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This simulation, which models a rheometer with particles, can help determine how well a rheometer design works at characterizing a fluid. The NIST team is performing a number of simulations like this one, varying the shape and number of blades to better i

Predicting Concrete Flow Properties from Simple Measurements

January 23, 2015 2:44 pm | by NIST | News | Comments

Just because concrete is the most widely used building material in human history doesn’t mean it can’t be improved. A recent study using DOE Office of Science supercomputers has led to a new way to predict concrete’s flow properties from simple measurements. The results should help accelerate the design of a new generation of high-performance and eco-friendly cement-based materials by reducing time and costs associated with R&D.

Dream it. Code it. Win it. Programming Competition Launches

January 23, 2015 2:15 pm | by TradingScreen | News | Comments

The MIT Enterprise Forum of New York and TradingScreen have announced the launch of the second...

Puzzle: Does Glass Ever Stop Flowing?

January 22, 2015 2:15 pm | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Is glass a true solid? Researchers have combined computer simulation and information theory,...

Researchers get $1.4 Million to Advance Big Data for Genomic Research

January 22, 2015 2:04 pm | by Brian M. Mullen, Clemson University | News | Comments

A team of scientists has received a $1.4 million grant from the National Science Foundation to...

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Partek Flow 4.0 for NGS Analysis

Partek Flow 4.0 for NGS Analysis

January 22, 2015 1:51 pm | Partek Incorporated | Product Releases | Comments

Partek Flow 4.0 is designed specifically for the analysis needs of next-generation sequencing applications including RNA, small RNA and DNA sequencing. With the ability to either build custom analysis pipelines or download pre-built pipelines, users can perform alignment, quantification, quality control, statistics and visualization.

An international team of roughly 300 scientists pooled brain scans and genetic data worldwide to pinpoint genes that enhance or break down key brain regions in people from 33 countries. This is the first high-profile study since the NIH launched its Big D

Global Consortium Cracks Part of Brain’s Genetic Code

January 21, 2015 4:05 pm | by Alison Trinidad, Keck Medicine of USC | News | Comments

In the largest collaborative study of the brain to date, researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) led a global consortium of 190 institutions to identify eight common genetic mutations that appear to age the brain an average of three years. The discovery could lead to targeted therapies and interventions for Alzheimer’s disease, autism and other neurological conditions.

Princeton University researchers have built a rice grain-sized microwave laser, or "maser," powered by single electrons that demonstrates the fundamental interactions between light and moving electrons, and is a major step toward building quantum-computin

Rice-sized Laser, Powered One Electron at a Time, Bodes Well for Quantum Computing

January 21, 2015 1:19 pm | by Catherine Zandonella, Princeton University | News | Comments

Researchers have built a rice-grain-sized laser powered by single electrons tunneling through artificial atoms known as quantum dots. The tiny microwave laser, or "maser," is a demonstration of the fundamental interactions between light and moving electrons. The researchers built the device — which uses about one-billionth the electric current needed to power a hair dryer — while exploring how to use quantum dots.

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The Repository of Industrial Security Incidents is a database of incidents of a cybersecurity nature that have (or could have) affected process control, industrial automation or Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems.

Cybersecurity Expert Warns Not Enough Being Done to Prevent Highly Destructive Cyberattacks on Critical Infrastructure

January 21, 2015 1:13 pm | by International Society of Automation | News | Comments

Inadequate training and a culture of complacency among many owners and operators of critical infrastructure are significantly raising the risks of highly damaging cyberattack throughout the world. That’s the viewpoint expressed by Steve Mustard, an industrial cybersecurity subject-matter expert and consultant with extensive development and management experience in real-time embedded equipment and automation systems.

