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The University of Chicago’s Research Computing Center is helping linguists visualize the grammar of a given word in bodies of language containing millions or billions of words. Courtesy of Ricardo Aguilera/Research Computing Center

Billions of Words: Visualizing Natural Language

February 27, 2015 3:14 pm | by Benjamin Recchie, University of Chicago | News | Comments

Children don’t have to be told that “cat” and “cats” are variants of the same word — they pick it up just by listening. To a computer, though, they’re as different as, well, cats and dogs. Yet it’s computers that are assumed to be superior in detecting patterns and rules, not four-year-olds. Researchers are trying to, if not to solve that puzzle definitively, at least provide the tools to do so.

ISC Introduces the Hans Meuer Award

February 27, 2015 2:53 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

ISC is introducing the Hans Meuer Award to honor the most outstanding research paper submitted...

Russian Cyber Threat more Severe than Previously Assessed

February 26, 2015 1:11 pm | by Ken Dilanian, AP Intelligence Writer | News | Comments

The U.S. has elevated its appraisal of the cyber threat from Russia, the U.S. intelligence chief...

Flying Software Lab to Test Radically New Experimental Control Systems

February 26, 2015 8:35 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

ESA is developing a mini-satellite to test out radically new control systems and techniques and...

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Professor Dimitrios Nikolopoulos from the School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Queen’s University Belfast, is principal investigator for The Scalable, Energy-Efficient, Resilient and Transparent Software Adaptation (SERT)

Developing Simulation Software to Combat Humanity’s Biggest Issues

February 25, 2015 12:36 pm | by Queen’s University Belfast | News | Comments

Researchers are creating ground-breaking computer software, which has the potential to develop some of the world’s fastest supercomputers by increasing their ability to process masses of data at higher speeds than ever before. The new software has the potential to combat major global issues, including climate change and life-threatening diseases, by simulating detailed models of natural events.

While a member of the audience might have seen a variation on this trick before, the AI can now use psychological and mathematical principles to create lots of different versions and keep audiences guessing. Courtesy of Steven Depolo

Artificial Intelligence Performs Real Magic Tricks

February 25, 2015 11:41 am | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Researchers gave a computer program the outline of how a magic jigsaw puzzle and a mind-reading card trick work, as well the results of experiments into how humans understand magic tricks. With this information, the system created completely new variants on those tricks which can be delivered by a magician.

Klocwork 10.2 static code analysis software

Klocwork 10.2 Static Code Analysis Software

February 25, 2015 10:55 am | Rogue Wave Software | Product Releases | Comments

Klocwork 10.2 static code analysis software is designed to help developers write higher-quality, more secure code, faster. It integrates into desktop IDEs and into a team's natural workflow. Mirroring how code is developed, the software runs as code is being written, checking line-by-line.

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NWChem molecular modeling software takes full advantage of a wide range of parallel computing systems, including Cascade. Courtesy of PNNL

PNNL Shifts Computational Chemistry into Overdrive

February 25, 2015 8:29 am | by Karol Kowalski, Ph.D., and Edoardo Apra, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

We computational chemists are an impatient lot. Despite the fact that we routinely deal with highly complicated chemical processes running on our laboratory’s equally complex HPC clusters, we want answers in minutes or hours, not days, months or even years. In many instances, that’s just not feasible; in fact, there are times when the magnitude of the problem simply exceeds the capabilities of the HPC resources available to us.

Rather than using clear text, HTTP/2 is now a binary protocol which is quicker to parse and more compact in transmission. Courtesy of Rock1997

Upgrade to Core HTTP Protocol Promises Speedier, Easier Web

February 23, 2015 4:13 pm | by Peter Maynard, Queen's University Belfast | News | Comments

Hypertext Transfer Protocol, HTTP, is a key component of the World Wide Web. It is the communications layer through which Web browsers request Web pages from Web servers and with which Web servers respond with the contents of the page. Like much of the internet it’s been around for decades, but a recent announcement reveals that HTTP/2, the first major update in 15 years, is about to arrive.

A laser pulse is split into two paths: circularly polarized pump (blue) and linearly polarized probe (red). The pump’s path length is adjustable using a delay stage so that the relative arrival time between the pump and probe can be adjusted. After the pr

New Spin on Spintronics: Radiation-resistant Material May Enable Devices in Harsh Environments

February 23, 2015 4:01 pm | by American Institute of Physics (AIP) | News | Comments

A team of researchers is exploring new materials that could yield higher computational speeds and lower power consumption, even in harsh environments. Most modern electronic circuitry relies on controlling electronic charge within a circuit, but this control can easily be disrupted in the presence of radiation. Electronics that use spintronics may offer an alternative that is robust even in radiation-filled environments.

Stephen Jones is Product Manager, Strategic Alliances at NVIDIA.

