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Live Human Mesothelial Cell -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Live Human Mesothelial Cell

June 30, 2015 12:33 pm | News | Comments

This 600X image shows a live cultured human mesothelial cell activated to produce hyaluronan. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope and was taken using confocal microscopy.

Stars forming in the Taurus Molecular Cloud

June 26, 2015 4:57 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

The intricate jumble depicted in this image from ESA’s Herschel space observatory shows the...

Tactical Toss Camera sends Panoramic Images Back to Smartphone

June 26, 2015 11:18 am | by Rob Matheson, MIT | News | Comments

Unseen areas are troublesome for police and first responders: Rooms can harbor dangerous gunmen...

Live Zebrafish Embryo

June 26, 2015 10:33 am | News | Comments

The image shows an entire live zebrafish embryo at 22 hours post-fertilization and single-cell...

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Wandering Jew Leaf Stomata -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Wandering Jew Leaf Stomata

June 25, 2015 8:20 am | News | Comments

This 40x image of wandering jew leaf stomata — pores found in the epidermis that control gas exchange — received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photograph was taken using brightfield, epi illumination and image stacking.

LISA Pathfinder Electrode Housing Box -- Courtesy of CGS SpA -- Click to enlarge

Best Free-fall Ever: LISA Pathfinder Electrode Housing Box

June 24, 2015 1:56 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

This photo, suggestive of an old-fashioned lift cage, shows a much smaller enclosure: an electrode housing box that will fly on ESA’s LISA Pathfinder mission. The inside measures 5.5 centimeters on each side. The mission is a technology demonstrator that will pave the way for future space-based observatories measuring gravitational waves — ripples in the fabric of space-time predicted by Einstein’s general theory of relativity.

Satellite View of San Francisco Bay Area -- Courtesy of USGS/ESA – click to enlarge

Satellite View of San Francisco Bay Area

June 23, 2015 10:25 am | by ESA | News | Comments

Landsat-8 captured this image of the San Francisco Bay Area in California on March 5, 2015. The city of San Francisco is on a peninsula in the center left of the image. In the upper-central portion, we can see the delta of the Sacramento and San Joaquin rivers with brown, sediment-filled water flowing down into the larger bay. Starting in the top-left corner of the image and running diagonally to the south is the San Andreas Fault.

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Hot Lava Flows Discovered on Venus

June 23, 2015 9:34 am | by ESA | News | Comments

Some models of planetary evolution suggest that Venus was resurfaced in a cataclysmic flood of lava around half a billion years ago. But whether Venus is active today has remained a hot topic in planetary science. ESA’s Venus Express, which completed its eight-year study of the planet last year, conducted a range of observations at different wavelengths to address this important question.

Night-shining Clouds -- Courtesy of NASA Earth Observatory map by Joshua Stevens, using Polar Mesospheric Cloud data from the University of Colorado Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics – click to enlarge

Night-shining Clouds created when Ice Crystals form on Meteor Dust

June 20, 2015 9:51 am | by Mike Carlowicz, NASA | News | Comments

In the late spring and summer, unusual clouds form high in the atmosphere above the polar regions of the world. As the lower atmosphere warms, the upper atmosphere gets cooler, and ice crystals form on meteor dust and other particles high in the sky. The result is noctilucent or “night-shining” clouds — electric blue wisps that grow on the edge of space.

Researchers used high-resolution microscopy to examine owl feathers in fine detail. They observed that the flight feathers on an owl’s wing have a downy covering, which resembles a forest canopy when viewed from above. In addition to this fluffy canopy, o

How Owls could help make Computer Fans Quieter

June 20, 2015 9:46 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

A newly-designed material, which mimics the wing structure of owls, could help make wind turbines, computer fans and even planes much quieter. Early wind tunnel tests of the coating have shown a substantial reduction in noise without any noticeable effect on aerodynamics.

Applied Mathematician Theorizes what Happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — June 12-18

June 19, 2015 2:35 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

The top most-visited stories of the past week included an amazing image of Jupiter’s second largest moon, solving billions of equations in just minutes, relief and delight as Philae woke up, Einstein saving the Quantum Cat, a fundamental change in wireless communications, a 40-year-old algorithm problem put to rest, news that a black hole’s surface is no deadly firewall, and an applied mathematician’s theory on MA flight 370.

Close-up: Water Flea -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Close-up: Water Flea

June 19, 2015 11:37 am | News | Comments

This 20x image of a water flea received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photograph was taken using a darkfield technique.

