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A robot developed by Toshiba is demonstrated at its laboratory in Yokohama, near Tokyo. As Japan struggles in the early stages of decades-long cleanup of the Fukushima nuclear crisis, Toshiba has developed the robot that raises its tail like a scorpion an

Nuclear Scorpion Robot will look into Fukushima Reactor, Collect Data

July 1, 2015 4:07 pm | by Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press | News | Comments

A new robot that raises its tail like a scorpion is scheduled to look at melted nuclear fuel inside one of the three wrecked Fukushima reactors in Japan. Toshiba, co-developer of the "scorpion" crawler, said the robot will venture into the Unit 2 reactor's primary containment vessel in August after a month of training for its handlers. Officials hope the robot can see the fuel in the pressure vessel in the middle of the reactor.

Survey: US Political and Generation Gaps on Science Issues

July 1, 2015 3:58 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Age divides Americans on science issues just as much as political ideology, a new analysis of...

Leading Computational Scientist Peter Coveney Keynotes at ISC Cloud & Big Data

July 1, 2015 3:45 pm | by ISC | News | Comments

ISC Events, the organizer of the inaugural ISC Cloud & Big Data conference has announced...

Speeding Up Genome Assembly, from Months to Minutes

June 30, 2015 12:23 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Computing Sciences | News | Comments

By applying some novel algorithms, computational techniques and the innovative programming...

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Are you a Tau-ist? Pi Day is Under Attack

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — June 19-25

June 26, 2015 12:41 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

As we entered our first week of summer, the week’s biggest hits included a strong bent toward several “lighter” mathematical topics: learning how math drives Formula 1 and launches Angry Birds, inspiring young minds at MoMATH, and Pi Day under attack. You also won’t want to miss molecules exhibiting strange, exotic states, hot lava flows on Venus, and some of the coolest experimental technology showcased at this year’s Paris Air Show.

Jill M. Hruby was named the next president and director of Sandia National Laboratories, the country’s largest national lab, on June 22, 2015. When she steps into her new role July 17, she will be the first woman to lead a national security laboratory. A

Jill Hruby will be First Woman to Lead National Security Lab

June 25, 2015 8:34 am | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

Jill Hruby was named the next president and director of Sandia National Laboratories, the country’s largest national lab. When she steps into her new role July 17, she will be the first woman to lead a national security laboratory. A Sandia staff member and manager for the past 32 years, Hruby most recently oversaw Sandia efforts in nuclear, biological and chemical security, homeland security, counterterrorism and energy security.

From his hospital bed, a disabled patient is capable of controlling a telepresence robot and interacting with people he meets over Skype. Courtesy of Alain Herzog / EPFL

Quadriplegics Pilot Telepresence Robot Remotely with Thoughts

June 24, 2015 2:15 pm | by EPFL | News | Comments

For someone suffering from paralysis or limited mobility, visiting with other people is extremely difficult. Researchers have been working on a revolutionary brain-machine approach to restore a sense of independence to the disabled. The idea is to remotely control a robot from home with one's thoughts. The research, involving numerous subjects located in different countries, produced excellent results in both human and technical terms.

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GATK is already available for download at no cost to academic and non-profit users. In addition, business users can license GATK from the Broad. To date, more than 20,000 users have processed genomic data using GATK.

Broad Institute Genome Analysis Toolkit offered as part of Google Genomics

June 24, 2015 7:56 am | by Broad Institute | News | Comments

Broad Institute is teaming up with Google Genomics to explore how to break down major technical barriers that increasingly hinder biomedical research by addressing the need for computing infrastructure to store and process enormous datasets, and by creating tools to analyze such data. As a first step, Broad Institute’s Genome Analysis Toolkit, GATK, will be offered as a service on the Google Cloud Platform, as part of Google Genomics.

