Advertisement
Imaging
Subscribe to Imaging

The Lead

Researchers have developed 3-D maps of the age of the ice within the Greenland Ice Sheet. The new research will help scientists determine what may happen to the ice sheet as the climate changes.

3-D View of Greenland Ice Sheet Opens Window on History

January 26, 2015 3:53 pm | by Jackson School of Geosciences | News | Comments

Scientists using ice-penetrating radar data collected by NASA’s Operation IceBridge and earlier airborne campaigns have built the first comprehensive map of layers deep inside the Greenland Ice Sheet, opening a window on past climate conditions and the ice sheet’s potentially perilous future. This allows scientists to determine the age of large swaths of the second largest mass of ice on Earth.

First-of-its-kind Software Enables Major Breakthrough in Reading Ancient Scrolls

January 26, 2015 2:39 pm | by University of Kentucky | News | Comments

After working for more than 10 years on unlocking an ancient piece of history, what lies inside...

Jupiter’s Cratered Moon Callisto

January 26, 2015 11:08 am | by European Space Agency (ESA) | News | Comments

The speckled object depicted here is Callisto, Jupiter’s second largest moon. This image was...

Holographic Computing will allow Scientists to Work on Mars

January 23, 2015 2:24 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA and Microsoft have teamed up to develop software called OnSight, a new technology that will...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

The Brightest Comet in Earth's Sky -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

The Brightest Comet in Earth's Sky

January 23, 2015 1:55 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Comet C/2014 Q2 (Lovejoy) is one of more than 32 comets imaged by NASA's NEOWISE mission from December 2013 to December 2014. This image combines a series of observations made in November 2013, when Lovejoy was 1.7 astronomical units from the sun. The image spans half of one degree. It shows the comet moving in a mostly west and slightly south direction.

In April 2014, researchers flew over a site in southwest Greenland to find that a sub-glacial lake had drained away. This photo shows the crater left behind, as well as a deep crack in the ice. Photo by Stephen Price, Los Alamos National Lab, courtesy of

Two Mysterious Lakes beneath Greenland Ice Sheet Gone within Weeks

January 22, 2015 2:38 pm | by Pam Frost Gorder, The Ohio State University | News | Comments

Researchers who are building the highest-resolution map of the Greenland Ice Sheet to date have made a surprising discovery: two lakes of meltwater that pooled beneath the ice and rapidly drained away. One lake once held billions of gallons of water and emptied to form a mile-wide crater in just a few weeks. The other lake has filled and emptied twice in the last two years.

Micro Algae -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Micro Algae

January 22, 2015 2:08 pm | News | Comments

This 40x photo of micro algae won 17th Place in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Rogelio Moreno of Panama using polarized light and lambda plate.

Advertisement
Training for Spacewalks – Courtesy of ESA

Training for Spacewalks at NASA's Johnson Space Center

January 21, 2015 12:34 pm | News | Comments

European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Pesquet training for spacewalks at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, USA, with ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano. Pesquet will fly to the International Space Station in 2016. Parmitano finished his six-month Volare mission in November 2013.

Venus’ south pole -- Courtesy of ESA/VIRTIS/INAF-IASF/Obs. de Paris-LESIA/Univ. Oxford

Venus Express Snaps Swirling Vortex

January 20, 2015 2:09 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

This ghostly puff of smoke is actually a mass of swirling gas and cloud at Venus’ south pole, as seen by the Visible and Infrared Thermal Imaging Spectrometer aboard ESA’s Venus Express spacecraft. Venus has a very choppy and fast-moving atmosphere — although wind speeds are sluggish at the surface, they reach dizzying speeds of around 400 km/h at the altitude of the cloud tops, some 70 km above the surface.

Mouse Brain Vasculature -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Mouse Brain Vasculature

January 16, 2015 2:14 pm | News | Comments

This 2x photo of mouse brain vasculature won 14th Place in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using light-sheet fluorescent microscopy.

