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Living Green Algae (Micrasterias) -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Close–up: Living Green Algae

March 2, 2015 12:20 pm | News | Comments

This 100x photo of living green algae in interference phase contrast received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using a light microscope and Interphako contrast.

Ordinary QR Code Transformed into High-End Cybersecurity Application

March 2, 2015 11:21 am | by Colin Poitras, University of Connecticut | News | Comments

QR codes have been used to convey information about everything from cereals to cars and new...

Colors in the Cloud: Exploring the Colors of the Small Magellanic Cloud

February 27, 2015 3:02 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

Astronomical images often look like works of art. This picture of one of our nearest neighboring...

Supermassive Black Hole Discovered with Mass of 12 Billion Suns

February 27, 2015 11:46 am | by Christian Veillet and Daniel Stolte, Large Binocular Telescope Observatory, University of Arizona | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered the brightest quasar in the early universe, powered by the most...

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In this January 22, 2015, photo, Gentoo penguins stand on rocks near the Chilean station Bernardo O'Higgins, Antarctica. Here on the Antarctic peninsula, where the continent is warming the fastest because the land sticks out in the warmer ocean, 49 billio

The Big Melt: Antarctica's Retreating Ice May Re-shape Earth

February 27, 2015 10:48 am | by Luis Andres Henao and Seth Borenstein, Associated Press | News | Comments

From the ground in this extreme northern part of Antarctica, spectacularly white and blinding ice seems to extend forever. What can't be seen is the battle raging underfoot to re-shape Earth. Water is eating away at the Antarctic ice, melting it where it hits the oceans. As the ice sheets slowly thaw, water pours into the sea — 130 billion tons per year for the past decade. That's the weight of more than 356,000 Empire State Buildings.

Cardiovascular diseases are the largest cause of death in Europe and responsible for two million deaths per year. According to WHO, they are the number one cause of death in the world, accounting for 30 percent of deaths worldwide and 42 percent in the EU

Novel 3-D Computer Model brings Insight to Cardiovascular Diseases

February 26, 2015 12:56 pm | by Lappeenranta University of Technology, LUT | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a novel three-dimensional, multiscale and multicomponent model of the endothelial cell monolayer, the inner lining of the artery, to identify the cellular mechanisms involved in cardiovascular diseases. New research based on the model is able to identify the main cellular pathways involved in the initiation and progression of the disease.

Chicago in Winter -- Courtesy of NASA/ESA/Samantha Cristoforetti – click to enlarge

Chicago in Winter

February 26, 2015 9:46 am | News | Comments

From the International Space Station, astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti took this photograph of Chicago and posted it to social media. Crewmembers on the space station photograph the Earth from their unique point of view located 200 miles above the surface as part of the Crew Earth Observations program. Photographs record how the planet is changing over time.

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Sagittal Brain Slice Showing Cell Nuclei and Purkinije Cells -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Sagittal Brain Slice Showing Cell Nuclei and Purkinije Cells

February 25, 2015 11:33 am | News | Comments

This 40x photo shows a sagittal brain slice with cell nuclei and Purkinije cells expressing EGFP. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using confocal microscopy.

Tsunami impact map provides more precise estimates of the areas that might face tsunami-induced flooding.

Study Maps Major Tsunami Impact on Columbia River

February 24, 2015 12:19 pm | by Oregon State University | News | Comments

Engineers at Oregon State University have completed one of the most precise evaluations yet done about the impact of a major tsunami event on the Columbia River, what forces are most important in controlling water flow and what areas might be inundated.

Astronaut Barry Wilmore -- Courtesy of NASA – click to enlarge

Astronaut Barry Wilmore on First of Three Spacewalks

February 24, 2015 12:09 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA astronaut Barry Wilmore works outside the International Space Station on the first of three spacewalks preparing the station for future arrivals by U.S. commercial crew spacecraft, on February 21, 2015. Fellow spacewalker Terry Virts, seen reflected in the visor, shared this photograph on social media.

Ant Carrying its Larva

February 23, 2015 12:10 pm | News | Comments

This 5x photo of an ant carrying its larva received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using reflected light and focus stacking.

