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MIT researchers explain their new visualization system that can project a robot's "thoughts." Video screenshot courtesy of Melanie Gonick/MIT

Projecting a Robot’s Intentions: New Spin on Virtual Reality to Read Robots’ Minds

October 30, 2014 4:46 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

In a darkened, hangar-like space inside MIT’s Building 41, a small, Roomba-like robot is trying to make up its mind. Standing in its path is an obstacle — a human pedestrian who’s pacing back and forth. To get to the other side of the room, the robot has to first determine where the pedestrian is, then choose the optimal route to avoid a close encounter.

New Algorithm Provides Enormous Reduction in Computing Overhead

October 30, 2014 4:37 pm | by University of Luxembourg | News | Comments

The control of modern infrastructure, such as intelligent power grids, needs lots of computing...

WOS S3 Object Storage Platform Interface

October 29, 2014 11:57 am | Product Releases | Comments

WOS S3 is designed for efficient storing and sharing of massive quantities of big data. It adds...

UK National Weather Service Awards $128M Supercomputer Contract

October 29, 2014 11:43 am | by Cray | News | Comments

Cray announced it has been awarded a contract to provide the Met Office in the United Kingdom...

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Indiana University received one of the largest individual awards from the NSF’s $31 million Data Infrastructure Building Blocks program this year. Researchers will use the $5 million in funding to help boost the nation’s big data efforts. Courtesy of NSF

NSF Awards $5M to Empower Researchers with New Data Analysis Tools

October 29, 2014 10:15 am | by Indiana University Bloomington | News | Comments

A team of computer scientists working to improve how researchers across the sciences empower big data to solve problems have been awarded $5 million by the National Science Foundation. The team will address one of the leading challenges in tackling some of the world’s most pressing issues in science: the ability to analyze and compute large amounts of data.

As the United States pursues the next generation of computing (exascale), new software-centered partnerships could be the key to maximizing economic benefits for Americans

Supporting America’s Economic Competitiveness: A Look at Federal Supercomputing Leadership

October 28, 2014 11:18 am | by Council on Competitiveness | News | Comments

The Council on Competitiveness has released a new report that explores the value of government leadership in supercomputing for industrial competitiveness, titled Solve. The Exascale Effect: the Benefits of Supercomputing Investment for U.S. Industry. As the federal government pursues exascale computing to achieve national security and science missions, Solve examines how U.S.-based companies also benefit from leading-edge computation

Huygens Titan Image Search Engine

Huygens Titan Image Search Engine

October 28, 2014 10:43 am | Scientific Volume Imaging | Product Releases | Comments

Huygens Titan is lightweight software that indexes, finds and shows 2-D to 5-D microscopic image data. It can read all common microscope formats from any folder and subdirectory on any location to which a user has access. The software does not alter or move images.

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R.D. McDowall is Principal, McDowall Consulting.

The Cloud Meets GMP Regulations – Part 2: SaaS and Qualified IT Infrastructure

October 28, 2014 9:40 am | by R D McDowall | Articles | Comments

The purpose of this series is to discuss the impact of GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) regulations on cloud computing and to debate some of the regulatory issues facing an organization contemplating this approach. In this part, we look at the SaaS (Software as a Service) hosting options available to consider for regulated users and the requirement for qualified IT infrastructure.

Researchers have demonstrated the potential of a new class of fiber to increase transmission capacity and mitigate the impending capacity crunch.

Record Data Transmission Demonstrated over Specially Fabricated Fiber

October 27, 2014 3:45 pm | by Eindhoven University of Technology | News | Comments

Researchers report the successful transmission of a record high 255 Terabits/s over a new type of fiber allowing 21 times more bandwidth than currently available in communication networks. This new type of fiber could be an answer to mitigating the impending optical transmission capacity crunch caused by the increasing bandwidth demand.

Working with the Sierra Leone Government, IBM is producing heatmaps showing Ebola-related issues as reported by the citizens of Freetown, Sierra Leone. Courtesy of IBM

IBM Launches Humanitarian Initiatives to Help Contain Ebola

October 27, 2014 3:16 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM has launched several initiatives to help curb the spread of Ebola in West Africa. They include a global platform for sharing Ebola-related open data; a citizen engagement and analytics system in Sierra Leone that enables communities affected by Ebola to communicate their issues and concerns directly to the government; and a donation of IBM Connections technology in Nigeria to strengthen the government’s preparedness for future outbreaks

When properly understood, privacy rules are essential, Neil M. Richards, JD, professor of law says.

Right to Privacy: Achieving Meaningful Protection in a Big Data World

October 24, 2014 8:42 pm | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

In the digital age in which we live, monitoring, security breaches and hacks of sensitive data are all too common. It has been argued that privacy has no place in this big data environment and anything we put online can, and probably will, be seen by prying eyes. In a new paper, a privacy law expert makes the case that, when properly understood, privacy rules will be an essential and valuable part of our digital future.

