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This graphic shows a 3-D model of 98 geysers whose source locations and tilts were found in a Cassini imaging survey of Enceladus' south polar terrain by the method of triangulation. Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

101 Geysers and More found on Icy Saturn Moon

July 29, 2014 4:01 pm | by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists using mission data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft have identified 101 distinct geysers erupting on Saturn's icy moon Enceladus. Their analysis suggests it is possible for liquid water to reach from the moon's underground sea all the way to its surface.

Fish Egg Cluster

July 29, 2014 2:16 pm | News | Comments

This 6.6X photo of a benthic zone fish egg cluster received an Image of Distinction designation...

Orion's Belt Rises through the Atmosphere

July 29, 2014 12:17 pm | News | Comments

On June 23, 2014, Expedition 40 Flight Engineer Reid Wiseman captured this image which connects...

New Platform Enables Large-Scale Neuroscience

July 28, 2014 2:23 pm | by Howard Hughes Medical Institute | News | Comments

In an age of “big data,” a single computer cannot always find the solution a user wants....

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The automatic placement of the albums by the algorithm was in agreement with the chronological order of the recording of each Beatles albums.

AI Reveals The Beatles’ Dramatic Musical Transformation

July 28, 2014 12:29 pm | by Lawrence Technological University | News | Comments

Music fans and critics know that the music of the Beatles underwent a dramatic transformation in just a few years. But, until now, there hasn’t been a scientific way to measure the progression. Computer scientists at Lawrence Technological University have developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that can analyze and compare musical styles, enabling research into their musical progression.

Recrystallized Sulfur -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Recrystallized Sulfur

July 28, 2014 12:06 pm | News | Comments

This 100X photo of recrystallized sulfur received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Dr. Edward Leighman Gafford in Richland, WA, using polarized light.

Caribbean Sea Viewed from International Space Station -- Courtesy of NASA

Caribbean Sea Viewed from International Space Station

July 25, 2014 1:51 pm | News | Comments

From the Earth-orbiting International Space Station, flying some 225 nautical miles above the Caribbean Sea in the early morning hours of July 15, 2104, NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman photographed this north-looking panorama that includes parts of Cuba, the Bahamas and Florida, and even runs into several other areas in the southeastern US. The long stretch of lights to the left of center frame gives the shape of Miami.

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Vorticella Protozoa -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Vorticella Protozoa

July 24, 2014 12:57 pm | News | Comments

This 20X photo of the protozoa Vorticella sp. received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Mr. Frank Fox ofKonz, Rheinland-Pfalz, Germany, using a darkfield technique.

Crab Nebula -- Courtesy of NASA/CXC/SAO

Chandra Celebrates 15th Anniversary: Crab Nebula

July 23, 2014 1:32 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

In 1054 AD, Chinese astronomers and others around the world noticed a new bright object in the sky. This “new star” was, in fact, the supernova explosion that created what is now called the Crab Nebula. At the center of the Crab Nebula is an extremely dense, rapidly rotating neutron star left behind by the explosion.

Reddish Bands on Europa -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/SETI Institute

Reddish Bands on Europa

July 22, 2014 3:33 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

This colorized image of Jupiter's moon Europa is a product of clear-filter grayscale data from one orbit of NASA's Galileo spacecraft, combined with lower-resolution color data taken on a different orbit. The blue-white terrains indicate relatively pure water ice, whereas the reddish areas contain water ice mixed with hydrated salts, potentially magnesium sulfate or sulfuric acid.

The Eagle Prepares to Land

July 21, 2014 2:00 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The Apollo 11 Lunar Module Eagle, in a landing configuration was photographed in lunar orbit from the Command and Service Module Columbia. Inside the module were Commander Neil A. Armstrong and Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin. The long rod-like protrusions under the landing pods are lunar surface sensing probes. Upon contact with the lunar surface, the probes sent a signal to the crew to shut down the descent engine.

Deep-sea Amphipod

July 18, 2014 3:29 pm | News | Comments

This photo of a deep-sea amphipod received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Mr. David Forest and Alison Sweeney ofUC Santa Barbara, Neuroscience Research Institute in Santa Barbara, CA, using a brightfield technique.

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Two Burs Locked Together

July 17, 2014 11:27 am | News | Comments

This 15x photo of two burs locked together received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Mr. Neil James Egan of PPG Industries, Electro-coat Quality Assurance in Cleveland, OH, using a brightfield technique.

Phytoplankton Bloom off the Coast of Iceland

July 15, 2014 4:42 pm | News | Comments

A spring bloom of phytoplankton lingered in the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Iceland in early June, 2014. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured this true-color image on June 5. At that time, swirling jewel tones of a vast bloom were visible between banks of white clouds.

Liftoff! Orbiting Carbon Observatory Heads to Orbit

July 15, 2014 11:48 am | News | Comments

On July 2, 2014, a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket launched with the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2) satellite onboard from Space Launch Complex 2 at Vandenberg Air Force Base, CA. OCO-2 is now in orbit. It is NASA's first mission dedicated to studying global distribution of atmospheric carbon dioxide, the leading human-produced greenhouse gas driving changes in Earth's climate.

The Massive Perseus Cluster

July 11, 2014 4:35 pm | News | Comments

This image is Chandra’s latest view of the Perseus Cluster, where red, green, and blue show low, medium, and high-energy X-rays respectively. It combines data equivalent to more than 17 days’ worth of observing time taken over a decade with Chandra.

