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The industry's preeminent event on Molecular Medicine, focusing on Drug Discovery, Genomics, Diagnostics and Information Technology.

22nd International Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference

August 28, 2014 3:17 pm | Events

The 22nd International Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference is the industry's Preeminent Event on Molecular Medicine, focusing on Drug Discovery, Genomics, Diagnostics and Information Technology. Spanning six days this year, the Tri-Conference includes an expanded program that includes 6 symposia, over 20 short courses, and 17 conference programs.

2015 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo

August 28, 2014 3:06 pm | Events

The 2015 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo plans to unite 3,000+ life sciences, pharmaceutical...

On a Mission to Analyze Hurricane Cristobal

August 28, 2014 2:59 pm | by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM Satellite provided a look under the hood of...

New Future for Cloud Computing: NSF Awards $20M to Two New Testbeds

August 28, 2014 2:45 pm | by The National Science Foundation | News | Comments

The National Science Foundation has announced two $10 million projects to create cloud computing...

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Within the framework of the project CLOUDS, Madrid-based researchers have made crucial scientific advances in the state-of-the-art of cloud computing. Courtesy of Ehecatl1138

Is Cloud Computing the Last Step toward Technological Globalization?

August 27, 2014 3:22 pm | by IMDEA Networks Institute | Blogs | Comments

Cloud computing is not only the latest revolution in the Information and Communication Technology (ICT) world, but a key enhancer of innovation and economic development. Within the framework of the project CLOUDS, Madrid-based researchers have made crucial scientific advances in the state-of-the-art of cloud computing.

So far, JOANA is the only software analysis tool worldwide that does not only find all security gaps but also minimizes the number of false alarms without affecting the functioning of programs.

For Secure Software: X-rays instead of Passport Control

August 27, 2014 3:13 pm | by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Trust is good, control is better. This also applies to the security of computer programs. Instead of trusting “identification documents” in the form of certificates, the JOANA software analysis tool examines the source text (code) of a program. In this way, it detects leaks, via which secret information may get out or strangers may enter the system from outside. At the same time, JOANA reduces the number of false alarms to a minimum.

Simulating magnetized plasma devices requires multiple particle interaction models and highly accurate, self-consistent particle trajectory modelling in combined magnetic and space-charge modified electric fields.

3D Space Charge Parallel Processing Module

August 27, 2014 3:03 pm | Cobham Technical Services | Product Releases | Comments

The 3D Space Charge module uses code that is optimized for the shared memory architecture of standard PCs and workstations with multi-core processors. Although the speed benefit of parallel processing depends on model complexity, highly iterative and computationally-intensive analysis tasks can be greatly accelerated by the technique.

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An example of a whole slide scan

Leica Microsystems Offers Slide Scanning and Image Hosting for Education

August 27, 2014 2:40 pm | by Leica Microsystems | News | Comments

Leica Microsystems is offering a custom slide scanning and image hosting service for teachers, which makes it possible to share images within the classroom and to expand learning outside the classroom. Glass slides sent to a scanning center are processed to create high-resolution digital image files, which then can be accessed online from a hosted server via any standard Internet browser for study by students anytime, anywhere.

Pressure retarded osmosis (PRO) is a method of producing renewable energy from two streams of a different salinity. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Renewable Energy: The Power of Salt

August 26, 2014 4:27 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

Where the river meets the sea, there is the potential to harness a significant amount of renewable energy, according to a team of mechanical engineers at MIT. The researchers evaluated an emerging method of power generation called pressure retarded osmosis, in which two streams of different salinity are mixed to produce energy. In principle, a PRO system would take in river water and seawater on either side of a semi-permeable membrane.

Cray CS-Storm High Density Cluster

Cray CS-Storm High Density Cluster

August 26, 2014 3:11 pm | Cray Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Cray CS-Storm is a high-density accelerator compute system based on the Cray CS300 cluster supercomputer. Featuring up to eight NVIDIA Tesla GPU accelerators and a peak performance of more than 11 teraflops per node, the Cray CS-Storm system is a powerful single-node cluster.

Akselos' software running in a Web browser for 2.01x. This app shows the stresses in the landing gear for a solar-powered airplane. Courtesy of Akselos

Simulation Software Drastically Increases Speed of 3-D Engineering Simulations

August 25, 2014 12:40 pm | by Rob Matheson, MIT | News | Comments

MIT spinout Akselos has developed novel software, based on years of research at the Institute, which uses precalculated supercomputer data for structural components — like simulated “Legos” — to solve FEA models in seconds. Hundreds of engineers in the mining, power-generation, and oil and gas industries are now using Akselos software.

Sandia National Laboratories managers Alex Roesler, left, and Luke Purvis, center, and systems analyst Jarret Lafleur shown inside a Bank of Italy vault in a historic Livermore, California, building, studied 23 high-value heists that occurred in the last

National Security: Lessons Learned Drawn from Perfect Heists

August 25, 2014 12:00 pm | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

The Antwerp Diamond Center theft and other sophisticated, high-value heists show that motivated criminals can find ways to overcome every obstacle between them and their targets. Can the Energy and Defense departments, responsible for analyzing, designing and implementing complex systems to protect vital national security assets, learn from security failures in the banking, art and jewelry worlds? Sandia Labs set out to answer that question

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The study combined two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Does your Computer Know How You’re Feeling?