Researchers found that people who played violent video games in 3-D showed more evidence of anger afterward than did people who played using traditional 2-D systems — even those with large screens. © lassedesignen / Fotolia

Violent 3-D Gaming Provokes More Anger

October 24, 2014 5:17 pm | by Jeff Grabmeier, The Ohio State University | News | Comments

Playing violent video games in 3-D makes everything seem more real — and that may have troubling consequences for players, a new study reveals. Researchers found that people who played violent video games in 3-D showed more evidence of anger afterward than did people who played using traditional 2-D systems — even those with large screens.

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Researchers are expanding the applicability of biological circuits. Background: Microscopic image of human kidney cells with fluorescent proteins in cell culture.

Constructing Precisely Functioning, Programmable Bio-computers

October 23, 2014 3:40 pm | by Fabio Bergamin, ETH | News | Comments

Bio-engineers are working on the development of biological computers with the aim of designing small circuits made from biological material that can be integrated into cells to change their functions. In the future, such developments could enable cancer cells to be reprogrammed, thereby preventing them from dividing at an uncontrollable rate. Stem cells could likewise be reprogrammed into differentiated organ cells.

NIST Cloud Computing Roadmap Details Research Requirements, Action Plans  Courtesy of Irvine/NIST and ©magann/Fotolia

NIST Cloud Computing Roadmap Reflects Worldwide Input

October 23, 2014 3:23 pm | by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) | News | Comments

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has published the final version of the US Government Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap, Volumes I and II. The roadmap focuses on strategic and tactical objectives to support the federal government’s accelerated adoption of cloud computing. This final document reflects the input from more than 200 comments on the initial draft received from around the world.

To carry out their work, the team was awarded resources on two world-class supercomputers — HeCTOR at the University of Edinburgh and Abel at the University of Oslo — which were made available through PRACE.

Imaging Extremely Distant Galaxies to Create New Window on Early Universe

October 23, 2014 3:18 pm | by University of Bonn | News | Comments

Scientists at the Universities of Bonn and Cardiff see good times approaching for astrophysicists after hatching a new observational strategy to distill detailed information from galaxies at the edge of the Universe. Using two world-class supercomputers, the researchers were able to demonstrate the effectiveness of their approach by simulating the formation of a massive galaxy at the dawn of cosmic time.

New software algorithms reduce the time and material needed to produce objects with 3-D printers. Here, the wheel on the left was produced with conventional software and the one on the right with the new algorithms. Courtesy of Purdue University/Bedrich B

New Software Algorithms Speed 3-D Printing, Reduce Waste

October 22, 2014 12:40 pm | by Emil Venere, Purdue University | News | Comments

New software algorithms have been shown to significantly reduce the time and material needed to produce objects with 3-D printers. The algorithms have been created to address the problem. Researchers from Purdue University have demonstrated one approach that has been shown to reduce printing time by up to 30 percent and the quantity of support material by as much as 65 percent.

Set up of the experiment showing the orthogonal side illumination  © Vetlugin et al.

Quantum Holograms could become Quantum Information Memory

October 22, 2014 12:22 pm | by Springer | News | Comments

Russian scientists have developed a theoretical model of quantum memory for light, adapting the concept of a hologram to a quantum system. The authors demonstrate for the first time that it is theoretically possible to retrieve, on demand, a given portion of the stored quantized light signal of a holographic image — set in a given direction in a given position in time sequence.

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Companies can log on, cost-free, at http://cyberchain.rhsmith.umd.edu and track developing threats, plus map their IT supply chains and anonymously measure themselves against industry peers and NIST standards.

Counter-measure Offers Cyber Protection for Supply Chains

October 22, 2014 10:14 am | by University of Maryland | News | Comments

The supply chain is ground zero for several recent cyber breaches. Hackers, for example, prey on vendors that have remote access to a larger company's global IT systems, software and networks. In the 2013 Target breach, the attacker infiltrated a vulnerable link: a refrigeration system supplier connected to the retailer's IT system. A counter-measure, via a user-ready online portal, has been developed at the Supply Chain Management Center.

Light-enabled wi-fi, or Li-Fi, was first developed by Professor Harald Haas, Chair of Mobile Communication with the University of Edinburgh. Haas is co-founder of the spin-out company pureLiFi.  Courtesy of LaurenceWinram

Light-enabled Wi-fi could Tackle Global Data Crunch

October 22, 2014 9:50 am | by University of Edinburgh | News | Comments

High-speed bi-directional wireless technology that uses light to send information securely offers faster, safer transfer of data than conventional wi-fi. Because it does not rely on the radio spectrum, it provides 10,000 times more bandwidth. Light-enabled wi-fi, or Li-Fi, was first developed by Professor Harald Haas, Chair of Mobile Communication with the University of Edinburgh. Haas is co-founder of the spin-out company pureLiFi.

LLNL researcher Monte LaBute was part of a Lab team that recently published an article in PLOS ONE detailing the use of supercomputers to link proteins to drug side effects. Courtesy of Julie Russell/LLNL

Supercomputers Link Proteins to Adverse Drug Reactions

October 21, 2014 10:40 am | by Kenneth K Ma, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | News | Comments

The drug creation process often misses many side effects that kill at least 100,000 patients a year. LLNL researchers have discovered a high-tech method of using supercomputers to identify proteins that cause medications to have certain adverse drug reactions, using high-performance computers to process proteins and drug compounds in an algorithm that produces reliable data outside of a laboratory setting for drug discovery.