Powering a New Era of Deep Learning

February 20, 2015 12:42 pm | by Stephen Jones, NVIDIA | Blogs | Comments

GPU-accelerated applications have become ubiquitous in scientific supercomputing. Now, we are seeing increased adoption of GPU technology in other computationally demanding disciplines, including deep learning, one of the fastest growing areas in the machine learning and data science fields

The OpenPOWER Foundation has announced a solid lineup of speakers headlining its inaugural OpenPOWER Summit at NVIDIA’s GPU Technology Conference at the San Jose Convention Center, March 17-19, 2015. Drawing from the open development organization’s more t

OpenPOWER Announces “Rethink the Data Center” Speaker Lineup

February 20, 2015 11:26 am | by OpenPOWER Foundation | News | Comments

The OpenPOWER Foundation has announced a solid lineup of speakers headlining its inaugural OpenPOWER Summit at NVIDIA’s GPU Technology Conference at the San Jose Convention Center, March 17-19, 2015. Drawing from the open development organization’s more than 100 members worldwide, the Summit’s organizers have lined up over 35 member presentations tied to the event’s “Rethink the Data Center” theme.

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Another myth is that scientists look like this. U.S. Army RDECOM/Flickr, CC BY-SA

Seven Myths about Scientists Debunked

February 19, 2015 2:07 pm | by Jeffrey Craig and Marguerite Evans-Galea, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute | Articles | Comments

As scientific researchers, we are often surprised by some of the assumptions made about us by those outside our profession. So we put together a list of common myths we and our colleagues have heard anecdotally regarding scientific researchers.

Daniel Sanchez, Nathan Beckmann and Po-An Tsai have found that the ways in which a chip carves up computations can make a big difference to performance. -- Courtesy of Bryce Vickmark

Making Smarter, Much Faster Multicore Chips

February 19, 2015 2:02 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Computer chips’ clocks have stopped getting faster. To keep delivering performance improvements, chipmakers are instead giving chips more processing units, or cores, which can execute computations in parallel. But the ways in which a chip carves up computations can make a big difference to performance.

The first in its series, ISC Cloud & Big Data will highlight the synergies between cloud and big data and present ways these technologies can build on each other’s strengths.

Inaugural ISC Cloud & Big Data Conference to be Held in Frankfurt

February 19, 2015 10:36 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

The inaugural international ISC Cloud & Big Data conference is a three-day multiple-track event that is replacing the ISC Cloud and ISC Big Data conferences, which were held separately over the past five years. Taking place from September 28 to 30, 2015, the conference will be held in Frankfurt, Germany, at the Frankfurt Marriott Hotel.

Building on two decades of incremental research on data storage, IMDEA Networks launches the scientific project ATOMICDFS, with the aim to tackle the challenge of “Seeking Efficient Atomic Implementations of Distributed Data Storage.”

Achieving Efficient, Strongly Consistent Data Storage

February 18, 2015 12:15 pm | by Nicolas Nicolaou, IMDEA Networks Institute | Blogs | Comments

One of the fundamental and open problems in computer science is effective data storage. Unfortunately, magnetic and flash storage devices alone have proven to be unreliable to guarantee data availability and survivability, due to their frequent and unpredictable failures. ATOMICDFS aims to investigate the existence of highly efficient DFS able to provide atomic guarantees in harsh environments.

id the National Security Agency plant spyware deep in the hard drives of thousands of computers used by foreign governments, banks and other surveillance targets around the world?  A new report from Russian cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab said its resear

Cyber Espionage: Seagate, Western Digital, Toshiba, IBM Products Reported Compromised

February 18, 2015 9:36 am | by Brandon Bailey, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Did the National Security Agency plant spyware deep in the hard drives of thousands of computers used by foreign governments, banks and other surveillance targets around the world? A new report from Russian cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab said its researchers identified a new family of malicious programs or worms that infected computers in multiple countries, primarily overseas.

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Apple CEO Tim Cook, right, watches as President Barack Obama speaks during a summit on cybersecurity and consumer protection at Stanford University in Palo Alto, CA. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Obama calls on Silicon Valley to help thwart Cyber Attacks

February 17, 2015 2:15 pm | by Darlene Superville and Martha Mendoza, Associated Press | News | Comments

Cyberspace is the new "Wild West," President Barack Obama said, with everyone looking to the government to be the sheriff. But he told the private sector it must do more to stop cyber attacks aimed at the U.S. every day. Obama signed an executive order aimed at making it easier for private firms to have access to classified information about cyber attacks.

In the search for ways to store data permanently, ETH researchers have been inspired by fossils. Courtesy of Philipp Stössel/ETH Zurich

Data Storage for Eternity: Encapsulated DNA-encoded Information Expected to Survive a Million Years

February 13, 2015 3:36 pm | by Angelika Jacobs, ETH Zurich | News | Comments

How can we preserve our knowledge today for the next millennia? Researchers have found a way to store information in the form of DNA, preserving it for nearly an eternity. As encapsulation in silica is roughly comparable to that in fossilized bones, researchers could draw on prehistoric information about long-term stability and calculate a prognosis: through storage in low temperatures, DNA-encoded information can survive.

