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New Discovery Could Pave the Way for Spin-based Computing

September 26, 2014 11:12 am | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

Electricity and magnetism rule our digital world. Semiconductors process electrical information, while magnetic materials enable long-term data storage. A University of Pittsburgh research team has discovered a way to fuse these two distinct properties in a single material, paving the way for new ultrahigh density storage and computing architectures.

Close-up: Star-shaped Algae

September 26, 2014 9:36 am | News | Comments

This 40X photo shows the star-shaped algae Micrasterias radiosa. It received an Image...

King Fire in Eldorado National Forest, California

September 25, 2014 4:33 pm | by Adam Voiland, NASA | News | Comments

On September 19, 2014, the Operational Land Imager on the Landsat 8 satellite captured these...

Sunrise at the Soyuz Launch Pad

September 24, 2014 12:05 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The sun rises as the Soyuz TMA-14M spacecraft is rolled out by train to the launch pad at the...

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Mouse Adipose (Fat) Tissue -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Fat Tissue from a Mouse

September 23, 2014 9:53 am | News | Comments

This 25X photo shows mouse adipose tissue. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken byDaniela Malide of the National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute.

This mosaic of images from the Wide Field Imager on the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope at ESO’s La Silla Observatory in Chile shows two dramatic star formation regions in the southern Milky Way. The first is of these, on the left, is dominated by the star cl

Spectacular Landscape of Star Formation

September 22, 2014 11:51 am | by European Southern Observatory - ESO | News | Comments

This image, captured by the Wide Field Imager at La Silla Observatory, shows two dramatic star formation regions in the southern Milky Way. The first of these, on the left, is dominated by the star cluster NGC 3603, located 20,000 light-years away, in the Carina-Sagittarius spiral arm of the Milky Way galaxy. The second object, on the right, is a collection of glowing gas clouds known as NGC 3576 that lies only about half as far from Earth.

Researchers performed a test of the Finding Individuals for Disaster and Emergency Response (FINDER) prototype technology — which can locate individuals buried in disasters — at the Virginia Task Force 1 Training Facility in Lorton, VA. The device uses ra

NASA Technology Can Detect Heartbeats in Rubble

September 19, 2014 4:46 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

When natural disasters or human-made catastrophes topple buildings, search and rescue teams immediately set out to find victims trapped beneath the wreckage. During these missions, time is imperative, and the ability to quickly detect living victims greatly increases the chances of rescue and survival.

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Leica Application Suite X Imaging and Analysis Platform for Life Sciences

Leica Application Suite X Imaging and Analysis Platform for Life Sciences

September 19, 2014 4:02 pm | Leica Microsystems Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Leica Application Suite X (LAS X) imaging software for life sciences spans all widefield, confocal and super-resolution platforms. It introduces new features for microscopic image acquisition, processing and analysis while maintaining established principles of its predecessor software LAS AF, such as the workflow-based approach.

Whirligig Beetle -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Whirligig Beetle Swimming Leg

September 19, 2014 3:19 pm | News | Comments

This 25X photo shows the swimming leg of a whirligig beetle (Gyrinus sp.). It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope, and was taken by David Linstead.

Common Orange Lichen -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Common Orange Lichen

September 18, 2014 2:26 pm | News | Comments

This 4X photo shows a close-up of common orange lichen (Xanthoria parietina), a partnership between a fungus and a green alga. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

Is there life on Mars? Researchers say that life as we know it, in the form of bacteria, for example, could be there, although we haven’t found it yet. Courtesy of NASA/JPL/MSSS

Martian Meteorite Yields More Evidence of the Possibility of Life on Mars

September 18, 2014 2:05 pm | by University of Manchester | News | Comments

A tiny fragment of Martian meteorite 1.3 billion years old is helping to make the case for the possibility of life on Mars, say scientists. The finding of a ‘cell-like’ structure, which investigators now know once held water, came about as a result of collaboration between scientists in the UK and Greece. These findings are significant because they add to increasing evidence that Mars does provide all the conditions for life to have formed.

Florida to Louisiana  -- Courtesy of NASA

Florida to Louisiana Viewed from International Space Station

September 17, 2014 1:43 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman captured this image of Florida to Louisiana just before dawn, taken from the International Space Station, and posted it to social media on Friday, September 12, 2014. Wiseman, Commander Max Suraev and Flight Engineer Alexander Gerst began their first full workweek Monday, September 15, as a three-person crew aboard the space station

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Flying through an Aurora  -- Courtesy of NASA/ESA/Alexander Gerst

Flying through an Aurora

September 16, 2014 2:40 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

European Space Agency astronaut Alexander Gerst posted this photograph taken from the International Space Station to social media on August 29, 2014, writing, "words can't describe how it feels flying through an #aurora. I wouldn't even know where to begin…." Crewmembers on the space station photograph the Earth from their unique point of view located 200 miles above the surface.

In this August 3, 2014, photo taken by Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow-angle camera Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is pictured from a distance of 285 kms. Scientists at the European Space Agency on September 15, 2014, announced the spot where they will attempt t

European Space Agency Picks Site for Comet Landing

September 16, 2014 2:22 pm | by Frank Jordans, Associated Press | News | Comments

Talk about a moving target. Scientists at the European Space Agency have announced the spot where they will attempt the first landing on a comet hurtling through space at 55,000 kph (34,000 mph). The maneuver is one of the key moments in the decade-long mission to examine comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and learn more about the origins and evolution of objects in the universe.

Tobacco Leaf Epidermal Cells -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Tobacco Leaf Epidermal Cells

September 15, 2014 3:10 pm | News | Comments

This 63X photo shows an expression of a fluorescently labeled protein in Tobacco leaf epidermal cells. It received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

The team's solution is to develop new algorithms that divide the data among the processors, allowing each to handle a certain region, and then stitch the image back together at the end.

Multicore Computing helps Fight Lung Cancer, Speeds CT Image Processing

September 12, 2014 3:08 pm | by University of Michigan | News | Comments

A new $1.9 million study at the University of Michigan seeks to make low-dose computed tomography scans a viable screening technique by speeding up the image reconstruction from half an hour or more to just five minutes. The advance could be particularly important for fighting lung cancers, as symptoms often appear too late for effective treatment.

Supernova Remains -- Courtesy of  NASA/CXC/IAFE/G.Dubner et al & ESA/XMM-Newton

Unprecedented X-ray View of Supernova Remains

September 12, 2014 11:50 am | by NASA | News | Comments

The destructive results of a powerful supernova explosion reveal themselves in a delicate tapestry of X-ray light, as seen in this image from NASA’s Chandra X-Ray Observatory and the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton. The image shows the remains of a supernova that would have been witnessed on Earth about 3,700 years ago. The remnant is called Puppis A and is around 7,000 light years away and about 10 light years across.

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Space Launch System Takes Flight -- Courtesy of NASA/MSFC

Space Launch System Takes Flight

September 11, 2014 2:39 pm | News | Comments

Artist concept of NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS) 70-metric-ton configuration launching to space. SLS will be the most powerful rocket ever built for deep space missions, including to an asteroid and ultimately to Mars. The first SLS mission — Exploration Mission 1 — will launch an uncrewed Orion spacecraft to a stable orbit beyond the moon.

As the scientists observe the star system, the infrared signal from this cloud varies based on what is visible from Earth. By studying the oscillations, the team is gathering first-of-its-kind data on the detailed process and outcome of collisions that cr

Spitzer Telescope Witnesses Asteroid Smashup

September 10, 2014 4:01 pm | by Caltech | News | Comments

NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope has spotted an eruption of dust around a young star, possibly the result of a smashup between large asteroids. This type of collision can eventually lead to the formation of planets. Scientists had been regularly tracking the star, called NGC 2547-ID8, when it surged with a huge amount of fresh dust.

The Department of Energy’s Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamline 7.3.3 (SAXS/WAXS/GISAXS/GIWAXS) and endstation at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Courtesy of Roy Kaltschmidt

Tools for Reducing, Managing, Analyzing and Visualizing Data Transform Beamline Science

September 10, 2014 3:48 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Some mysteries of science can only be explained on a nanometer scale — even smaller than a single strand of human DNA, which is about 2.5 nanometers wide. At this scale, scientists can investigate the structure and behavior of proteins that help our bodies fight infectious microbes, and even catch chemical reactions in action. To resolve these very fine details, they rely on synchrotron light sources like the ALS at Berkeley Lab.