Diver collecting microbial samples from Australian seaweeds for Uncovering Genome Mysteries

Crowdsourced Supercomputing Examines Big Genomic Data

October 21, 2014 9:31 am | by IBM | News | Comments

What do the DNA in Australian seaweed, Amazon River water, tropical plants, and forest soil all have in common? Lots, say scientists. And understanding the genetic similarities of disparate life forms could enable researchers to produce compounds for new medicines, eco-friendly materials, more resilient crops, and cleaner air, water and energy.

R.D. McDowall is Principal, McDowall Consulting.

The Cloud Meets GMP Regulations – Part 1: Applicable Regulations

October 20, 2014 2:35 pm | by R D McDowall | Articles | Comments

The purpose of this series is to discuss the impact of GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) regulations on cloud computing and to debate some of the regulatory issues facing an organization contemplating this approach. In this part, we look at the applicable regulations.

The HPCAC-ISC Student Cluster Competition is designed to introduce the next generation to the international high performance computing (HPC) community. This is an excellent educational opportunity for students around the world to showcase their knowledge

HPCAC-ISC 2015 Student Cluster Competition Accepting Undergraduate Applications

October 20, 2014 11:11 am | by ISC | News | Comments

The HPC Advisory Council and ISC High Performance call on undergraduate students from around the world to submit their application for partaking in the 2015 Student Cluster Competition (SCC). The 11 teams selected will receive the opportunity to build a small cluster of their design and run a series of benchmarks and applications in real time for four days, on the ISC 2015 exhibition floor.

An IBM logo displayed in Berlin, VT. IBM is paying $1.5 billion to Globalfoundries in order to shed its costly chip division. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

IBM to Pay $1.5B to Shed Costly Chip Division

October 20, 2014 10:54 am | by Michelle Chapman, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

IBM will pay $1.5 billion to Globalfoundries in order to shed its costly chip division. IBM Director of Research John E. Kelly III said in an interview on October 20, 2104, that handing over control of the semiconductor operations will allow it to grow faster, while IBM continues to invest in and expand its chip research.

ESnet installed its first European network node at CERN (the major laboratory outside Geneva that houses the LHC) in mid-September, and is now deploying other equipment necessary to bring the first link online by October. The plan is for all links to be c

DOE’s High-Speed Network to Boost Big Data Transfers by Extending 100G Connectivity across Atlantic

October 20, 2014 10:44 am | by ESnet | News | Comments

The DOE’s Energy Sciences Network, or ESnet, is deploying four new high-speed transatlantic links, giving researchers at America’s national laboratories and universities ultra-fast access to scientific data from the Large Hadron Collider and other research sites in Europe. ESnet’s transatlantic extension will deliver a total capacity of 340 gigabits-per-second, and serve dozens of scientific collaborations.

DOE’s High-Speed Network to Boost Big Data Transfers by Extending 100G Connectivity across Atlantic

Meeting the Technical Challenges of Transatlantic Connectivity

October 20, 2014 10:39 am | by ESnet | News | Comments

When ESnet engineers began to study the idea of building a new 100 Gbps network between the US and Europe, a primary concern was ensuring the service would be robust and built from multiple underlying links — so that if one went down, researchers could still rely on sufficient bandwidth. Based on data collected by Caltech physicist and networking pioneer Harvey Newman, the team understood multiple cables are sometimes cut simultaneously.

Bathymetry image of Lake George: In 2014, a bathymetric and topographic survey conducted by boat and plane mapped the lake bed, shoreline and watershed. Now, within the data visualization center, scientists will be able to zoom in as close as half a meter

State-of-the-Art Visualization Lab to Display Streaming Data in Real-Time

October 20, 2014 10:00 am | by IBM | News | Comments

The Jefferson Project announced new milestones in a multimillion-dollar collaboration that seeks to understand and manage complex factors impacting Lake George. A new data visualization laboratory features advanced computing and graphics systems that allow researchers to visualize sophisticated models and incoming data on weather, runoff and circulation patterns. The lab will display streaming data from various sensors in real-time.

Shown here is a square-centimeter chip containing the nTron adder, which performed the first computation using the researchers' new superconducting circuit. Courtesy of Adam N. McCaughan

Nanocryotron could Unlock Power of Superconducting Computer Chips

October 17, 2014 10:43 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Computer chips with superconducting circuits — circuits with zero electrical resistance — would be 50 to 100 times as energy-efficient as today’s chips, an attractive trait given the increasing power consumption of the massive data centers that power the Internet’s most popular sites. Superconducting chips also promise greater processing power.

SGI UV for SAP HANA

SGI UV for SAP HANA

October 17, 2014 10:30 am | Sgi | Product Releases | Comments

SGI UV for SAP HANA is a purpose-built, in-memory computing appliance for growing environments running the SAP HANA platform. SAP-certified and available as a 4- or 8-socket single-node system with up to 6 TBs of in-memory computing, the appliance is designed to enable the largest enterprises to achieve real-time operations and business breakthroughs with SAP HANA at extreme scale

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