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Yin-yang haplotypes arise when a stretch of DNA evolves to present two divergent forms. A group of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis showed a massive yin-yang haplotype pair encompassing the gene gephyrin on human chromosome 14. This image s

Mining Public Big Data yields Genetic Clues in Complex Human Diseases

March 27, 2015 11:35 am | by Beth Miller, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Big data: It’s a term we read and hear about often, but is hard to grasp. Computer scientists tackled some big data about an important protein and discovered its connection in human history as well as clues about its role in complex neurological diseases. Through a novel method of analyzing these big data, they discovered a region encompassing the gephyrin gene on chromosome 14 that underwent rapid evolution after splitting in two...

Highly Realistic Human Heart Simulations Transforming Medical Care

March 26, 2015 5:03 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Articles | Comments

The World Health Organization reports that cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of...

SLIM: Stability Lab Information Manager

March 26, 2015 11:36 am | Product Releases | Comments

SLIM (Stability Lab Information Manager) is a fully validated LIMS designed for complete...

Car-sized Ancient Salamanders found in Portugal

March 25, 2015 11:45 am | by AP | News | Comments

Fossil remains of a previously unknown species of a crocodile-like "super salamander" that grew...

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Graphic of viruses attempting to "dock" on a microbial mat, using the tips of their tails. Courtesy of Blair Paul

Strange Viruses Discovered in Deep Ocean

March 23, 2015 11:51 am | by NSF | News | Comments

The intraterrestrials, they might be called. Strange creatures live in the deep sea, but few are odder than the viruses that inhabit deep ocean methane seeps and prey on single-celled microorganisms called archaea. The least understood of life's three primary domains, archaea thrive in the most extreme environments: near hot ocean rift vents, in acid mine drainage, in the saltiest of evaporation ponds and in petroleum deposits.

Life reconstruction of Carnufex carolinensis. Copyright Jorge Gonzales

Before Dinosaurs, Carolina Butcher was Top Beast of Prey

March 20, 2015 10:26 am | by North Carolina State University | News | Comments

A newly discovered crocodilian ancestor may have filled one of North America's top predator roles before dinosaurs arrived on the continent. The "Carolina Butcher" was a nine-foot-long, land-dwelling crocodylomorph that walked on its hind legs and likely preyed upon smaller inhabitants of North Carolina ecosystems, such as armored reptiles and early mammal relatives.

Buckybombs could one day be used for demolition of cancer cells. Courtesy of USC/Holly Wilder

Turning Buckyballs into Buckybombs: Nanoscale Explosives could Eliminate Cancer Cells

March 19, 2015 2:44 pm | by University of Southern California | News | Comments

In 1996, a trio of scientists won the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for their discovery of Buckminsterfullerene — soccer-ball-shaped spheres of 60 joined carbon atoms that exhibit special physical properties. Now, 20 years later, scientists have figured out how to turn them into Buckybombs. These nanoscale explosives show potential for use in fighting cancer, with the hope that they could target and eliminate cancer at the cellular level.

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Giant beetles present a potential alternative to remote-controlled drones

Remote-controlled Cyborg Beetle Flies, Turns and Hovers

March 19, 2015 2:40 pm | by Nanyang Technological University | News | Comments

Breaking new grounds in the future of remote-controlled drone technology, researchers have developed a living machine whose flight can be wirelessly controlled with minimal human intervention. Mounted on top of a giant flower beetle, a tiny, electronic backpack with a built-in wireless receiver and transmitter converts radio signals received remotely into a variety of actions in the beetle.

Physicist Chien-Shiung Wu in 1963 at Columbia University, where she was a professor. Known as the First Lady of Physics, Wu worked on the Manhattan Project and helped disprove a widely-accepted law of theoretical physics. Later in her life, Wu researched

Paving the Way: 28 Amazing Women, Trailblazing Science

March 18, 2015 12:16 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Breakthrough science requires pioneers. People who combine brilliance with courage, even in the face of daunting opposition. The women who paved the way for modern scientific exploration exemplify this spirit; grappling not only with fundamental questions of the universe, but with discrimination and societal constraints that often stripped them of scientific credit.

By using the app, Citizen Scientists can examine photos from the Web and provide further context that does not typically exist with the image alone.

iPad App Game Uses Citizen Science to Track Endangered Species

March 18, 2015 11:12 am | by Aaron Mason, Wildsense, University of Surrey | News | Comments

A new app for the iPad could change the way wildlife is monitored. Wildsense, an initiative from a group of researchers at the University of Surrey, is designed to use citizen science, the concept of allowing people to get directly involved in science, to help in the conservation of rare and endangered species.

TITAN Laboratory Information Management System

TITAN Laboratory Information Management System

March 18, 2015 10:41 am | Product Releases | Comments

TITAN is a Web-based enterprise resource planning (ERP)/laboratory information management system (LIMS) with integrated Report Designer, Workflow and Artifact Designer tools. It features three layers: a Laboratory Layer for management of laboratory functions from sample tracking to final disposition, facilitation of ISO 17025 compliance, e-sigs for custom workflows ...

