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Leica Microsystems Offers Slide Scanning and Image Hosting for Education

August 27, 2014 2:40 pm | by Leica Microsystems | News | Comments

Leica Microsystems is offering a custom slide scanning and image hosting service for teachers, which makes it possible to share images within the classroom and to expand learning outside the classroom. Glass slides sent to a scanning center are processed to create high-resolution digital image files, which then can be accessed online from a hosted server via any standard Internet browser for study by students anytime, anywhere.

Close-up: Crocus Pollen and Stigmate

August 27, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

This 400X photo of crocus pollen and stigmate received an Image of Distinction designation in...

Most Complete Antarctic Map for Climate Research Publicly Available

August 26, 2014 4:18 pm | by University of Waterloo | News | Comments

The University of Waterloo has unveiled a new satellite image of Antarctica, and the imagery...

25 Years Ago, Voyager 2 Captures Images of Neptune

August 26, 2014 3:16 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft gave humanity its first glimpse of Neptune and its moon Triton in...

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Mizapin -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Mizapin Antidepressant Drug Crystals

August 25, 2014 10:41 am | News | Comments

This 160X photo of Mizapin antidepressant drug crystals received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Robert Markus of Stockholm University using polarized light and differential interference contrast.

Supernova Seen in Two Lights -- Courtesy of NASA/ESA/JPL-Caltech/GSFC/IAFE

Supernova Seen in Two Lights

August 22, 2014 11:49 am | by NASA | News | Comments

The destructive results of a mighty supernova explosion reveal themselves in a delicate blend of infrared and X-ray light, as seen in this image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton. The bubbly cloud is an irregular shock wave, generated by a supernova that would have been witnessed on Earth 3,700 years ago.

Ulrich Rabl measured the volume of the test subjects' hippocampi using computer-assisted techniques and analyzed the results in the context of the genetic and environmental data.

Genes Determine Traces Stress Leaves Behind on Our Brains

August 21, 2014 4:20 pm | by MedUni Vienna | News | Comments

Our individual genetic make-up determines the effect that stress has on our emotional centers. Not every individual reacts in the same way to life events that produce the same degree of stress. Some grow as a result of the crisis, whereas others break down and fall ill, for example with depression. The outcome is determined by a complex interaction between depression gene versions and environmental factors.

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Fruit Fly Larval Brain -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Fruit Fly Larval Brain

August 21, 2014 3:01 pm | News | Comments

This 25X photo of a fruit fly larval brain received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Dr. Christian Klämbt and Ann Christin Bauke of the University of Muenster using confocal microscopy.

Testing Electric Propulsion -- Courtesy of NASA Langley/David C. Bowman

Greased Lightning Tests Electric Propulsion

August 20, 2014 9:35 am | by NASA | News | Comments

On August 19, 2014, National Aviation Day, a lot of people reflected on how far aviation has come in the last century. Could this be the future — a plane with many electric motors that can hover like a helicopter and fly like a plane, and that could revolutionize air travel?

Fossil Hallucigenia sparsa from the Burgess Shale Courtesy of M. R. Smith / Smithsonian Institute

Strangest Creature of Ancient Earth linked to Modern Animals

August 19, 2014 3:08 pm | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

The spines along its back were thought to be legs, its legs thought to be tentacles along its back, and its head was mistaken for its tail. The animal, known as Hallucigenia due to its otherworldly appearance, had been considered an ‘evolutionary misfit’ as it was not clear how it related to modern animal groups. Researchers have discovered an important link...

North Korea (the dark area) and South Korea at night. Courtesy of NASA

Citizen Science: Images of Earth at Night Crowdsourced for Science

August 19, 2014 2:59 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A wealth of images of Earth at night taken by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) could help save energy, contribute to better human health and safety and improve our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. But, scientists need your help to make that happen.

US Gulf Coast at Night -- Courtesy of NASA

US Gulf Coast at Night

August 19, 2014 12:05 pm | News | Comments

One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the International Space Station photographed this nighttime image showing city lights in at least half a dozen southern states from some 225 miles above the home planet. Lights from areas in the Gulf Coast states of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, as well as some of the states that border them on the north, are visible.

