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Europe’s second POWER Acceleration and Design Center is located at the IBM Research & Development Lab in Montpellier, France, where developers can get hands-on, technical assistance for creating OpenPOWER-based high performance computing apps.

IBM, NVIDIA and Mellanox Launch Design Center for Big Data and HPC

July 2, 2015 2:21 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM in collaboration with NVIDIA and Mellanox announced the establishment of a POWER Acceleration and Design Center in Monpellier, France, to advance the development of data-intensive research, industrial and commercial applications. Born out of the collaborative of the OpenPOWER Foundation, the new Center provides commercial and open-source software developers with technical assistance to enable them to develop HPC applications.

Intel President Renee James to leave Chipmaker

July 2, 2015 12:31 pm | by AP | News | Comments

Intel said July 2, 2015, that President Renee James, who has worked at the chipmaker for 28...

Leading Computational Scientist Peter Coveney Keynotes at ISC Cloud & Big Data

July 1, 2015 3:45 pm | by ISC | News | Comments

ISC Events, the organizer of the inaugural ISC Cloud & Big Data conference has announced...

Solar Superstorms show Highlights Extremely Powerful Computer Simulation, Visualization

July 1, 2015 3:35 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

A 24-minute, high-resolution science documentary narrated Benedict Cumberbatch about the...

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Artist’s conception of a quantum frequency comb. Courtesy of Nicoletta Barolini

Quantum Entanglement Method Vastly Increases How Much Data can be carried in a Photon

July 1, 2015 3:03 pm | by Matthew Chin, UCLA | News | Comments

A team of researchers led by UCLA electrical engineers has demonstrated a new way to harness light particles, or photons, that are connected to each other and act in unison no matter how far apart they are — a phenomenon known as quantum entanglement. In previous studies, photons have typically been entangled by one dimension of their quantum properties — usually the direction of their polarization.

WOS 360 2.0 Object Storage Platform

WOS 360 2.0 Object Storage Platform

June 30, 2015 1:59 pm | Datadirect Networks | Product Releases | Comments

The WOS 360 2.0 object storage platform enables secure public and private cloud deployments, and delivers efficient data protection options for data-intensive environments, offering a full suite of options to expand use cases in enterprises, cloud, BYOD shared storage, deep archive, video streaming, and file sync and share offerings.

Human chromosomes. Courtesy of Jane Ades, NHGRI

Speeding Up Genome Assembly, from Months to Minutes

June 30, 2015 12:23 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Computing Sciences | News | Comments

By applying some novel algorithms, computational techniques and the innovative programming language Unified Parallel C (UPC) to the cutting-edge de novo genome assembly tool Meraculous, a team of scientists simplified and sped up genome assembly, reducing a months-long process to mere minutes. This was primarily achieved by “parallelizing” the code to harness the processing power of supercomputers.

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Michael King is Senior Director of Marketing at DataDirect Networks (DDN).

Winds of Change are Bringing Fresh Solutions to High Performance Data Storage

June 30, 2015 7:53 am | by Michael King, DataDirect Networks | Blogs | Comments

Large-scale scientific organizations are grappling with the implications of rapid data growth. Massive data collections, analytics and the need for data collaboration are driving the need for high-performance storage solutions that can deliver time to results, fast. A different breed of technologies developed originally for the supercomputing industry are being adapted to meet the needs of technical computing organizations.

A simulation of vortex-induced motion shows how ocean currents affect offshore oil rigs.

Supercomputing the Vortex: Simulation improves Offshore Drill Rig Safety

June 29, 2015 2:00 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

LANL researchers’ efforts to solve the complex problem of how ocean currents affect the infrastructure of floating oilrigs and their computational fluid dynamics numerical simulations has received recognition from ANSYS. Vortex-induced motion is a complex problem that occurs when there are highly turbulent flow and fluid-solid interaction phenomena. The available experimental data are very limited, especially from field measurements.

