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Beach goers cooling off during the 2014 Southern California heat wave, in Huntington Beach, CA. It sounds like a broken record, but last month again set a new mark for global heat. And meteorologists say Earth is now on pace to tie the hottest year ever r

Warming Earth Heading for Hottest Year on Record

October 21, 2014 11:35 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Earth is on pace to tie or even break the mark for the hottest year on record, federal meteorologists say. That's because global heat records have kept falling in 2014, with September the latest example. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced October 20, 2014, that last month the globe averaged 60.3 degrees Fahrenheit (15.72 degrees Celsius). That was the hottest September in 135 years of record keeping.

Crowdsourced Supercomputing Examines Big Genomic Data

October 21, 2014 9:31 am | by IBM | News | Comments

What do the DNA in Australian seaweed, Amazon River water, tropical plants, and forest soil all...

The Cloud Meets GMP Regulations – Part 1: Applicable Regulations

October 20, 2014 2:35 pm | by R D McDowall | Articles | Comments

The purpose of this series is to discuss the impact of GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice)...

Planet’s First Sex Act: Ancient Armored Fish did it Sideways

October 20, 2014 12:11 pm | by Flinders University | News | Comments

A profound new discovery reveals how the intimate act of sexual intercourse first evolved in our...

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A carbapenem molecule, a last resort antibiotic, enters the carbapenemase enzyme (blue arrow), where the crucial beta-lactam structure gets broken down. The ineffective molecule then leaves (orange arrow)

Nobel Prize-winning Technique Helps Design Antibiotics of Future

October 17, 2014 11:52 am | by Bristol University | News | Comments

Scientists have used computer simulations to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics — a breakthrough that will help develop drugs which can effectively tackle infections in the future. Researchers at the University of Bristol focused on the role of enzymes in the bacteria, which split the structure of the antibiotic and stop it from working, making the bacteria resistant.

This image provided by Oculus shows a new prototype of its virtual reality headset. The hew headset features a higher resolution and refresh rate, 360-degree head tracking and integrated headphones. (AP Photo/Oculus)

Smithsonian Honors Founder of Virtual Reality Firm Oculus

October 17, 2014 11:03 am | by AP | News | Comments

The founder of virtual reality firm Oculus and singer Rosanne Cash and are among those who were honored with American Ingenuity Awards at the Smithsonian Institution, along with eight other scientists and scholars for their groundbreaking work. Washingtonian magazine has described the event as the “Golden Globes of Intellect.”

A 500-million-year-old fossil used by Australian researchers to make their discovery about vetulicolians. These marine creatures had a rod through their tail similar to a backbone, which places them as distant cousins of vertebrate animals. Courtesy of Un

Bizarre Ancient Fossils Confirmed as Strange Human Cousins

October 16, 2014 2:50 pm | by University of Adelaide | News | Comments

More than 100 years since they were first discovered, some of the world's most bizarre fossils have been identified as distant relatives of humans. The fossils belong to 500-million-year-old blind water creatures, known to scientists as "vetulicolians" (pronounced: ve-TOO-lee-coal-ee-ans).

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Phylogenetic tree constructed with the BEAST software and built on a subset of both contemporary and ancient samples. Courtesy of Oxford University Press

Treasure Trove of Ancient Genomes Helps Recalibrate Human Evolutionary Clock

October 14, 2014 4:18 pm | by Molecular Biology and Evolution, Oxford University Press | News | Comments

To improve the modeling and reading of the branches on the human tree of life, researchers compiled the most comprehensive DNA set to date, a new treasure trove of 146 ancient (including Neanderthal and Denisovian) and modern human full mitochondrial genomes (amongst a set of 320 available worldwide).

The Oil and Gas High Performance Computing (HPC) Workshop, hosted annually at Rice University, is the premier meeting place for discussion of challenges and opportunities around high performance computing, information technology, and computational science

2015 Rice Oil & Gas High Performance Computing Workshop

October 13, 2014 2:45 pm | by Rice University | Events

The Oil and Gas High Performance Computing (HPC) Workshop, hosted annually at Rice University, is the premier meeting place for discussion of challenges and opportunities around high performance computing, information technology, and computational science and engineering.