Billboards of the future could show astonishing 3-D effects — due to a new technology developed in Austria. Courtesy of TriLite

Huge 3-D Displays can be seen without 3-D Glasses

January 16, 2015 10:53 am | by Vienna University of Technology | News | Comments

Public screenings have become an important part of major sports events. In the future, we will be able to enjoy them in 3-D, thanks to a new invention. A sophisticated laser system sends laser beams into different directions. Therefore, different pictures are visible from different angles. The angular resolution is so fine that the left eye is presented a different picture than the right one, creating a 3-D effect

Developing a more efficient vision system for household robots. Courtesy of Christine Daniloff and Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

MIT Algorithm Helps Household Robots Identify Items Concealed in Clutter

January 15, 2015 9:49 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

For household robots to be practical, they need to be able to recognize the objects they’re supposed to manipulate. While object recognition is one of the most widely studied topics in AI, even the best detectors still fail much of the time. Researchers believe the robots should take advantage of their mobility, imaging objects from multiple perspectives. Matching up objects in the different images, however, poses computational challenges.

Advertisement
Jewel Beetle Carapace -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Jewel Beetle Carapace

January 15, 2015 9:08 am | News | Comments

This 45x photo shows a jewel beetle (Chrysochroa buqueti) carapace near the eye. It won 15th Placein the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using diffused and reflected illumination.

DVD Reader Circuitry -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

DVD Reader Circuitry

January 14, 2015 11:21 am | News | Comments

This 100x photo shows the circuitry in a DVD reader. It won 7th Place in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using cross-polarized microscopy.

Jumping Spider Eyes -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Jumping Spider Eyes

January 13, 2015 11:29 am | News | Comments

This 20x photo shows jumping spider eyes. It won 3rd Placein the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken by Noah Fram-Schwartz of Greenwich, CT, using reflected light.

Map of diffuse interstellar bands Courtesy of T.W. Lan, G. Zasowski, B. Ménard, SDSS and 2MASS/UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF

Astronomers Map Mysterious Molecules in our Galaxy

January 12, 2015 10:20 am | by Phil Sneiderman, Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

By analyzing the light of hundreds of thousands of celestial objects, astronomers have created a unique map of enigmatic molecules in our galaxy that are responsible for puzzling features in the light from stars, called diffuse interstellar bands. DIBs have been a mystery ever since they were discovered in 1922 — exactly which of the many thousands of possible molecules are responsible for these features?

Montana Dryhead Agate -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Montana Dryhead Agate

January 12, 2015 9:21 am | News | Comments

This 50x photo shows an unpolished Montana Dryhead agate, found in southern Montana between the Big Horn and Pryor Mountain ranges and just to the west of the Big Horn River. It won 12th Placein the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using axial lighting provided by Leeds fiberoptic illuminators.

Advertisement
Scarlet Pimpernel Flower -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Scarlet Pimpernel Flower

January 9, 2015 11:52 am | News | Comments

This 80x photo shows a scarlet pimpernel flower. It won 18th Place in the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using macroscopy.

Parsley Ovary -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Parsley Ovary

January 8, 2015 2:30 pm | News | Comments

This 63x photo shows a parsley (Petroselinum crispum) ovary fixed and stained to reveal lectins (red) and nuclei (blue). It won 9th Placein the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using confocal laser scanning microscopy.

A bundle of nerves that relays information from touch receptors on the skin to the spinal cord and ultimately the brain, imaged with the new technique. Courtesy of EMBL/L.Castaldi -- Click to enlarge

Unprecedentedly Detailed Image of Mouse Neurons

January 7, 2015 12:48 pm | by European Molecular Biology Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists can now explore nerves in mice in much greater detail than ever before, thanks to an approach developed by scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. The work enables researchers to easily use artificial tags, broadening the range of what they can study and vastly increasing image resolution.

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has taken a bigger and sharper photograph of the iconic Eagle Nebula's "Pillars of Creation," shown at right. The original 1995 Hubble image of the gaseous towers, taken with Hubble’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2, is shown a

Evocative New High-Def Views of Iconic Pillars of Creation

January 6, 2015 1:50 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Although Hubble has taken many breathtaking images of the universe, one snapshot stands out from the rest: the iconic view of the so-called Pillars of Creation. The jaw-dropping 1995 photo revealed never-before-seen details of giant columns of cold gas bathed in the scorching UV light from a cluster of young, massive stars. In celebration of its 25th anniversary, Hubble has revisited the pillars, providing a sharper, wider view.