The living relative, a New Zealand burrowing bat. Courtesy of Rod Morris

Large Walking Bat Fossil Discovered in New Zealand

June 22, 2015 3:40 pm | by University of New South Wales Sydney | News | Comments

Fossilized remains of a new bat species, which lived 16 million years ago, walked on four limbs and was three times larger than today’s average bat, have been discovered in New Zealand. The fossils were found in sediment left over from a vast prehistoric body of water, which was part of warmer subtropical rainforest during the early Miocene era. The new species is related to another bat which still lives in old growth forests.

Pope Francis waves as he leaves at the end of his weekly general audience, in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Wednesday, June 17, 2015. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini) Pope Challenges World to Clean Up its Filth

Pope Challenges World to Clean Up its Filth

June 20, 2015 9:34 am | by Nicole Winfield, Rachel Zoll and Seth Borenstein, Associated Press | News | Comments

Pope Francis' plea to make the state of the environment a central moral issue of our age has been greeted with applause from climate activists and a wide range of church, science and government leaders, but dismissive shrugs from those who doubt climate change. In "Laudato Si," Francis addressed "every living person on this planet," urging them to hear "both the cry of the Earth and the cry of the poor."

This image depicts the times at which different connections in the brain are used to spread information. In general, information appears to rapidly spread from a compact core of central pathways. Courtesy of Olaf Sporns/Bratislav Misic

Twitter Tracking Model Sheds Light on How Information Spreads in the Brain

June 19, 2015 1:49 pm | by Indiana University | News | Comments

Researchers are using data mapping methods created to track the spread of information on social networks to trace its dissemination across a surprisingly different system: the human brain. The research team found that applying social network models to the brain reveals specific connections and nodes that may be responsible for higher forms of cognition.

The Merlin digital lab notebook supports researchers in documenting processes and controls laboratory equipment. © Fraunhofer IPA

Digital Lab Notebook Protocol Editor Simplifies Documentation

June 19, 2015 12:05 pm | by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft | News | Comments

Scientists have to clearly document their experiments in a reproducible way, but depending on time pressure and the workflow in the lab, that is often a difficult task. “Merlin,” a digital lab notebook developed by the Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Engineering and Automation IPA, aims to make scientific documentation easier in the future.

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Researchers have successfully cooled a gas of sodium potassium (NaK) molecules to a temperature of 500 nanokelvin. In this artist's illustration, the NaK molecule is represented with frozen spheres of ice merged together: the smaller sphere on the left re

Near Absolute Zero, Molecules Exhibit Strange, Exotic States of Matter

June 19, 2015 12:00 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

The air around us is a chaotic superhighway of molecules whizzing through space and constantly colliding at speeds of hundreds of miles per hour. Such erratic behavior is normal at ambient temperatures. But scientists have long suspected that, if temperatures were to plunge to near absolute zero, they would come to a screeching halt. This more orderly behavior would begin to form very strange, exotic states of matter never observed...

A Mass Spectrometry Add-On for ChemAxon’s Instant JChem enables storing, searching and displaying of mass spectrometry data in the context of chemically aware databases.

ChemAxon and BSSN Software Partner to Offer Analytical Data Management in a Chemical Context

June 18, 2015 3:15 pm | by ChemAxon | News | Comments

ChemAxon, a provider of chemistry software solutions and consulting services for life science research, and BSSN Software GmbH, a specialist in vendor-independent analytical data management, are announcing a partnership that allows users to manage analytical data in ChemAxon's chemistry software solutions using open standards.

Short inverted repeat sequences of DNA nucleotides are enriched at human cancer breakpoints. Courtesy of Karen Vasquez, UT Austin

Researchers Surprisingly Link DNA Crosses to Cancer using Stampede and Lonestar

June 18, 2015 2:43 pm | by Jorge Salazar, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

Supercomputers have helped scientists find a surprising link between cross-shaped (or cruciform) pieces of DNA and human cancer. The study found that small DNA cruciforms are mutagenic, altering DNA in a way that can increase risk of cancer in yeast, monkeys and in humans. Researchers found short inverted repeats of 30 base pairs and under in a reference database of mutations in human cancer that are somatic, meaning not inherited.

