Advertisement
Imaging
Subscribe to Imaging

The Lead

Expedition 43 Soyuz Rolls Out for Launch -- Courtesy of NASA/Bill Ingalls – click to enlarge

Expedition 43 Soyuz Rolls Out for Launch

March 26, 2015 9:12 am | by NASA | News | Comments

The Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft is rolled out by train to the launch pad at the Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, on March 25, 2015. NASA Astronaut Scott Kelly, and Russian Cosmonauts Mikhail Kornienko, and Gennady Padalka of the Russian Federal Space Agency are scheduled to launch to the International Space Station in the Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on March 28.

Mouse Heart Muscle Cells

March 25, 2015 2:02 pm | News | Comments

This 400x photo of mouse cardiac ventricular myocytes (isolated heart muscle cells) received an...

Galactic Pair: Porpoise or Penguin?

March 24, 2015 2:16 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

What do you see in this image: a porpoise or a penguin? Amateur astronomers have nicknamed this...

London and the River Thames

March 23, 2015 12:01 pm | News | Comments

London appears as a cluster of bright radar reflections along the River Thames in this radar...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

The desktop software application is free and can be used on any basic desktop or laptop computer. Amateur astronomers may take images from their telescopes and analyze them with the application. The application will tell the user whether a matching astero

Help NASA Explore the Universe with Free Asteroid Data Hunter App

March 23, 2015 11:35 am | by NASA | News | Comments

During a panel at the South by Southwest Festival, NASA representatives discussed how citizen scientists have made a difference in asteroid hunting and announced the release of a desktop software application developed by NASA. The application is based on an Asteroid Data Hunter-derived algorithm that analyzes images for potential asteroids. It’s a tool that can be used by amateur astronomers and citizen scientists.

Air Pearl in Soldier Fly Larva Respiratory Fringe-- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Air Pearl in Soldier Fly Larva Respiratory Fringe

March 20, 2015 12:17 pm | News | Comments

This 30x photo of an air pearl in a soldier fly larva respiratory fringe received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using stereomicroscopy.

Researchers used a “pixon” image enhancement technique, originally designed to peer into the distant Universe, to sharpen the map and reveal the enormous size of the thorium deposit from the volcanic eruption.

Lunar Volcano’s Enormous Eruption Reached Hundreds of Miles

March 20, 2015 11:01 am | by Durham University | News | Comments

Scientists have produced a new map of the Moon’s most unusual volcano showing that its explosive eruption spread debris over an area much greater than previously thought. A team of astronomers and geologists studied an area of the lunar surface in the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex. By mapping the radioactive element thorium, which spewed out during the eruption, they discovered debris was able to cover an area the size of Scotland.

Advertisement
Life reconstruction of Carnufex carolinensis. Copyright Jorge Gonzales

Before Dinosaurs, Carolina Butcher was Top Beast of Prey

March 20, 2015 10:26 am | by North Carolina State University | News | Comments

A newly discovered crocodilian ancestor may have filled one of North America's top predator roles before dinosaurs arrived on the continent. The "Carolina Butcher" was a nine-foot-long, land-dwelling crocodylomorph that walked on its hind legs and likely preyed upon smaller inhabitants of North Carolina ecosystems, such as armored reptiles and early mammal relatives.

Leafy Liverwort Gametophyte -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Leafy Liverwort Gametophyte

March 19, 2015 3:04 pm | News | Comments

This 125x photo of a leafy liverwort (Nowellia curvifolia) gametophyte that is berberine stained received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

Groovy Rings of Saturn -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute – click to enlarge

Groovy Rings of Saturn

March 18, 2015 10:53 am | by NASA | News | Comments

From afar, Saturn's rings look like a solid, homogenous disk of material. But, upon closer examination from Cassini, we see that there are varied structures in the rings at almost every scale imaginable.

Pea Aphid Embryo -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Pea Aphid Embryo

March 17, 2015 2:31 pm | News | Comments

This 40x photo of a pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) stage 17 embryo showing actin filaments (red), tubulin (green), nucleus (blue) and germ cells (white) received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

The alliance, funded by UPMC, will see its work carried out by Pitt-led and CMU-led centers, with participation from all three institutions.