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Cat’s Lip Cross Section

June 18, 2015 2:21 pm | News | Comments

This 6.25x image is an antique slide featuring cat lip section, showing capillary bed of hairs, whiskers and musculature. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photograph was taken using transmitted light with partially crossed polars and a retarder.

For several years now, researchers have been investigating techniques for amplifying movements captured by video but indiscernible to the human eye. Earlier this month, they presented a new version of the algorithm that can amplify small motions even when

Video-Processing Algorithm Amplifies Small Motions in Large Motions

June 17, 2015 1:49 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

For several years now, researchers have been investigating techniques for amplifying movements captured by video but indiscernible to the human eye. Earlier this month, they presented a new version of the algorithm that can amplify small motions even when they’re contained within objects executing large motions.

Iridescent Mercury: An Ethereal, Colorful View of Our Innermost Planet -- Courtesy of NASA / JHU Applied Physics Lab / Carnegie Inst. Washington – click to enlarge

Iridescent Mercury: An Ethereal, Colorful View of Our Innermost Planet

June 16, 2015 8:56 am | by ESA | News | Comments

To the human eye, Mercury may resemble a dull, grey orb but this enhanced-color image from NASA’s Messenger probe, tells a completely different story. Swathes of iridescent blue, sandy-colored plains and delicate strands of greyish white, create an ethereal and colorful view of our Solar System’s innermost planet. These contrasting colors have been chosen to emphasize the differences in the composition of the landscape across the planet.

Oculus Founder Palmer Luckey holds up the new Oculus Touch input device for the Rift virtual reality headset during a news conference June 11, 2015, in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

Oculus expanding Virtual-Reality Headset to Simulate Touch, Gestures

June 15, 2015 3:28 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Oculus is expanding its virtual-reality headset to simulate the sensation of touch and gesturing as part of its quest to blur the lines between the fake and genuine world. The touch controllers are designed to enable people to pick up guns, throw Frisbees or carry out other actions within the fantasy scenes they see through the Rift virtual reality headset.

This photograph of the Florida Straits and Grand Bahama Bank was taken during the Gemini IV mission during orbit no. 19, on June 4, 1965, with a Hasselblad camera and a 70mm lens. The Gemini IV crew — astronauts Jim McDivitt and Ed White — conducted scien

Florida Straits and Grand Bahama Bank

June 15, 2015 3:01 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

This photograph of the Florida Straits and Grand Bahama Bank was taken during the Gemini IV mission during orbit no. 19, on June 4, 1965, with a Hasselblad camera and a 70mm lens. The Gemini IV crew — astronauts Jim McDivitt and Ed White — conducted scientific experiments, including photography of Earth's weather and terrain, for the remainder of their four-day mission following White's historic first American spacewalk on June 3.

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Escherichia Coli Colonies

June 12, 2015 4:41 pm | by CDC | News | Comments

These are colonies of Escherichia coli bacteria grown on a Hektoen enteric (HE) agar plate medium; colonies of E. coli grown on HE agar display a raised morphology, and are yellow to orange-yellow in coloration.

This November 14, 1969, photo shows Jack King in the Firing Room of the Kennedy Space Center's Launch Control Center in Cape Canaveral during the countdown for Apollo 12, the second lunar landing mission. King, the NASA public affairs official who counted

Voice of Apollo 11 Moon Shot, Jack King, Dies

June 12, 2015 4:29 pm | by Marcia Dunn, AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

Jack King, a NASA public affairs official who became the voice of the Apollo moon shots, has died. He was 84. King counted down the historic launch of Apollo 11 on July 16, 1969. He also did the countdown for hundreds of the early rocket launches, including the two-man Gemini missions and many other Apollo missions.

Computer Vision Breakthrough: Merlin taps Powerful AI to ID Birds from Photos

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — June 5-11

June 12, 2015 3:39 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

In case you missed it, here's another chance to catch this week's biggest hits. Software and “Moore’s Drumbeat,” CFD scalability at 64,000 cores, experiencing “Pluto Time,” the first LightSail images, why legendary racer John McGuinness is so fast, whether RAID is dead or alive, a computer operating on water droplets, and a breakthrough for computer vision are among the latest top stories.

A hawkmoth clings to a robotic flower used to study the insect’s ability to track the moving flower under low-light conditions. The research shows that the creatures can slow their brains to improve vision under low

Infrared Cameras, Robotic Flowers Reveal Hawkmoth Secrets

June 11, 2015 4:48 pm | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

It's difficult enough to see things in the dark, but what if you also had to hover in mid-air while tracking a flower moving in the wind? That's the challenge the hummingbird-sized hawkmoth (Manduca sexta) must overcome while feeding on the nectar of its favorite flowers.

