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A 3-D image of the researchers' study site in Malaysian Borneo using drone data and a photo of the Sensefly eBee drone up close. Courtesy of Trends in Parasitology, Fornace et al.

Drones Help Map Spread of Infectious Disease

October 24, 2014 5:07 pm | by Cell Press | News | Comments

Unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, can collect detailed information in real time at relatively low cost for ecological research. In a new Opinion piece published in the Cell Press journal Trends in Parasitology, experts demonstrate that drones can be used to understand how environmental factors influence the spread of infectious diseases.

Significant Solar Flare in Extreme Ultraviolet

October 24, 2014 3:35 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The sun emitted a significant solar flare on October 19, 2014, peaking at 1:01 a.m. EDT. NASA's...

NASA Rover Opportunity Captured Images of Comet Siding Spring

October 23, 2014 3:56 pm | by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory | News | Comments

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity captured images of a comet passing much closer to Mars...

Imaging Extremely Distant Galaxies to Create New Window on Early Universe

October 23, 2014 3:18 pm | by University of Bonn | News | Comments

Scientists at the Universities of Bonn and Cardiff see good times approaching for...

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Composite Cross-cut -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Composite Cross-cut

October 23, 2014 9:42 am | News | Comments

This 50X photo shows cross-cut through an assembly of two dark-brown fiber-reinforced composite pieces, which are bonded together with gray adhesive and back-filled with a blue mass of composite material. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using reflected light and darkfield.

Freshwater Flea -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Freshwater Flea Close-up

October 22, 2014 10:58 am | News | Comments

This 200X photo shows the freshwater flea Daphnia magna. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using differential interference contrast and image stacking.

One Euro Coin -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: One Euro Coin

October 21, 2014 10:43 am | News | Comments

This 10X photo shows the surface details of a one euro coin. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using confocal reflection microscopy, Z-stacking and maximum intensity projection.

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The robot has a friction crawler-based drive system (such as the one in war tanks), ideal for all types of terrain. It also has motion sensors, cameras, a laser and an infrared system, allowing it to rebuild the environment and, thereby, find paths or cre

Robot Scans Rubble, Recognizes Humans in Disaster Situations

October 21, 2014 9:35 am | by Investigación y Desarrollo | News | Comments

Through a computational algorithm, researchers have developed a neural network that allows a small robot to detect different patterns, such as images, fingerprints, handwriting, faces, bodies, voice frequencies and DNA sequences. Nancy Guadalupe Arana Daniel focused on the recognition of human silhouettes in disaster situations.

Hurricane Gonzalo -- Courtesy of Alexander Gerst/ESA/NASA

Major Hurricane Gonzalo Approaches Bermuda

October 20, 2014 9:19 am | by NASA | News | Comments

This image of Hurricane Gonzalo was taken from the International Space Station by European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst on October 16, 2014. In addition to the crew Earth observations from the space station, NASA and NOAA satellites provided continuous coverage of Hurricane Gonzalo as it moved toward Bermuda.

A sketch (not to scale) showing axions (blue) streaming out from the Sun, converting in the Earth's magnetic field (red) into X-rays (orange), which are then detected by the XMM-Newton observatory.  Copyright: University of Leicester

Dark Matter: Inexplicable Signal from Unseen Universe Provides Tantalizing Clue

October 17, 2014 12:08 pm | by University of Leicester | News | Comments

A cutting-edge paper has provided the first potential indication of direct detection of Dark Matter — something that has been a mystery in physics for over 30 years. Space scientists at the University of Leicester have detected a curious signal in the X-ray sky — one that provides a tantalizing insight into the nature of mysterious Dark Matter.

IceBridge DMS L0 Raw Courtesy of the Digital Mapping System (DMS) team/NASA DAAC at the National Snow and Ice Data Center

Operation IceBridge Turns Five

October 17, 2014 9:45 am | by Kathryn Hansen, NASA | News | Comments

In May 2014, two new studies concluded that a section of the land-based West Antarctic ice sheet had reached a point of inevitable collapse. Meanwhile, fresh observations from September 2014 showed sea ice around Antarctica had reached its greatest extent since the late 1970s. To better understand such dynamic and dramatic differences in the region's land and sea ice, researchers are travelling south to Antarctica.