A three-dimensional spatial structure of mixing in an idealized ocean simulation, computed using Lagrangian particle statistics.

Vast Eddies swirl across Open Ocean, pull Carbon Emissions into the Deep

June 25, 2015 9:11 am | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a computer model that clarifies the complex processes driving ocean mixing in the vast eddies that swirl across hundreds of miles of open ocean. The model is a first-of-its-kind tool because of its ability to exploit the power available from today’s supercomputers. Global climate simulations are beginning to be able to resolve the largest mesoscale eddies, which are considered the “weather” of the ocean.

Jill M. Hruby was named the next president and director of Sandia National Laboratories, the country’s largest national lab, on June 22, 2015. When she steps into her new role July 17, she will be the first woman to lead a national security laboratory. A

Jill Hruby will be First Woman to Lead National Security Lab

June 25, 2015 8:34 am | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

Jill Hruby was named the next president and director of Sandia National Laboratories, the country’s largest national lab. When she steps into her new role July 17, she will be the first woman to lead a national security laboratory. A Sandia staff member and manager for the past 32 years, Hruby most recently oversaw Sandia efforts in nuclear, biological and chemical security, homeland security, counterterrorism and energy security.

PBS Professional 13.0 Workload Manager and Job Scheduler

PBS Professional 13.0 Workload Manager and Job Scheduler

June 24, 2015 12:05 pm | Product Releases | Comments

PBS Professional is a workload manager and job scheduler for high-performance computing (HPC) clusters and supercomputers. It has been architected to meet the needs of companies looking to prepare for the move to exascale.

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PowerEdge C6320 Server

PowerEdge C6320 Server

June 24, 2015 11:41 am | Dell Computer Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

The PowerEdge C6320 server is purpose-built for high-performance computing and hyper-converged solutions and appliances. It is designed to offer four independent server nodes in a 2U chassis. Compared to the previous generation, it provides up to two times the performance improvement on the LinPack spec.

Following their collaboration a year ago to develop a cognitive computing cooking app and test it with home cooks as part of a beta program, IBM and Bon Appetit have opened up the web app to anyone interested in expanding his or her imagination in the kit

Cognitive Computing App Taps 10,000 Bon Appétit Recipes, Suggests Creative Flavor Combinations

June 24, 2015 11:12 am | by IBM Watson | News | Comments

IBM and Bon Appétit have introduced a one-of-a-kind Chef Watson cognitive computing cooking app that is open to anyone interested in expanding his or her imagination in the kitchen. Created through a collaboration with Bon Appétit, the app inspires home cooks everywhere to discover unexpected flavor combinations to address everyday mealtime challenges in creative ways and bring new ideas to the kitchen.

GATK is already available for download at no cost to academic and non-profit users. In addition, business users can license GATK from the Broad. To date, more than 20,000 users have processed genomic data using GATK.

Broad Institute Genome Analysis Toolkit offered as part of Google Genomics

June 24, 2015 7:56 am | by Broad Institute | News | Comments

Broad Institute is teaming up with Google Genomics to explore how to break down major technical barriers that increasingly hinder biomedical research by addressing the need for computing infrastructure to store and process enormous datasets, and by creating tools to analyze such data. As a first step, Broad Institute’s Genome Analysis Toolkit, GATK, will be offered as a service on the Google Cloud Platform, as part of Google Genomics.

Power-performance tradeoff for conventional and superconducting supercomputers

Anticipating a Major Role for Superconducting Computing

June 22, 2015 4:27 pm | by Elie K. Track and Alan M. Kadin, IEEE Rebooting Computing | Blogs | Comments

In the past, evolution of computer technology was largely driven by industrial advances in a single technology. That unified approach led to advances on all levels. With the ending of Moore’s Law, this unified approach will inevitably split, leading to a variety of different device technologies, architectures and interface approaches. Within such a mixed environment, we anticipate a major role for superconducting computing.

