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A team of MIT neuroscientists has found that some computer programs can identify the objects in these images just as well as the primate brain. Courtesy of the researchers

Deep Computer Neural Networks Catch Up to Primate Brain

December 18, 2014 4:53 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

For decades, neuroscientists have been trying to design computer networks that can mimic visual skills such as recognizing objects. Until now, no computer model has been able to match the primate brain at visual object recognition during a brief glance. However, a new study from MIT neuroscientists has found that one of the latest generation of these so-called “deep neural networks” matches the primate brain.

COMSOL Server

December 18, 2014 4:41 pm | Product Releases | Comments

COMSOL Server was developed specifically for running applications built with the Application...

Optimized Algorithms Give Combustion Simulations a Boost

December 18, 2014 4:32 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Turbulent combustion simulations, which provide input to the design of more fuel-efficient...

Deep Learning Reveals Unexpected Genetic Roots of Cancers, Autism and Other Disorders

December 18, 2014 4:23 pm | by The University of Toronto | News | Comments

In the decade since the genome was sequenced, scientists and doctors have struggled to answer an...

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Simulated and observed annual maximum five-day accumulated precipitation over land points, averaged. Observations are calculated from the period 1979 to 1999. Model results are calculated from the period 1979 to 2005.

Global High-resolution Models Fuel New Golden Age of Climate Science

December 18, 2014 4:14 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Not long ago, it would have taken several years to run a high-resolution simulation on a global climate model. But using supercomputing resources at NERSC, climate scientist Michael Wehner was able to complete a run in just three months. What he found was that not only were the simulations much closer to actual observations, but the high-resolution models were far better at reproducing intense storms, such as hurricanes and cyclones.

ONET FT-NIR Networking Software

ONET FT-NIR Networking Software

December 18, 2014 12:45 pm | Bruker Optics Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

ONET networking software is for the setup, administration and control of large FT-NIR spectrometer networks. It is a server application accessed via a browser-based Web interface (WebUI), allowing users to set up, administrate and control a network of FT-NIR instruments from a central remote location anywhere in the world.

The species used in a Rice University genetic study of mice were collected from 15 locations in Europe and Africa. The green region indicates the range of Mus spretus, the Algerian mouse, while the blue region indicates the range of Mus musculus domesticu

Big Data Analysis Reveals Shared Genetic Code between Species

December 18, 2014 11:32 am | by Mike Williams, Rice University | News | Comments

Researchers have detected at least three instances of cross-species mating that likely influenced the evolutionary paths of “old world” mice, two in recent times and one in the distant past. They think these instances of introgressive hybridization are only the first of many needles waiting to be found in a very large genetic haystack. The finding suggests that hybridization in mammals may not be an evolutionary dead end.

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Artist’s impression of a proton depicting three interacting valence quarks inside. Courtesy of Jefferson Lab

HPC Community Experts Weigh in on Code Modernization

December 17, 2014 4:33 pm | by Doug Black | Articles | Comments

Sense of urgency and economic impact emphasized: The “hardware first” ethic is changing. Hardware retains the glamour, but there is now the stark realization that the newest parallel supercomputers will not realize their full potential without reengineering the software code to efficiently divide computational problems among the thousands of processors that comprise next-generation many-core computing platforms.

Open Ethernet Switch Abstraction Interface

Open Ethernet Switch Abstraction Interface

December 17, 2014 3:51 pm | Mellanox Technologies, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

The Switch Abstraction Interface (SAI) to Open Ethernet switch systems is designed for open management and control of Ethernet Switches. SAI is the common software application programming interface (API), which is in specification by the Open Compute Project (OCP), and is targeted at forming a common, hardware-agnostic, unified API for Ethernet switches.

Watson will make it possible for VHA physicians to interact with medical data in natural language, process millions of pages of patient information and medical literature to uncover patterns and insights, and learn from each interaction.

VA Clinical Reasoning System Based on Watson Cognitive Capabilities

December 17, 2014 3:45 pm | News | Comments

IBM announced that the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs is using Watson technology in a pilot to assist physicians in helping accelerate the process of evidence-based medical decision making. The VA joins leading healthcare organizations that are working with IBM Watson to help improve efficiency and quality of care being delivered. The VHA will also work with Watson for a clinical focus supporting veterans with PTSD.

ISC has announced the ISC Cloud & Big Data conference, which has merged into a three-day event to take place in Frankfurt, Germany, on September 28 to 30, 2015.

ISC Cloud & Big Data Conferences to Merge in 2015

December 16, 2014 12:11 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

ISC has announced the ISC Cloud & Big Data conference, which has merged into a three-day event to take place in Frankfurt, Germany, on September 28 to 30, 2015. The new format offers attendees two full days of multi-track sessions, highlighting current and future technologies, and applications most relevant in the cloud and big data fields. In addition, there will be one full day of workshops.

The NORAD Tracks Santa Web site features a mobile version, a holiday countdown, and new games and daily activities.