Brain Cancer Stem Cells from Human Brain Cancer Tissue

July 11, 2014 12:23 pm | News | Comments

This 200x photo of brain cancer stem cells from human brain cancer tissue received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken using immunofluorescence.

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Hi-ho! Astronomers Discover Seven Dwarf Galaxies

July 10, 2014 8:37 pm | by Jim Shelton, Yale University | News | Comments

Yale University astronomers, using a new type of telescope made by stitching together telephoto lenses, recently discovered seven celestial surprises while probing a nearby spiral galaxy. The previously unseen galaxies may yield important insights into dark matter and galaxy evolution, while possibly signaling the discovery of a new class of objects in space.

False-twist Textured Nylon Yarn

July 9, 2014 4:19 pm | News | Comments

This 100x photo of false-twist textured nylon yarn received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Ms. Kelly Brinsko of McCrone Research Institute in Chicago, IL, using crossed polarized light.

Mummies: Newborn Siberian Woolly Mammoths Yield Trove of Insights

July 9, 2014 4:08 pm | by American Museum of Natural History | News | Comments

Three-dimensional scans of two mummified newborn woolly mammoths recovered from the Siberian Arctic are revealing previously inaccessible details about the early development of prehistoric proboscideans. X-ray images further show that both animals died from suffocation after inhaling mud. Lyuba and Khroma, who died at ages one and two months, respectively, are the most complete and best-preserved baby mammoth specimens ever found.

Close-up: Green Algae

July 9, 2014 3:37 pm | News | Comments

This 400x photo of Closterium — a common genera of green algae (chlorophyta) found in lakes and ponds around the Puget Sound region — received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Mr. Karl Bruun of Nostoca Algae Laboratory on Bainbridge Island, WA, using differential interference contrast.

Imaging the Fukushima Daiichi Reactors with Cosmic-ray Muons

July 9, 2014 3:35 pm | by Amber Harmon | News | Comments

Los Alamos National Laboratory, in New Mexico, US, will team up with Toshiba Corporation to use muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade, and greatly reduce plant personnel exposure to radiation.

Windswept Valleys in Northern Africa

July 8, 2014 2:08 pm | News | Comments

Expedition 40 Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst of the European Space Agency posted this photograph of windswept valleys in Northern Africa, taken from the International Space Station, to social media on July 6, 2014. Astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) regularly photograph the Earth from their unique point of view located 200 miles above the surface.

Galactic Pyrotechnics on Display

July 7, 2014 3:15 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A galaxy about 23 million light years away is the site of impressive, ongoing fireworks. Rather than paper, powder and fire, this galactic light show involves a giant black hole, shock waves and vast reservoirs of gas. This galactic fireworks display is taking place in NGC 4258, also known as M106, a spiral galaxy like the Milky Way. This galaxy is famous, however, for something that our galaxy doesn’t have — two extra spiral arms...

Rocket Launch: Soyuz TMA-12M Rocket

July 7, 2014 9:32 am | News | Comments

The Soyuz TMA-12M rocket launches from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on March 26, 2014 carrying Expedition 39 Soyuz Commander Alexander Skvortsov of the Russian Federal Space Agency, Roscosmos, Flight Engineer Steven Swanson of NASA, and Flight Engineer Oleg Artemyev of Roscosmos to the International Space Station.

New Satellite Data Like an Ultrasound for Baby Stars

July 3, 2014 8:31 pm | by University of British Columbia | News | Comments

An international team of researchers have been monitoring the “heartbeats” of baby stars to test theories of how the Sun was born 4.5 billion years ago. In a paper published in Science magazine, the team describes how data from two space telescopes — the Canadian Space Agency’s MOST satellite and the French CoRoT mission — have unveiled the internal structures and ages of young stars before they’ve even emerged as full-fledged stars.

The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has launched the Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials to accelerate discovery, design and deployment of new materials.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Launches Imaging Institute

June 24, 2014 8:34 am | by Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

The Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory has launched the Institute for Functional Imaging of Materials to accelerate discovery, design and deployment of new materials. The institute will meld world-class capabilities in imaging, high-performance computing, materials science and other scientific disciplines to probe materials.

Inside the International Space Station Destiny Laboratory -- Courtesy of NASA

Inside the International Space Station Destiny Laboratory

June 18, 2014 12:46 pm | News | Comments

This view in the International Space Station, photographed by an Expedition 40 crew member, shows how it looks inside the space station while the crew is asleep. The dots near the hatch point to a Soyuz spacecraft docked to the station in case the crew was to encounter an emergency. This view is looking into the Destiny Laboratory from Node 1 (Unity) with Node 2 (Harmony) in the background. Destiny is the primary research laboratory ...

Spurting Plasma Bursts Out from the Sun -- Courtesy of NASA/Solar Dynamics Observatory

Spurting Plasma Bursts Out from the Sun

June 17, 2014 2:03 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A stream of plasma burst out from the Sun, but since it lacked enough force to break away, most of it fell back into the Sun on May 27, 2014. A video, seen in a combination of two wavelengths of extreme ultraviolet light, covers a little over two hours. This eruption was minor, and such events occur almost every day on the sun and suggest the kind of dynamic activity being driven by powerful magnetic forces near the Sun's surface.

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