A heat map of a home captured by one of Essess' thermal-imaging cars. Courtesy of Essess

Drive-by Heat Mapping: Thermal Imaging Tracks Energy Leaks in Thousands of Homes

January 6, 2015 12:04 pm | by Rob Matheson, MIT | News | Comments

In 2007, Google unleashed a fleet of cars with roof-mounted cameras to provide street-level images of roads around the world. Now, an MIT spinout is bringing similar drive-by innovations to energy efficiency by deploying cars with thermal-imaging rooftop rigs that create heat maps of thousands of homes and buildings per hour, detecting fixable leaks in building envelopes — windows, doors, walls and foundations — to help curb energy loss.

The 2.5-meter-long underwater drone is ready to be launched through the hole in the sea ice. Courtesy of Lars Chresten Lund Hansen

Underwater Drones lead Antarctic Exploration into New Epoch

January 5, 2015 1:12 pm | by Signe Høgslund & Peter Bondo Christensen, Aarhus University | News | Comments

Splash. A Weddell seal weighing almost 500 kilograms lands inside the tent and blocks the hole laboriously sawn out by researchers in the two-meter-thick ice to launch drones under the sea ice. The tent is lovely and warm. Outside, the thermometer shows -15 degrees. The seal finally glides back into the water, and the researchers have access to the open water. The advanced technology drone is carefully lowered into the icy cold sea.

Common Brine Shrimp Appendages -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Common Brine Shrimp Appendages

January 5, 2015 12:47 pm | News | Comments

This 100x photo of the appendages of a common brine shrimp won 8th Placein the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It taken using confocal microscopy.

Close-up: Acorn Worm Larvae -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Acorn Worm Larvae

January 2, 2015 2:24 pm | News | Comments

This 10x photo of the larval stage of the acorn worm Balanoglossus misakiensis, dorsal view, shows cell borders, muscles and apical eye spots. It won 19th Placein the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken by Dr. Sabrina Kaul of theUniversity of Vienna, Austria, using confocal microscopy.

House cricket's tongue -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

House Cricket's Tongue

December 24, 2014 11:36 am | News | Comments

This 25x photo of a house cricket's tongue won 11th Placein the 2014 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Stefano Barone of Cremona, Italy, using Rheinberg illumination.

Rice University graduate student Sidong Lei displays a three-pixel prototype made with atomically thin layers of CIS. The new material developed at Rice shows promise for two-dimensional electronics. Courtesy of Jeff Fitlow/Rice University

Ultrathin, Transparent and Flexible, 2-D Materials could lead to Thinnest-ever Imaging Devices

December 24, 2014 11:26 am | by Rice University | News | Comments

An atomically thin material may lead to the thinnest-ever imaging platform. Synthetic two-dimensional materials based on metal chalcogenide compounds could be the basis for super-thin devices, according to Rice University researchers. Although one such material, copper indium selenide, shows extraordinary promise.

VuePod allows users to virtually fly over, wander through or hover above 3-D environments that are otherwise difficult to visit. The images are created by point data from aircraft equipped with LIDAR.

3-D Virtual Reality Powerful Enough for Gamer, Made for Engineer

December 22, 2014 4:55 pm | by Brigham Young University | News | Comments

It’s like a scene from a gamer’s wildest dreams: 12 high-definition, 55-inch 3-D televisions all connected to a computer capable of supporting high-end, graphics-intensive gaming. On the massive screen, images are controlled by a Wii remote that interacts with a Kinnect-like Bluetooth device (called SmartTrack), while 3-D glasses worn by the user create dizzying added dimensions.

The Internet Archives Book Images Project was launched to catalog the imagery from half a millennium of books.

Unlocking the Imagery of 500 Years of Books

December 22, 2014 4:49 pm | by Library of Congress | Blogs | Comments

Over 14.7 million images were extracted from over 600 million pages covering an enormous variety of topics and stretching back to the year 1500. Yet, perhaps what is most remarkable about this montage is that these images come not from some newly-unearthed archive being seen for the first time, but rather from the books we have been digitizing for the past decade that have been resting in our digital libraries.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading