10 Gigabytes/second or faster.

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ISC High Performance has extended the deadline to apply for the ISC Student Volunteer Program. ISC will provide out-of-town students with accommodation, as well as most meals.

ISC High Performance Issues Urgent Call for Student Volunteers

April 16, 2015 8:46 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

ISC High Performance has extended the deadline to apply for the ISC Student Volunteer Program. The new deadline is April 30, 2015. More volunteers are needed this year, as the conference will be hosting a larger number of sessions than in previous years, and the student volunteer program is critical in helping to run the conference as smoothly as possible.

Technological advances are enabling scientists to sequence the genomes of cancer tumors, revealing a detailed portrait of genetic mutations that drive these diseases. But genomic studies are only one piece of the puzzle that is precision medicine. In orde

Big Data Key to Precision Medicine's Success

April 15, 2015 4:04 pm | by Weill Cornell Medical College | News | Comments

Technological advances are enabling scientists to sequence the genomes of cancer tumors, revealing a detailed portrait of genetic mutations that drive these diseases. But genomic studies are only one piece of the puzzle that is precision medicine. In order to realize the promise of this field, there needs to be an increased focus on creating robust clinical databases.

Cybersecurity strategist George M. Schu says the emerging Internet of Things (IoT) will expose the global aviation industry to vulnerabilities at a level never before seen and will have a transformative impact on the industry.

Internet of Things Threatens Aviation Safety

April 15, 2015 2:55 pm | News | Comments

Cybersecurity strategist George M. Schu says the emerging Internet of Things (IoT) will expose the global aviation industry to vulnerabilities at a level never before seen and will have a transformative impact on the industry.

If you’re designing a new computer, you want it to solve problems as fast as possible. Just how fast is possible is an open question when it comes to quantum computers, but physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have narrowed the

NIST Tightens Bounds on Quantum Information 'Speed Limit'

April 14, 2015 3:49 pm | by NIST | News | Comments

If you’re designing a new computer, you want it to solve problems as fast as possible. Just how fast is possible is an open question when it comes to quantum computers, but physicists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have narrowed the theoretical limits for where that “speed limit” is.

Imagine your computer screen could change shape. Imagine if that screen could spring to life at the touch of a fingertip, translating numbers and trends into shapes and gradients you can reach out and touch.

Shape-Changing Display is the End of 2D Graphing

April 14, 2015 3:37 pm | by Lancaster University | News | Comments

Imagine your computer screen could change shape. Imagine if that screen could spring to life at the touch of a fingertip, translating numbers and trends into shapes and gradients you can reach out and touch. 

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A key handwritten scientific document by Alan Turing in which he works on the foundations of mathematical notation and computer science was sold for $1,025,000 in the Fine Books & Manuscripts Sale at Bonhams New York.

Alan Turing's Manuscript on Foundations of Mathematics and Computer Science Sold for $1,025,000

April 14, 2015 3:00 pm | by Bonhams | News | Comments

A key handwritten scientific document by Alan Turing in which he works on the foundations of mathematical notation and computer science was sold for $1,025,000 in the Fine Books & Manuscripts Sale at Bonhams New York.

A new technology in development has the potential to revolutionize the sourcing of renewable energy from rivers.

Big Data Finds Ideal River Locations for Hydro-Power

April 13, 2015 3:41 pm | by University of Leicester | News | Comments

A new technology in development has the potential to revolutionize the sourcing of renewable energy from rivers.

Most recent advances in artificial intelligence are the result of machine learning, in which computers are turned loose on huge data sets to look for patterns. To make machine-learning applications easier to build, computer scientists have begun developin

Probabilistic Programming Squeezes Code to Create Intuitive Modeling

April 13, 2015 3:03 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Most recent advances in artificial intelligence are the result of machine learning, in which computers are turned loose on huge data sets to look for patterns. To make machine-learning applications easier to build, computer scientists have begun developing so-called probabilistic programming languages, which let researchers mix and match machine-learning techniques that have worked well in other contexts.  

The tape path used for data read back in the world record tape demo. On the right, you can see a tape head that writes the data, tape moves to the left, and then on the left, you can see a dimple where the HDD head is reading back the data written (the mi

IBM Research Sets New Record for Tape Storage

April 10, 2015 9:50 am | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM scientists have demonstrated an areal recording density of 123 billion bits of uncompressed data per square inch on low-cost, particulate magnetic tape, a breakthrough which represents the equivalent of a 220 terabyte tape cartridge that could fit in the palm of your hand.

The newly developed framework, IMPEx, allows scientists to better understand complex observational data, to fill gaps in observations with computer-simulated data and to compare observations and simulations.

Space Scientists Create Common Data Hub, Universal Language for Mission Data

April 10, 2015 9:40 am | by Austrian Academy of Science | News | Comments

A consortium of European space scientists has succeeded in establishing a common data hub that allows the comparison of data from numerous space missions. A task that until now was hampered by different data processing protocols of individual space missions. Furthermore, observational data can now easily be compared with theoretical numerical models — regardless of the protocols used.

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Erik DeBenedictis is on the staff at Sandia National Labs and participates in the IEEE Rebooting Computing initiative and International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors.

Rebooting Supercomputing

April 10, 2015 9:11 am | by Erik DeBenedictis, IEEE Rebooting Computing Initiative | Blogs | Comments

Most of the principles behind supercomputing were set in place during the 1940s, so it is not surprising they are in need of rethinking or rebooting. Turing’s computability theory helped many people discover the potential of computers and, with von Neumann’s concept of software stored in memory, enabled some of those people to program computers with easy-to-understand abstractions. This ultimately led to a long period of growth...

As the liquid crystals align in electric fields, it helps to align the nanotubes — changing the electrical structure of the materials. You can see the thermal output from the material during this “training” process. Bright colors represent localized heati

Evolution-in-materio: Carbon Nanotube Computing?

April 9, 2015 4:29 pm | by American Institute of Physics (AIP) | News | Comments

As we approach the miniaturization limits of conventional electronics, alternatives to silicon-based transistors — the building blocks of the multitude of electronic devices we’ve come to rely on — are being hotly pursued. Inspired by the way living organisms have evolved in nature to perform complex tasks with remarkable ease, a group of researchers is exploring similar “evolutionary” methods to create information processing devices.

Ransomware infiltrates a computer after a user clicks on a link or attachment in an e-mail. It can also attack when a user visits a Web site, including well-known ones with good security systems.

A Q&A about the Malicious Software Known as Ransomware

April 9, 2015 4:23 pm | by Joyce M. Rosenberg, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

Ransomware is a growing threat to computer users, who can suddenly find they're unable to open or use their files when their machines are infected. The malicious software can attack any user — an individual, small business, Fortune 500 company or a government agency.

Argonne’s decision to utilize Intel’s HPC scalable system framework stems from the fact it is designed to deliver a well-balanced and adaptable system capable of supporting both compute-intensive and data-intensive workloads

Intel to Deliver Nation’s Most Powerful Supercomputer at Argonne

April 9, 2015 2:07 pm | by Intel | News | Comments

Intel has announced that the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) has awarded Intel Federal LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Intel Corporation, a contract to deliver two next-generation supercomputers to Argonne National Laboratory.

President Barack Obama speaks in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington. President Barack Obama on Wednesday authorized a new U.S. government approach to deterring cyberattacks: financial sanctions against malicious overseas hackers and companie

Obama Signs Order Creating New Cyber Sanctions Program

April 9, 2015 9:59 am | by Ken Dilanian, AP Intelligence Writer | News | Comments

President Barack Obama authorized a new U.S. government approach to deterring cyberattacks on April 8, 2015: financial sanctions against malicious overseas hackers and companies that knowingly benefit from the fruits of cyberespionage. The latter category could include state-owned corporations in Russia, China and elsewhere, setting the stage for major diplomatic friction if the sanctions are employed in that way.

Nurses practice taking blood pressure and collecting medical history with a traditional human patient simulator system. Its face is completely inexpressive, and its lips do not move when it "talks." Speech is either pre-recorded, or voiced by the clinical

Human Patient Simulators: How Robots can Help Build Better Doctors

April 9, 2015 9:53 am | by NSF | News | Comments

A young doctor leans over a patient who has been in a serious car accident and invariably must be experiencing pain. The doctor's trauma team examines the patient's pelvis and rolls her onto her side to check her spine. They scan the patient's abdomen with a rapid ultrasound machine, finding fluid. They insert a tube in her nose. Throughout the procedure, the patient's face remains rigid, showing no signs of pain.

One of the new drones of the UZH research group Courtesy of UZH

New Technology Making Drones Safer and Smarter

April 8, 2015 3:27 pm | by University of Zurich | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of Zurich have unveiled new technology enabling drones to recover stable flight from any position and land autonomously in failure situations. It will even be possible to launch drones by simply tossing them into the air like a baseball or recover stable flight after a system failure. Drones will be safer and smarter, with the ability to identify safe landing sites and land automatically when necessary.

A supercomputer that can do 551 trillion calculations per second is housed at Clemson’s Information Technology Center.

Data-enabled Science: Top500 Supercomputers Provide Universities with Competitive Edge

April 7, 2015 5:02 pm | by Paul Alongi, Clemson University | News | Comments

Researchers have long believed that supercomputers give universities a competitive edge in scientific research, but now they have some hard data showing it’s true. A Clemson University team found that universities with locally available supercomputers were more efficient in producing research in critical fields than universities that lacked supercomputers.

The UCLA Biomechatronics Lab develops a language of touch that can be "felt" by computers and humans alike. Courtesy of the National Science Foundation

Artificial Haptic Intelligence: Giving Robots the Human Touch

April 7, 2015 4:56 pm | by Miles O'Brien, NSF | News | Comments

Researchers are designing artificial limbs to be more sensational, with the emphasis on sensation. They have developed a language of touch that can be "felt" by computers and humans alike. The engineers and students are constructing a language quantified with mechanical touch sensors that interact with objects of various shapes, sizes and textures.

Scanning electron microscope image of the one-micrometer thick nanocoatings on a silicon substrate

Phase-change Heat Transfer: Viruses Help Water Blow off Steam 3X Faster

April 7, 2015 12:14 pm | by Drexel University | News | Comments

Legions of viruses that infect the leaves of tobacco plants could be the key to making power plants safer, heating and cooling buildings more efficient and “really kick-ass computers,” or to the liquid cooling of high-powered electronic devices, like radar systems. These tiny protein bundles, which were once a threat to a staple cash crop, are now helping researchers better understand the processes of boiling and condensation. 

Researchers have accomplished a new step forward in electronics that could bring brain-like computing closer to reality. Courtesy of Rolff Images

Memristors Mimic Brain Function

April 7, 2015 10:44 am | by Amanda Morris, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Researchers are always searching for improved technologies, but the most efficient computer possible already exists. It can learn and adapt without needing to be programmed or updated. It has nearly limitless memory, is difficult to crash, and works at extremely fast speeds. It’s not a Mac or a PC; it’s the human brain. And scientists around the world want to mimic its abilities.

A high resolution image of the data transition region on a CD-ROM taken with an Olympus OLS 4000 LEXT 3-D digital laser confocal microscope. The sharp points are data on a compact disk. Courtesy of Greg Gogolin, Ph.D., Information Security & Intelligence,

Restoring Lost Data: 3-D Digital Laser Microscopy Creates Visual Roadmap

April 6, 2015 4:12 pm | by Marlene Cimons, National Science Foundation | News | Comments

It can be disheartening to learn that something precious, such as a one-of-a-kind family photo, has disappeared from a scratched or broken CD or DVD. It also can become serious, dangerous and potentially costly if it happens to a disc containing criminal forensic evidence, corporate records or scientific data. But there may be a way in the future to bring the material back.

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