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Guanidine Hydrochloride -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Guanidine Hydrochloride, Chaotropic Salt

August 18, 2014 10:12 am | News | Comments

This 200X photo of guanidine hydrochloride, a chaotropic salt used to denature proteins, received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Dr. Christopher Benjamin Jackson of IKELOS GmbH in Berne, Switzerland, using polarized light.

Users can use the tool to focus on images in which President Obama appears over Stephen Colbert’s shoulder, and then observe Colbert’s typical body posture among those results. Courtesy of Jun-Yan Zhu, Yong Jae Lee and Alexei Efros, UC Berkeley

Single Picture worth 1000 — and More — Images

August 15, 2014 12:38 pm | by Sarah Yang, UC Berkeley | News | Comments

A photo is worth a thousand words, but what if the image could also represent thousands of other images? New software seeks to tame the vast amount of visual data in the world by generating a single photo that can represent massive clusters of images. This tool can give users the photographic gist of a kid on Santa’s lap or housecats. It works by generating an image that literally averages the key features of the other photos.

NGC 3081 -- Courtesy of ESA/Hubble & NASA; acknowledgement: R. Buta (University of Alabama)

Magnificent Face-on Image of Golden Rings of Star Formation

August 15, 2014 11:39 am | by European Space Agency | News | Comments

Taking center stage in this new NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image is a galaxy known as NGC 3081, set against an assortment of glittering galaxies in the distance. Located in the constellation of Hydra (The Sea Serpent), NGC 3081 is located over 86 million light-years from us. It is known as a type II Seyfert galaxy, characterized by its dazzling nucleus.

Lily of the Valley Rhizome Section -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Lily of the Valley Rhizome Section

August 14, 2014 12:41 pm | News | Comments

This 40X photo of a lily of the valley rhizome section received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Dr. Guichuan Hou of the Dewel Microscopy Facility in Boone, NC.

In this August 6, 2014, photo provided by Catlin Seaview Survey, Catlin's Christophe Bailhache surveys "Christ of the Abyss," with the SVII cameras off the coast of Key Largo, Fla. U.S. government scientists hope people will soon be able to go online and

Street View goes Undersea to Map Reefs, Wonders

August 13, 2014 2:16 pm | by Jennifer Kay, Associated Press | News | Comments

It's easy to go online and get a 360-degree, ground-level view of almost any street in the US and throughout the world. Soon, scientists hope to do the same with coral reefs and other underwater wonders. They are learning to use specialized fisheye lenses underwater in the Florida Keys in hopes of applying "street view" mapping to research and management plans in marine sanctuaries nationwide. Some of the images will be available online...

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Butterfly Tongue -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Butterfly Tongue

August 13, 2014 11:28 am | News | Comments

This 60X photo of a butterfly tongue received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Ms. Kata Kenesei and Barbara Orsolits of the Institute of Experimental Medicine - Hungarian Academy of Sciences in Budapest, Hungary, using confocal microscopy.

This 3-D map shows how HCN molecules (made of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen) are released from the nucleus of comet Lemmon and then spread evenly throughout the atmosphere, or coma. Similar maps revealed that HNC and formaldehyde are produced in the coma,

3-D Comet Study Reveals Chemical Factory at Work

August 12, 2014 12:05 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A NASA-led team of scientists has created detailed 3-D maps of the atmospheres surrounding comets, identifying several gases and mapping their spread at the highest resolution ever achieved. Almost unheard of for comet studies, the 3-D perspective provides deeper insight into which materials are shed from the nucleus of the comet and which are produced within the atmosphere, or coma.

Lunar Transit -- Courtesy of NASA/SDO

Solar Dynamics Observatory Captures Images of Lunar Transit

August 12, 2014 11:55 am | by NASA | News | Comments

On July 26, 2014, from 10:57 a.m. to 11:42 a.m. EDT, the moon crossed between NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and the sun, a phenomenon called a lunar transit. A lunar transit happens approximately twice a year, causing a partial solar eclipse that can only be seen from SDO's point of view.

