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EcoDataCenter is building the world’s first climate-positive data center, projected to attain the highest level of availability and also to have an exceptionally high performance level, with a guaranteed uptime of 100 percent.

Building the World's First Climate-positive Data Center

April 1, 2015 3:35 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

Around the world, data centers pump out hundreds of millions of tons of CO2 every year. As companies like Microsoft, Apple and Facebook are seeking to become greener and, at the same time, to lower their power costs, they moving away from fossil fuels like coal to generate electricity. Taking things another step further, in North Sweden’s town of Falun, a game-changing data center is being built in tandem with a local energy system.

Total Partners with SGI to Upgrade its Pangea Supercomputer

April 1, 2015 11:27 am | by SGI | News | Comments

Total has chosen SGI to upgrade its supercomputer Pangea. Total is one of the largest integrated...

The Weather Company Migrates Data Services to IBM Cloud, Plans to Advance Internet of Things Solutions

March 31, 2015 1:43 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM and The Weather Company have announced a global strategic alliance to integrate real-time...

U.S., Japan Bring Big Data and Data Analytics to Disaster Response

March 31, 2015 12:29 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

When disaster strikes, it is critical that experts, decision makers and emergency personnel have...

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The physicists obliged qDots and ions to work together as a team. The hybrid system combines two completely different quantum systems with one another.

Physicists Succeed in Linking Two Completely Different Quantum Systems

March 31, 2015 12:22 pm | by University of Bonn | News | Comments

Physicists at the Universities of Bonn and Cambridge have succeeded in linking two completely different quantum systems to one another. In doing so, they have taken an important step forward on the way to a quantum computer.

Researchers have harnessed bionanotechnology to emit a full range of colors in one pliable pixel layer — as opposed to the several rigid layers that constitute today's screens.

From Genes to Screens: Molecular Backbone of Super-Slim, Bendable Digital Displays Developed

March 31, 2015 11:44 am | by Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

A new study suggests that a novel DNA-peptide structure can be used to produce thin, transparent and flexible screens. The research harnesses bionanotechnology to emit a full range of colors in one pliable pixel layer — as opposed to the several rigid layers that constitute today's screens.

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using Mira to study the magnetic state of iron selenide, a known high-temperature superconductor, at varying levels of pressure. Courtesy of Lucas Wagner, University of Illinois at Urbana

Mira sheds Light on Mysterious Nature of High-temperature Superconductors

March 30, 2015 2:52 pm | by Jim Collins | News | Comments

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using supercomputing resources at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, to shed light on the mysterious nature of high-temperature superconductors. With critical temperatures ranging from 30 Kelvin to 130 Kelvin, this relatively new class of superconductors is high-temperature in name only.

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The fact that the neutron is slightly more massive than the proton is the reason why atomic nuclei have exactly those properties that make our world and ultimately our existence possible. Courtesy of Bergische Universität Wuppertal

Supercomputer Calculates Mass Difference between Neutron and Proton, confirms Theory of Strong Interaction

March 30, 2015 2:45 pm | by Forschungszentrum Jülich | News | Comments

The fact that the neutron is slightly more massive than the proton is the reason why atomic nuclei have exactly those properties that make our world and ultimately our existence possible. Eighty years after the discovery of the neutron, a team of physicists has finally calculated the tiny neutron-proton mass difference. The findings confirm the theory of the strong interaction.

“The things I do for my housemates' downloading habit…” Maths by Sergey Nivens

How a Long-dead Mathematician called Maxwell can Speed up your Internet

March 30, 2015 1:48 pm | by Jason Cole, Imperial College London | Articles | Comments

Electromagnetic radiation – it might sound like something that you’d be better off avoiding, but electromagnetic waves of various kinds underpin our senses and how we interact with the world – from the light emissions through which your eyes perceive these words, to the microwaves that carry the Wi-Fi signal to your laptop or phone on which you’re reading it.