NORAD Ready to Track Santa’s Flight

December 16, 2014 11:19 am | by North American Aerospace Defense Command | News | Comments

The North American Aerospace Defense Command is once again ready to track Santa’s yuletide journey. It all started in 1955 when a local media advertisement directed children to call Santa direct — only the number was misprinted. Instead of reaching Santa, the phone rang through to the Crew Commander on duty at the Continental Air Defense Command Operations Center. Thus began the tradition, which NORAD has carried on since 1958.

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NASA flight engineer Roy Roper (left) reviews laptop displays showing the ASTAR data with Boeing principal investigator Gabe Brewer during a ground simulation. Courtesy of Boeing

NASA Software May Help Increase Flight Efficiency, Decrease Aircraft Noise

December 16, 2014 11:03 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA researchers began flight tests of computer software that shows promise in improving flight efficiency and reducing environmental impacts of aircraft, especially on communities around airports. Known as ASTAR, or Airborne Spacing for Terminal Arrival Routes, the software is designed to give pilots specific speed information and guidance so that planes can be more precisely spaced, enabling pilots to fly a "follow the leader" approach.

Quantum computers could in principle communicate with each other by exchanging individual photons to create a quantum internet.

Controlling Light Particle Shape Opens Way to Quantum Internet

December 15, 2014 4:07 pm | by Eindhoven University of Technology | News | Comments

In the same way as we now connect computers in networks through optical signals, it could also be possible to connect future quantum computers in a quantum internet. The optical signals would then consist of individual light particles or photons. One prerequisite for a working quantum internet is control of the shape of these photons. Researchers have succeeded for the first time in getting this control within the required short time. 

Big Data and genetic complexity: HotNet2 helps define the terrain for complex genetic associations involved in cancer. “The next step,” says researcher Ben Raphael, “is translating all of this information from cancer sequencing into clinically actionable

Big Data v. Cancer: Algorithm Identifies Genetic Changes across Cancers

December 15, 2014 4:00 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

Using a computer algorithm that can sift through mounds of genetic data, researchers from Brown University have identified several networks of genes that, when hit by a mutation, could play a role in the development of multiple types of cancer. The algorithm, called Hotnet2, was used to analyze genetic data from 12 different types of cancer assembled as part of the pan-cancer project of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA).

For the family of bee-eaters (on the photo Merops bullocki), the study revealed a close relationship to oscine birds, parrots, and birds of prey. Courtesy of Peter Houde

Bird Tree of Life Reproduced using Gene Analysis, Supercomputing

December 15, 2014 1:57 pm | by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology | News | Comments

About 95 percent of the more than 10,000 bird species known only evolved upon the extinction of dinosaurs about 66 million years ago. According to computer analyses of the genetic data, today's diversity developed from a few species at a virtually explosive rate after 15 million years. Scientists designed the algorithms for the comprehensive analysis of the evolution of birds; a computing capacity of 300 processor-years was required.

Duke researchers led by associate professor of neurobiology Erich Jarvis, left, did most of the DNA extraction from bird tissue samples used in the Avian Phylogenomics Consortium. (l-r: Carole Parent, Nisarg Dabhi, Jason Howard). Courtesy of Les Todd, Duk

Mapping the "Big Bang" of Bird Evolution

December 12, 2014 6:04 pm | by Kelly Rae Chi, Duke University | News | Comments

The genomes of modern birds tell a story of how they emerged and evolved after the mass extinction that wiped out dinosaurs and almost everything else 66 million years ago. That story is now coming to light, thanks to an ambitious international collaboration that has been underway for four years. The first findings of the Avian Phylogenomics Consortium are being reported nearly simultaneously in 28 papers.

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Madhu Sudan and his colleagues have begun to describe theoretical limits on the degree of imprecision that communicating computers can tolerate, with very real implications for the design of communication protocols. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

New Theory could Yield More Reliable Communication Protocols

December 12, 2014 5:23 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Communication protocols for digital devices are very efficient but also very brittle: They require information to be specified in a precise order with a precise number of bits. If sender and receiver — say, a computer and a printer — are off by even a single bit relative to each other, communication between them breaks down entirely.

ISC High Performance is the only yearly international HPC forum that introduces over 300 hand-picked speakers to their attendees.

ISC High Performance Program to Offer Greater Diversity

December 12, 2014 4:32 pm | by ISC | News | Comments

Celebrating its 30th conference anniversary, ISC High Performance has announced that the 2015 program’s technical content “will be strikingly broad in subject matter, differentiated and timely.” Over 2,600 attendees will gather in Frankfurt, from July 12 to 16, to discuss their organizational needs and the industry’s challenges, as well as learn about the latest research, products and solutions.

Results of large-scale simulations showing the Alnico alloy separates into FeCo-rich and NiAl-rich phases at low temperatures and is a homogenized phase at high temperatures.

Solving the Shaky Future of Super-strong Rare Earth Magnets

December 11, 2014 4:15 pm | by Katie Elyce Jones, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

The US Department of Energy is mining for solutions to the rare earth problem — but with high-performance computing instead of bulldozers. Researchers are using the hybrid CPU-GPU, 27-petaflop Titan supercomputer managed by the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to discover alternative materials that can substitute for rare earths.