An international team of researchers has discovered traces of methane in Martian meteorites, a possible clue in the search for life on the Red Planet.

Methane Found on Martian Meteorites

June 17, 2015 2:44 pm | by Jim Shelton, Yale University | News | Comments

An international team of researchers has discovered traces of methane in Martian meteorites, a possible clue in the search for life on the Red Planet.

Complex models that let you look at the combined action of many different variants have, until now, involved so much computation that it would take a year to run a single complex query.

Complex, Large-scale Genome Analysis made Easier

June 16, 2015 12:45 pm | by European Molecular Biology Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new approach to studying the effect of multiple genetic variations on different traits. The new algorithm makes it possible to perform genetic analysis of up to 500,000 individuals — and many traits at the same time. Complex models that let you look at the combined action of many different variants have, until now, involved so much computation that it would take a year to run a single complex query.

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Roger Smith is the Chief Technology Officer for Florida Hospital's Nicholson Center.

Robotic Surgery Advances the Future of Medicine

June 16, 2015 8:28 am | by Roger Smith, Ph.D., Florida Hospital Nicholson Center | Blogs | Comments

As robotic surgery technology continues to advance, so does the need for medical research around the standard of care and true capabilities of the technology in a surgical setting. Many industry leaders, including Fortune 500 companies and the Florida Hospital Nicholson Center, are interested in taking robotic surgery to the next step to allow for telesurgery, or remote surgery.

Writer-director Pete Docter wanted to deeply understand the science behind such intellectual concepts as personality and memory before visually interpreting them on screen. He studied scientific papers and cross-checked story ideas with Keltner and other

Neuroscience Inspires Cartoon Action in Pixar's Inside Out

June 15, 2015 4:30 pm | by Sandy Cohen, AP Entertainment Writer | News | Comments

Drawing on real neuroscience and the latest psychological research, Inside Out goes where no animated film has gone before: Deep inside the workings of a young girl's mind. It centers on 11-year-old Riley, a happy, hockey-loving kid. Most of the action, though, takes place inside her head, where her staff of personified emotions — Joy, Anger, Sadness, Fear and Disgust — is in charge of operations.

Oculus Founder Palmer Luckey holds up the new Oculus Touch input device for the Rift virtual reality headset during a news conference June 11, 2015, in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg)

Oculus expanding Virtual-Reality Headset to Simulate Touch, Gestures

June 15, 2015 3:28 pm | by Associated Press | News | Comments

Oculus is expanding its virtual-reality headset to simulate the sensation of touch and gesturing as part of its quest to blur the lines between the fake and genuine world. The touch controllers are designed to enable people to pick up guns, throw Frisbees or carry out other actions within the fantasy scenes they see through the Rift virtual reality headset.

Paul Denny-Gouldson is VP of Strategic Solutions at IDBS.

Shaping your ‘Lab of the Future’ Strategy

June 15, 2015 8:50 am | by Paul Denny-Gouldson, IDBS | Blogs | Comments

For research and development decision-makers, the ‘lab of the future’ invokes images of huge cost and resources diverted to new and complex systems. Some cite automation and AI as harbingers of the futuristic lab although, fundamentally, these will support scientists — not replace them. Others see mobility as the key issue, but this is not a panacea and, instead, should form part of a multi-platform approach.

 	http://www.scientificcomputing.com/sites/scientificcomputing.com/files/Escherichia_Coli_Colonies.jpg

Escherichia Coli Colonies

June 12, 2015 4:41 pm | by CDC | News | Comments

These are colonies of Escherichia coli bacteria grown on a Hektoen enteric (HE) agar plate medium; colonies of E. coli grown on HE agar display a raised morphology, and are yellow to orange-yellow in coloration.