Astronaut's View from Space -- Courtesy of NASA/Reid Wiseman (@astro_reid)

An Astronaut's View from Space

September 10, 2014 3:02 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA astronaut Reid Wiseman tweeted this photo from the International Space Station on Tuesday morning, September 2, 2014. "My favorite views from #space – just past #sunrise over the ocean," the Expedition 40 astronaut tweeted. The Expedition 40 crew has been busy aboard the Space Station, recently performing health checks and humanoid robot upgrades.

The top image shows how the new algorithm is able to identify an area (in red) where stress has created a weak spot in a small piece of plastic wrap. The older method (shown in the bottom half of the picture) is unable to pinpoint the place where the plas

Identifying Tiny Strains in Body Tissues before Injuries Occur

September 9, 2014 3:14 pm | by Jim Dryden, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have developed algorithms to identify weak spots in tendons, muscles and bones prone to tearing or breaking. The technology one day may help pinpoint minor strains and tiny injuries in the body’s tissues long before bigger problems occur.

Teepee Canyon agate -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Teepee Canyon Agate

September 9, 2014 2:16 pm | News | Comments

This 25X photo of a polished slab of Teepee Canyon agate received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope.

A laser-based instrument being developed for the International Space Station will provide a unique 3-D view of Earth’s forests, helping to fill in missing information about their role in the carbon cycle.

Probe Studies Earth’s Forests in 3-D

September 9, 2014 9:58 am | by Elizabeth Zubritsky, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

A laser-based instrument being developed for the International Space Station will provide a unique 3-D view of Earth’s forests, helping to fill in missing information about their role in the carbon cycle.             

This 100X photo of Pearceite, an uncommon silver mineral, in beautiful hexagonal crystals, from a copper mine in Spain received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellenc

Hexagonal Silver Crystals

September 5, 2014 8:33 am | News | Comments

This 100X photo of Pearceite, an uncommon silver mineral, in beautiful hexagonal crystals, from a copper mine in Spain received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. 

An example of a whole slide scan

Leica Microsystems Offers Slide Scanning and Image Hosting for Education

August 27, 2014 2:40 pm | by Leica Microsystems | News | Comments

Leica Microsystems is offering a custom slide scanning and image hosting service for teachers, which makes it possible to share images within the classroom and to expand learning outside the classroom. Glass slides sent to a scanning center are processed to create high-resolution digital image files, which then can be accessed online from a hosted server via any standard Internet browser for study by students anytime, anywhere.

Crocus Pollen and Stigmate -- Courtesy of Nikon Small World

Close-up: Crocus Pollen and Stigmate

August 27, 2014 2:28 pm | News | Comments

This 400X photo of crocus pollen and stigmate received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Frederic Labaune of Education Nationale in Auxonne, France, using episcopy and stacking.

Mosaic of satellite images of Antarctica taken by RADARSAT-2. Courtesy of RADARSAT-2 Data and Products © MacDonald, Dettwiler and Associates Ltd. (2008) – All Rights Reserved.  RADARSAT is an official mark of the Canadian Space Agency.

Most Complete Antarctic Map for Climate Research Publicly Available

August 26, 2014 4:18 pm | by University of Waterloo | News | Comments

The University of Waterloo has unveiled a new satellite image of Antarctica, and the imagery will help scientists all over the world gain new insight into the effects of climate change. The mosaic is free and fully accessible to the academic world and the public. Using Synthetic Aperture Radar with multiple polarization modes aboard the RADARSAT-2 satellite, the CSA collected more than 3,150 images of the continent.

Voyager 2 Captures Images of Neptune -- Courtesy of NASA

25 Years Ago, Voyager 2 Captures Images of Neptune

August 26, 2014 3:16 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft gave humanity its first glimpse of Neptune and its moon Triton in the summer of 1989. This picture of Neptune was produced from the last whole planet images taken through the green and orange filters on the Voyager 2 narrow angle camera. The images were taken on August  20, 1989, at a range of 4.4 million miles from the planet, 4 days and 20 hours before closest approach on August 25.

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