Four Seasons: A new algorithm developed by Brown computer scientists allows users to change the season and other “transient attributes” in outdoor photos.

Photo Editing Algorithm Changes Weather, Seasons Automatically

August 11, 2014 12:34 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

A computer algorithm being developed by Brown University researchers enables users to instantly change the weather, time of day, season, or other features in outdoor photos with simple text commands. Machine learning and a clever database make it possible.

Hurricanes Iselle and Julio -- Courtesy of NASA; image by Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE/EOSDIS Rapid Response

Hurricanes Iselle and Julio Nearing the Hawaiian Islands

August 11, 2014 11:38 am | by Mike Carlowicz, NASA | News | Comments

In early August 2014, not one but two hurricanes were headed for the Hawaiian Islands. Storms arriving from the east are a relative rarity, and landfalling storms are also pretty infrequent. This image is a composite of three satellite passes over the tropical Pacific Ocean in the early afternoon.

Next-Generation Microshutter Array Technology -- Courtesy of NASA/Bill Hrybyk

Next-Generation Microshutter Array Technology

August 8, 2014 11:56 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA technologists have hurdled a number of significant challenges in their quest to improve a revolutionary observing technology originally created for the James Webb Space Telescope. This image shows a close-up view of the next-generation microshutter arrays — designed to accommodate the needs of future observatories — during the fabrication process.

Cut Gemstone from Minas Gerais, Brazil -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Cut Gemstone from Minas Gerais, Brazil

August 7, 2014 3:00 pm | News | Comments

This 40X photo of an inclusion in a cut gemstone: rutile crystals (titanium oxide) included in rock crystal (quartz) from Minas Gerais, Brazil, received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

The two inset images show before-and-after images captured by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope of Supernova 2012Z in the spiral galaxy NGC 1309. The white X at the top of the main image marks the location of the supernova in the galaxy. Courtesy of NASA, ESA

Hubble Finds Supernova Star System Linked to Possible “Zombie Star”

August 6, 2014 8:38 pm | by Science Newsline | News | Comments

Using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, a team of astronomers has spotted a star system that could have left behind a "zombie star" after an unusually weak supernova explosion. A supernova typically obliterates the exploding white dwarf, or dying star. On this occasion, scientists believe this faint...

Head of a Male Mosquito -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Head of a Male Mosquito

August 6, 2014 3:02 pm | News | Comments

This 70X photo of the head of a male mosquito received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken byDr. Gareth Paul Jones of the University of Brighton in Eastbourne, Brighton, UK, using stereomicroscopy and fiber optic illumination.

As aircraft climb or descend under certain atmospheric conditions, they can inadvertently seed mid-level clouds and cause narrow bands of snow or rain to develop and fall to the ground. Through this process, they leave behind odd-shaped holes or channels

Mysterious Clouds: When Aircraft Inadvertently Cause Rain or Snow

August 5, 2014 2:53 pm | by National Center for Atmospheric Research | News | Comments

As turboprop and jet aircraft climb or descend under certain atmospheric conditions, they can inadvertently seed mid-level clouds and cause narrow bands of snow or rain to develop and fall to the ground, new research finds. Through this seeding process, they leave behind odd-shaped holes or channels in the clouds, which have long fascinated the public.

MIT researchers extracted audio from the vibrations of a plant, potato-chip bag and other objects. Courtesy of Christine Daniloff/MIT

Like James Bond, Algorithm Recovers Speech through Soundproof Glass

August 5, 2014 12:35 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers at MIT, Microsoft and Adobe have developed an algorithm that can reconstruct an audio signal by analyzing minute vibrations of objects depicted in video. In one set of experiments, they were able to recover intelligible speech from the vibrations of a potato-chip bag photographed from 15 feet away through soundproof glass.

Iberian Peninsula at Night -- Courtesy of NASA

Iberian Peninsula at Night

August 5, 2014 11:50 am | by NASA | News | Comments

One of the Expedition 40 crew members aboard the International Space Station recorded this early evening photo of the entire Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) on July 26, 2014. Part of France can be seen at the top of the image and the Strait of Gibraltar is visible at bottom, with a very small portion of Morocco visible near the lower right corner.

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