Applied Mathematician Theorizes what Happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — June 12-18

June 19, 2015 2:35 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

The top most-visited stories of the past week included an amazing image of Jupiter’s second largest moon, solving billions of equations in just minutes, relief and delight as Philae woke up, Einstein saving the Quantum Cat, a fundamental change in wireless communications, a 40-year-old algorithm problem put to rest, news that a black hole’s surface is no deadly firewall, and an applied mathematician’s theory on MA flight 370.

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Stanford researchers have demonstrated that sheathing semiconductor wires in graphene can help electrons scoot through tiny copper wires in chips more quickly.

Simple yet Clever Approach Boosts Chip Speeds by 30 Percent

June 18, 2015 5:34 pm | by Tom Abate, Stanford University | News | Comments

A typical computer chip includes millions of transistors connected with an extensive network of copper wires. Although chip wires are unimaginably short and thin compared with household wires, in each case, the copper is wrapped within a protective sheath. For years, tantalum nitride has formed a protective layer around chip wires. Now, experiments demonstrate graphene can help electrons scoot through tiny wires in chips more quickly.

Mellanox announced the world’s first end-to-end 10/25/40/50 and 100 Gigabit Ethernet connectivity on June 17, 2015, in the newly opened Observatory at One World Trade Center.

End-to-end Ethernet Solutions

June 18, 2015 5:12 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

Atop the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere, a remarkable glass-fronted skyscraper where you can practically feel New York City’s invincible spirit, Mellanox announced the world’s first end-to-end 10/25/40/50 and 100 Gigabit Ethernet connectivity on June 17, 2015, in the newly opened Observatory at One World Trade Center.

Short inverted repeat sequences of DNA nucleotides are enriched at human cancer breakpoints. Courtesy of Karen Vasquez, UT Austin

Researchers Surprisingly Link DNA Crosses to Cancer using Stampede and Lonestar

June 18, 2015 2:43 pm | by Jorge Salazar, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

Supercomputers have helped scientists find a surprising link between cross-shaped (or cruciform) pieces of DNA and human cancer. The study found that small DNA cruciforms are mutagenic, altering DNA in a way that can increase risk of cancer in yeast, monkeys and in humans. Researchers found short inverted repeats of 30 base pairs and under in a reference database of mutations in human cancer that are somatic, meaning not inherited.

This year’s winning research poster

ISC Announces 2015 PRACE, GAUSS and Poster Winners

June 16, 2015 11:28 am | by ISC | News | Comments

ISC has announced that the 2015 PRACE ISC Award and Gauss Award will be given to two deserving European researchers reporting on their work focused on the development of energy-efficient supercomputers. These two research papers were selected by the respective award committees from the 37 submissions accepted for presentation at the 2015 ISC High Performance Research Paper Session. This year’s winning research poster...

The plight of Malaysia Airlines flight 370 (MH370) is one of the biggest mysteries in aviation history, but an interdisciplinary research team led by a Texas A&M University at Qatar math professor has theorized the ill-fated plane plunged vertically into

Applied Mathematician Theorizes what Happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370

June 15, 2015 4:35 pm | by Texas A&M at Qatar | News | Comments

The plight of Malaysia Airlines flight 370 (MH370) is one of the biggest mysteries in aviation history, but an interdisciplinary research team led by a Texas A&M University at Qatar math professor has theorized the ill-fated plane plunged vertically into the southern Indian Ocean in March 2014.

Stanford Professor Charbel Farhat and his team accomplished a rare feat in computer engineering through a partnership with the U.S. Army Research Laboratory. Courtesy of Norbert von der Groeben

Now, Billions of Questions can be answered in about 3 Minutes

June 12, 2015 4:16 pm | by James Urton, | News | Comments

Stanford Professor Charbel Farhat and his research team at the Army High Performance Computing Research Center used a new, high-end, massively parallel computer to demonstrate the power of algorithms that instruct processors to work together to solve challenging problems. They directed 22,000 processors to solve billions of mathematical equations in just a few minutes, a rare feat in computer engineering.

