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Another dimension: Professor Marc in het Panhuis (left) and Ph.D. student Shannon Bakarich are building objects using 4D printing, where time is the fourth dimension.

4D Printing, where Time — actually Shape Shifting — is the 4th Dimension

April 24, 2015 2:01 pm | by University of Wollongong | News | Comments

Just as the extraordinary capabilities of 3D printing have begun to infiltrate industry and the family home, researchers have started to develop 3D printed materials that morph into new structures post production, under the influence of external stimuli, such as water or heat — hence the name, 4D printing.

Cray XC40 will be First Supercomputer in Berkeley Lab’s New Computational Research and Theory Facility

April 23, 2015 3:17 pm | by NERSC and Berkeley Lab | News | Comments

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Research Scientific Computing (NERSC)...

GenomeStack Big Data Analytics Database

April 22, 2015 2:52 pm | by SQream Technologies | Product Releases | Comments

The GenomeStack Big Data Analytics platform has been developed specifically for bioinformatics...

Biotic Processing Makes Biotech Interactive with Games, Remote-control Labs

April 22, 2015 2:10 pm | by Tom Abate, Stanford Engineering | News | Comments

Riedel-Kruse and his team are enabling people to interact with biological materials and perform...

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Power networks and cancer treatment are two of the applications for the dynamic, scalable algorithms that Frank E. Curtis has developed. Courtesy of Ryan Hulvat

Algorithms: Finding Optimal Balance in the Face of Uncertainty

April 21, 2015 12:20 pm | by Kurt Pfitzer, Lehigh University | News | Comments

Curtis writes algorithms that enable computers to solve large-scale continuous optimization problems. He is collaborating with researchers at Argonne through a five-year Early Career Award from the U.S. Department of Energy. In a three-year single-investigator project for the NSF, Curtis has developed algorithms that solve large-scale continuous optimization problems in less than a quarter of the time required by conventional methods.

A special feature of these molecular electronics is that they take place in a fluid within a test tube, where the molecules are contacted within the solution.

Advances in Molecular Electronics: A Computer from a Test Tube?

April 20, 2015 10:49 am | by University of Konstanz | News | Comments

Scientists are working on storing and processing information on the level of single molecules to create the smallest possible components that will combine autonomously to form a circuit. The researchers can switch on the current flow through a single molecule for the first time with the help of light.

Trish Meek is Director of Product Strategy at Thermo Fisher Scientific.

The Case for User-Friendly Informatics in the Pharmaceutical QA/QC Lab

April 20, 2015 9:32 am | by Trish Meek, Thermo Fisher Scientific | Articles | Comments

All the computing power in the world isn’t useful if the software designed to access it is poorly designed. And we’re all much more discerning about user interfaces and usability: we expect our laboratory software to behave as intuitively as our smartphones. After all, laboratory employees are unlikely to be preoccupied with lines of codes and processors — they’re focused more on how easy the software is to use.

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Technological advances are enabling scientists to sequence the genomes of cancer tumors, revealing a detailed portrait of genetic mutations that drive these diseases. But genomic studies are only one piece of the puzzle that is precision medicine. In orde

Big Data Key to Precision Medicine's Success

April 15, 2015 4:04 pm | by Weill Cornell Medical College | News | Comments

Technological advances are enabling scientists to sequence the genomes of cancer tumors, revealing a detailed portrait of genetic mutations that drive these diseases. But genomic studies are only one piece of the puzzle that is precision medicine. In order to realize the promise of this field, there needs to be an increased focus on creating robust clinical databases.

This multitemporal Sentinel-1A radar image shows the Aral Sea, located on the border between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan in Central Asia. The Aral Sea is a striking example of humankind’s impact on the environment and natural resources.

Aral Sea Between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, Central Asia

April 15, 2015 2:33 pm | News | Comments

This multitemporal Sentinel-1A radar image shows the Aral Sea, located on the border between Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan in Central Asia. The Aral Sea is a striking example of humankind’s impact on the environment and natural resources.  

The newly developed framework, IMPEx, allows scientists to better understand complex observational data, to fill gaps in observations with computer-simulated data and to compare observations and simulations.

Space Scientists Create Common Data Hub, Universal Language for Mission Data

April 10, 2015 9:40 am | by Austrian Academy of Science | News | Comments

A consortium of European space scientists has succeeded in establishing a common data hub that allows the comparison of data from numerous space missions. A task that until now was hampered by different data processing protocols of individual space missions. Furthermore, observational data can now easily be compared with theoretical numerical models — regardless of the protocols used.

Sentient Knowledge Explorer 5.1

Sentient Knowledge Explorer 5.1

April 9, 2015 12:29 pm | IO Informatics, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Sentient Knowledge Explorer 5.1 is semantic data integration and knowledge management software for healthcare and life sciences. Both KE PRO and KE Personal Edition versions are available. Key features include the ability to save data, layout only or both, and to save as type TTL, NT, N3 or RDF.

The future of tropical rainforests in the Amazon and worldwide is the focus of a new research project that combines field experiments and predictive modeling.

Study Combines Field Experiments, Predictive Modeling to Look at How Forests Worldwide Respond to Climate Change

April 7, 2015 5:09 pm | by Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers from the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory will play key roles in an expansive new project that aims to bring the future of tropical forests and the climate system into much clearer focus by coupling field research with the development of a new ecosystem model.

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A supercomputer that can do 551 trillion calculations per second is housed at Clemson’s Information Technology Center.

Data-enabled Science: Top500 Supercomputers Provide Universities with Competitive Edge

April 7, 2015 5:02 pm | by Paul Alongi, Clemson University | News | Comments

Researchers have long believed that supercomputers give universities a competitive edge in scientific research, but now they have some hard data showing it’s true. A Clemson University team found that universities with locally available supercomputers were more efficient in producing research in critical fields than universities that lacked supercomputers.

Scanning electron microscope image of the one-micrometer thick nanocoatings on a silicon substrate

Phase-change Heat Transfer: Viruses Help Water Blow off Steam 3X Faster

April 7, 2015 12:14 pm | by Drexel University | News | Comments

Legions of viruses that infect the leaves of tobacco plants could be the key to making power plants safer, heating and cooling buildings more efficient and “really kick-ass computers,” or to the liquid cooling of high-powered electronic devices, like radar systems. These tiny protein bundles, which were once a threat to a staple cash crop, are now helping researchers better understand the processes of boiling and condensation. 

To demonstrate how neuroelectro.org could be used, the researchers compared electrophysiological data from more than 30 neuron types that had been most heavily studied in the literature. The site was able to find many expected similarities between the dif

Researchers Create Wikipedia for Neurons

April 7, 2015 11:11 am | by Jocelyn Duffy, Carnegie Mellon University | News | Comments

The decades worth of data collected about the billions of neurons in the brain is astounding. To help scientists make sense of this “brain big data,” researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have used data mining to create a publicly available Web site that acts like Wikipedia, indexing physiological information about neurons. The site will help to accelerate the advance of neuroscience research by providing a centralized resource.

UNSW Professor Melissa Knothe Tate is leading the project, which is using semiconductor technology to explore osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. Courtesy of Grant Turner/Mediakoo.

Previously Top-secret Technology enables Whole-body “Google Maps”

April 7, 2015 11:00 am | by UNSW Australia | News | Comments

A world-first collaboration uses previously top-secret technology to zoom through the human body down to the level of a single cell and could be a game-changer for medicine. UNSW Australia's Professor Tate is first to use the system in humans. She has forged a pioneering partnership with the US-based Cleveland Clinic, Brown and Stanford Universities, as well as Zeiss and Google to help crunch terabytes of data gathered from human study.

Researchers have accomplished a new step forward in electronics that could bring brain-like computing closer to reality. Courtesy of Rolff Images

Memristors Mimic Brain Function

April 7, 2015 10:44 am | by Amanda Morris, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Researchers are always searching for improved technologies, but the most efficient computer possible already exists. It can learn and adapt without needing to be programmed or updated. It has nearly limitless memory, is difficult to crash, and works at extremely fast speeds. It’s not a Mac or a PC; it’s the human brain. And scientists around the world want to mimic its abilities.

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Cutting-edge brain research is helping some people with paraplegia walk and helping some blind people see. Courtesy of the National Science Foundation

Exploring the Unknown Frontier of the Brain

April 6, 2015 3:56 pm | by James L. Olds, National Science Foundation | Blogs | Comments

To a large degree, your brain is what makes you... you. It controls your thinking, problem solving and voluntary behaviors. At the same time, your brain helps regulate critical aspects of your physiology, such as your heart rate and breathing. And yet your brain — a nonstop multitasking marvel — runs on only about 20 watts of energy, the same wattage as an energy-saving light bulb.

Genomics processing is now moving mainstream to clinical applications, as new approaches to diagnosing and treatment involving genomics are gaining interest.

Efficient, Time Sensitive Execution of Next-gen Sequencing Pipelines Critical for Translational Medicine

April 6, 2015 3:26 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

Demand for genomics processing is rapidly spreading from research labs to the clinical arena. Genomics is now a "must have" tool for researchers in areas of oncology and rare diseases. It is also becoming a requirement in the clinical space for precision medicine, translational medicine and similar "bench to bedside" initiatives.

A first-generation demonstration system of the hyperspectral platform, which combines an optical component and image processing software

Star Trek Tricorder is No Longer Science Fiction

April 2, 2015 10:44 am | by American Friends of Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

For the crew of the Starship Enterprise, Star Trek's "Tricorder" was an essential tool, a multifunctional hand-held device used to sense, compute and record data in a threatening and unpredictable universe. It simplified a number of Starfleet tasks, scientific or combat-related, by beaming sensors at objects to obtain instant results. A new invention may be able to turn smartphones into powerful hyperspectral sensors...

New research has demonstrated that an amputee can grasp with a bionic hand, powered only by his thoughts.

Bionic Hand is Powered only by Thoughts

April 2, 2015 9:53 am | by Jeannie Kever, University of Houston | News | Comments

Researchers have created an algorithm that allowed a man to grasp a bottle with a prosthetic hand powered only by his thoughts. The technique, demonstrated with a man whose right hand had been amputated, uses non-invasive brain monitoring, capturing brain activity to determine what parts of the brain are involved in grasping an object. A computer program, or brain-machine interface (BMI), harnessed the subject’s intentions...

With new industry-specific cloud data services and developer tools, IBM will help clients and partners integrate data from an unprecedented number of IoT and traditional sources. These resources will be made available on an open platform.

IBM Building Cloud-based Open Platform to Connect Internet of Things to Enterprise

April 2, 2015 9:21 am | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM announced that it will invest $3 billion over the next four years to establish a new Internet of Things (IoT) unit, and that it is building a cloud-based open platform designed to help clients and ecosystem partners build IoT solutions.

Figure d (left) shows a representative x-y projected brain vasculature image through an intact skull. Figure e shows a representative enhanced x-z projected brain vasculature image. Figure f shows photoacoustic microscopy of oxygen saturation of hemoglobi

Photoacoustic Method allows Rapid Imaging of Living Brain Functions

April 1, 2015 12:11 pm | by Beth Miller, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Researchers studying cancer and other invasive diseases rely on high-resolution imaging to see tumors and other activity deep within the body's tissues. Using photoacoustic microscopy, a single-wavelength, pulse-width-based technique, they were able to see blood flow, blood oxygenation, oxygen metabolism and other functions inside a living mouse brain at faster rates than ever before.

We can now use a very fast and biologically relevant computational model to study deforming structures of the clots growing in blood flow. The new model may be adapted to study clot formation in blood vessels, which can pose the risk of detaching and migr

Simulating Biofilm Mechanical Behavior Aids Blood Clotting Studies

April 1, 2015 11:47 am | by Gene Stowe, University of Notre Dame | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new computational model that effectively simulates the mechanical behavior of biofilms. Their model may lead to new strategies for studying a range of issues from blood clots to waste treatment systems. The new model may be adapted to study clot formation in blood vessels, which can pose the risk of detaching and migrating to the lungs, a fatal event.

Iceland is a common place to see the aurora borealis. Courtesy of Moyan Brenn

Aurora-viewers Worldwide Compare Sightings, Provide Real-time Alerts

April 1, 2015 11:38 am | by NSF | News | Comments

The phenomenon called aurora borealis in the Northern Hemisphere, and aurora australis in the Southern Hemisphere, is a dance of particles and magnetism between the Sun and Earth. Scientists hope that, by amassing data from thousands of aurora-viewers, they'll learn more about the solar storms that can disrupt or destroy Earth's communications networks and affect the planet's navigation, pipeline, electrical and transportation systems.

Omics Explorer 3.1 for Mac

Omics Explorer 3.1 for Mac

April 1, 2015 11:18 am | Qlucore AB | Product Releases | Comments

Qlucore Omics Explorer 3.1 for Mac is data analysis software designed to maximize the outcome of research by making it easy to analyze experiment data from a biological point-of-view. Examples of this are the inbuilt Gene Ontology (GO) Browser, a Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) function, and freedom to explore data using any variable identifier: variable collapse.

Researchers have harnessed bionanotechnology to emit a full range of colors in one pliable pixel layer — as opposed to the several rigid layers that constitute today's screens.

From Genes to Screens: Molecular Backbone of Super-Slim, Bendable Digital Displays Developed

March 31, 2015 11:44 am | by Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

A new study suggests that a novel DNA-peptide structure can be used to produce thin, transparent and flexible screens. The research harnesses bionanotechnology to emit a full range of colors in one pliable pixel layer — as opposed to the several rigid layers that constitute today's screens.

MOVIA Big Data Analytics Platform

MOVIA Big Data Analytics Platform

March 30, 2015 1:38 pm | by Modus Operandi, Inc. | Modus Operandi, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

MOVIA Big Data Analytics Platform is designed to help organizations watch for important patterns in their data and generate instant alerts to users or other systems. The software enables improved prediction of trends through advanced data modeling that captures situational context, so decisions are not ‘made in a vacuum.’

Yin-yang haplotypes arise when a stretch of DNA evolves to present two divergent forms. A group of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis showed a massive yin-yang haplotype pair encompassing the gene gephyrin on human chromosome 14. This image s

Mining Public Big Data yields Genetic Clues in Complex Human Diseases

March 27, 2015 11:35 am | by Beth Miller, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Big data: It’s a term we read and hear about often, but is hard to grasp. Computer scientists tackled some big data about an important protein and discovered its connection in human history as well as clues about its role in complex neurological diseases. Through a novel method of analyzing these big data, they discovered a region encompassing the gephyrin gene on chromosome 14 that underwent rapid evolution after splitting in two...

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