A neuroblastoma: TGen's extended partnership with Dell will help it optimize a high-performance computing infrastructure to enable researchers to analyze and store massive amounts of genetic data more quickly and reach more patients than ever before. To d

First-of-a-kind Clinical Trials Support Fight against Pediatric Cancer

June 11, 2015 5:08 pm | by TGen | News | Comments

Dell has announced an extended partnership with TGen to help clinical researchers and doctors globally expand the reach and impact of the world's first FDA-approved precision medicine trial for pediatric cancer. The renewed commitment includes an additional $3 million Dell grant to support continued collaboration with TGen and the Neuroblastoma and NMTRC expanded pediatric cancer clinical trials in EMEA.

A hawkmoth clings to a robotic flower used to study the insect’s ability to track the moving flower under low-light conditions. The research shows that the creatures can slow their brains to improve vision under low

Infrared Cameras, Robotic Flowers Reveal Hawkmoth Secrets

June 11, 2015 4:48 pm | by Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

It's difficult enough to see things in the dark, but what if you also had to hover in mid-air while tracking a flower moving in the wind? That's the challenge the hummingbird-sized hawkmoth (Manduca sexta) must overcome while feeding on the nectar of its favorite flowers.

The basic algorithm for determining how much two sequences of symbols have in common — the “edit distance” between them — is now more than 40 years old. And for more than 40 years, computer science researchers have been trying to improve upon it, without

Longstanding Problem Put to Rest: 40-year-old Algorithm can’t be solved More Efficiently

June 11, 2015 4:33 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Comparing the genomes of different species — or different members of the same species — is the basis of a great deal of modern biology. DNA sequences that are conserved across species are likely to be functionally important, while variations between members of the same species can indicate different susceptibilities to disease. The basic algorithm for determining how much two sequences of symbols have in common is more than 40 years old.

Scientists from the California Academy of Sciences celebrated World Ocean’s Day with a slew of brand new marine discoveries — more than 100 species that are likely new to science. The Philippines is home to the most biologically diverse waters on Earth, a

Scientists discover 100+ New Marine Species in Philippines

June 11, 2015 4:25 pm | by California Academy of Sciences | News | Comments

Scientists from the California Academy of Sciences celebrated World Ocean’s Day with a slew of brand new marine discoveries — more than 100 species that are likely new to science. The Philippines is home to the most biologically diverse waters on Earth, and remains the centerpiece of the Academy’s multi-year exploration of the Coral Triangle’s biological treasures.

Exemplar 7.0 LIMS

Exemplar 7.0 LIMS

June 10, 2015 11:44 am | Product Releases | Comments

Exemplar LIMS 7.0 goes beyond traditional laboratory information management (LIMS) systems by combining biology electronic laboratory notebook (ELN) and scientific data management system (SDMS) capabilities with searching tools, robust collaboration and high scalability. Features include full indexing of unstructured data, so all relevant content becomes searchable.

Manu Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford, and his students have developed a synchronous computer that operates using the unique physics of moving water droplets. Their goal is to design a new class of computers that can precisely

Computer Operates on Water Droplets

June 9, 2015 10:30 am | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford University | News | Comments

Stanford bioengineer Manu Prakash and his students have developed a synchronous computer that operates using the unique physics of moving water droplets. Computers and water typically don't mix, but in Manu Prakash's lab, the two are one and the same. Prakash, an assistant professor of bioengineering at Stanford, and his students have built a synchronous computer that operates using the unique physics of moving water droplets.

Rose had a "formidable intellect and unwavering curiosity about fundamental biological and chemical processes that are the foundation for life,"

2004 Nobel Chemistry Winner Irwin Rose Dies at 88

June 4, 2015 3:54 pm | by AP | News | Comments

Irwin Rose, a biochemist who shared the 2004 Nobel Prize in chemistry for discovering a way that cells destroy unwanted proteins — the basis for developing new therapies for diseases such as cervical cancer and cystic fibrosis — has died. He was 88. He had a "formidable intellect and unwavering curiosity about fundamental biological and chemical processes that are the foundation for life."

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