University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon University, UPMC Form Alliance to Transform Healthcare through Big Data

March 17, 2015 2:19 pm | by UPMC | News | Comments

Today’s health care system generates massive amounts of data — electronic health records, diagnostic imaging, prescriptions, genomic profiles, insurance records, even data from wearable devices. Information has always been essential for guiding care, but computer tools now make it possible to use that data to provide deeper insights. Leveraging big data to revolutionize healthcare is the focus of the Pittsburgh Health Data Alliance.

Advertisement
Athens, Baltimore, Hong Kong, Miami: What are those people doing? A new evaluation method measures a computer’s ability to decipher movements, relationships, and implied intent from images by asking questions.

Visual Turing Test raises Bar on Computer Vision Benchmarks

March 16, 2015 12:39 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

Researchers from Brown and Johns Hopkins universities have come up with a new way to evaluate how well computers can divine information from images. The team describes its new system as a “visual Turing test,” after the legendary computer scientist Alan Turing’s test of the extent to which computers display human-like intelligence.

Image of a section of the brain shows the fusion of microscopy (pink area) and mass spectrometry (pixelated colors at bottom) to produce a detailed “map” of the distribution of proteins, lipids and other molecules within sharply delineated brain structure

Mass Spectrometry and Microscopy Blended with Regression Analysis

March 16, 2015 12:28 pm | by Bill Snyder, Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

Researchers have achieved the first “image fusion” of mass spectrometry and microscopy — a technical tour de force that could, among other things, dramatically improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Using a mathematical approach called regression analysis, they mapped each pixel of mass spectrometry data onto the corresponding spot on the microscopy image to produce a new, “predicted” image.

Hungary Mosaic Image -- Courtesy of Copernicus data/ESA – click to enlarge

Hungary Mosaic Image

March 16, 2015 9:44 am | by ESA | News | Comments

This image of Hungary, with the political border in white, is a mosaic of 11 scans by Sentinel-1A’s radar from October to December 2014. The scans were recorded in ‘dual polarization’ horizontal and vertical radar pulses, from which the artificial color composite was generated.

Rat Embryo -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Close-up: Rat Embryo

March 13, 2015 9:25 am | News | Comments

This 10x photo of a rat embryo fluorescently labeled with Rhodamine received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using epi-fluorescence.

Island of Hawaii seen from the International Space Station -- Courtesy of NASA/ESA/Samantha Cristoforetti – click to enlarge

Island of Hawaii seen from the International Space Station

March 12, 2015 12:19 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

From the International Space Station, European Space Agency astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti took this photograph of the island of Hawaii and posted it to social media on February 28, 2015. Cristoforetti wrote, "And suddenly as we flew over the Pacific... the island of #Hawaii with its volcanoes! #HelloEarth"

Advertisement
MATLAB 8.5 (R2015a) Numerical Computing Environment

MATLAB 8.5 (R2015a) Numerical Computing Environment

March 12, 2015 10:36 am | The Mathworks, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

MATLAB 8.5 is a high-level language and interactive environment used by engineers and scientists to explore and visualize ideas and to collaborate across disciplines, including signal and image processing, communications, control systems and computational finance.

The appearance of fractal patterns on the surface of cancer cells. Courtesy of M. Dokukin and I. Sokolov

Fractal Patterns Offer New Line of Attack on Cancer

March 11, 2015 2:19 pm | by Institute of Physics | News | Comments

Studying the intricate fractal patterns on the surface of cells could give researchers a new insight into the physical nature of cancer, and provide new ways of preventing the disease from developing. This is according to scientists who have, for the first time, shown how physical fractal patterns emerge on the surface of human cancer cells at a specific point of progression towards cancer.

Clam Shrimp Larva -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Clam Shrimp Larva

March 11, 2015 11:50 am | News | Comments

This 250x photo of clam shrimp larva received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using confocal microscopy.

Common Blue Butterfly -- Courtesy of Erk Dallmeyer – Click to enlarge

Common Blue Butterfly

March 10, 2015 12:39 pm | News | Comments

For the Common Blue (Polyommatus icarus), by far the most common Gossamer in Germany, collected data shows a statistically significant decline of population. Grassland butterfly populations have declined dramatically over the last two decades.

