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Enterprise AI deployments will also drive additional spending on IT hardware and services including computing power, graphics processor units (GPUs), networking products, storage and cloud computing.

AI for Enterprise Applications to Reach $11.1 Billion, Deep Learning will be Breakout Technology

April 24, 2015 2:39 pm | by Tractica | News | Comments

After 60 years of false starts, the integration of artificial intelligence with probability and statistics has led to a marriage of machine learning, control theory and neuroscience that is yielding practical benefits. This shared theoretical foundation, combined with the exponential growth of processing power and the unprecedented increase in the amount of data available to analyze, has made AI systems attractive for businesses to adopt.

Central and Southern Italy

April 24, 2015 2:22 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

Part of Italy’s Molise, Apulia and Campania regions are pictured in this radar composite image...

Huge Magma Chamber Spied under Yellowstone Supervolcano

April 24, 2015 1:58 pm | by AP | News | Comments

Scientists have spied a vast reservoir of hot, partly molten rock beneath the supervolcano at...

First Image of the Moon Taken by a U.S. Spacecraft

April 23, 2015 3:22 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Ranger 7 took this image, the first picture of the moon by a U.S. spacecraft, on July 31, 1964...

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The Cori Phase 1 system will be the first supercomputer installed in the new Computational Research and Theory Facility now in the final stages of construction at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

Cray XC40 will be First Supercomputer in Berkeley Lab’s New Computational Research and Theory Facility

April 23, 2015 3:17 pm | by NERSC and Berkeley Lab | News | Comments

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC) Center and Cray announced they have finalized a new contract for a Cray XC40 supercomputer that will be the first NERSC system installed in the newly built Computational Research and Theory facility at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

This LiDAR image from the CAO shows the Tambopata River in the Peruvian Amazon. The ancient meanders and oxbows are in blue extending out from the existing river in black. Higher terraced regions are in pink. Courtesy of Greg Asner, The Carnegie Airborne

Carnegie Launches Next-gen Airborne Laboratory for Earth

April 23, 2015 1:45 pm | by Carnegie Science | News | Comments

Carnegie Science announces the launch of the Carnegie Airborne Observatory-3 (CAO-3), the most scientifically advanced aircraft-based mapping and data analytics system in civil aviation today. This third-generation aircraft has been completely overhauled from previous models, boasting a multitude of cutting-edge improvements to its onboard laboratory.

Mouse-ear Cress Plant Root Tip -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Mouse-ear Cress Plant Root Tip

April 22, 2015 2:30 pm | News | Comments

This 40x photo features a depth-coded rendering of a transgenic mouse-ear cress (Arabidopsis thaliana) plant root tip stably expressing the nuclear histone marker H2B fused to a green fluorescent protein. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition.

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A map of the cosmic microwave background made using the Planck satellite. The Cold Spot, the ellipse at the bottom right, area resides in the constellation Eridanus in the southern galactic hemisphere. The insets show the environment of this anomalous pat

Largest Structure in Universe a Supervoid 1.3 Billion Light Years Across

April 21, 2015 12:09 pm | by Royal Astronomical Society | News | Comments

Astronomers may have found "the largest individual structure ever identified by humanity." In 2004, astronomers examining a map of radiation left over from the Big Bang discovered the Cold Spot, a larger-than-expected unusually cold area of the sky. The physics surrounding the Big Bang theory predicts warmer and cooler spots of various sizes in the infant universe, but a spot this large and this cold was unexpected.

Liquid Crystals with Focal Conic-like Texture -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Liquid Crystals with Focal Conic-like Texture

April 21, 2015 11:58 am | News | Comments

This 40x photo shows focal conic-like domain with varying degrees of modulation and checkerboard patterns. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photograph was taken using polarized light.

Fruit Fly Salivary Gland Cells -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Fruit Fly Salivary Gland Cells

April 20, 2015 10:02 am | News | Comments

This 20x photo features salivary gland cells from a fruit fly showing cell boundaries (white) and genomic DNA (red). It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

Global Lightning Activity  NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens using LIS/OTD data from the Global Hydrology and Climate Center Lightning Team.

Where does Lightning Flash most Frequently?

April 17, 2015 3:16 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

According to satellite observations, lightning flashes more often over land than over the oceans. And lightning seems to happen more often closer to the equator. The NASA Earth Observatory’s Global Lightening Activity Map shows the average yearly counts of lightning flashes per square kilometer from 1995 to 2013. Areas with the largest number of lightning flashes — as many as 150 per year per square kilometer — are bright pink.

With the laser data, a 3-D map of the surface vegetation can be obtained.