Jewel Beetle Carapace -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlargeThis 450x photo shows a jewel beetle (Chrysochroa buqueti) carapace, near the eye. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Sma

Jewel Beetle Carapace

June 11, 2015 4:13 pm | News | Comments

This 450x photo shows a jewel beetle (Chrysochroa buqueti) carapace, near the eye. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photograph was taken using diffused, reflected illumination.

This 20x photo shows chlorophyll fluorescence of the symbiotic zooxanthellae (dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium) living inside the cells of a sea anemone (Aiptasia pallida). It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photo

Symbiotic Algae Living inside the Cells of a Sea Anemone

June 11, 2015 8:50 am | News | Comments

This 20x photo shows chlorophyll fluorescence of the symbiotic zooxanthellae (dinoflagellate algae of the genus Symbiodinium) living inside the cells of a sea anemone (Aiptasia pallida). It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

LightSail captured this image of its deployed solar sails in Earth orbit on June 8, 2015. The Planetary Society

LightSail Test Mission Declared Success, First Image Complete

June 10, 2015 2:03 pm | by Jason Davis, The Planetary Society | News | Comments

The Planetary Society’s LightSail test mission successfully completed its primary objective of deploying a solar sail in low-Earth orbit, mission managers said on June 9, 2015. During a ground station pass over Cal Poly San Luis Obispo, the final pieces of an image showcasing LightSail’s deployed solar sails were received on Earth. The image confirms the sails have unfurled, which was the final milestone of a shakedown mission.

Fusion of Melted Nylon and Polyester Fibers -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World -- 2014 Nikon Small World Honorable Mention -- Click to enlarge

Fusion of Melted Nylon and Polyester Fibers

June 10, 2015 11:16 am | News | Comments

This 400x photo shows the fusion of melted nylon and polyester fibers, recovered from the hood of a vehicle that was in a motor vehicle versus pedestrian collision. It received an honorable mention in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

The near-to-eye display with see-through functionality facilitates a small, unobtrusive design. © Fraunhofer IOF

Small, Discreet Data Glasses also Correct for Farsightedness

June 9, 2015 9:56 am | by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft | News | Comments

Data glasses tend to be chunky, unstylish objects, so it’s no wonder they haven’t caught on among general consumers. Researchers have now developed a technology that allows specs to be made in small, unobtrusive designs. The new glasses also correct for farsightedness. While commercially available data glasses often project the image on the edge of the field of view, users of the new model see information precisely where context dictates.

Soyuz TMA-15M Spacecraft – courtesy of ESA/NASA – click to enlarge

Soyuz TMA-15M Spacecraft to Head Home this Week

June 9, 2015 8:52 am | by ESA | News | Comments

Soyuz TMA-15M launched successfully aboard a Soyuz-FG rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan November 23, 2014. The spacecraft reached low Earth orbit approximately nine minutes after lift-off. After executing rendezvous maneuvers, it docked with the International Space Station on November 24. Soyuz TMA-15M has remained docked to the ISS, serving as an emergency escape vehicle and  waiting for its return flight to Earth.

It’s always Pluto Time somewhere, and NASA wants to see your view, using a new interactive widget that provides the approximate time, based on your location.

NASA Lets You Experience “Pluto Time” with New Interactive Widget

June 8, 2015 2:24 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Just how dim is the sunlight on Pluto, some three billion miles away?  While sunlight is much weaker than it is here on Earth, it isn’t as dark as you might expect. In fact, for just a moment during dawn and dusk each day, the illumination on Earth matches that of high noon on Pluto. We call this “Pluto Time”. If you go outside at this time on a clear day, the world around you will be as dim as the surface of Pluto.

Infrared light enters this silicon structure from the left. The cut-out patterns, determined by an algorithm, route two different frequencies of this light into the pathways on the right. This is a greatly magnified image of a working device that is about

Bringing Optical Data Transport Closer to Replacing Wires

June 8, 2015 2:20 pm | by Tom Abate, Stanford University | News | Comments

Stanford engineer Jelena Vuckovic wants to make computers faster and more efficient by reinventing how they send data back and forth between chips, where the work is done. A new process could revolutionize computing by making it practical to use light instead of electricity to carry data inside computers, miniaturizing the proven technology of the Internet, which moves data by beaming photons of light through fiber optic threads.

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