The Simula SpringerBriefs on Computing series will provide introductory volumes on the main topics within Simula’s expertise, including communications technology, software engineering and scientific computing.

New Open Access Book Series Introduces Essentials of Computing Science

December 11, 2014 3:58 pm | by Springer | News | Comments

Springer and Simula have launched a new book series, which aims to provide introductions to select research in computing. The series presents both a state-of-the-art disciplinary overview and raises essential critical questions in the field. All Simula SpringerBriefs on Computing are open access, allowing for faster sharing and wider dissemination of knowledge.

Researchers will track the lives of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) in unprecedented detail in OPTIMISE — a project to improve the evaluation of treatments.

Big Data Project Captures Multiple Sclerosis Patient Experience

December 11, 2014 3:43 pm | by Francesca Davenport, Imperial College London | News | Comments

MS affects more than two million people worldwide. Symptoms are different for everyone but commonly include fatigue, tingling, speech problems and difficulties with walking and balance. To gain a better understanding of MS and its treatments, there is a need for a system to collect comprehensive data that provides an in-depth picture of the experiences of MS patients across a large population.

A black hole as depicted in the movie Interstellar -- Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

A Supermassive Black Hole Comes to the Big Screen

December 11, 2014 3:34 pm | by University of Arizona | News | Comments

What does a black hole look like up close? As the sci-fi movie Interstellar wows audiences with its computer-generated views of one of most enigmatic and fascinating phenomena in the universe, University of Arizona (UA) astrophysicists Chi-kwan Chan, Dimitrios Psaltis and Feryal Ozel are likely nodding appreciatively and saying something like, "Meh, that looks nice, but check out what we've got."

Galactic gas from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulation. Represented here is a Milky Way mass halo, with colors denoting different densities.

Interstellar Mystery Solved by Supercomputer Simulations

December 10, 2014 4:25 pm | by Jorge Salazar, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

An interstellar mystery of why stars form has been solved thanks to the most realistic supercomputer simulations of galaxies yet made. Theoretical astrophysicist Philip Hopkins led research that found that stellar activity — like supernova explosions or even just starlight — plays a big part in the formation of other stars and the growth of galaxies.

Professor Stephen Hawking using his Intel-powered communication system in his library at home.

Intel Provides Open Access to Hawking’s Advanced Communications Platform

December 10, 2014 4:09 pm | by Intel | News | Comments

Intel demonstrated for the first time with Professor Stephen Hawking a new Intel-created communications platform to replace his decades-old system, dramatically improving his ability to communicate with the world. The customizable platform will be available to research and technology communities by January of next year. It has the potential to become the backbone of a modern, customizable system other researchers and technologists can use.

The HPCAC-ISC Student Cluster Competition is an opportunity to showcase the world’s brightest computer science students’ expertise in a friendly, yet spirited competition.

University Teams for HPCAC-ISC 2015 Student Cluster Competition Announced

December 10, 2014 3:45 pm | by ISC | News | Comments

In a real-time challenge, the 11 teams of undergraduate students will build a small cluster of their own design on the ISC 2015 exhibit floor and race to demonstrate the greatest performance across a series of benchmarks and applications. It all concludes with a ceremony on the main conference keynote stage to award and recognize all student participants in front of thousands of HPC luminaries.

World Community Grid enables anyone with a computer, smartphone or tablet to donate their unused computing power to advance cutting-edge scientific research on topics related to health, poverty and sustainability.

Donate Processing Time to Fight Ebola

December 10, 2014 3:15 pm | by Brandon Bailey, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Scientists at Scripps Research Institute have teamed with IBM on a project that aims to combine the power of thousands of small computers to help analyze various compounds to see which might be effective in attacking the Ebola virus and also to help with a longer-term effort to understand how Ebola proteins change shape over time.

While most genome centers focus on research, the CPGM develops new clinical tests as a starting point for next‐generation medical treatments to improve outcomes in patients.

Applying HPC to Improve Business ROI

December 9, 2014 3:31 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

At the SC14 conference, which took place recently in New Orleans, IDC’s HPC Innovation Excellence Award Program continued to showcase benefits of investment in high performance computing (HPC). Initiated in 2011 to recognize innovative achievements using HPC, the program is designed to provide a means to evaluate the economic and scientific value HPC systems contribute.

The ancient Antikythera relic was rescued from a shipwreck. Courtesy of Giovanni Dall Orto

World's Oldest Computer, Ancient Greek Antikythera Mechanism, 100 Years Older than Previously Believed

December 9, 2014 2:10 pm | by University of Puget Sound | News | Comments

An ancient Greek astronomical puzzle has one more piece in place. The new evidence results from research by James Evans, professor of physics at University of Puget Sound, and Christián Carman, history of science professor at University of Quilmes, Argentina. The two researchers published a paper advancing our understanding of the Antikythera Mechanism, an ancient Greek mechanism that modeled the known universe of 2,000 years ago. 

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