August 25, 2014 11:16 am | by Taylor & Francis | News | Comments

Researchers in Bangladesh have designed a computer program that can accurately recognize users’ emotional states as much as 87 percent of the time, depending on the emotion. Writing in the journal Behaviour & Information Technology, A.F.M. Nazmul Haque Nahin and his colleagues describe how their study combined — for the first time — two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Researchers from Argonne, in collaboration with Caterpillar Inc. and Convergent Science, carried out large internal combustion engine simulations involving fine spatial and temporal resolutions; high fidelity; and robust two-phase flow, spray, turbulence,

Argonne wins HPC Innovation Excellence Award

August 25, 2014 10:47 am | by Argonne National Laboratory | News | Comments

Argonne National Laboratory was one of seven new winners of the HPC Innovation Excellence Award. Announced by International Data Corporation at the ISC '14 supercomputer industry conference in Leipzig, Germany, the award recognizes noteworthy achievements by users of high-performance computing (HPC) technologies.

Ramasany Gowthami participated in the creation of an Android app by means of which users get together to crack a modern cryptographic code.

Smartphones Set Out to Decipher Cryptographic System

August 25, 2014 4:33 am | by Sébastien Corthésy, EPFL | News | Comments

An Android app has been created that allows users to get together to crack a modern cryptographic code. All encryption types, among which we can find the widely used RSA, can theoretically be broken. If so, how to ensure that our data remains protected? The answer lies in the time and effort required to break the code.

Pathogenic bacteria (red) live side-by-side with benign species (green) in a healthy mouth. Scientists are beginning to understand what causes bacterial communities to shift from health to diseases like periodontitis, diabetes, and Crohn's disease. Courte

Mouth Bacteria Can Change its Diet, Supercomputers Reveal

August 22, 2014 12:28 pm | by Jorge Salazar, TACC | News | Comments

Bacteria inside your mouth drastically change how they act when you're diseased. Scientists say these surprising findings might lead to better ways to prevent or even reverse the gum disease periodontitis, diabetes and Crohn's disease. UT Austin researchers used shotgun metagenomic sequencing, a non-targeted way to study the all the genetic material of the bacterial communities. They analyzed the RNA collected with  Lonestar and Stampede.

NVIDIA CUDA 6.5 Production Release

NVIDIA CUDA 6.5 Production Release

August 22, 2014 12:15 pm | Nvidia Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

NVIDIA CUDA 6.5 brings GPU-accelerated computing to 64-bit ARM platforms. The toolkit provides programmers with a platform to develop advanced scientific, engineering, mobile and HPC applications on GPU-accelerated ARM and x86 CPU-based systems. Features include support for Microsoft Visual Studio 2013, cuFFT callbacks capability and improved debugging for CUDA FORTRAN applications.

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DESY's 1.7 mile-long PETRA III accelerator is a super microscope that speeds up electrically charged particles nearly to the speed of light.

20 GB Data per Second Shared with 2000+ Scientists Worldwide

August 22, 2014 12:02 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM announced it is collaborating with DESY, a national research center in Germany, to speed up management and storage of massive volumes of x-ray data. The planned Big Data and Analytics architecture can handle more than 20 gigabyte per second of data at peak performance and help scientists worldwide gain faster insights into the atomic structure of novel semiconductors, catalysts, biological cells and other samples.

Rock Stars of Cybersecurity will take place in Austin, TX, on September 24, 2014

Top Cybersecurity Advice from the Rock Stars

August 22, 2014 10:57 am | by Amanda Sawyer, IEEE Computer Society | Blogs | Comments

High-profile security breaches, data thefts and cyberattacks are increasing in frequency, ferocity and stealth. They result in significant loss of revenue and reputation for organizations, destabilize governments, and hit everyone’s wallets. Cybersecurity is in the global spotlight and, now more than ever, organizations must understand how to identify weaknesses and protect company infrastructure from incursions.

The climate dataset is the first fine-scale work to correct for artificial trends within weather station data caused by changes in equipment or weather station locations. It also is the first to provide direct estimates of uncertainty and to provide open-

Improving Temperature Modeling across Mountainous Landscapes

August 21, 2014 4:28 pm | by University of Montana | News | Comments

New research by University of Montana doctoral student Jared Oyler provides improved computer models for estimating temperature across mountainous landscapes. Oyler provided a new climate dataset for ecological and hydrological research and natural resource management.