©Classical and Quantum Gravity, 2015. Reproduced by permission of IOP Publishing

Code from Interstellar Movie Leads to new Spinning Black Hole Discoveries

February 13, 2015 3:25 pm | by IOP Institute of Physics | News | Comments

The team responsible for the Oscar-nominated visual effects at the center of Christopher Nolan’s epic, Interstellar, have turned science fiction into science fact by providing new insights into the powerful effects of black holes. The team describes innovative computer code used to generate the film’s iconic images of the wormhole, black hole and various celestial objects, and explains how the code has led them to new science discoveries.

Tim Cutts is Head of Scientific Computing at Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Modern DNA Sequencing Requires a Modern Day Approach

February 13, 2015 2:27 pm | by Tim Cutts, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute | Blogs | Comments

The sequencing machines that run today produce data several orders of magnitude faster than the machines used in the Human Genome Project. We at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute currently produce more sequences in one hour than we did in our first 10 years of operation. A great deal of computational resource is then needed to process that data.

The IoT concept is much broader today, with the possibility of networking national and even international infrastructure for improved transport, weather forecasting, earthquake prediction and response, disease tracking and control and many other applicati

Internet of Things Reality Check: Obstacles may limit a Connected World

February 13, 2015 11:31 am | by Inderscience | News | Comments

Connecting different kinds of devices, not just computers and communications devices, to the Internet could lead to new ways of working with a wide range of machinery, sensors, domestic and other appliances. Researchers suggest that we are on the verge of another technological revolution, but practicalities and legal obstacles may stymie the development of the so-called Internet of Things (IoT) if they are not addressed quickly.

Qian and colleagues found that the topological phases in the TMDC materials can be turned on and off by simply applying a vertical electric field that is perpendicular to the atomic plane of the material. That's shown here in calculations by the red cross

Exotic States Materialize with Supercomputers

February 13, 2015 11:26 am | by Jorge Salazar, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

Scientists used supercomputers to find a new class of materials that possess an exotic state of matter known as the quantum spin Hall effect. The researchers published their results in the journal Science in December 2014, where they propose a new type of transistor made from these materials.

In this real-time, non-stop, 48-hour challenge, teams of undergraduate and/or high school students will assemble a small cluster on the SC15 exhibit floor and race to demonstrate the greatest sustained performance across a series of applications.

SC15 to Strengthen, Enhance Programs for Students, Early Career Researchers

February 13, 2015 10:32 am | by SC15 | News | Comments

For the past 15 years, the annual SC conference has welcomed hundreds of students to the week-long conference held every November, providing an entry into the community of high performance computing and networking. For SC15 in Austin, the student programs will be coordinated as a broader program to recruit a diverse group of students, ranging from undergrads to graduate students, as well as researchers in the early stages of their careers

Seagate EVault Backup Target Appliance

Seagate EVault Backup Target Appliance

February 13, 2015 10:16 am | Seagate Technology, LLC | Product Releases | Comments

The Seagate EVault Backup Target Appliance is a backup device for large enterprises and service providers seeking data protection for multiple operating systems and appliances, including Oracle databases. It is based on Seagate’s hybrid cloud model, which supports environments where both private (on-premise) and public (off-premise) storage is used.

Researchers are reporting a fascinating discovery that provides insight into how the brain makes sense of data from fingers.Courtesy of Quinn Dombrowski

Bringing Texture to Touchscreens: How the Brain Makes Sense of Data from Fingers

February 12, 2015 2:31 pm | by Megan Fellman, Northwestern University | News | Comments

What if the touchscreen of your smartphone or tablet could touch you back? What if touch was as integrated into our ubiquitous technology as sight and sound? Northwestern University and Carnegie Mellon University researchers now report a fascinating discovery that provides insight into how the brain makes sense of data from fingers.

Founded in 1999, D-Wave Systems describes itself as “the first commercial quantum computing company.”

Analog Quantum Computers: Still Wishful Thinking?

February 12, 2015 2:24 pm | by European Physical Journal (EPJ) | News | Comments

Many challenges lie ahead before quantum annealing, the analog version of quantum computation, contributes to solve combinatorial optimization problems. Traditional computational tools are simply not powerful enough to solve some complex optimization problems, like, for example, protein folding.

Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source

Helping to Save Lives of Critically Ill Children

February 12, 2015 10:17 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Articles | Comments

For those on the front lines of treating cancer, speed and precision are key to patients’ survival. Pediatric cancer researchers have been making incredible strides in accelerating delivery of new diagnostic and treatment options. Supercomputer-powered genetic diagnosis is being used to harness the power of high throughput genomic and proteomic methods and is playing a key role in improving the outcome for children with genetic diseases.

Supported through crowdfunding, researchers have concluded a successful experiment to identify a novel genetic mutation as the source of a specific rare disease.

Crowdfunding Helps Solve Rare Disease Mystery

February 11, 2015 1:47 pm | by Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

Rare diseases — those that affect fewer than one in 200,000 people — are often identified early in life. Some 30 percent of children afflicted by these "orphan diseases" do not live to see their fifth birthday. While the US Orphan Drug Act of 1983 was written into law to promote research on the topic, the cost of identifying the source and progression of these diseases remains prohibitive for many families.

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