Milky Way Glitters Brightly -- Courtesy of ESO/B. Tafreshi

Milky Way Glitters Brightly over Chile

October 16, 2014 8:46 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

The Milky Way glitters brightly over the Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array’s (ALMA) antennas, in this image taken by the ESO Ultra High Definition Expedition team as they capture the site in 4K quality. Currently under construction in the thin, dry air of northern Chile's Atacama desert at an altitude of 5,000 meters above sea level, ALMA will initially be composed of 66 high-precision antennas

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Female Flower of a Madwort -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Female Flower of a Madwort

October 15, 2014 3:37 pm | News | Comments

This 10X photo shows the female flower of a madwort. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken using epi-illumination.

This artist's concept shows NASA's Mars orbiters lining up behind the Red Planet for their "duck and cover" maneuver to shield them from comet dust that may result from the close flyby of comet Siding Spring. Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

Science Fleet Prepares for Mars Comet Encounter

October 15, 2014 3:24 pm | by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory | News | Comments

NASA's extensive fleet of science assets, particularly those orbiting and roving Mars, have front row seats to image and study a once-in-a-lifetime comet flyby on October 19, 2014. Comet C/2013 A1, also known as comet Siding Spring, will pass within about 87,000 miles (139,500 kilometers) of the Red Planet — less than half the distance between Earth and our moon and less than one-tenth the distance of any known comet flyby of Earth.

Quail Embryo -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Quail Embryo

October 14, 2014 4:34 pm | News | Comments

This 0.17X photo shows a quail embryo at embryonic day 13. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

Haunting Image of Jack-O-Lantern Sun -- Courtesy of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center/SDO

NASA Captures Haunting Image of Jack-O-Lantern Sun

October 13, 2014 10:36 am | by Karen Fox (ASI), NASA | News | Comments

On October 8, 2014, active regions on the sun combined to look something like a jack-o-lantern’s face. This image is a blend of 171 and 193 angstrom light as captured by the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The active regions appear brighter, because those are areas that emit more light and energy — markers of an intense and complex set of magnetic fields hovering in the sun’s atmosphere, the corona.

Algae Micrasterias Americana -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Desmid Micrasterias Americana

October 10, 2014 3:51 pm | News | Comments

This 50X photo shows the algae Micrasterias Americana. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken by Marek Mis using polarized light.

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Crops growing in an Egyptian oasis, with the Pyramids of Giza in the background. Courtesy of Purdue University

Powerful Web-based Geospatial Data Project puts Major Issues on the Map

October 9, 2014 2:02 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Technology is putting complex topics like severe weather and climate change on the map — literally. Mapping data associated with specific geographic locations is a powerful way to glean new and improved knowledge from data collections and to explain the results to policymakers and the public. Particularly useful is the ability to layer different kinds of geospatial data on top of one another and see how they interact.

Artist's impression: Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF

Astronomers See Right into Heart of Exploding Star

October 9, 2014 12:43 pm | by University of Manchester | News | Comments

An international team of astronomers has been able to see into the heart of an exploding star, by combining data from telescopes that are hundreds or even thousands of kilometers apart. Highly-detailed images produced using radio telescopes from across Europe and America have pinpointed the locations where a stellar explosion (called a nova), emitted gamma rays (extremely high energy radiation).

First Spacewalk of Expedition 41 -- Courtesy of NASA/ESA/Alexander Gerst

Astronaut Reid Wiseman on the First Spacewalk of Expedition 41

October 9, 2014 12:25 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

On October 7, 2014, NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman and European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst completed the first of three spacewalks for the Expedition 41 crew aboard the International Space Station. The spacewalkers worked outside the space station's Quest airlock for 6 hours and 13 minutes, relocating a failed cooling pump to external stowage and installing gear that provides back up power to external robotics equipment.