This still from a KIPAC visualization shows a jet of energy and particles streaming from a black hole. (Visualization: Ralf Kaehler / Simulation: Jonathan McKinney, Alexander Tchekhovskoy, and Roger Blandford)

Dramatically Intricate 3-D Universes Tell Important Stories about the Cosmos

August 21, 2014 3:16 pm | by Kelen Tuttle, Kavli Foundation | Articles | Comments

Recently, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics unveiled an unprecedented simulation of the universe’s development. Called the Illustris project, the simulation depicts more than 13 billion years of cosmic evolution across a cube of the universe that’s 350-million-light-years on each side. But why was it important to conduct such a simulation?

In the competition, teams of six students partner with vendors to design and build a cutting-edge cluster from commercially available components that does not exceed a 3120-watt power limit, and work with application experts to tune and run the competitio

12 Teams Set to Compete in SC14 Student Cluster Competition

August 20, 2014 10:50 am | by SC14 | News | Comments

As university students around the world prepare to head back to school this fall, 12 groups are already looking ahead to November when they will converge at SC14 in New Orleans for the Student Cluster Competition. In this real-time, non-stop, 48-hour challenge, teams students assemble a small cluster on the SC14 exhibit floor and race to demonstrate the greatest sustained performance across a series of applications.

MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory has released a data-visualization tool that lets users highlight aberrations and possible patterns in the graphical display; the tool then automatically determines which data sources are respon

Visual Control of Big Data: Recomputing Visualizations without Aberrant Results

August 20, 2014 10:44 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

In the age of big data, visualization tools are vital. With a single glance at a graphic display, a human being can recognize patterns that a computer might fail to find even after hours of analysis. But what if there are aberrations in the patterns? Or what if there’s just a suggestion of a visual pattern that’s not distinct enough to justify any strong inferences? Or what if the pattern is clear, but not what was to be expected?

Brookhaven theoretical physicist Swagato Mukherjee explains that 'invisible' hadrons are like salt molecules floating around in the hot gas of hadrons, making other particles freeze out at a lower temperature than they would if the 'salt' wasn't there.

Invisible Particles Provide First Indirect Evidence of Strange Baryons

August 20, 2014 10:17 am | by Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

New supercomputing calculations provide the first evidence that particles predicted by the theory of quark-gluon interactions, but never before observed, are being produced in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. These heavy strange baryons, containing at least one strange quark, still cannot be observed directly, but instead make their presence known by lowering the temperature at which other baryons "freeze out"

TCP Stealth defense software can help to prevent cyberattacks. Courtesy of Artur Marciniec/Fotolia

TCP Stealth Offers Protection against Hacienda Intelligence Program

August 20, 2014 10:00 am | by Technische Universität München | News | Comments

According to a group of journalists, a spy program known as "Hacienda" is being used by five western intelligence agencies to identify vulnerable servers across the world in order to control them and use them for their own purposes. However, scientists at the Technische Universität München have developed free software that can help prevent this kind of identification and, thus, the subsequent capture of systems.

Florida Polytechnic University is the newest addition to the State University System of Florida and the only one dedicated exclusively to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

New Supercomputing Center to Support Big Data and Analytics, Cybersecurity and other STEM Skills

August 18, 2014 3:57 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

Florida Polytechnic University, Flagship Solutions Group and IBM have announced a new supercomputing center at the University composed of IBM high performance systems, software and cloud-based storage, to help educate students in emerging technology fields. Florida Polytechnic University is the newest addition to the State University System and the only one dedicated exclusively to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

With their new method, computer scientists from Saarland University are able, for the first time, to compute all illumination effects in a simpler and more efficient way. Courtesy of AG Slusallek/Saar-Uni

Realistic Computer Graphics Technology Vastly Speeds Process

August 18, 2014 2:15 pm | by University Saarland | News | Comments

Creating a realistic computer simulation of how light suffuses a room is crucial not just for animated movies like Toy Story or Cars, but also in industry. Special computing methods should ensure this, but require great effort. Computer scientists from Saarbrücken have developed a novel approach that vastly simplifies and speeds up the whole calculating process.

The semester-long online course will include video lectures, quizzes, and homework assignments and will provide students with free access to the Blue Waters supercomputer.

Blue Waters Project to Offer Graduate Visualization Course in Spring 2015

August 18, 2014 12:12 pm | by NCSA | News | Comments

NCSA’s Blue Waters project will offer a graduate course on High Performance Visualization for Large-Scale Scientific Data Analytics in Spring 2015 and is seeking university partners who are interested in offering the course for credit to their students. This semester-long online course will include video lectures, quizzes and homework assignments and will provide students with free access to the Blue Waters supercomputer.

The Kilobots, a swarm of one thousand simple but collaborative robots. Courtesy of Mike Rubenstein and Science/AAAS

AI: Self-organizing Thousand-robot Swarm Forms Vast, Complex Shapes

August 18, 2014 12:03 pm | by Caroline Perry, Harvard SEAS | News | Comments

The first thousand-robot flash mob has assembled at Harvard University. Instead of one highly-complex robot, a “kilo” of robots collaborate, providing a simple platform for the enactment of complex behaviors. Called Kilobots, these extremely simple robots are each just a few centimeters across and stand on three pin-like legs.

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