Protecting Nature on the Fly: Computer Algorithms, Laser Technology Characterize Biodiversity

April 16, 2015 12:50 pm | by Technische Universität Wien | News | Comments

Simply declaring a region as a nature protection area is not enough, regular monitoring of its ecological condition is also necessary. New methods are being developed to monitor Europe’s nature protection areas from the air. Short laser pulses are sent to the ground, and information on the status of the habitat can be deduced from the reflected light signals using elaborate computer algorithms.

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Drug-resistant Shigella Bacteria -- Courtesy of CDC/James Archer – click to enlarge

Drug-resistant Shigella Bacteria

April 16, 2015 11:38 am | by CDC | News | Comments

This illustration depicts a three-dimensional (3-D) computer-generated image of a number of rod-shaped, drug-resistant Shigella bacteria. The artistic recreation was based upon scanning electron micrographic imagery. Note that the exterior of the Shigella bacterium is fimbriated, covered by numerous thin, hair-like projections, imparting a furry appearance.

This multitemporal Sentinel-1A radar image shows the Aral Sea, located on the border between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan in Central Asia. The Aral Sea is a striking example of humankind’s impact on the environment and natural resources.

Aral Sea Between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, Central Asia

April 15, 2015 2:33 pm | News | Comments

This multitemporal Sentinel-1A radar image shows the Aral Sea, located on the border between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan in Central Asia. The Aral Sea is a striking example of humankind’s impact on the environment and natural resources.  

Sitting in the valley of the Tuul River – running northeast to southwest across the image – the city of Ulan Bator is flanked by the Bogd Khan Mountain to its south (centre of image). This forested mountain is the site of one of the oldest national parks

Ulan Bator, Mongolian Capital

April 13, 2015 2:15 pm | News | Comments

Sitting in the valley of the Tuul River – running northeast to southwest across the image – the city of Ulan Bator is flanked by the Bogd Khan Mountain to its south (centre of image). This forested mountain is the site of one of the oldest national parks in the world, home to wildlife such as foxes and wolves and endangered species of hare and deer.

Mars Marathon Valley Overlook – Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell Univ./Arizona State Univ. – click to enlarge

Mars Marathon Valley Overlook

April 9, 2015 3:58 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

This view from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows part of "Marathon Valley," a destination on the western rim of Endeavour Crater, as seen from an overlook north of the valley. The scene spans from east, at left, to southeast.

Female Deer Fly -- Courtesy of CDC/Dr. Gary Alpert – click to enlarge

Female Deer Fly

April 9, 2015 12:43 pm | by CDC | News | Comments

This image depicts a dorsal view of a female deer fly, Chrysops dimmock, which had been collected at Nickerson State Park, Cape Cod, MA, on July 4, 2013. This particular specimen had been feeding on both human beings and canines.

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Cultured embryonic chicken dorsal root ganglia neuron explant -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Cultured Embryonic Chicken Dorsal Root Ganglia

April 7, 2015 4:26 pm | News | Comments

This 60x photo "Random Connection" shows a cultured embryonic chicken dorsal root ganglia neuron explant. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

Experimental Wing Tests Electric Propulsion Technologies -- Courtesy of Joby Aviation – click to enlarge

Experimental Wing Tests Electric Propulsion Technologies

April 7, 2015 11:22 am | by NASA | News | Comments

Leading Edge Asynchronous Propeller Technology project researchers at NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center are performing ground testing of a 31-foot-span, carbon composite wing section with 18 electric motors. The LEAPTech project will test the premise that tighter propulsion-airframe integration, made possible with electric power, will deliver improved efficiency and safety, as well as environmental and economic benefits.

UNSW Professor Melissa Knothe Tate is leading the project, which is using semiconductor technology to explore osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. Courtesy of Grant Turner/Mediakoo.

Previously Top-secret Technology enables Whole-body “Google Maps”

April 7, 2015 11:00 am | by UNSW Australia | News | Comments

A world-first collaboration uses previously top-secret technology to zoom through the human body down to the level of a single cell and could be a game-changer for medicine. UNSW Australia's Professor Tate is first to use the system in humans. She has forged a pioneering partnership with the US-based Cleveland Clinic, Brown and Stanford Universities, as well as Zeiss and Google to help crunch terabytes of data gathered from human study.