Like a Chinese Finger Puzzle Trap, the bond between scaffolding proteins in the cellulosome strengthens when force is exerted on it and becomes one of the strongest found in living systems.

Solving Puzzle-Like Bond for Biofuels: First Look at One of Nature's Strongest Biomolecular Interactions

March 17, 2015 3:02 pm | by Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

One of life's strongest bonds has been discovered by a science team researching biofuels with the help of supercomputers. Their find could boost efforts to develop catalysts for biofuel production from non-food waste plants. Renowned computational biologist Klaus Schulten of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign led the analysis and modeling of the bond, which behaves like a Chinese Finger Trap puzzle.

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Monocytes are immune cells present in the blood. They are consequently also found in tumors. In this setting, monocytes are known to promote the development of the tumoral blood vessels and to suppress the immune response directed at the tumor. Courtesy o

Mathematics Yields New Possibilities for Reprogramming Immune Response to Breast Cancer

March 17, 2015 2:55 pm | by Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics | News | Comments

A means of reprogramming a flawed immune response into an efficient anti-tumoral one was brought to light by the results of a translational trial relating to breast cancer. Thanks to the innovative combination of mathematical modeling and experimentation, only 20 tests were necessary, whereas traditional experimentation would have required 596 tests to obtain the same results.

The alliance, funded by UPMC, will see its work carried out by Pitt-led and CMU-led centers, with participation from all three institutions.

University of Pittsburgh, Carnegie Mellon University, UPMC Form Alliance to Transform Healthcare through Big Data

March 17, 2015 2:19 pm | by UPMC | News | Comments

Today’s health care system generates massive amounts of data — electronic health records, diagnostic imaging, prescriptions, genomic profiles, insurance records, even data from wearable devices. Information has always been essential for guiding care, but computer tools now make it possible to use that data to provide deeper insights. Leveraging big data to revolutionize healthcare is the focus of the Pittsburgh Health Data Alliance.

Image of a section of the brain shows the fusion of microscopy (pink area) and mass spectrometry (pixelated colors at bottom) to produce a detailed “map” of the distribution of proteins, lipids and other molecules within sharply delineated brain structure

Mass Spectrometry and Microscopy Blended with Regression Analysis

March 16, 2015 12:28 pm | by Bill Snyder, Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

Researchers have achieved the first “image fusion” of mass spectrometry and microscopy — a technical tour de force that could, among other things, dramatically improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Using a mathematical approach called regression analysis, they mapped each pixel of mass spectrometry data onto the corresponding spot on the microscopy image to produce a new, “predicted” image.

Debra 6.2 Laboratory Information Management System

Debra 6.2 Laboratory Information Management System

March 12, 2015 11:17 am | Lablogic Systems Limited | Product Releases | Comments

Debra 6.2 laboratory information management system (LIMS) is designed for radiolabelled metabolism studies. The system offers a protocol set-up for adsorption/desorption studies, together with flexible reporting for all study parameters. Other key features include soil dispensing options for aqueous sediment study types, the ability to convert aliquot volumes to weights by addition of a density value ...

The appearance of fractal patterns on the surface of cancer cells. Courtesy of M. Dokukin and I. Sokolov

Fractal Patterns Offer New Line of Attack on Cancer

March 11, 2015 2:19 pm | by Institute of Physics | News | Comments

Studying the intricate fractal patterns on the surface of cells could give researchers a new insight into the physical nature of cancer, and provide new ways of preventing the disease from developing. This is according to scientists who have, for the first time, shown how physical fractal patterns emerge on the surface of human cancer cells at a specific point of progression towards cancer.

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To qualify for the DRC Finals, the new teams had to submit videos showing successful completion of five sample tasks.

$3.5 Million in Prizes at Stake in DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals

March 11, 2015 11:40 am | by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency | News | Comments

The international robotics community has turned out in force for the DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals, a competition of robots and their human supervisors to be held June 5 to 6 outside of Los Angeles. In the competition, human-robot teams will be tested on capabilities that could enable them to provide assistance in future natural and man-made disasters.

Proba-V’s ability to see the unseeable is helping doctors to look deeper into human tissues and detect skin diseases earlier.

High-speed Space Camera helping to Save Lives

March 10, 2015 10:37 am | by ESA | News | Comments

A high-speed camera for monitoring vegetation from space and combating famine in Africa is being adapted to spot changes in human skin cells, invisible to the naked eye, to help diagnose skin diseases like cancer. In fact, the extraordinary digital infrared sensor from ESA’s Proba-V vegetation-scanning satellite is being adapted for several non-space applications.

SampleManager LIMS

SampleManager LIMS

March 10, 2015 9:44 am | Thermo Fisher Scientific | Product Releases | Comments

SampleManager LIMS is a comprehensive laboratory information management system. The integrated informatics solution comprises method execution, data visualization and laboratory management, and integrates with all popular enterprise-level software packages. It encompasses laboratory information management (LIMS), scientific data management (SDMS) and lab execution (LES).