MOVIA Big Data Analytics Platform

MOVIA Big Data Analytics Platform

March 30, 2015 1:38 pm | by Modus Operandi, Inc. | Modus Operandi, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

MOVIA Big Data Analytics Platform is designed to help organizations watch for important patterns in their data and generate instant alerts to users or other systems. The software enables improved prediction of trends through advanced data modeling that captures situational context, so decisions are not ‘made in a vacuum.’

Prof. Dr. Yutong Lu, Director, System Software Laboratory, School of Computer Science, National University of Defense Technology (NUDT), Changsha, China

Prof. Dr. Yutong Lu

March 27, 2015 2:47 pm | Biographies

Prof. Dr. Yutong Lu is the Director of the System Software Laboratory, School of Computer Science, National University of Defense Technology (NUDT), Changsha, China. She is also a professor in the State Key Laboratory of High Performance Computing, China. She got her B.S, M.S, and Ph.D. degrees from the NUDT

Dr. Jurgen Kohler, Head of NVH CAE and Vehicle Concepts, Daimler AG

Dr. Jurgen Kohler

March 27, 2015 2:35 pm | Biographies

Jürgen Kohler studied Aerospace Engineering at the University of Stuttgart. In 1992 he started his career at the Mercedes Benz AG and became Manager of Crash-Simulation in 1997. From 2001 to 2005 he was Senior Manager for CAE Passive Safety, Durability and NVH, from 2006 to 2010 for CAE Passive Safety, Durability and Stiffness CAE and Test

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Yin-yang haplotypes arise when a stretch of DNA evolves to present two divergent forms. A group of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis showed a massive yin-yang haplotype pair encompassing the gene gephyrin on human chromosome 14. This image s

Mining Public Big Data yields Genetic Clues in Complex Human Diseases

March 27, 2015 11:35 am | by Beth Miller, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Big data: It’s a term we read and hear about often, but is hard to grasp. Computer scientists tackled some big data about an important protein and discovered its connection in human history as well as clues about its role in complex neurological diseases. Through a novel method of analyzing these big data, they discovered a region encompassing the gephyrin gene on chromosome 14 that underwent rapid evolution after splitting in two...

Hamlin, left, and Webb with a book about breaking the Nazi Enigma code, which was also the subject of the recent film, The Imitation Game. Courtesy of Rebecca Phillips, WSU

Mathematicians adapt Knapsack Code to take on Quantum-level Cyber Attacks

March 27, 2015 11:24 am | by Rebecca Phillips, Washington State University | News | Comments

Mathematicians have designed an encryption code capable of fending off the phenomenal hacking power of a quantum computer. Using high-level number theory and cryptography, the researchers reworked an infamous old cipher called the knapsack code to create an online security system better prepared for future demands.

Kettering University students participating in a community cleanup along University Avenue in front of Atwood Stadium in Flint, MI. Technologies made possible through US Ignite partnership will benefit many institutions along Flint's University Avenue Cor

Igniting Change in Vehicle City: High-speed Networking brings Game-changing Capabilities

March 27, 2015 11:09 am | by NSF | News | Comments

Flint, MI, the former home of General Motors, is on the rebound these days. Leaders there believe they have hit on a winning formula — connecting the city's institutions to high-speed networks that support new, game-changing capabilities. Through grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ), Flint is beginning to lay the groundwork for an information technology-driven transformation.

The Living Heart Project’s goal is to enable creation of a customized 3-D heart.

Highly Realistic Human Heart Simulations Transforming Medical Care

March 26, 2015 5:03 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Articles | Comments

The World Health Organization reports that cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death globally. Working to address this imperative public health problem, researchers world-wide are seeking new ways to accelerate research, raise the accuracy of diagnoses and improve patient outcomes. Several initiatives have utilized ground-breaking new simulations to advance research into aspects such as rhythm disturbances and ...