Seahorse Mobile Edition

Seahorse Mobile Edition

March 10, 2015 9:31 am | BSSN Software GmbH | Product Releases | Comments

Seahorse Scientific Workbench is a vendor-neutral software suite for capturing, analyzing and sharing analytical data. It consolidates raw and result data from multiple experimental techniques in a single tool, based on the emerging ASTM AnIML Data Standard. Seahorse Mobile delivers scientific data to mobile devices and supports chromatography (HPLC, GC), mass spectrometry, NMR, optical spectroscopy, microplate reader, bioreactor and fermenter, medical imaging and process chromatography data types.

Veil Nebula South-eastern Knot-- Courtesy of NASA/ESA/Hubble Heritage (STScI/AURA) - ESA/Hubble Collaboration. Acknowledgment: J. Hester (Arizona State Univ.) – click to enlarge

The Twisted Shockwaves of an Exploded Star

March 9, 2015 4:06 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

Discovered on September 5, 1784, by astronomer William Herschel, the Veil Nebula was once a star. Now, it is a twisted mass of shock waves that appears six times larger than the full Moon in the sky. This Hubble Space Telescope image shows just a small part of the nebula, a region known as the ‘south-eastern knot.’ The entire nebula is about 50 light years in radius, and is located almost 1500 light years away.

Some recent views of the Red Planet from the Visual Monitoring Camera, the "Mars Webcam" on board the Mars Express orbiter. Left: a clear view of the canyon, and all the way down to the south polar cap. Right: weather on the horizon. Courtesy of ESA/Mars

Mars Express Camera available for Public Imaging

March 9, 2015 3:53 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

Have you ever used a camera on board an interplanetary spacecraft? In May 2015, the ‘webcam’ on board Mars Express will be available for public imaging requests. ESA is inviting schools, science clubs and youth groups to submit proposals for one of eight opportunities to image another planet using the Visual Monitoring Camera on board Mars Express.

This computerized rendering shows a cutaway view of a collection of about 200 X-ray patterns, produced in an experiment at SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser. The images were combined to produce a 3-D rendering of an intact Mimivirus, a giant

Fantastic 3-D Images of Intact Infectious Virus Revealed

March 4, 2015 12:00 pm | by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory | News | Comments

For the first time, researchers have produced a 3-D image revealing part of the inner structure of an intact, infectious virus, using a unique X-ray laser. The virus, called Mimivirus, is in a curious class of “giant viruses” discovered just over a decade ago. The experiment establishes a new technique for reconstructing the 3-D structure of many types of biological samples from a series of X-ray laser snapshots.

An Ant’s Eye -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

An Ant’s Eye

March 3, 2015 3:00 pm | News | Comments

This 20x photo of an ant eye received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Noah Fram-Schwartz of Greenwich, CT, using reflected light.

Southern Tip of Phlegra Montes on Mars -- Courtesy of ESA/DLR/FU Berlin, CC BY-SA 3.0 IGO – click to enlarge

Southern Tip of Phlegra Montes on Mars

March 3, 2015 11:21 am | News | Comments

This color image shows the southernmost portion of Phlegra Montes on Mars, a complex system of isolated hills, ridges and small basins that spans over 1400 kilometers from the Elysium volcanic region at about 30ºN and deep into the northern lowlands at about 50°N.

Using a two-camera system, the researchers can capture images in stereo. That is, if you look at the center of the image and unfocus your eyes, the two images merge into one, creating the illusion of a three dimensional ice crystal. Courtesy of Cale Fallg

Incredible Snowflake Imaging Technology may Help Improve Road Safety

March 3, 2015 10:18 am | by National Science Foundation | News | Comments

The technology behind the camera that revealed the intricate, imperfect beauty of snowflakes is now able to expose their potential danger. About three years ago, a new high-speed camera captured free-falling ice crystals so well it might as well be yelling "freeze!" Now, a less expensive, hardier version with the same incredible capability has been designed for use by departments of transportation to anticipate road conditions.

Living Green Algae (Micrasterias) -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Close–up: Living Green Algae

March 2, 2015 12:20 pm | News | Comments

This 100x photo of living green algae in interference phase contrast received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using a light microscope and Interphako contrast.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading