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IBM is investing in Pathway to position both companies on the cutting edge of offering truly personalized wellness information.

Evidence-based Medicine: Bringing Big Data to Healthcare Consumers

November 26, 2014 9:31 am | by Kalorama Information | News | Comments

The IBM Watson Group's investment in Pathway Genomics is a model for the types of partnerships that are bringing Big Data to the healthcare consumer marketplace. IBM hopes to use Watson, their cognitive technology, and Big Data — enormous medical datasets — to transform the quality and speed of care delivered to individuals through individualized, evidence-based medicine.

National Medals of Science, Technology and Innovation Presented

November 25, 2014 12:00 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

At a White House ceremony on November 20, 2014, President Obama presented the National Medal of...

Inside job: Designer Nanoparticles Infiltrate Cancer Cells from Within

November 25, 2014 10:34 am | by Melanie Titanic-Schefft, University of Cincinnati | News | Comments

Conventional treatment seeks to eradicate cancer cells by drugs and therapy delivered from...

Another Brick in the Wall: The Legendary Rescue of a Doomed Project

November 20, 2014 2:08 pm | by Randy C. Hice | Blogs | Comments

Of course, I remember the Berlin Wall being pummeled to gravel 25 years ago. I always hated what...

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Moleculomics’s core business is focused on developing new computational tools (known as pipelines) that take genetic information (in the form of DNA sequences) and automatically convert this into detailed three-dimensional models of all of the proteins wi

High Performance Computing for All (Yes, You Too…)

November 19, 2014 1:34 pm | by Gilad Shainer, HPC Advisory Council | Blogs | Comments

High-performance computing can help a business to become more efficient and more productive. And, for a small business, HPC can be a game changer, helping it leapfrog ahead of the competition by reducing its costs and dramatically improving its time to market.

This 4x image of Aphaenogaster senilis (ant worker) received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photo was compose

Ant at Work

November 18, 2014 3:33 pm | News | Comments

This 4x image of Aphaenogaster senilis (ant worker) received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photo was composed using image stacking by Dimitri Seeboruth of Paris, France.

John Wass is a statistician based in Chicago, IL.

Exploration and Analysis of DNA Microarray and Other High-Dimensional Data

November 18, 2014 3:10 pm | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

The introduction of newer sequencing methodologies, DNA microarrays and high-throughput technology has resulted in a deluge of large data sets that require new strategies to clean, normalize and analyze the data. All of these and more are covered in approximately 300 pages with extraordinary clarity and minimal mathematics.

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Karol Kowalski, Capability Lead for NWChem Development, works in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at PNNL.

Advancing Computational Chemistry with NWChem

November 18, 2014 3:07 pm | by Mike Bernhardt, HPC Community Evangelist, Intel | Articles | Comments

An interview with PNNL’s Karol Kowalski, Capability Lead for NWChem Development - NWChem is an open source high performance computational chemistry tool developed for the Department of Energy at Pacific Northwest National Lab in Richland, WA. I recently visited with Karol Kowalski, Capability Lead for NWChem Development, who works in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) at PNNL.

The Center for Pediatric Genomic Medicine at Children’s Mercy was the first genome center in the world inside children’s hospital and one of the first to focus on genome sequencing and analysis for inherited childhood diseases.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: The Center for Pediatric Genomic Medicine

November 17, 2014 6:40 pm | Award Winners

The Center for Pediatric Genomic Medicine at Children's Mercy Hospitals Kansas City was the first genome center in the world to be created inside a children's hospital and one of the first to focus on genome sequencing and analysis for inherited childhood diseases. 

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Ohio State University Cancer Comprehensive Care Center

November 17, 2014 5:36 pm | Award Winners

Researchers at Ohio State University Cancer Comprehensive Care Center developed and implemented bioinformatics and molecular methods to understand what happens to human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in the "end game" of HPV-positive human cancers.

This 100x image of Polypodium virginianum (fern) sorus received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The confocal image

What’s On a Fern

November 17, 2014 3:46 pm | News | Comments

This 100x image of Polypodium virginianum (fern) sorus received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The confocal image was taken by Dr. Igor Siwanowicz of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Janelia Farm Research Campus in Ashburn, Virginia.