Conichalcite pseudomorph after azurite -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Mineral Close-up: Conichalcite Pseudomorph after Azurite

February 20, 2015 11:41 am | News | Comments

This 6x photo of a pseudomorph of conichalcite after azurite received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using transmitted light.

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In this April 25, 1979, file photo, Dr. Ernest Sternglass, a professor of radiological physics at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, talks about the dosimeters worn by workers and newsmen during the crisis at Three Mile Island, in Pittsburgh

Physicist whose Work Helped the World to See Armstrong's Historic First Steps Dies

February 20, 2015 8:42 am | by AP | News | Comments

Physicist Ernest Sternglass, whose research helped make it possible for the world to see the first moon walk, has died at age 91 of heart failure. His research helped lead to a sensitive television camera tube that captured low-light lunar action during the 1969 moon landing and U.S. astronaut Neil Armstrong's historic first steps.

Solar Dynamics: Curly-Q Filament Blast -- Courtesy of Solar Dynamics Observatory, NASA

Solar Dynamics: Curly-Q Filament Blast

February 19, 2015 11:04 am | by NASA | News | Comments

A solar filament erupted from the sun in the shape of a twisted arch, and the activity in the lower corona was caught in a wavelength of extreme ultraviolet light. The event occurred over a three-hour period on February 4, 2015, with most of the filament falling back into the Sun. Filaments are notoriously unstable.

Comet Lovejoy, the Pleiades and the California Nebula -- Courtesy of P. Horálek/ESO – Click to enlarge

Nightfall Raises the Curtain: Celestial Nomad Takes Center Stage

February 18, 2015 12:40 pm | by ESO | News | Comments

In this new ESO image, nightfall raises the curtain on a theatrical display taking place in the cloudless skies over La Silla. In a scene humming with activity, the major players captured here are Comet Lovejoy, glowing green in the center of the image; the Pleiades above and to the right; and the California Nebula, providing some contrast in the form of a red arc of gas directly to the right of Lovejoy.

Rotifer showing mouth interior and heart-shaped corona -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

1st Place Winner: Rotifer Showing Mouth Interior and Heart-shaped Corona

February 17, 2015 3:30 pm | News | Comments

This 40x photo of a rotifer shows the mouth interior and heart-shaped corona. It won 1st Place in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using differential interference contrast.

Original Caption Released with Image: These six narrow-angle color images were made from the first ever 'portrait' of the solar system taken by Voyager 1, which was more than 4 billion miles from Earth and about 32 degrees above the ecliptic. The spacecra

Pale Blue Dot Images Turn 25

February 17, 2015 2:21 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Valentine's Day is special for NASA's Voyager mission. It was on February 14, 1990, that the Voyager 1 spacecraft looked back at our solar system and snapped the first-ever pictures of the planets from its perch at that time beyond Neptune. This "family portrait" captures Neptune, Uranus, Saturn, Jupiter, Earth and Venus from Voyager 1's unique vantage point.

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3-D marine seascapes are zoned using statistical analysis to identify distinct geomorphological terrains.

Biodiversity Hotspots found by Mapping Seascapes in the Deep Ocean

February 17, 2015 2:05 pm | by National Oceanography Centre | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new, automated method for classifying hundreds of kilometers of the deep sea floor, in a way that is more cost efficient, quicker and more objective than previously possible, estimating geographic distribution of life on the sea floor using a combination of submarine mapping technology, statistics and a landscape ecology technique called Niche Theory.

Las Vegas and Lake Mead - Courtesy of USGS/ESA

Las Vegas and Lake Mead

February 13, 2015 3:51 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

This image from the Landsat-8 satellite acquired on September 23, 2014, brings us over the southwest United States: Nevada and Arizona. Las Vegas with its grid-like urban plan is visible near the center. Sitting in a basin of the Mojave Desert, the city is surrounded by a number of mountain ranges.

Little Sombrero an Edge-on Galaxy -- Courtesy of ESA/Hubble & NASA; Acknowledgement: Josh Barrington

Little Sombrero an Edge-on Galaxy

February 13, 2015 10:47 am | by NASA | News | Comments

Galaxies can take many shapes and be oriented any way relative to us in the sky. This can make it hard to figure out their actual morphology, as a galaxy can look very different from different viewpoints. A special case is when we are lucky enough to observe a spiral galaxy directly from its edge, providing us with a spectacular view like this one.