Shubham Banerjee works on his lego robotics braille printer. Banerjee launched a company to develop a low-cost machine to print Braille materials for the blind based on a prototype he built with his Lego robotics kit. Last month, Intel invested in his sta

Eighth-grader Builds Braille Printer with Legos, Launches Company

January 21, 2015 1:02 pm | by Terence Chea, Associated Press | News | Comments

In Silicon Valley, it's never too early to become an entrepreneur. Just ask 13-year-old Shubham Banerjee. The California eighth-grader has launched a company to develop low-cost machines to print Braille, the tactile writing system for the visually impaired. Tech giant Intel recently invested in his startup, Braigo Labs.

This live panel discussion looks at how big data and data science have fast become the next frontier for innovation, competition and productivity.

Big Data Insights: Accelerating Discovery in Medicine, Research & More

January 20, 2015 11:51 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

On Wednesday, January 21, Scientific Computing will host a live panel discussion that looks at how big data and data science have fast become the next frontier for innovation, competition and productivity. One of today’s significant advances in data science introduces us to the Next Generation Cyber Capability (NGCC) at Arizona State University (ASU)...

The conference will focus on High-Performance Computing essentials, new developments and emerging technologies, best practices and hands-on training.

HPC Advisory Council Switzerland Conference 2015

January 20, 2015 10:10 am | by HPC Advisory Council | Events

The HPC Advisory Council and the Swiss Supercomputing Centre will host the HPC Advisory Council Switzerland Conference 2015 in the Lugano Convention Centre, Lugano, Switzerland, from March 23 - March 25, 2015. The conference will focus on High-Performance Computing essentials, new developments and emerging technologies, best practices and hands-on training.

The aim of this conference is to bring together all stakeholders involved in solving the software challenges of the exascale – from application developers, through numerical library experts, programming model developers and integrators, to tools designers

EASC2015: Solving Software Challenges for Exascale

January 20, 2015 10:01 am | by University of Edinburg | Events

The aim of this conference is to bring together all of the stakeholders involved in solving the software challenges of the exascale — from application developers, through numerical library experts, programming model developers and integrators, to tools designers. EASC2015 is organised by EPCC at the University of Edinburgh.

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The University of Texas at Austin took home top honors with a new app called CallScout, designed to give Texas residents fast and easy access to information about social services in their area.

IBM Watson Group Awards UT Austin $100K to Bring Social Services App to Residents

January 16, 2015 2:08 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM has announced the first winner of its Watson University Competition, part of the company's partnership with top universities through its cognitive computing academic initiative. The winning team of student entrepreneurs from the University of Texas at Austin will receive $100,000 in total in seed funding to help launch a business based on their Watson app, which offers the promise of improved citizen services.

One aspect of the user-assistance software that distinguishes it from previous planning systems is that it assesses risk. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Software that Knows the Risks: Planning Algorithms Evaluate Probability of Success, Suggest Low-risk Alternatives

January 16, 2015 1:57 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Imagine that you could tell your phone that you want to drive from your house in Boston to a hotel in upstate New York, that you want to stop for lunch at an Applebee’s around 12:30, and that you don’t want the trip to take more than four hours. Then imagine that your phone tells you that you have only a 66 percent chance of meeting those criteria — but that if you can wait until 1:00 for lunch, or if you’re willing to eat at TGI Friday...

President Barack Obama, right, walks with British Prime Minister David Cameron on the West Wing Colonnade of the White House, on Thursday, January 15, 2015, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

US, Britain to Stage Cyber War Games

January 16, 2015 12:02 pm | by Josh Lederman, Associated Press | News | Comments

The U.S. and U.K. will stage cyber "war games" together, starting this year, to boost both countries' resistance to cyberattacks, Britain's government said. The two Western powers have also agreed to launch a joint cyber cell to share information on cyberthreats, as both countries seek to ramp up their cyberdefenses in the wake of alarming attacks. The FBI and National Security Agency will be involved, along with Britain's GCHQ and MI5...

Rackform iServ R4420 and R4422 High-density Servers

Rackform iServ R4420 and R4422 High-density Servers

January 16, 2015 9:54 am | Silicon Mechanics | Product Releases | Comments

Rackform iServ R4420 and R4422 high-density servers are designed to deliver cost-effective, energy-efficient compute power in a small footprint. The 2U 4-node products provide high throughput and processing capabilities based on Supermicro TwinPro architecture.

Two particles are positioned between highly reflective mirrors and entangled with one another by means of a laser. Additional lasers encode quantum information in the ions and then transfer the information to a single photon. Courtesy of U. Innsbruck

Optimizing Information Transfer for a Quantum Internet

January 15, 2015 12:28 pm | by University of Innsbruck | News | Comments

A quantum network requires efficient interfaces over which information can be transferred from matter to light and back. Physicists have shown how this information transfer can be optimized by taking advantage of a collective quantum phenomenon. The collective interaction between the particles and the resonator can now be tuned in order to enhance the creation of single photons.

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Automated systems for isolating collected data, restricting queries that can be made against those data, and auditing usage of the data can help to enforce privacy protections and allay some civil liberty concerns.

Surveillance: NRC finds No Alternative to Bulk Data Collection

January 15, 2015 12:10 pm | by The National Academies | News | Comments

No software-based technique can fully replace bulk collection of signals intelligence, but methods can be developed to more effectively conduct targeted collection and to control usage of collected data, says the NRC. Automated systems for isolating collected data, restricting queries that can be made against those data, and auditing usage of the data can help to enforce privacy protections and allay some civil liberty concerns.

Students who take part in these competitions jumpstart their careers in technology and research. They typically spend six months of their time preparing for this competition, all the while learning an incredible amount of skills in software, hardware and

Join us in Sponsoring the HPC Workforce of the Future

January 15, 2015 8:55 am | by Brian Sparks, HPC Advisory Council Media Relations and Events Director | Blogs | Comments

It’s no secret that finding good talent is hard. It’s even harder in the HPC and scientific community. To help bridge the gap between the next wave of HPC professionals and the commercial vendors that require their talent, the HPC Advisory Council has joined forces with ISC Events to host the fourth HPCAC-ISC Student Cluster Competition 2015.

Rendering of the LSST camera. SLAC is leading the construction of the 3,200-megapixel camera, which will be the size of a small car and weigh more than 3 tons. The digital camera will be the largest ever built, allowing LSST to create an unprecedented arc

World's Most Powerful Camera Receives DOE Funding Approval

January 14, 2015 11:56 am | by Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

Plans for the construction of the world's largest digital camera at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have reached a major milestone. The 3,200-megapixel centerpiece of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope, which will provide unprecedented details of the universe and help address some of its biggest mysteries, has received key "Critical Decision 2" approval from the DOE.

The top image shows an office building that is to be remodeled. Below, a virtual image based on 3-D BIM data is superimposed. © Fraunhofer FIT

Virtual Reality Enables On-Site Visualization of Architectural Plans

January 14, 2015 11:50 am | by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft | News | Comments

A new virtual reality system allows architects to view 3-D models of buildings in their intended shape, precisely where the buildings will be constructed. This provides a much clearer, realistic impression of the design. Digitization is fundamentally changing the work processes in architectural design, planning and construction work. Increasingly, CAD drawings are transferred to a central 3-D Building Information Model...

President Barack Obama speaks at the National Cybersecurity and Communications Integration Center in Arlington, VA, January 13, 2015. Obama renewed his call for Congress to pass cybersecurity legislation, including a proposal that encourages companies to

Obama Unveils Cybersecurity Proposals in Advance of State of the Union Address

January 14, 2015 11:46 am | by Jack Gillum, Associated Press | News | Comments

President Barack Obama has said that recent cyberthreats to Sony and the military's U.S. Central Command are reminders of the serious threats facing the nation. Obama laid out plans on January 13, 2015, as part of a push for new cybersecurity legislation that increases government information-sharing and protects businesses from lawsuits for revealing cyberthreats.

Measuring side-channel signals2: Georgia Tech researcher Alenka Zajic measures electromagnetic emissions from various components of a desktop computer. The researchers have studied emissions from desktop and laptop computers, as well as cellphones.