IBM and Pathway Genomics are aiming to revolutionize the health and wellness industry by leveraging the natural language processing and cognitive capabilities of Watson. For the first time consumers will be able to ask the Pathway Panorama app questions t

IBM Watson Group Invests in Pathway Genomics

November 13, 2014 2:28 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

Cognitive apps are in market today and continue to change the way professionals and consumers make decisions. To help accelerate this transformation, the IBM Watson Group announced an investment in Pathway Genomics, a clinical laboratory that offers genetic testing services globally, to help deliver the first-ever cognitive consumer-facing app based on genetics from a user’s personal makeup.

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Black pine (Pinus nigra), one of the species whose life history data is part of the database, is seen against a stunning backdrop of New Zealand. Courtesy of Yvonne Buckley

Big Data Takes Root in the World of Plant Research

November 12, 2014 3:47 pm | by Trinity College Dublin | News | Comments

Botanists have launched a database with information that documents significant ‘life events’ for nearly 600 plant species across the globe. They clubbed together with like-minded individuals working across five different continents to compile the huge database of plant life histories, for which data have been gathered over a near 50-year span.

Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source

HPC Matters – Now More than Ever

November 12, 2014 11:07 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

In our November issue, Don Johnston looks at how “HPC Matters to our Quality of Life and Prosperity” and at how, through the HPC Impact Showcase, SC14 aims to underscore just how far-reaching high performance computing’s influence has become. Our cover story takes a look at several examples of how supercomputing capabilities are now being applied to problems that help businesses be more competitive and improve the quality of daily life.

Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source

Cloud Meets GMP

November 10, 2014 9:45 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

As companies move from traditional physical infrastructure operated in house to cloud computing, there are several important factors they must take into consideration. With this in mind, Scientific Computing has published a special series that examines the impact of good manufacturing practice regulations on cloud computing.

Scientific Computing November 2014

November 2014 SC14 Special Edition

November 10, 2014 9:33 am | Digital Editions | Comments

Scientific Computing | November 2014 SC14 Special Edition

A time-lapse photograph of the CIBER rocket launch, taken from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia in 2013. This was the last of four launches of the Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER). Sub-orbital rockets are smaller than those that boo

Rocket Experiment Finds Surprising Cosmic Light

November 7, 2014 3:37 pm | by Kathy Svitil, Caltech | News | Comments

Using an experiment carried into space on a NASA suborbital rocket, astronomers have detected a diffuse cosmic glow that appears to represent more light than that produced by known galaxies in the universe. The researchers say the best explanation is that the cosmic light originates from stars that were stripped away from their parent galaxies and flung out into space as those galaxies collided and merged with other galaxies.

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StarDrop Card View Drug Discovery Software

StarDrop Card View Drug Discovery Software

November 7, 2014 2:15 pm | Optibrium Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

Card View is designed to provide a unique way to look at compound data, clearly representing the relationships between compounds to highlight the best chemistries and optimization strategies. It presents compound structures and associated data on cards that can be moved, stacked and linked in a unique, flexible environment.

Michael Elliott is CEO of Atrium  Research & Consulting.

Déjà Vu All Over Again: Knowledge management is not an IT problem, but a challenge to the culture of an organization

November 7, 2014 8:48 am | by Michael H. Elliott | Articles | Comments

In the late 1990s and the early 2000s, “Knowledge Management” (KM) was all the rage. Companies invested millions on enterprise content management (ECM) systems and teams of KM practitioners. It was believed that the codification of all knowledge assets across the enterprise would lead to new insights and higher levels of innovation.

UW students Darby Losey (shown) and Jose Ceballos were positioned in two different buildings on campus. The sender thinks about firing a cannon at various points throughout a computer game. That signal is sent over the Web directly to the brain of the rec

Direct Brain-to-brain Interface Operates between Humans in Real Time

November 6, 2014 4:05 pm | by Michelle Ma, University of Washington | News | Comments

Sometimes, words just complicate things. What if our brains could communicate directly with each other, bypassing the need for language? Researchers have successfully replicated a direct brain-to-brain connection between pairs of people as part of a scientific study following the team’s initial demonstration a year ago.

QT 2.5 Chemometrics Software

Symbion QT 2.5 Chemometrics Software

November 6, 2014 3:27 pm | Symbion Systems | Product Releases | Comments

Symbion QT 2.5. chemometrics software provides Parametric Data Cleaning, a technique that automates the handling of data compromised by excessive noise or other artifacts. Key cleaning parameters are under the control of the analyst, allowing chemometric optimization under a wide range of analytical situations.

R.D. McDowall is Principal, McDowall Consulting.

The Cloud Meets GMP Regulations – Part 4: Selecting a Cloud Service Provider

November 6, 2014 3:16 pm | by R D McDowall | Articles | Comments

The purpose of this series is to discuss the impact of GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) regulations on cloud computing and to debate some of the regulatory issues facing an organization contemplating this approach. In this part, we look at a process to select a suitable hosting provider that can demonstrate compliance with GMP and possession of qualified IT infrastructure.

Vintana during the age of the dinosaurs. Courtesy of Lucille Betti-Nash

Paleontologists Find Ancient, Bizarre Groundhog-like Mammal

November 5, 2014 4:37 pm | by Stony Brook University | News | Comments

A newly discovered 66 to 70 million-year-old groundhog-like creature, massive in size compared to other mammals of its era, provides new and important insights into early mammalian evolution. Stony Brook University paleontologist David Krause, Ph.D., led the research team that unexpectedly discovered a nearly complete cranium of the mammal, which lived alongside Late Cretaceous dinosaurs in Madagascar.

Professor Robert Sinclair illustrates one of his examples of a biological system (the fruit fly eye) which exhibits tendencies towards both deterministic and stochastic development, where the number of cells is uniform, but the way in which they determine

Back to Basics: Where Supercomputers Dominate Analysis, Classical Thinking Still Holds Relevance

November 5, 2014 4:25 pm | by Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology | News | Comments

Sinclair suggests that there still is a place in science in modern times for the interpretation of results using rational numbers or simple ratios. In a time where supercomputers dominate analysis, he argues that there is not enough attention being paid to the basic approaches to science of the past, which were able to profoundly illuminate our understanding of the natural world through the simplification of very complex topics and systems.

R.D. McDowall is Principal, McDowall Consulting.

The Cloud Meets GMP Regulations – Part 3: Options for Auditing a Cloud Service Provider

November 3, 2014 2:53 pm | by R D McDowall | Articles | Comments

The purpose of this series is to discuss the impact of GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice) regulations on cloud computing and to debate some of the regulatory issues facing an organization contemplating this approach. In this part, we look at the options for auditing a cloud service provider.

GeneSpring Pathway Architect Software

GeneSpring Pathway Architect Software

November 3, 2014 11:44 am | Agilent Technologies | Product Releases | Comments

GeneSpring Pathway Architect software is designed to enable faster discovery of complex relationships across multi-omic data. Designed for researchers focused on genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics or any combination of life science disciplines, the package includes GeneSpring GX and Mass Profiler Professional, as well as Pathway Architect.

Understanding cell transformation can help clinical researchers tackle medical problems. The images show how a growth factor caused cells to change forms and regroup from tight packs of epithelial cells to more mobile, loose arrays of mesenchymal cells —

Modeling Cancer: Researchers Prove Mathematical Models Can Predict Cellular Processes

October 30, 2014 5:08 pm | by Virginia Tech | News | Comments

How does a normal cellular process derail and become unhealthy? A multi-institutional, international team led by Virginia Tech researchers studied cells found in breast and other types of connective tissue and discovered new information about cell transitions that take place during wound healing and cancer.

Indiana University received one of the largest individual awards from the NSF’s $31 million Data Infrastructure Building Blocks program this year. Researchers will use the $5 million in funding to help boost the nation’s big data efforts. Courtesy of NSF

NSF Awards $5M to Empower Researchers with New Data Analysis Tools

October 29, 2014 10:15 am | by Indiana University Bloomington | News | Comments

A team of computer scientists working to improve how researchers across the sciences empower big data to solve problems have been awarded $5 million by the National Science Foundation. The team will address one of the leading challenges in tackling some of the world’s most pressing issues in science: the ability to analyze and compute large amounts of data.

As the United States pursues the next generation of computing (exascale), new software-centered partnerships could be the key to maximizing economic benefits for Americans

Supporting America’s Economic Competitiveness: A Look at Federal Supercomputing Leadership

October 28, 2014 11:18 am | by Council on Competitiveness | News | Comments

The Council on Competitiveness has released a new report that explores the value of government leadership in supercomputing for industrial competitiveness, titled Solve. The Exascale Effect: the Benefits of Supercomputing Investment for U.S. Industry. As the federal government pursues exascale computing to achieve national security and science missions, Solve examines how U.S.-based companies also benefit from leading-edge computation

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