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The industry's preeminent event on Molecular Medicine, focusing on Drug Discovery, Genomics, Diagnostics and Information Technology.

22nd International Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference

August 28, 2014 3:17 pm | Events

The 22nd International Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference is the industry's Preeminent Event on Molecular Medicine, focusing on Drug Discovery, Genomics, Diagnostics and Information Technology. Spanning six days this year, the Tri-Conference includes an expanded program that includes 6 symposia, over 20 short courses, and 17 conference programs.

2015 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo

August 28, 2014 3:06 pm | Events

The 2015 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo plans to unite 3,000+ life sciences, pharmaceutical...

Humans and Computers Figure Out the Plant World Together

August 28, 2014 1:30 pm | by American Journal of Botany | News | Comments

As advances in technology allow researchers to gather more and more morphological and image-...

Agilent and Shimadzu Enable Control of Each Other’s GC Instruments in Respective Chromatographic Data Systems

August 26, 2014 3:32 pm | by Agilent | News | Comments

Agilent Technologies and Shimadzu announced the release of each other’s GC instrument control...

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Pathogenic bacteria (red) live side-by-side with benign species (green) in a healthy mouth. Scientists are beginning to understand what causes bacterial communities to shift from health to diseases like periodontitis, diabetes, and Crohn's disease. Courte

Mouth Bacteria Can Change its Diet, Supercomputers Reveal

August 22, 2014 12:28 pm | by Jorge Salazar, TACC | News | Comments

Bacteria inside your mouth drastically change how they act when you're diseased. Scientists say these surprising findings might lead to better ways to prevent or even reverse the gum disease periodontitis, diabetes and Crohn's disease. UT Austin researchers used shotgun metagenomic sequencing, a non-targeted way to study the all the genetic material of the bacterial communities. They analyzed the RNA collected with  Lonestar and Stampede.

Fossil Hallucigenia sparsa from the Burgess Shale Courtesy of M. R. Smith / Smithsonian Institute

Strangest Creature of Ancient Earth linked to Modern Animals

August 19, 2014 3:08 pm | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

The spines along its back were thought to be legs, its legs thought to be tentacles along its back, and its head was mistaken for its tail. The animal, known as Hallucigenia due to its otherworldly appearance, had been considered an ‘evolutionary misfit’ as it was not clear how it related to modern animal groups. Researchers have discovered an important link...

North Korea (the dark area) and South Korea at night. Courtesy of NASA

Citizen Science: Images of Earth at Night Crowdsourced for Science

August 19, 2014 2:59 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A wealth of images of Earth at night taken by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) could help save energy, contribute to better human health and safety and improve our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. But, scientists need your help to make that happen.

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Geneticist Assistant NGS Interpretative Workbench

Geneticist Assistant NGS Interpretative Workbench

August 18, 2014 3:42 pm | SoftGenetics, LLC | Product Releases | Comments

Geneticist Assistant NGS Interpretative Workbench features an Operational Management function with a unique workflow builder that permits users to mimic their physical workflow in “silico,” providing real‐time status tracking of samples throughout the workflow; operational statistics by department or function and automated e-mail notification of status changes.

The Ebola virus viewed through an electron microscope. As of mid-2014, Ebola has caused two dozen outbreaks in Africa since the virus first emerged in 1976. (AP Photo/Antwerp Institute of Tropical Medicine)

Another Ebola Problem: Finding its Natural Source

August 18, 2014 12:25 pm | by Mike Stobbe and Marilynn Marchione, AP Medical Writers | News | Comments

A scary problem lurks beyond the frenzied efforts to keep people from spreading Ebola: No one knows exactly where the virus comes from or how to stop it from seeding new outbreaks. Ebola has caused two dozen outbreaks in Africa since it first emerged in 1976. It is coming from somewhere — probably bats — but experts agree they need to pinpoint its origins in nature.

CEEDS — Collective Experience of Empathic Data Systems — is trying to make the subconscious ‘visible’ by gauging our sensory and physiological reactions to the flow of Big Data before us. © CEEDS

CEEDS Project: New Ways of Exploring Big Data

August 14, 2014 3:36 pm | by European Commission, CORDIS | News | Comments

In a society that has to understand increasingly big and complex datasets, EU researchers are turning to the subconscious for help in unraveling the deluge of information. Big Data refers to large amounts of data produced very quickly by a high number of diverse sources. Data can either be created by people or generated by machines, such as sensors gathering climate information, satellite imagery, digital pictures and videos...

Michael J. Fox speaks at Lotusphere 2012. The potential to collect and analyze data from thousands of individuals on measurable features of Parkinson's, such as slowness of movement, tremor and sleep quality, could enable researchers to assemble a better

Intel, Michael J. Fox Foundation Start Smartwatch Study

August 14, 2014 3:25 pm | by Intel | News | Comments

The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research (MJFF) and Intel have announced a collaboration aimed at improving research and treatment for Parkinson's disease — a neurodegenerative brain disease second only to Alzheimer's in worldwide prevalence. The collaboration includes a multiphase research study using a new big data analytics platform that detects patterns in participant data collected from wearable technologies.

“There are just so many reasons why data sharing is important,” says Gary Berg-Cross, general secretary of the Spatial Ontology Community of Practice and a member of the US advisory committee for RDA.

Laying the Foundations for Better Sharing of Research Data

August 14, 2014 2:57 pm | by Andrew Purcell | Articles | Comments

The Research Data Alliance seeks to build the social and technical bridges that enable open sharing and reuse of data, so as to address cross-border and cross-disciplinary challenges faced by researchers. This September, the RDA will be hosting its Fourth Plenary Meeting. Ahead of the event, iSGTW spoke to Gary Berg-Cross, general secretary of the Spatial Ontology Community of Practice and a member of the US advisory committee for RDA.

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Bain de Japonais Spring, an intertidal hydrothermal vent on Prony Bay. Courtesy of Roy Price, NASA

Our Ancestor’s Leaky Membrane answers Big Biology Questions

August 13, 2014 2:34 pm | by University College London | News | Comments

All life on Earth came from one common ancestor — a single-celled organism — but what it looked like, how it lived, and how it evolved into today’s modern cells is a four-billion-year-old mystery being solved by researchers using mathematical modeling. Findings suggest for the first time that life’s Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) had a ‘leaky’ membrane, which helps scientists answer two of biology’s biggest questions...

An April memo from the EPA's chief of staff said that "unsolicited contacts" need to be "appropriately managed" and that committee members should refrain from directly responding to requests about committees' efforts to advise the agency.

Groups to EPA: Stop Muzzling Science Advisers

August 13, 2014 12:39 pm | by Dina Cappiello, Associated Press | News | Comments

Journalist and scientific organizations accused the EPA of attempting to muzzle its independent scientific advisers by directing them to funnel all outside requests for information through agency officials. In a letter on August 12, 2014, groups representing journalists and scientists urged the EPA to allow advisory board members to talk directly to news reporters, Congress and other outside groups without first asking for permission.

This 3-D map shows how HCN molecules (made of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen) are released from the nucleus of comet Lemmon and then spread evenly throughout the atmosphere, or coma. Similar maps revealed that HNC and formaldehyde are produced in the coma,

3-D Comet Study Reveals Chemical Factory at Work

August 12, 2014 12:05 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A NASA-led team of scientists has created detailed 3-D maps of the atmospheres surrounding comets, identifying several gases and mapping their spread at the highest resolution ever achieved. Almost unheard of for comet studies, the 3-D perspective provides deeper insight into which materials are shed from the nucleus of the comet and which are produced within the atmosphere, or coma.

Qualoupe LIMS 1.3

Qualoupe LIMS 1.3

August 12, 2014 8:47 am | Two Fold Software Limited | Product Releases | Comments

Qualoupe LIMS 1.3 has a suite of over 30 applications that can be assigned to different roles within the laboratory so that users only have access to the applications they need to fulfil their role. All work within the system is based on management of samples and their associated details and action items.

Quantum dots make greens and reds pop on screens (left) compared with other types of displays (right).

The Grass Really Is Greener on Computer Screens, Thanks to Quantum Dots

August 11, 2014 1:06 pm | by ACS | News | Comments

High-tech specks called quantum dots could bring brighter, more vibrant color to mass market TVs, tablets, phones and other displays. A scientist has described a new technology, called 3M quantum dot enhancement film (QDEF), that efficiently makes liquid crystal display (LCD) screens more richly colored. His talk was given at the 248th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society (ACS).

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Seamlessly marrying electronics and brain signaling could transform how we treat some of the most puzzling and devastating diseases. Courtesy of Janulla

On the Frontiers of Cyborg Science: Seamless Marriage between Electronics and Brain Signaling

August 11, 2014 12:22 pm | by ACS | News | Comments

No longer just fantastical fodder for sci-fi buffs, cyborg technology is bringing us tangible progress toward real-life electronic skin, prosthetics and ultraflexible circuits. Taking this human-machine concept to an unprecedented level, pioneering scientists are working on the seamless marriage between electronics and brain signaling, with the potential to transform our understanding of how to treat the brain's most devastating diseases.

This July 2014 image provided by the Bureau of Land Management shows researchers in the interior of the Natural Trap Cave in north-central Wyoming. The cave holds the remains of tens of thousands of animals, including many now-extinct species, from the la

Dig This: Ancient Bones found in Wyoming Cave

August 8, 2014 4:36 pm | by Mead Gruver, Associated Press | News | Comments

North American lions, cheetahs and short-faced bears: Those are just a few fearsome critters from 25,000 years ago paleontologists already might have found in their first excavation of a bizarre northern Wyoming cave in 30 years. Good fossils also come in small packages: Exquisite rodent bones best examined by microscope, or even snippets of genetic material from long-extinct species, could be in their haul.

Mapping the Connection Matrix of the Human Brain: Structural and functional brain imaging analyses, combined with computational analyses, reveal highly connected, centrally located regions of the human cortex that form a “structural core” of the brain.

Institutions Announce Collaboration toward Sharing Neuroscience Data

August 8, 2014 4:21 pm | by Kavli Foundation | News | Comments

he Allen Institute for Brain Science, California Institute of Technology, New York University School of Medicine, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) and the University of California, Berkeley (UC Berkeley) are collaborating on a project aimed at making databases about the brain more useable and accessible for neuroscientists — a step seen as critical to accelerating the pace of discoveries about the brain in health and disease.

Proficy HMI/SCADA iFIX 5.8 Automation Software

Proficy HMI/SCADA iFIX 5.8 Automation Software

August 8, 2014 12:15 pm | Ge Intelligent Platforms | Product Releases | Comments

Proficy HMI/SCADA - iFIX 5.8 is designed to enable users to drive better analytics and leverage more reliability, flexibility and scalability across the enterprise. The real-time information management and SCADA solution includes latest-generation visualization tools and a control engine.

The aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN 76) transits the Pacific Ocean with ships assigned to Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 combined task force as part of a photo exercise north of Hawaii. RIMPAC, the world's largest multinational maritime exercise

Jam Session: New Technology Helps Sailors on the Digital Frontier

August 7, 2014 2:56 pm | by Eric Beidel, ONR | News | Comments

During the world's largest international maritime exercise, Sailors demonstrated a new system that could transform the future of electronic warfare and defense of ships at sea. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Research, Electronic Warfare Battle Management for Surface Defense will help Sailors and Marines coordinate electronic countermeasure responses to inbound threats faster than is possible through traditional voice communications

Paul Denny-Gouldson is Vice President of Strategic Solutions at IDBS.

The ELN Command Center: Gateway to Better Knowledge Management and Re-Use

August 7, 2014 10:35 am | by Paul Denny-Gouldson, IDBS | Blogs | Comments

The command center: any place which provides centralized command, a source of leadership and guidance to the rest of the organization. That’s what I see the concept of ELN developing into in research and development (R&D) across all sectors. Furthermore, it won’t be just a notebook, but a ’workplace.’

As aircraft climb or descend under certain atmospheric conditions, they can inadvertently seed mid-level clouds and cause narrow bands of snow or rain to develop and fall to the ground. Through this process, they leave behind odd-shaped holes or channels

Mysterious Clouds: When Aircraft Inadvertently Cause Rain or Snow

August 5, 2014 2:53 pm | by National Center for Atmospheric Research | News | Comments

As turboprop and jet aircraft climb or descend under certain atmospheric conditions, they can inadvertently seed mid-level clouds and cause narrow bands of snow or rain to develop and fall to the ground, new research finds. Through this seeding process, they leave behind odd-shaped holes or channels in the clouds, which have long fascinated the public.

PrecisionMDx LIS-LIMS Process Management Software Suite

PrecisionMDx LIS-LIMS Process Management Software Suite

July 30, 2014 11:37 am | Uniconnect | Product Releases | Comments

The PrecisionMDx (PMDx) System is designed for molecular laboratories. It supports molecular diagnostic requirements of entrepreneurial molecular test development companies and the institutional services of molecular pathology departments in community, private and academic medical centers.

A close-up of tiny bioink droplets used to print organs shows live cells inside. Courtesy of the American Chemical Society

Exploring 3-D Printing to Make Organs for Transplants

July 30, 2014 9:44 am | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

Printing whole new organs for transplants sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, but the real-life budding technology could one day make actual kidneys, livers, hearts and other organs for patients who desperately need them. In the ACS journal Langmuir, scientists are reporting new understanding about the dynamics of 3-D bioprinting that takes them a step closer to realizing their goal of making working tissues and organs on-demand.

ArxLab Notebook Web-based Electronic Notebook

ArxLab Notebook Web-based Electronic Notebook

July 29, 2014 3:15 pm | by Arxspan | Product Releases | Comments

ArxLab Notebook is a Web-based electronic notebook application. Its SaaS platform is intended for use in experimental sciences; it is preconfigured for chemistry and biology workflows while supporting free-form research notes and data. The software provides full audit trails, electronic signatures, witnessing workflows and built-in sharing functionality.

George Vacek is life sciences global director at DataDirect Networks.

Enabling Innovation and Discovery through Data-Intensive High Performance Cloud and Big Data Infrastructure

July 29, 2014 2:34 pm | by George Vacek, DataDirect Networks | Blogs | Comments

As the size and scale of life sciences datasets increases — think large-cohort longitudinal studies with multiple samples and multiple protocols — so does the challenge of storing, interpreting and analyzing this data. Researchers and data scientists are under increasing pressure to identify the most relevant and critical information within massive and messy data sets, so they can quickly make the next discovery.

Grammatikopoulos simulated two palladium nanoparticles colliding at different temperatures. The hotter the temperature, the more homogenous the resulting product, and the further the atoms in the particle crystallize.

Simulating the Invisible

July 29, 2014 2:07 pm | by Poncie Rutsch, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) | News | Comments

Every trillionth of a second, Panagiotis Grammatikopoulos calculates the location of each individual atom in a particle based on where it is and which forces apply. He uses a computer program to make the calculations, and then animates the motion of the atoms using visualization software. The resulting animation illuminates what happens, atom-by-atom, when two nanoparticles collide.

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