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Researchers have developed a math model that can predict the progression from nephritis — kidney inflammation — to interstitial fibrosis, scarring in the kidney that current treatments cannot reverse. Courtesy of Piotr Michał Jaworski

Math Model Replaces Invasive Kidney Biopsy for Lupus Patients

September 18, 2014 2:11 pm | by Emily Caldwell, Ohio State University | News | Comments

Mathematics might be able to reduce the need for invasive biopsies in patients suffering kidney damage related to the autoimmune disease lupus. Researchers have developed a math model that can predict the progression from kidney inflammation to scarring in the kidney that current treatments cannot reverse.

Martian Meteorite Yields More Evidence of the Possibility of Life on Mars

September 18, 2014 2:05 pm | by University of Manchester | News | Comments

A tiny fragment of Martian meteorite 1.3 billion years old is helping to make the case for the...

Mathematica Online

September 17, 2014 1:59 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Mathematica Online operates completely in the cloud and is accessible through any modern Web...

StarDrop 5.5 Software Suite

September 16, 2014 3:15 pm | Product Releases | Comments

StarDrop 5.5 is a suite of software for guiding decisions in drug discovery, helping project...

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Rice researchers tune the color output of each array both by varying the length of the nanorods and by adjusting the length of the spaces between nanorods. Courtesy of J. Olson/Rice University

Full-color Camouflage Displays Sense Color, Automatically Blend In

September 16, 2014 2:27 pm | by Jade Boyd, Rice University | News | Comments

The quest to create artificial “squid skin” — camouflaging metamaterials that can “see” colors and automatically blend into the background — is one step closer to reality, thanks to a color-display technology unveiled by Rice University’s Laboratory for Nanophotonics. The new full-color display technology uses aluminum nanoparticles to create the vivid red, blue and green hues found in today’s top-of-the-line LCD televisions and monitors.

The new Watson system is being trained to analyze patient records and clinical trial criteria in order to determine appropriate matches for patients.

Mayo Clinic Partners with IBM Watson for Clinical Trials

September 15, 2014 3:00 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

Mayo Clinic and IBM have announced plans to pilot Watson, the IBM cognitive computer, to match patients more quickly with appropriate clinical trials. A proof-of-concept phase is currently underway, with the intent to introduce it into clinical use in early 2015. Researchers hope the increased speed also will speed new discoveries.

Associate Professor Federico Lauro (left) and his wife Rachelle Jensen holding a sample cartridge

Building a Global Network of Citizen Oceanographers

September 12, 2014 3:00 pm | by Nanyang Technological University (NTU) | News | Comments

NTU is working with other international universities to build a global network of ‘citizen scientists’ on a free-to-access database for oceanographic data. To gain a better understanding of marine microbes that support the nutrient cycle and form the foundation of the food web, NTU scientists have embarked on a pilot project to crowd-source the collection of oceanographic data globally.

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Initial research focused on optimization of the PMEMD classical molecular dynamics code, part of the widely used AMBER Molecular Dynamics software, on multi-core Intel Xeon processors and “manycore” Intel Xeon Phi processors.

SDSC Joins Intel Parallel Computing Centers Program with Focus on Molecular Dynamics, Neuroscience and Life Sciences

September 12, 2014 2:44 pm | by San Diego Supercomputer Center | News | Comments

The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California, San Diego, is working with semiconductor chipmaker Intel to further optimize research software to improve the parallelism, efficiency, and scalability of widely used molecular and neurological simulation technologies.

Sentira Data Visualization Software

Sentira Data Visualization Software

September 12, 2014 2:36 pm | Optibrium Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

Sentira is a desktop application designed to provide elegant and dynamic visualization for compound data. The software is applicable across many fields of chemistry, enabling users to quickly find patterns in compound data, visualize structure-activity relationships and present and report results.

Scaffolded DNA origami utilizes numerous chemically synthesized, short DNA strands (staple strands) to direct the folding of a larger, biologically derived strand of DNA (scaffold strand). Molecular recognition (base pairing, i.e., A binds to T and G bind

Researchers Create World’s Largest DNA Origami

September 11, 2014 4:48 pm | by North Carolina State University | News | Comments

Researchers from North Carolina State University, Duke University and the University of Copenhagen have created the world’s largest DNA origami, which are nanoscale constructions with applications ranging from biomedical research to nanoelectronics. The standard for DNA origami has long been limited to a scaffold strand that is made up of 7,249 bases. The research team has now created DNA origami consisting of 51,466 bases

University of Chicago Paleontologist Paul C. Sereno looks inside the jaws of a 50-foot life-size model of a Spinosaurus dinosaur at the National Geographic Society exhibit in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Bizarre, Alien-like Giant Dinosaur Unveiled

September 11, 2014 4:33 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Picture the fearsome creatures of "Jurassic Park" crossed with the shark from "Jaws." Then, super-size to the biggest predator ever to roam Earth. Now, add a crocodile snout as big as a person and feet like a duck's. The result gives you some idea of a bizarre dinosaur scientists unveiled September 11, 2014. This patchwork of critters, a 50-foot predator, is the only known dinosaur to live much of its life in the water.

Parents and physicians and scientists from the Neuroblastoma and Medulloblastoma Translational Research Consortium and TGen have teamed to launch a groundbreaking personalized medicine clinical trial investigation for pediatric cancer.

Providing Critical Child-cancer Research Tools to Speed Development of Personalized Treatments

September 11, 2014 3:25 pm | by TGen | News | Comments

Dell, Terascala and the Translational Genomics Research Institute are installing state-of-the-art computing and programing specialized for human genome investigations at the National Cancer Institute. The mission of the Oncogenomics Section at the NCI is to harness the power of high throughput genomic and proteomic methods to improve the outcome of children with high-risk metastatic, refractory and recurrent cancers.

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This undated image provided by NASA shows the ozone layer over the years, September 17, 1979, top left, October 7, 1989, top right, October 9, 2006, lower left, and October 1, 2010, lower right. Earth’s protective but fragile ozone layer is finally starti

Scientists say Ozone Layer is Recovering

September 10, 2014 4:17 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Earth's protective but fragile ozone layer is beginning to recover, largely because of the phase-out since the 1980s of certain chemicals used in refrigerants and aerosol cans, a U.N. scientific panel reported September 10, 2014, in a rare piece of good news about the health of the planet. Scientists said the development demonstrates that, when the world comes together, it can counteract a brewing ecological crisis.

Ralph Lauren Corp. is unveiling the high-performance, fashion-forward Polo Tech shirt on opening day of the US Open. The Polo Tech shirt is an innovative new product from a fashion brand that merges biometrics into active lifestyle apparel, marking a revo

Ralph Lauren Introduces the Next Evolution of Wearable Technology

September 3, 2014 3:33 pm | by Ralph Lauren Corporation | News | Comments

Ralph Lauren Corp. is unveiling the high-performance, fashion-forward Polo Tech shirt on opening day of the US Open. The Polo Tech shirt is an innovative new product from a fashion brand that merges biometrics into active lifestyle apparel, marking a revolution in advanced technology designed to improve general wellness and increase personal fitness.

Cool Calculations for Cold Atoms

September 3, 2014 9:14 am | by The Joint Quantum Institute | News | Comments

Chemical reactions drive the mechanisms of life as well as a million other natural processes on earth. These reactions occur at a wide spectrum of temperatures, from those prevailing at the chilly polar icecaps to those at work churning near the earth’s core. At nanokelvin temperatures, by contrast, nothing was supposed to happen. Chemistry was expected to freeze up. Experiments and theoretical work have now show that this is not true.

This fluo image of a rat heart section received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Miguel Mano of the

Rat Heart Sections

September 2, 2014 9:22 am | News | Comments

This fluo image of a rat heart section received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. It was taken by Miguel Mano of the International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Department of High Throughput Screening, Trieste, Italy.

The industry's preeminent event on Molecular Medicine, focusing on Drug Discovery, Genomics, Diagnostics and Information Technology.

22nd International Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference

August 28, 2014 3:17 pm | Events

The 22nd International Molecular Medicine Tri-Conference is the industry's Preeminent Event on Molecular Medicine, focusing on Drug Discovery, Genomics, Diagnostics and Information Technology. Spanning six days this year, the Tri-Conference includes an expanded program that includes 6 symposia, over 20 short courses, and 17 conference programs.

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The Expo provides the perfect venue to share information and discuss enabling technologies that are driving biomedical research and the drug development process

2015 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo

August 28, 2014 3:06 pm | Events

The 2015 Bio-IT World Conference & Expo plans to unite 3,000+ life sciences, pharmaceutical, clinical, healthcare, and IT professionals from 32+ countries. The Expo provides the perfect venue to share information and discuss enabling technologies that are driving biomedical research and the drug development process.

As advances in technology allow researchers to gather more and more morphological and image-based data, it has become increasingly important to be able to analyze and interpret those data quickly, accurately, consistently, and objectively. Biometric and b

Humans and Computers Figure Out the Plant World Together

August 28, 2014 1:30 pm | by American Journal of Botany | News | Comments

As advances in technology allow researchers to gather more and more morphological and image-based data, it has become increasingly important to be able to analyze and interpret those data quickly, accurately, consistently, and objectively. Biometric and bioinformatic methods make this possible, and reveal the potential of data collected from the shape and form of plants to be as rich of a data source as genetic data.

Users in analytical laboratories have more freedom of choice when selecting a chromatography data system.

Agilent and Shimadzu Enable Control of Each Other’s GC Instruments in Respective Chromatographic Data Systems

August 26, 2014 3:32 pm | by Agilent | News | Comments

Agilent Technologies and Shimadzu announced the release of each other’s GC instrument control for their respective chromatography data systems. The move provides customers in analytical laboratories with more freedom of choice when selecting a chromatography data system.

Pathogenic bacteria (red) live side-by-side with benign species (green) in a healthy mouth. Scientists are beginning to understand what causes bacterial communities to shift from health to diseases like periodontitis, diabetes, and Crohn's disease. Courte

Mouth Bacteria Can Change its Diet, Supercomputers Reveal

August 22, 2014 12:28 pm | by Jorge Salazar, TACC | News | Comments

Bacteria inside your mouth drastically change how they act when you're diseased. Scientists say these surprising findings might lead to better ways to prevent or even reverse the gum disease periodontitis, diabetes and Crohn's disease. UT Austin researchers used shotgun metagenomic sequencing, a non-targeted way to study the all the genetic material of the bacterial communities. They analyzed the RNA collected with  Lonestar and Stampede.

Fossil Hallucigenia sparsa from the Burgess Shale Courtesy of M. R. Smith / Smithsonian Institute

Strangest Creature of Ancient Earth linked to Modern Animals

August 19, 2014 3:08 pm | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

The spines along its back were thought to be legs, its legs thought to be tentacles along its back, and its head was mistaken for its tail. The animal, known as Hallucigenia due to its otherworldly appearance, had been considered an ‘evolutionary misfit’ as it was not clear how it related to modern animal groups. Researchers have discovered an important link...

North Korea (the dark area) and South Korea at night. Courtesy of NASA

Citizen Science: Images of Earth at Night Crowdsourced for Science

August 19, 2014 2:59 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A wealth of images of Earth at night taken by astronauts on the International Space Station (ISS) could help save energy, contribute to better human health and safety and improve our understanding of atmospheric chemistry. But, scientists need your help to make that happen.

Geneticist Assistant NGS Interpretative Workbench

Geneticist Assistant NGS Interpretative Workbench

August 18, 2014 3:42 pm | SoftGenetics, LLC | Product Releases | Comments

Geneticist Assistant NGS Interpretative Workbench features an Operational Management function with a unique workflow builder that permits users to mimic their physical workflow in “silico,” providing real‐time status tracking of samples throughout the workflow; operational statistics by department or function and automated e-mail notification of status changes.

The Ebola virus viewed through an electron microscope. As of mid-2014, Ebola has caused two dozen outbreaks in Africa since the virus first emerged in 1976. (AP Photo/Antwerp Institute of Tropical Medicine)

Another Ebola Problem: Finding its Natural Source

August 18, 2014 12:25 pm | by Mike Stobbe and Marilynn Marchione, AP Medical Writers | News | Comments

A scary problem lurks beyond the frenzied efforts to keep people from spreading Ebola: No one knows exactly where the virus comes from or how to stop it from seeding new outbreaks. Ebola has caused two dozen outbreaks in Africa since it first emerged in 1976. It is coming from somewhere — probably bats — but experts agree they need to pinpoint its origins in nature.

CEEDS — Collective Experience of Empathic Data Systems — is trying to make the subconscious ‘visible’ by gauging our sensory and physiological reactions to the flow of Big Data before us. © CEEDS

CEEDS Project: New Ways of Exploring Big Data

August 14, 2014 3:36 pm | by European Commission, CORDIS | News | Comments

In a society that has to understand increasingly big and complex datasets, EU researchers are turning to the subconscious for help in unraveling the deluge of information. Big Data refers to large amounts of data produced very quickly by a high number of diverse sources. Data can either be created by people or generated by machines, such as sensors gathering climate information, satellite imagery, digital pictures and videos...

Michael J. Fox speaks at Lotusphere 2012. The potential to collect and analyze data from thousands of individuals on measurable features of Parkinson's, such as slowness of movement, tremor and sleep quality, could enable researchers to assemble a better

Intel, Michael J. Fox Foundation Start Smartwatch Study

August 14, 2014 3:25 pm | by Intel | News | Comments

The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research (MJFF) and Intel have announced a collaboration aimed at improving research and treatment for Parkinson's disease — a neurodegenerative brain disease second only to Alzheimer's in worldwide prevalence. The collaboration includes a multiphase research study using a new big data analytics platform that detects patterns in participant data collected from wearable technologies.

“There are just so many reasons why data sharing is important,” says Gary Berg-Cross, general secretary of the Spatial Ontology Community of Practice and a member of the US advisory committee for RDA.

Laying the Foundations for Better Sharing of Research Data

August 14, 2014 2:57 pm | by Andrew Purcell | Articles | Comments

The Research Data Alliance seeks to build the social and technical bridges that enable open sharing and reuse of data, so as to address cross-border and cross-disciplinary challenges faced by researchers. This September, the RDA will be hosting its Fourth Plenary Meeting. Ahead of the event, iSGTW spoke to Gary Berg-Cross, general secretary of the Spatial Ontology Community of Practice and a member of the US advisory committee for RDA.

Bain de Japonais Spring, an intertidal hydrothermal vent on Prony Bay. Courtesy of Roy Price, NASA

Our Ancestor’s Leaky Membrane answers Big Biology Questions

August 13, 2014 2:34 pm | by University College London | News | Comments

All life on Earth came from one common ancestor — a single-celled organism — but what it looked like, how it lived, and how it evolved into today’s modern cells is a four-billion-year-old mystery being solved by researchers using mathematical modeling. Findings suggest for the first time that life’s Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) had a ‘leaky’ membrane, which helps scientists answer two of biology’s biggest questions...

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