Countering Side-channel Hacker Attacks

January 14, 2015 11:35 am | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

If you’re sitting in a coffee shop, tapping away on your laptop, feeling safe from hackers because you didn’t connect to the shop’s Wi-Fi, think again. The bad guys may be able to see what you’re doing just by analyzing the low-power electronic signals your laptop emits, even when it’s not connected to the Internet. Side-channel signals could provide hackers with another way to see what the devices are doing.

IBM broke the U.S. patent record in 2014, becoming the first company to exceed 7,000 patents in a single year. More than 8,500 IBM inventors around the world, including researcher Stacy Hobson (pictured), produced 7,534 patents for IBM in 2014.

IBM Breaks U.S. Patent Record

January 13, 2015 10:35 am | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM has announced that it received a record 7,534 patents in 2014 — marking the 22nd consecutive year that the company topped the annual list of U.S. patent recipients. IBM inventors earned an average of more than 20 patents per day in 2014, propelling the company to become the first to surpass more than 7,000 patents in a single year.

The results show that, by mining Facebook Likes, the computer model was able to predict a person's personality more accurately than most of their friends and family.

AI: Computers Know the Real You Better than Friends, Family

January 13, 2015 10:01 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Researchers have found that, based on enough Facebook Likes, computers can judge your personality traits better than your friends, family and even your partner. Using a new algorithm, researchers have calculated the average number of Likes artificial intelligence (AI) needs to draw personality inferences about you as accurately as your partner or parents.

IEEE Computer Society has announced the top 10 most important technology trends for 2015 and explores how these technologies will be integrated into daily life.

IEEE Unveils Top 10 Technology Trends for 2015

January 12, 2015 12:10 pm | by IEEE | News | Comments

In the coming year, while consumers will be treated to a dizzying array of augmented reality, wearables, and low-cost 3-D printers, computer researchers will be tackling the underlying technology issues that make such cutting-edge consumer electronics products possible. IEEE Computer Society has announced the top 10 most important technology trends for 2015 and explores how these technologies will be integrated into daily life.

Experiment and theory by comparison: the PSI researchers’ Dutch colleagues were able to illustrate the magnetic structures generated by laser beams effectively in computer simulations.

Bat Signal Lights Way to Extremely Fast, Precise Data Storage

January 12, 2015 11:58 am | by Laura Hennemann, Paul Scherrer Institute | News | Comments

Researchers have succeeded in switching tiny, magnetic structures using laser light and tracking the change over time. In the process, a nanometer-sized area bizarrely reminiscent of the Batman logo appeared. The research results could render data storage on hard drives faster, more compact and more efficient.

Map of diffuse interstellar bands Courtesy of T.W. Lan, G. Zasowski, B. Ménard, SDSS and 2MASS/UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF

Astronomers Map Mysterious Molecules in our Galaxy

January 12, 2015 10:20 am | by Phil Sneiderman, Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

By analyzing the light of hundreds of thousands of celestial objects, astronomers have created a unique map of enigmatic molecules in our galaxy that are responsible for puzzling features in the light from stars, called diffuse interstellar bands. DIBs have been a mystery ever since they were discovered in 1922 — exactly which of the many thousands of possible molecules are responsible for these features?

The MHL Specification, created and maintained by the MHL Consortium, defines a high-definition video and digital audio interface intended for connecting mobile smart devices, such as tablets and cell phones, with high-definition televisions and other pers

Understanding Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL) Technology

January 12, 2015 9:00 am | by John R. Joyce, Ph.D. | Blogs | Comments

Okay, for today's pop-quiz, what is Mobile High-Definition Link (MHL) technology and what can it do? Is it a new NASA deep space communication protocol? Is it an upgrade to Google's street cams? Have you even heard of it? It turns out that many of you are equipped with devices that incorporate this technology. Specifically, many, though not all, of the current crop of smart phones and tablets support MHL.

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