Integer overflows occur when a computer tries to store too large a number in the memory space reserved for it. The leading digits are discarded — much as they are when a car odometer turns over. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Better Debugger: Algorithm Automatically Finds Integer-overflow Bugs

March 26, 2015 9:52 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Integer overflows are one of the most common bugs in computer programs — not only causing programs to crash but, even worse, potentially offering points of attack for malicious hackers. A new algorithm for identifying integer-overflow bugs was tested on five common open-source programs, in which previous analyses had found three bugs. The new algorithm found all three known bugs — and 11 new ones.

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Lights go out at Singapore’s 2014 flagship Earth Hour event

Lights in Over 7,000 Cities will go out for Earth Hour this Saturday

March 25, 2015 5:26 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

The World Wildlife Fund’s ninth annual Earth Hour is set to roll across the globe at 8:30 pm local time on Saturday, March 28, 2015. The world’s largest grassroots movement will range across six continents and the world’s 24 time zones in order to unify a global community bound by individual actions on climate. As in past years, many of the world's most famous landmarks and other non-essential lights will go dark for one hour.

The 2015 Ethernet Roadmap provides practical guidance to the development of Ethernet, and offers an in-depth look at Ethernet’s accelerating evolution and expansion in four key areas: consumer and residential; enterprise and campus; hyperscale data center

Ethernet Alliance Unveils Detailed Roadmap

March 25, 2015 1:57 pm | by Ethernet Alliance | News | Comments

The Ethernet Alliance, a global consortium dedicated to the continued success and advancement of Ethernet technologies, has released the 2015 Ethernet Roadmap. The first-ever publicly available industry roadmap will outline the ongoing development and evolution of Ethernet through the end of the decade. Ethernet, the world’s most widely adopted networking technology, saw a period of rapid change and diversification in 2014.

Michael Stonebraker invented many of the concepts that are used in almost all modern database systems. Courtesy of Dcoetzee

“Nobel Prize in Computing” goes to MIT Database Systems Architecture Pioneer

March 25, 2015 1:44 pm | by Association for Computing Machinery | News | Comments

The Association for Computing Machinery has named Michael Stonebraker of MIT recipient of the 2014 ACM A.M. Turing Award for fundamental contributions to the concepts and practices underlying modern database systems. Database systems are critical applications of computing and preserve much of the world's important data. Stonebraker invented many of the concepts that are used in almost all modern database systems.

Online negotiations can be improved if computer programs take social values, such as honesty and trust into account when bargaining with human counterparts. © tatniz

Solving the Trust Equation: Socially Intelligent Computers can turn Difficult Negotiations into Win-win Situations

March 25, 2015 12:19 pm | by A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing | News | Comments

Programming fundamental social intelligence skills into software agents can make humans substantially more trusting of online negotiations, which can lead to superior outcomes in e-commerce transactions, finds a team of technology researchers, business experts and cognitive scientists. People are naturally skeptical of negotiations lacking face-to-face contact...

Kuebler and his students used direct laser writing, a kind of nanoscale 3-D printing, to create the miniature lattices. The team then ran light beams through the lattices and confirmed that they could flow light without loss through turns that are twice a

New Light-bending Record Critical for Next-gen Supercomputing

March 24, 2015 1:32 pm | by University of Central Florida | News | Comments

A device resembling a plastic honeycomb yet much smaller than a bee’s stinger can steer light beams around tighter curves than ever before possible, while keeping the integrity and intensity of the beam intact. The work introduces a more effective way to transmit data rapidly on electronic circuit boards by using light.

The desktop software application is free and can be used on any basic desktop or laptop computer. Amateur astronomers may take images from their telescopes and analyze them with the application. The application will tell the user whether a matching astero

Help NASA Explore the Universe with Free Asteroid Data Hunter App

March 23, 2015 11:35 am | by NASA | News | Comments

During a panel at the South by Southwest Festival, NASA representatives discussed how citizen scientists have made a difference in asteroid hunting and announced the release of a desktop software application developed by NASA. The application is based on an Asteroid Data Hunter-derived algorithm that analyzes images for potential asteroids. It’s a tool that can be used by amateur astronomers and citizen scientists.