There are (so far) 1,800 known planets beyond our solar system, but among all of them, there's no place like Earth. This Earth Day, April 22, NASA is asking you to share pictures and video of your favorite places on Earth using social media – and tag them

#NoPlaceLikeHome: Amazing Places and Landscapes on Our Home Planet

April 7, 2015 10:03 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

NASA’s question is a simple one: What is your favorite place on Earth? The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s Earth Day project is seeking “to get the public involved in highlighting the great diversity of the places, landscapes and ecosystems of our home planet” by issuing an open invitation to share photos and videos on social media using the hashtag #NoPlaceLikeHome.

A high resolution image of the data transition region on a CD-ROM taken with an Olympus OLS 4000 LEXT 3-D digital laser confocal microscope. The sharp points are data on a compact disk. Courtesy of Greg Gogolin, Ph.D., Information Security & Intelligence,

Restoring Lost Data: 3-D Digital Laser Microscopy Creates Visual Roadmap

April 6, 2015 4:12 pm | by Marlene Cimons, National Science Foundation | News | Comments

It can be disheartening to learn that something precious, such as a one-of-a-kind family photo, has disappeared from a scratched or broken CD or DVD. It also can become serious, dangerous and potentially costly if it happens to a disc containing criminal forensic evidence, corporate records or scientific data. But there may be a way in the future to bring the material back.

Typhoon Maysak -- Courtesy of ESA/NASA – click to enlarge

Typhoon Maysak Commands Respect, Even from Space

April 6, 2015 3:34 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

ESA astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti took this image of Typhoon Maysak from her vantage point on the International Space Station. Commenting on the image Samantha said: "Commands respect even from space: we just flew over typhoon Maysak."

Genomics processing is now moving mainstream to clinical applications, as new approaches to diagnosing and treatment involving genomics are gaining interest.

Efficient, Time Sensitive Execution of Next-gen Sequencing Pipelines Critical for Translational Medicine

April 6, 2015 3:26 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

Demand for genomics processing is rapidly spreading from research labs to the clinical arena. Genomics is now a "must have" tool for researchers in areas of oncology and rare diseases. It is also becoming a requirement in the clinical space for precision medicine, translational medicine and similar "bench to bedside" initiatives.

A first-generation demonstration system of the hyperspectral platform, which combines an optical component and image processing software

Star Trek Tricorder is No Longer Science Fiction

April 2, 2015 10:44 am | by American Friends of Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

For the crew of the Starship Enterprise, Star Trek's "Tricorder" was an essential tool, a multifunctional hand-held device used to sense, compute and record data in a threatening and unpredictable universe. It simplified a number of Starfleet tasks, scientific or combat-related, by beaming sensors at objects to obtain instant results. A new invention may be able to turn smartphones into powerful hyperspectral sensors...

Pushing the Boundaries of Propelling Deep Space Missions -- Courtesy of NASA, Michelle M. Murphy (Wyle Information Systems, LLC) – click to enlarge

Pushing the Boundaries of Propelling Deep Space Missions

April 2, 2015 8:46 am | by NASA | News | Comments

Engineers at NASA’s Glenn Research Center are advancing the propulsion system that will propel the first-ever mission to redirect an asteroid for astronauts to explore in the 2020s. NASA's Asteroid Redirect Mission will test a number of new capabilities, like advanced Solar Electric Propulsion (SEP), needed for future astronaut expeditions into deep space, including to Mars.

Dung Cannon Fungi -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Dung Cannon Fungi

April 1, 2015 12:17 pm | News | Comments

This 80x photo showing dung cannon fungi (Pilobolus sp.) received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photograph was taken using LED lighting.

Figure d (left) shows a representative x-y projected brain vasculature image through an intact skull. Figure e shows a representative enhanced x-z projected brain vasculature image. Figure f shows photoacoustic microscopy of oxygen saturation of hemoglobi

Photoacoustic Method allows Rapid Imaging of Living Brain Functions

April 1, 2015 12:11 pm | by Beth Miller, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Researchers studying cancer and other invasive diseases rely on high-resolution imaging to see tumors and other activity deep within the body's tissues. Using photoacoustic microscopy, a single-wavelength, pulse-width-based technique, they were able to see blood flow, blood oxygenation, oxygen metabolism and other functions inside a living mouse brain at faster rates than ever before.

Galactic Turmoil: The Heart of the Large Magellanic Cloud -- Courtesy of ESA/NASA/JPL-Caltech/STScI -- click to enlarge

Galactic Turmoil: The Heart of the Large Magellanic Cloud

March 31, 2015 1:50 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

A scene of jagged fiery peaks, turbulent magma-like clouds and fiercely hot bursts of bright light — although this may be reminiscent of a raging fire or the heart of a volcano, it actually shows a cold cosmic clump of gas, dust and stars.

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