A neuroblastoma: TGen's extended partnership with Dell will help it optimize a high-performance computing infrastructure to enable researchers to analyze and store massive amounts of genetic data more quickly and reach more patients than ever before. To d

First-of-a-kind Clinical Trials Support Fight against Pediatric Cancer

June 11, 2015 5:08 pm | by TGen | News | Comments

Dell has announced an extended partnership with TGen to help clinical researchers and doctors globally expand the reach and impact of the world's first FDA-approved precision medicine trial for pediatric cancer. The renewed commitment includes an additional $3 million Dell grant to support continued collaboration with TGen and the Neuroblastoma and NMTRC expanded pediatric cancer clinical trials in EMEA.

The Ubimet Weather Cockpit allows golf courses, race venues and other clients to access site specific weather information unique to their topography.

Weather Matters: Enabling Precise, Real-time Forecasts

June 11, 2015 3:47 pm | by Ken Strandberg | Articles | Comments

Much of the world’s industries are affected by weather. UBIMET is one of the world’s leading private weather service providers. The company offers a range of precise, real-time micro-climate forecasting and alerts, historical weather data, and other services to several million customers around the globe. UBIMET’s competitive advantage lies in the complex character of their solutions and depth of their science and technology.

The Wilkinson Prize was established to honor the outstanding contributions of Dr. James Hardy Wilkinson to the field of numerical software. It is awarded every four years to the entry that best addresses all phases of the preparation of numerical software

Partial Differential Equations ‘Dolfin-adjoint’ wins 2015 Wilkinson Prize for Numerical Software

June 11, 2015 11:06 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

NAG, Argonne and the National Physical Laboratory have announced awarding of the 2015 Wilkinson Prize for “dolfin-adjoint,” which automatically derives and solves adjoint and tangent linear equations from high-level mathematical specifications of finite element discretizations of partial differential equations. The prize is awarded every four years to the entry that best addresses all phases of the preparation of numerical software.

John McGuinness, a.k.a 'Morecambe Missile,' with EMC CMO Jonathan Martin.

Why Legendary Motorcycle Racer John McGuinness is so Fast

June 10, 2015 10:44 am | by EMC | News | Comments

At the Isle of Man TT races, EMC is announcing the results of a new data analytics competition designed to unlock the secret of what makes John McGuinness, the 'Morecambe Missile,' so fast. At the Circuit Monteblanco in Spain, EMC captured over 700,000 rows of performance, biometric and mechanical data from sensors fitted on the racing suits and bikes of both John and a control subject.

Scanning electron microscope images of single crystal structures fabricated using template-assisted selective epitaxy. For better visibility, the silicon is colored in green, and the compound semiconductor in red. Courtesy of H. Schmid/IBM

Futuristic Components on Silicon Chips, Fabricated Successfully

June 9, 2015 9:44 am | by Jason Bardi, American Institute of Physics (AIP) | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a relatively simple, robust and versatile process for growing crystals made from compound semiconductor materials that will allow them be integrated onto silicon wafers — an important step toward making future computer chips that will allow integrated circuits to continue shrinking in size and cost even as they increase in performance. The work may allow an extension to Moore's Law.

Infrared light enters this silicon structure from the left. The cut-out patterns, determined by an algorithm, route two different frequencies of this light into the pathways on the right. This is a greatly magnified image of a working device that is about

Bringing Optical Data Transport Closer to Replacing Wires

June 8, 2015 2:20 pm | by Tom Abate, Stanford University | News | Comments

Stanford engineer Jelena Vuckovic wants to make computers faster and more efficient by reinventing how they send data back and forth between chips, where the work is done. A new process could revolutionize computing by making it practical to use light instead of electricity to carry data inside computers, miniaturizing the proven technology of the Internet, which moves data by beaming photons of light through fiber optic threads.

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