Seahorse Mobile Edition

Seahorse Mobile Edition

March 10, 2015 9:31 am | BSSN Software GmbH | Product Releases | Comments

Seahorse Scientific Workbench is a vendor-neutral software suite for capturing, analyzing and sharing analytical data. It consolidates raw and result data from multiple experimental techniques in a single tool, based on the emerging ASTM AnIML Data Standard. Seahorse Mobile delivers scientific data to mobile devices and supports chromatography (HPLC, GC), mass spectrometry, NMR, optical spectroscopy, microplate reader, bioreactor and fermenter, medical imaging and process chromatography data types.

ACD/Spectrus Portal

ACD/Spectrus Portal

March 10, 2015 9:07 am | Advanced Chemistry Development, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

The ACD/Spectrus Portal is a Web-based interface that provides vendor neutral, multi-technique results from analytical chemistry experiments to laboratory chemists. The portal extends the ACD/Spectrus analytical and chemical laboratory intelligence platform through a series of domain-specific market applications.

Paul Denny-Gouldson is VP of Strategic Solutions at IDBS.

AI and Robot Scientists: The Lab of the Future?

March 10, 2015 8:44 am | by Paul Denny-Gouldson, IDBS | Blogs | Comments

Pharmaceutical companies are under intense pressure. With patents expiring and cost pressures growing, the speed and productivity of drug discovery and manufacturing are under the microscope. It is timely, then, that researchers recently shared promising findings on Eve — an artificially-intelligent robot scientist. Eve discovered a compound with anti-cancer properties. Is this a glimpse of what the lab of the future might look like?

The LabWare 7 enterprise laboratory platform brings together the capabilities of laboratory information management systems (LIMS) and electronic laboratory notebooks (ELN) in a single comprehensive solution.

LabWare 7 Enterprise Laboratory Platform

March 9, 2015 4:42 pm | LabWare, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

The LabWare 7 enterprise laboratory platform brings together the capabilities of laboratory information management systems (LIMS) and electronic laboratory notebooks (ELN) in a single comprehensive solution. It is an adaptable and functionally complete LIMS system scalable to suit every size organization, from single-site, single-user to global organizations with 1000s of users.

Researchers have been running large-scale experiments on the Internet, where people of any age can become research subjects. Their websites feature cognitive tests designed to be completed in just a few minutes. Shown here is a "pattern completion test" f

The Rise and Fall of Cognitive Skills: Different Parts of the Brain Work Best at Different Ages

March 9, 2015 3:59 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Scientists have long known that our ability to think quickly and recall information, also known as fluid intelligence, peaks around age 20 and then begins a slow decline. However, more recent findings, including a new study from neuroscientists at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), suggest that the real picture is much more complex.

A National Institutes of Health-led public-private partnership to transform and accelerate drug development achieved a significant milestone recently with the launch of a new Alzheimer’s Big Data portal — including delivery of the first wave of data — for

Big Data Portal Launches for Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery

March 6, 2015 2:36 pm | News | Comments

A National Institutes of Health-led public-private partnership to transform and accelerate drug development achieved a significant milestone recently with the launch of a new Alzheimer’s Big Data portal — including delivery of the first wave of data — for use by the research community. 

This computerized rendering shows a cutaway view of a collection of about 200 X-ray patterns, produced in an experiment at SLAC’s Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser. The images were combined to produce a 3-D rendering of an intact Mimivirus, a giant

Fantastic 3-D Images of Intact Infectious Virus Revealed

March 4, 2015 12:00 pm | by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory | News | Comments

For the first time, researchers have produced a 3-D image revealing part of the inner structure of an intact, infectious virus, using a unique X-ray laser. The virus, called Mimivirus, is in a curious class of “giant viruses” discovered just over a decade ago. The experiment establishes a new technique for reconstructing the 3-D structure of many types of biological samples from a series of X-ray laser snapshots.

At their heart, the simulations are akin to modeling chemical reactions taking place between different elements and, in this case, we have four states a person can be in — human, infected, zombie or dead zombie — with approximately 300 million people. Cou

Statistical Mechanics Reveal Ideal Hideout to Save your Brains from the Undead

March 2, 2015 2:26 pm | by American Physical Society | News | Comments

Researchers focusing on a fictional zombie outbreak as an approach to disease modeling suggest heading for the hills, in the Rockies, to save your brains from the undead. Reading World War Z: An Oral History of the First Zombie War, and taking a graduate statistical mechanics class inspired a group of Cornell University researchers to explore how an "actual" zombie outbreak might play out in the U.S.

A representation of a 9-nanometer azotosome, about the size of a virus, with a piece of the membrane cut away to show the hollow interior. Courtesy of James Stevenson

Life 'Not as We Know It' Possible on Saturn's Moon Titan

March 2, 2015 11:31 am | by Anne Ju, Cornell University | News | Comments

Liquid water is a requirement for life on Earth. But in other, much colder worlds, life might exist beyond the bounds of water-based chemistry. Taking a simultaneously imaginative and rigidly scientific view, chemical engineers and astronomers offer a template for life that could thrive in a harsh, cold world — specifically Titan, the giant moon of Saturn.

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