UN-SCAN-IT Gel 7.1 Gel Analysis Software

UN-SCAN-IT Gel 7.1 Gel Analysis Software

October 9, 2014 9:32 am | Silk Scientific, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

UN-SCAN-IT Gel 7.1 gel analysis software converts virtually any scanner, digital camera or other image input device into an accurate high‑speed densitometer and digitizer system. Features include a zoomable and scalable analysis screen, lane analysis, segment analysis, dot blot analysis, color and grayscale gel analysis, clone drawing mode, MW calculation and calibration curves.

Fern Sorus -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Fern Reproduction: A Sorus, Stray Spores and Stomata

October 8, 2014 10:26 am | News | Comments

This 64X photo shows a fern sorus, which produces and contains spores, along with stray spores and stomata. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 was awarded jointly to Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell and William E. Moerner "for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy."

Americans, German Awarded 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

October 8, 2014 9:43 am | by Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences | News | Comments

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Eric Betzig of Janelia Farm Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stefan W. Hell of the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Göttingen and German Cancer Research Center, and William E. Moerner of Stanford University “for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy.”

NASA satellite data of the marine environment will be used in prototype marine biodiversity observation networks to be established in four U.S. locations, including the Florida Keys, pictured here. Courtesy of USF/WHOI/MBARI/NASA

U.S. Initiates Prototype System to Gauge National Marine Biodiversity

October 7, 2014 3:43 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA are funding three demonstration projects that will lay the foundation for the first national network to monitor marine biodiversity at scales ranging from microbes to whales. The U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) also plans to contribute.

Researchers of the Color Imaging Lab Group, from the Optics Department at the University of Granada. Miguel Ángel Martínez Domingo is on the right of the photo.

Imaging System Capable of Obtaining 12 Times More Information than Human Eye

October 7, 2014 3:35 pm | by University of Granada | News | Comments

Researchers have designed a new imaging system capable of obtaining up to 12 times more color information than the human eye and conventional cameras, which implies a total of 36 color channels. This important development will facilitate the easy capture of multispectral images in real time, and in the not too distant future it could also be used to develop new assisted vehicle driving systems, or to obtain more accurate medical images.

Live Soft Coral -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Live Soft Coral

October 7, 2014 3:13 pm | News | Comments

This 20X photo shows a single live soft coral (Ricordea florida). It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

Gravity model of the N. Atlantic; red dots are earthquakes. Quakes are often related to seamounts. Courtesy of David Sandwell, SIO

Satellite Data Offer Foundation for New High-resolution Version of Google Ocean Maps

October 6, 2014 3:42 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Scientists have created a new map of the world's seafloor, offering a more vivid picture of the structures that make up the deepest, least-explored parts of the ocean. The feat was accomplished by accessing two untapped streams of satellite data. Thousands of previously uncharted mountains rising from the seafloor, called seamounts, have emerged through the map, along with new clues about the formation of the continents.

NGC 5474, a dwarf galaxy located 21 million light-years away -- Courtesy of ESA/NASA

Hubble Sees a Dwarf Galaxy Shaped by a Grand Design

October 6, 2014 2:53 pm | by European Space Agency | News | Comments

The subject of this Hubble image is NGC 5474, a dwarf galaxy located 21 million light-years away in the constellation of Ursa Major (The Great Bear). This beautiful image was taken with Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The term "dwarf galaxy" may sound diminutive, but don't let that fool you — NGC 5474 contains several billion stars!

New data obtained by NASA’s GRAIL mission reveals that the Procellarum region on the near side of the moon — a giant basin often referred to as the “man in the moon” — likely arose not from a massive asteroid strike, but from a large plume of magma deep w

True Origin of the Man in the Moon

October 3, 2014 2:41 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

New data obtained by NASA’s GRAIL mission reveals that the Procellarum region on the near side of the moon — a giant basin often referred to as the “man in the moon” — likely arose not from a massive asteroid strike, but from a large plume of magma deep within the moon’s interior. 

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