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SMAP's soil moisture measurements will help with forecasts of precipitation and temperature. Courtesy of UCAR

Building a Better Weather Forecast? Fine-scale Soil Moisture Data will Soon Help

January 29, 2015 12:50 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

If you were trying to forecast tomorrow's weather, you would probably look up at the sky rather than down at the ground. But if you live in the U.S. Midwest or someplace with a similar climate, one key to a better weather forecast may lie beneath your feet. Better soil moisture observations lead to better land-atmosphere interaction in weather forecasting models and ultimately to a better prediction of temperature and precipitation.

ACD/Labs 2015 Cheminformatics Software

January 29, 2015 10:38 am | Product Releases | Comments

ACD/Labs 2015 cheminformatics software builds upon the capabilities of the ACD/Spectrus and ACD/...

Laser Co-creator and Nobel Laureate Charles Townes dies at 99

January 29, 2015 8:37 am | by Lisa Leff, Associated Press | News | Comments

Charles H. Townes' inspiration for the predecessor of the laser came to him while sitting on a...

Improving Data Mobility and Management for International Cosmology Workshop

January 28, 2015 3:06 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | Events

Registration is now open for a workshop on “Improving Data Mobility and Management for...

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Arabidopsis thaliana, a model flowering plant studied by biologists, has climate-sensitive genes whose expression was found to evolve. Courtesy of Penn State

Needle in a Haystack: Finding the Right Genes in Tens of Thousands

January 28, 2015 2:45 pm | by TACC | News | Comments

Scientists using supercomputers found genes sensitive to cold and drought in a plant help it survive climate change. The computational challenges were daunting, involving thousands of individual strains of the plant with hundreds of thousands of markers across the genome and testing for a dozen environmental variables. Their findings increase basic understanding of plant adaptation and can be applied to improve crops.

Production of growth factors (IGF-II) as public goods game network: this microscopic image shows how cancer cells (colorless cells) that do not produce IGF-II but need it for their growth reproduce in a population of cancer cells that produces and consume

Game Theory Explains Social Interactions of Cancer Cells

January 28, 2015 2:33 pm | by University of Basel | News | Comments

Researchers were able to predict the interactions of cancer cells using a part of game theory known as the public goods game, suggesting that work on the social interactions among cancer cells may provide insight into the dynamics of cancer. Researchers applied this model to the cooperation between producing and non-producing members of a cancer cell population, in order to examine if the model is also applicable to biological processes.

The Biosurveillance Gateway site offers a variety of Los Alamos-developed biosurveillance tools that can be used for decision support in disease surveillance.

Biosurveillance Gateway Supports Centralized Global Disease Response

January 28, 2015 2:21 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

A new online resource, called the Biosurveillance Gateway, is in place at Los Alamos National Laboratory, providing a centralized portal for all news, information, resources and research related to biosurveillance at the laboratory. The goal of the site is to support global disease surveillance, providing useful tools for professionals around the world to reference from a single location.

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The Software Sustainability Institute, a collaboration between the Universities of Southampton, Oxford, Edinburgh and Manchester, is spreading the word about its work in promoting greater use of software in research with an Android phone app, which is ava

New App Helping to Share World-class Software-enabled Research

January 27, 2015 10:04 am | by University of Southampton | News | Comments

Electronics and computer science researchers have helped to develop a new app to share world-class research and to receive the latest research news through a phone or tablet. The Software Sustainability Institute, a collaboration between the Universities of Southampton, Oxford, Edinburgh and Manchester, aims to spread the word about its work in promoting greater use of software in research.

The researchers determined the networks of the active genes and — like a dragnet — looked for the "main perpetrators" using a computer model. Courtesy of Atramos

Computer Model Creates Dragnet for Epilepsy Genes

January 26, 2015 3:07 pm | by University of Bonn | News | Comments

Scientists have taken a new path in the research into causes of epilepsy: They determined the networks of the active genes and — like a dragnet — looked for the "main perpetrators" using a computer model. In doing so, they discovered the molecule sestrin-3 as a central switch. In animal models, the scientists were able to demonstrate that inhibition of sestrin-3 leads to a reduction in seizures.

Clemson University associate professor of genetics and biochemistry Alex Feltus is co-principal investigator on the Tripal Gateway project award.

Researchers get $1.4 Million to Advance Big Data for Genomic Research

January 22, 2015 2:04 pm | by Brian M. Mullen, Clemson University | News | Comments

A team of scientists has received a $1.4 million grant from the National Science Foundation to help meet the growing needs of the data-driven genomic science community. The Tripal Gateway project will build on existing cyberinfrastructure to enhance the capacity of genomic databases to manage, exchange and process “big data.”

Partek Flow 4.0 for NGS Analysis

Partek Flow 4.0 for NGS Analysis

January 22, 2015 1:51 pm | Partek Incorporated | Product Releases | Comments

Partek Flow 4.0 is designed specifically for the analysis needs of next-generation sequencing applications including RNA, small RNA and DNA sequencing. With the ability to either build custom analysis pipelines or download pre-built pipelines, users can perform alignment, quantification, quality control, statistics and visualization.

An international team of roughly 300 scientists pooled brain scans and genetic data worldwide to pinpoint genes that enhance or break down key brain regions in people from 33 countries. This is the first high-profile study since the NIH launched its Big D

Global Consortium Cracks Part of Brain’s Genetic Code

January 21, 2015 4:05 pm | by Alison Trinidad, Keck Medicine of USC | News | Comments

In the largest collaborative study of the brain to date, researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) led a global consortium of 190 institutions to identify eight common genetic mutations that appear to age the brain an average of three years. The discovery could lead to targeted therapies and interventions for Alzheimer’s disease, autism and other neurological conditions.

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Biomolecule Toolkit

Biomolecule Toolkit

January 21, 2015 12:27 pm | ChemAxon, Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

The Biomolecule Toolkit is a Web service-based toolkit designed to bridge the gap between biology and chemistry for complex biomolecular entities. It provides unambiguous representation at the sequence and atomic level for a diverse set of biomolecules such as peptides, oligonucleotides, proteins and antibody drug conjugates, including those containing unnatural and chemically-modified components, thereby allowing their storage, indexing and search within a database.

Solar panels on the roof of the Paul VI Hall, at the Vatican. Pope Benedict XVI was dubbed "the Green Pope" for his frequent calls to stop ecological devastation and his efforts to bring solar power to the Vatican city-state. "Can we remain indifferent be

Pope's Statement on Climate Change: 5 Things to Know

January 20, 2015 2:43 pm | by Rachel Zoll, AP Religion Writer | News | Comments

Pope Francis, who pledged on the day of his installation as pontiff to make the environment a priority, is drafting a highly anticipated encyclical on ecology and climate change. Environmentalists are thrilled by the prospect of a rock-star pope putting his moral weight behind efforts to curb global warming. Francis said he wanted the document to be released in time to be read before the next round of U.N. climate treaty talks in Paris.

E-WorkBook 10 ELN Software

E-WorkBook 10 ELN Software

January 20, 2015 12:33 pm | Idbs | Product Releases | Comments

E-WorkBook 10is ELN software for multidisciplinary research and development that is designed to simplify day-to-day tasks, such as authoring content, analyzing datasets or visualizing complex results. Via the enhanced Web interface, the product is accessible through Internet browsers with a Web connection.

This live panel discussion looks at how big data and data science have fast become the next frontier for innovation, competition and productivity.

Big Data Insights: Accelerating Discovery in Medicine, Research & More

January 20, 2015 11:51 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

On Wednesday, January 21, Scientific Computing will host a live panel discussion that looks at how big data and data science have fast become the next frontier for innovation, competition and productivity. One of today’s significant advances in data science introduces us to the Next Generation Cyber Capability (NGCC) at Arizona State University (ASU)...

Map of diffuse interstellar bands Courtesy of T.W. Lan, G. Zasowski, B. Ménard, SDSS and 2MASS/UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF

Astronomers Map Mysterious Molecules in our Galaxy

January 12, 2015 10:20 am | by Phil Sneiderman, Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

By analyzing the light of hundreds of thousands of celestial objects, astronomers have created a unique map of enigmatic molecules in our galaxy that are responsible for puzzling features in the light from stars, called diffuse interstellar bands. DIBs have been a mystery ever since they were discovered in 1922 — exactly which of the many thousands of possible molecules are responsible for these features?

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William Weaver is an associate professor in the Department of Integrated Science, Business, and Technology at La Salle University.

By Any Other Name: The Central Role of Informatics in STEM Education

January 9, 2015 3:05 pm | by William Weaver, Ph.D. | Blogs | Comments

The human lament that things in the past were much simpler is an accurate observation made from the perspective of riding along an exponentially increasing complexity curve. Examining the present or looking into the future can be a confusing torrent of concepts, vocabulary and technologies that appear to be spiraling out-of-control. At the First IEEE Integrated STEM Education Conference, Professor Steve Zilora reflected on this increase...

John Wass is a statistician based in Chicago, IL

Qlucore Omics Explorer: Analysis in an Instant

January 8, 2015 4:00 pm | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

Qlucore is a software platform for the analysis of genomics, proteomics and related data. As with most statistical and genomics software, it generates an immediate graphic for most analyses. Its specific areas of use include gene expression, protein arrays, DNA methylation, miRNA, proteomics, and pattern and structure identification in multivariate data.

 Using a new algorithm ECG map can help diagnose the location of cardiac disorder in a way which is better for the patients and more cost effective for health services. Courtesy of Meul

Electrocardiogram Algorithm Pinpoints exact Location of Heart Defects

January 8, 2015 3:15 pm | by Manchester University | News | Comments

A new technique to help surgeons find the exact location of heart defects could save lives, help them to treat patients more effectively and save health service cash. The development will allow non-invasive detection of the origin of heart problems and allow more effective treatment.

Approximately 3,000 FRC teams are projected to compete for the chance to gain top honors at the FIRST Championship, which will take place April 22 to 25 in St. Louis, MO.

2015 FIRST Robotics Competition Kicks Off

January 7, 2015 2:45 pm | by Automation Federation | News | Comments

Nearly 75,000 high-school students on approximately 3,000 teams at 107 venues around the globe joined the kickoff event on January 3, 2015, of the 2015 FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC) via live Comcast NBCUniversal broadcast. FIRST is a not-for-profit organization devoted to helping young people discover and develop a passion for science, engineering, technology and math.

A bundle of nerves that relays information from touch receptors on the skin to the spinal cord and ultimately the brain, imaged with the new technique. Courtesy of EMBL/L.Castaldi -- Click to enlarge

Unprecedentedly Detailed Image of Mouse Neurons

January 7, 2015 12:48 pm | by European Molecular Biology Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists can now explore nerves in mice in much greater detail than ever before, thanks to an approach developed by scientists at the European Molecular Biology Laboratory. The work enables researchers to easily use artificial tags, broadening the range of what they can study and vastly increasing image resolution.

Peter Boogaard is the founder of Industrial Lab Automation and chairman of the Paperless Lab Academy.

2015 Promises Major Milestones and Demands for Change

January 7, 2015 12:28 pm | by Peter J. Boogaard | Articles | Comments

Despite the fact that industries won’t change working processes unless there is a mandatory need to do so, major milestones are expected in 2015 in the battle to adopt data and standardization in our scientific community. The need for deployment of these integration standards to enable efficient sharing of knowledge across our internal and external partners is re-enforced by regulatory bodies.

Physicist Jim Bailey of Sandia National Laboratories observes a wire array that will heat foam to roughly 4 million degrees until it emits a burst of X-rays that heats a foil target to the interior conditions of the sun. Courtesy of Randy Montoya

Iron Sun: Not a Rock Band, but a Key to Stars’ Energy Transmission

January 6, 2015 12:16 pm | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

Working at temperatures matching the interior of the sun, researchers have been able to determine, for the first time in history, iron’s role in inhibiting energy transmission from the Sun's center to near the edge of its radiative band. Because that role is much greater than formerly surmised, the experimentally derived amount of iron’s opacity helps close a theoretical gap in the Standard Solar Model, used to model the behavior of stars.

Astronomers have found evidence that the “recipe” for creating Earth also applies to terrestrial exoplanets orbiting distant stars. Courtesy of David A. Aguilar (CfA)

How Do You Create an Earth-like Planet?

January 6, 2015 10:39 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

In the on-going search for habitable exoplanets, astronomers have been searching for evidence of how planets orbiting distant stars were created. Although planet Earth’s "test kitchen" has provided a detailed recipe, it hasn’t been clear whether other planetary systems followed the same formula. Now, researchers are reporting evidence that the formula for Earth also applies to terrestrial exoplanets orbiting distant stars.

A leading cause of skin and wound infections once confined largely to hospitals and nursing homes, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, or MRSA, is now cropping up in schools, farms and locker rooms, infecting otherwise healthy people. Researchers

Algorithm Predicts Superbugs' Countermoves

January 2, 2015 4:24 pm | by Duke University | News | Comments

With drug-resistant bacteria on the rise, even common infections that were easily controlled for decades — such as pneumonia — are proving trickier to treat with standard antibiotics. New drugs are desperately needed, but so are ways to maximize the effective lifespan of these drugs. Researchers used software they developed to predict a constantly-evolving infectious bacterium's countermoves to one of these new drugs ahead of time...

Trophic Coherence allows food webs to become larger while maintaining stability, a bit like flying buttresses were the element needed for cathedrals to do likewise. Courtesy of Additya

Universal Mathematical Property Identified in Every Ecosystem in Nature

December 24, 2014 9:58 am | by University of Warwick | News | Comments

A previously unknown mathematical property has been found to be behind one of nature’s greatest mysteries — how ecosystems survive. Found in nature and common to all ecosystems, Trophic Coherence is a measure of how plant and animal life interact within the food web of each ecosystem — providing scientists with the first-ever mathematical understanding of their architecture and how food webs are able to grow larger and more stable

Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source

Here They Are — The Most-read Stories of 2014

December 23, 2014 2:15 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

Certain stories hit home more than others. As 2014 winds to a close, we take a look back at some of the year's biggest hits. These are the articles, blogs and images that you, our readers, visited the most, including Text Mining: The Next Data Frontier...

This year's theme will focus on how to manage the change process in R&D and QA/QC laboratories of scientific organizations in pharmaceutical, biotechnology, consumer goods and chemical industries.

Paperless Lab Academy

December 23, 2014 8:38 am | by Industrial Lab Automation | Events

This year's theme will focus on how to manage the change process in R&D and QA/QC laboratories of scientific organizations in pharmaceutical, biotechnology, consumer goods and chemical industries. The interactive congress will give actionable insights on how to adopt a new mindset in our daily work.

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