Active Fluid Flow around a Coral Polyp -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Active Fluid Flow around a Coral Polyp

February 12, 2015 12:56 pm | News | Comments

This 4x photo shows active fluid flow around a coral polyp (P. damicornis). It won 6th Place in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using fluorescence and autofluorescence.

Space Station Flyover -- Courtesy of NASA/ESA/Samantha Cristoforetti

Space Station Flyover: Gulf of Aden and Horn of Africa

February 11, 2015 11:44 am | by ESA | News | Comments

European Space Agency astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti, who is working and living on the International Space Station as part of Italy’s Futura mission, took this photograph from the International Space Station. Cristoforetti wrote, "A spectacular flyover of the Gulf of Aden and the Horn of Africa. #HelloEarth"

Rotifer Actively Feeding -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

A Rotifer Actively Feeding

February 10, 2015 12:20 pm | News | Comments

This 417x photo shows a rotifer (Conochilus unicornis) actively feeding — this rotifer species forms a free floating spherical colony. It won 13th Placein the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using differential interference contrast.

Curiosity Rover at Pahrump Hills -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona

Curiosity Rover at Pahrump Hills

February 9, 2015 11:30 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA's Curiosity Mars rover can be seen at the "Pahrump Hills" area of Gale Crater in this view from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Pahrump Hills is an outcrop at the base of Mount Sharp. The region contains sedimentary rocks that scientists believe formed in the presence of water.

Three moons and their shadows parade across Jupiter — comparison of beginning and end of sequence. Courtesy of NASA, ESA, Hubble Heritage Team

Hubble Captures Rare Triple Moon Transit of Jupiter

February 9, 2015 11:02 am | by Hubble Space Telescope | News | Comments

New NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope images capture a rare occurrence, as three of Jupiter’s largest moons parade across the giant gas planet’s banded face. Hubble took a string of images of the event which show the three satellites — Europa, Callisto and Io — in action. The planet's four moons can commonly be seen transiting the face of Jupiter. However, seeing three of them transiting at the same time is rare.

Portugal’s Capital, Lisbon, from Space -- Courtesy of Copernicus/ESA

Portugal’s Capital, Lisbon, from Space

February 6, 2015 3:42 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

This image from Sentinel-1A’s radar shows the metropolitan area of Portugal’s capital, Lisbon. Flowing in from the upper-right corner is the Tagus River. Originating in central Spain, the Tagus is the longest river on the Iberian Peninsula, stretching over 1,000 kilometers. The river flows west through Portugal, emptying into the Atlantic Ocean at Lisbon

Three Transgenic Kidneys Cultured Together -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Three Transgenic Kidneys Cultured Together

February 5, 2015 3:46 pm | News | Comments

This 20x photo of three transgenic kidneys cultured together shows colliding, branching collecting duct systems. It won 16th Place in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using confocal microscopy.

A new way of streaming high-resolution, full-color full-parallax three-dimensional (3D) hologram videos may have applications in the entertainment and medical imaging industries. © 2015 A*STAR Data Storage Institute

Streaming Full-color Moving Holograms in High Resolution

February 4, 2015 3:30 pm | by A*STAR | News | Comments

3-D movies, which require viewers to wear stereoscopic glasses, have become very popular in recent years. However, the 3-D effect produced by the glasses cannot provide perfect depth cues. Furthermore, it is not possible to move one’s head and observe that objects appear different from different angles. Now, researchers have developed a new way of generating high-resolution, full-color, 3-D videos that uses holographic technology.

Cloud Streets in the Bering Sea -- Courtesy of NASA/Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA GSFC

Cloud Streets in the Bering Sea

February 4, 2015 11:21 am | by NASA | News | Comments

Ice, wind, cold temperatures and ocean waters combined to created dramatic cloud formations over the Bering Sea in late January, 2015. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite passed over the region and captured this true-color image on January 23.

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