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A 3-D model of the new class of auxetic metamaterials that defy logic and can be used to create better skin grafts and new smart materials. Courtesy of University of Malta

Logic-defying Mathematical Model could lead to Better Skin Grafts, New Smart Materials

February 26, 2015 2:00 pm | by Cassi Camilleri, University of Malta | News | Comments

Pull on a piece of plastic at separate ends; it becomes thinner. So does a rubber band. One might assume tha,t when a force is applied along an axis, materials will always stretch and become thinner. Wrong. Thanks to their peculiar internal geometry, auxetic materials grow wider. After confounding scientists for decades, researchers are now developing mathematical models to explain the unusual behavior of these logic-defying materials

Three Men First to Get Reconstructed Bionic Hands

February 26, 2015 1:18 pm | by Maria Cheng, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Three Austrians have replaced injured hands with bionic ones that they can control using nerves...

Novel 3-D Computer Model brings Insight to Cardiovascular Diseases

February 26, 2015 12:56 pm | by Lappeenranta University of Technology, LUT | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a novel three-dimensional, multiscale and multicomponent model of the...

PNNL Shifts Computational Chemistry into Overdrive

February 25, 2015 8:29 am | by Karol Kowalski, Ph.D., and Edoardo Apra, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

We computational chemists are an impatient lot. Despite the fact that we routinely deal with...

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A mathematical will give researchers an opportunity to discover the earliest words and languages spoken to date, with the potential to go back thousands of years. Courtesy of woodleywonderworks

Statistical Technique Traces Languages Back to Oldest Spoken Words

February 24, 2015 12:42 pm | by Current Biology | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a statistical technique that sorts out when changes to words’ pronunciations most likely occurred in the evolutionary history of related languages. Their model gives researchers a renewed opportunity to trace words and languages back to their earliest common ancestor or ancestors — potentially thousands of years further into prehistory than previous techniques.

Matrix Gemini LIMS

Matrix Gemini LIMS

February 20, 2015 10:57 am | Autoscribe Limited | Product Releases | Comments

Matrix Gemini Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) features enhanced cross sample testing capabilities. Cross sample calculations provide the ability to utilize one set of results in the calculation of another set of results. Examples include blank correction, drift and spike correction.

Another myth is that scientists look like this. U.S. Army RDECOM/Flickr, CC BY-SA

Seven Myths about Scientists Debunked

February 19, 2015 2:07 pm | by Jeffrey Craig and Marguerite Evans-Galea, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute | Articles | Comments

As scientific researchers, we are often surprised by some of the assumptions made about us by those outside our profession. So we put together a list of common myths we and our colleagues have heard anecdotally regarding scientific researchers.

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Scientists at the University of Valencia have developed a research methodology called Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), based on network analysis mathematical tools for studying anatomy. Courtesy of Asociación RUVID

Modular Anatomical Structure of Human Head Described for First Time

February 18, 2015 10:03 am | by Asociación RUVID | News | Comments

A new mathematical analysis tool has allowed a deeper understanding of the anatomy of the human head, describing the skull as an extended network structured in 10 modules. Researchers have developed a research methodology called Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), based on network analysis mathematical tools for studying anatomy.

In the search for ways to store data permanently, ETH researchers have been inspired by fossils. Courtesy of Philipp Stössel/ETH Zurich

Data Storage for Eternity: Encapsulated DNA-encoded Information Expected to Survive a Million Years

February 13, 2015 3:36 pm | by Angelika Jacobs, ETH Zurich | News | Comments

How can we preserve our knowledge today for the next millennia? Researchers have found a way to store information in the form of DNA, preserving it for nearly an eternity. As encapsulation in silica is roughly comparable to that in fossilized bones, researchers could draw on prehistoric information about long-term stability and calculate a prognosis: through storage in low temperatures, DNA-encoded information can survive.

Tim Cutts is Head of Scientific Computing at Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Modern DNA Sequencing Requires a Modern Day Approach

February 13, 2015 2:27 pm | by Tim Cutts, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute | Blogs | Comments

The sequencing machines that run today produce data several orders of magnitude faster than the machines used in the Human Genome Project. We at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute currently produce more sequences in one hour than we did in our first 10 years of operation. A great deal of computational resource is then needed to process that data.

Qian and colleagues found that the topological phases in the TMDC materials can be turned on and off by simply applying a vertical electric field that is perpendicular to the atomic plane of the material. That's shown here in calculations by the red cross

Exotic States Materialize with Supercomputers

February 13, 2015 11:26 am | by Jorge Salazar, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

Scientists used supercomputers to find a new class of materials that possess an exotic state of matter known as the quantum spin Hall effect. The researchers published their results in the journal Science in December 2014, where they propose a new type of transistor made from these materials.

Omics Explorer 3.1 Advanced Data Analysis Software

Omics Explorer 3.1 Advanced Data Analysis Software

February 12, 2015 1:32 pm | Qlucore AB | Product Releases | Comments

Qlucore Omics Explorer 3.1 advanced data analysis software features a well-defined open interface to R. The interface allows users to utilize a broad range of statistical tests, to use existing tests in R, and to write new ones. The inbuilt statistical functions of the bioinformatics program are extended with the R interface to include the full suite of statistical methods available in R.

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Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source

Helping to Save Lives of Critically Ill Children

February 12, 2015 10:17 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Articles | Comments

For those on the front lines of treating cancer, speed and precision are key to patients’ survival. Pediatric cancer researchers have been making incredible strides in accelerating delivery of new diagnostic and treatment options. Supercomputer-powered genetic diagnosis is being used to harness the power of high throughput genomic and proteomic methods and is playing a key role in improving the outcome for children with genetic diseases.

Supported through crowdfunding, researchers have concluded a successful experiment to identify a novel genetic mutation as the source of a specific rare disease.

Crowdfunding Helps Solve Rare Disease Mystery

February 11, 2015 1:47 pm | by Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

Rare diseases — those that affect fewer than one in 200,000 people — are often identified early in life. Some 30 percent of children afflicted by these "orphan diseases" do not live to see their fifth birthday. While the US Orphan Drug Act of 1983 was written into law to promote research on the topic, the cost of identifying the source and progression of these diseases remains prohibitive for many families.

Map generated by more than 250 million public tweets Courtesy of Salathé et al.

Digital Disease Detection: Using Big Data to Detect Outbreaks

February 10, 2015 11:42 am | by PLOS | News | Comments

Personal information taken from social media, blogs, page views and so on is used to detect disease outbreaks, but does this violate our privacy, consent and trust? Dr. Effy Vayena from the University of Zurich and colleagues have mapped the numerous ethical challenges confronting digital disease detection and propose a framework to address the questions.

John Wass is a statistician based in Chicago, IL.

Explorations of Mathematical Models in Biology with Maple

February 10, 2015 9:29 am | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

The author of this wonderful text delivers a brief, easy-to-absorb, yet very comprehensive text on modeling real-world data with Maple. Maple is software for performing mathematics, with a none-too-steep learning curve. In the introduction, the author is quick to point out that this is neither a detailed textbook of mathematical modeling, nor Maple. It is, however, a very well-written manual of introductory modeling and use of Maple.

ENIGMA cipher machine  Rotor Set Courtesy of Andy L.

Similar Statistics Play Role in Decision Making and World War II Code Breaking

February 9, 2015 11:22 am | by Cell Press | News | Comments

Statistical decision making resembles a process Alan Turning's team did in Bletchley Park to work out the settings of German enigma machines. In order to make use of the large clicking machine, Turing's team analyzed pairs of randomly intercepted German messages, aligned them one above the other to accumulate evidence from letter pairs until they reach a threshold level of certainty that the messages were sent on identical enigma machine.

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Heatmap of the Pseudomonas genus, the most abundant genus found across the city. Hotspots are found in areas of high station density and traffic (i.e. lower Manhattan and parts of Brooklyn). Courtesy of Ebrahim Afshinnekoo

Researchers Produce 1st Map of NYC Subway System Microbes

February 9, 2015 10:52 am | by Weill Cornell Medical College | News | Comments

The microbes that call the New York City subway system home are mostly harmless, but include samples of disease-causing bacteria that are resistant to drugs — and even DNA fragments associated with anthrax and Bubonic plague. A pathogen map of a city provides a baseline assessment. Repeated sampling could be used for long-term, accurate disease surveillance, bioterrorism threat mitigation, and large-scale health management.

Smartphone dongles performed a point-of-care HIV and syphilis test in Rwanda from finger prick whole blood in 15 minutes, operated by health care workers trained on a software app. Courtesy of Samiksha Nayak, Columbia Engineering

Smartphone, Finger Prick, 15 Minutes — Diagnosis!

February 6, 2015 3:20 pm | by Holly Evarts, Columbia University | News | Comments

A team of researchers has developed a low-cost smartphone accessory that can perform a point-of-care test that simultaneously detects three HIV and syphilis infectious disease markers from a finger prick of blood in just 15 minutes. The device replicates, for the first time, all mechanical, optical and electronic functions of a lab-based blood test. Specifically, it performs an ELISA assay.

Brain Researcher Marianne Fyhn receives computation help from, among others, Gaute Einevoll and Anders Malthe-Sørenssen to acquire an understanding of how the brain Works.

Mathematics to Reveal Secrets of the Brain

February 5, 2015 4:33 pm | by Yngve Vogt, University of Oslo | News | Comments

Top researchers are using mathematical modelling and heavy computations to understand how the brain can both remember and learn. Ten years ago, when the team of Marianne Fyhn and Torkel Hafting Fyhn cooperated with the Nobel Prize winning team of May-Britt and Edvard Moser at NTNU, they discovered the sense of orientation in the brain.

Researchers found that the link between having a faster-running biological clock and early death held true even after accounting for other factors such as smoking, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Courtesy of Elliott Brown

DNA Clock Helps Predict Individual Lifespans

February 5, 2015 4:14 pm | by University of Edinburgh | News | Comments

Scientists have identified a biological clock that provides vital clues about how long a person is likely to live. Researchers studied chemical changes to DNA that take place over a lifetime, and can help them predict an individual's age. By comparing individuals’ actual ages with their predicted biological clock age, scientists saw a pattern emerging.

Microscopic image of senile plaques seen in the cerebral cortex of a person with Alzheimer's disease of presenile onset. Courtesy of KGH

Blue Waters Project helps Uncover Alzheimer's Complex Genetic Networks

February 5, 2015 4:06 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

The release of the film, Still Alice, in September 2014 placed a much-needed light on Alzheimer's disease, a debilitating neurological disease that affects a growing number of Americans each year. More than 5.2 million people in the U.S. are currently living with Alzheimer's. One out of nine Americans over 65 has Alzheimer's, and one out of three over 85 has the disease. For those over 65, it is the fifth leading cause of death.

In the United States, big data environments are utilizing advanced computing systems to map phenotype to underlying process and to compare those who develop disease with those who don’t. To accomplish this, the researchers are assembling publically availa

Reversing the Global Diabesity Epidemic

February 5, 2015 2:38 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

Diabesity has been identified as a major global health problem by researchers and healthcare professionals world-wide, including England’s National Health Service, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Ain Shams University Hospital in Cairo, Egypt, and a research consortium of the European Union.

Eve, the Robot Scientist Courtesy of University of Manchester

AI Robot Scientist ‘Eve’ could Boost Search for New Drugs

February 4, 2015 2:46 pm | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Eve, an artificially-intelligent ‘robot scientist’ could make drug discovery faster and much cheaper, say researchers. The team has demonstrated the success of the approach, as Eve discovered that a compound shown to have anti-cancer properties might also be used in the fight against malaria.

A code hidden in the arrangement of the genetic information of single-stranded RNA viruses tells the virus how to pack itself within its outer shell of proteins.

Molecular Warfare: Researchers Discover Viral "Enigma Machine"

February 4, 2015 2:21 pm | by University of Leeds | News | Comments

Researchers have cracked a code that governs infections by a major group of viruses, including the common cold and polio. The unnoticed code had been hidden in plain sight in the sequence of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) that makes up this type of viral genome. But researchers have unlocked its meaning and demonstrated that jamming the code can disrupt virus assembly. Stopping a virus assembling can stop it functioning.

American leafminer moth Coptodisca lucifluella has been invading Italian walnut orchards since 2010. Interestingly, the moth lives on pecan trees in the United States, but invaded a new host plant in Europe: the walnut tree.

Leafminer Moth Invades Italy

February 3, 2015 4:14 pm | News | Comments

American leafminer moth Coptodisca lucifluella has been invading Italian walnut orchards since 2010. Interestingly, the moth lives on pecan trees in the United States, but invaded a new host plant in Europe: the walnut tree.       

Customized Treatment: "Charting the versions of the genes that are only found in cancer cells may help tailor the treatment offered to each patient," says Rolf Skotheim. Courtesy of Yngve Vogt

Supercomputing Reveals Genetic Code of Cancer

February 2, 2015 12:46 pm | by Yngve Vogt, University of Oslo | News | Comments

Cancer researchers must use one of the world's fastest computers to detect which versions of genes are only found in cancer cells. Every form of cancer, even every tumor, has its own distinct variants. A research group is working to identify the genes that cause bowel and prostate cancer, which are both common diseases. There are 4,000 new cases of bowel cancer in Norway every year. Only six out of 10 patients survive the first five years.

WinWedge 3.5 Data Collection Software

WinWedge 3.5 Data Collection Software

January 30, 2015 11:57 am | Tal Technologies, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

WinWedge 3.5 collects data from laboratory instruments, balances, pH meters, moisture analyzers, micrometers, flow meters, temperature sensors, bar code scanners, GPS receivers, and other serial output devices. It is designed to easily input data in real time into MS Excel or any Windows application software and to be quick and easy to set up for any instrument.

“In nanomedicine we need to understand physical phenomena on a nano scale, forming as correct a picture as possible of molecular phenomena. In this context, quantum chemical calculations are important,” says Michele Cascella. Courtesy of Hanne Utigard

Quantum Chemistry Closing in on Quantum Mechanics of Living Cells

January 30, 2015 11:19 am | by Yngve Vogt, University of Oslo | News | Comments

Quantum chemical calculations have been used to solve big mysteries in space. Soon the same calculations may be used to produce tomorrow’s cancer drugs. Quantum chemical calculations are needed to explain what happens to the electrons’ trajectories within a molecule, and the results of a quantum chemical calculation are often more accurate than what is achievable experimentally.

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