Future quantum technologies promise to deliver secure communications and superfast computing applications. Courtesy of NASA/Sonoma State University/Aurore Simonnet

Fastest-ever Quantum Switch achieved with Silicon

March 23, 2015 11:17 am | by University of Surrey | News | Comments

Research has demonstrated laser control of quantum states in an ordinary silicon wafer and observation via a conventional electrical measurement. The findings mark a crucial step toward future quantum technologies, which promise to deliver secure communications and superfast computing. The team demonstrated a quantum on/off switching time of about a millionth of a millionth of a second — over a thousand times faster than previous attempts

, Dr. Jürgen Kohler, the head of NVH CAE and Vehicle Concepts at Daimler AG, will talk about “High-Performance Computing – Highly Efficient Development – Mercedes-Benz Cars” at the opening keynote at this year’s ISC High Performance conference.

ISC 2015 Keynotes will focus on Latest Innovation and Future Challenges

March 20, 2015 12:08 pm | by ISC | News | Comments

World-renowned for automotive quality and safety, Daimler’s Mercedes-Benz cars are also highly innovative. To share the inside story, Dr. Jürgen Kohler, the head of NVH CAE and Vehicle Concepts at Daimler AG, will talk about “High-Performance Computing – Highly Efficient Development – Mercedes-Benz Cars” at the opening keynote at this year’s ISC High Performance conference.

Smart grids — power grids that adapt to changes in demand and reconfigure as needed to avoid overloads and other problems — can reduce energy costs, help avoid blackouts and deter cyber attacks. They also pose new challenges. A team led by researchers at

Developing Smarter Smart Grids

March 20, 2015 11:11 am | by NSF | News | Comments

Smart grids help avoid blackouts and deter cyber attacks. They also pose new challenges. As power generation — and the communication and information processing associated with it — shifts from centralized power stations to distributed, heterogeneous systems, massive amounts of sensor data from stations must be transmitted efficiently and effectively analyzed in real time.

John Renick is Director of Partner Solutions at Meridium.

3 Key Function Areas for Improved Asset Management and Industrial Success

March 19, 2015 5:18 pm | by John Renick, Director of Partner Solutions, Meridium | Blogs | Comments

Having a strategy in place for effective asset performance management (APM) is critical in today’s zero downtime world. To guarantee that you are fully utilizing your assets, you should consider implementing the three “M” strategy: Measure, Monitor and Manage. This allows you to best gauge the state and quality of your assets, make changes where needed before a problem arises and strategically plan for future production.

The OpenPOWER Foundation which is a collaboration of technologists encouraging the adoption of an open server architecture for computer data centers has grown to more than 110 businesses, organizations and individuals across 22 countries.

10 New OpenPOWER Foundation Solutions Unveiled

March 19, 2015 3:19 pm | by OpenPOWER Foundation | News | Comments

The OpenPOWER Foundation has announced more than 10 hardware solutions — spanning systems, boards and cards, and a new microprocessor customized for China. Built collaboratively by OpenPOWER members, the new solutions exploit the POWER architecture to provide more choice, customization and performance to customers, including hyperscale data centers. 

Nonlinear metamaterials, which possess physical capabilities not found in nature, may be the building blocks that allow major companies like IBM and Intel to move from electronic to optical computing.

Novel Nanoscale Metamaterial is Breaking Digital Connectivity Barriers

March 19, 2015 2:26 pm | by American Friends of Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

From computers, tablets and smartphones to cars, homes and public transportation, our world is more digitally connected every day. The technology required to support the exchange of massive quantities of data is critical. That's why scientists are intent on developing faster computing units capable of supporting much larger amounts of data transfer and data processing. New optical materials could serve as the nuts and bolts of future ...

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