Male Scarlet Tanager (Piranga olivacea). The Scarlet Tanager is a vibrant songster of eastern hardwood forests. Widespread breeders in the East, they are long-distance migrants that move all the way to South America for the winter. Courtesy of Kelly Colga

NSF Awards $15 Million to Environmental Science Data Project

October 10, 2014 3:38 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

As with the proverbial canary in the coal mine, birds serve as an indicator of the health of our environment. Many common species have experienced significant population declines within the last 40 years. Suggested causes include habitat loss and climate change, however to fully understand bird distribution relative to the environment, extensive data are needed.

“The collective expertise of NeuroLINCS investigators provides a unique opportunity to increase our knowledge of what makes brain cells unique and what happens during neurodegenerative diseases," said UC Irvine's Leslie M. Thompson.

Novel NIH Program will Create Database of Human Brain Cell Activity

October 10, 2014 12:08 pm | by UC Irvine | News | Comments

UC Irvine will receive $8 million from the NIH to establish one of six national centers dedicated to creating a database of human cellular responses that will accelerate efforts to develop new therapies for many diseases. The center will partner with researchers from Cedars-Sinai Medical Center’s Regenerative Medicine Institute, the Gladstone Institute of Neurological Disease, UC San Francisco, Johns Hopkins University and MIT.

UN-SCAN-IT Gel 7.1 Gel Analysis Software

UN-SCAN-IT Gel 7.1 Gel Analysis Software

October 9, 2014 9:32 am | Silk Scientific, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

UN-SCAN-IT Gel 7.1 gel analysis software converts virtually any scanner, digital camera or other image input device into an accurate high‑speed densitometer and digitizer system. Features include a zoomable and scalable analysis screen, lane analysis, segment analysis, dot blot analysis, color and grayscale gel analysis, clone drawing mode, MW calculation and calibration curves.

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LabVantage 7 LIMS

LabVantage 7 LIMS

October 8, 2014 11:14 am | Labvantage Solutions | Product Releases | Comments

LabVantage 7 is available in a number of different LIMS editions, including Enterprise, Express, Pharma, Biobanking and Quality. It provides users the ability to access laboratory data from any device using Web browsers, and features a built-in search engine, making it possible to find data as easily as on the Web.

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2014 was awarded jointly to Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell and William E. Moerner "for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy."

Americans, German Awarded 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

October 8, 2014 9:43 am | by Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences | News | Comments

The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Eric Betzig of Janelia Farm Research Campus, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stefan W. Hell of the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Göttingen and German Cancer Research Center, and William E. Moerner of Stanford University “for the development of super-resolved fluorescence microscopy.”

NASA satellite data of the marine environment will be used in prototype marine biodiversity observation networks to be established in four U.S. locations, including the Florida Keys, pictured here. Courtesy of USF/WHOI/MBARI/NASA

U.S. Initiates Prototype System to Gauge National Marine Biodiversity

October 7, 2014 3:43 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA are funding three demonstration projects that will lay the foundation for the first national network to monitor marine biodiversity at scales ranging from microbes to whales. The U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) also plans to contribute.

Tom Conte is President-elect, IEEE Computer Society; Professor of Computer Science and Electrical & Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology; and Elie Track is President, IEEE Council on Superconductivity; CEO, nVizix.

Technology Time Machine Looks Far Ahead at Future of Processing

October 7, 2014 3:25 pm | by Tom Conte and Elie Track, IEEE | Blogs | Comments

The IEEE Technology Time Machine (TTM) is going further into the future. Now in its third year, the annual two-day IEEE meeting is mixing things up a little in terms of format and topics. Rather than just looking at how some technologies might evolve in the next decade, experts and visionaries are going to look out to 2035 and beyond.

This 600X photograph of a Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) seminal vesicle received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microsc

Fruit Fly Privates

October 3, 2014 2:57 pm | News | Comments

This 600X photograph of a Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) seminal vesicle received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The confocal image was created by Barbara Laurinyecz of University of Szeged, Department of Genetics, Szeged, Hungary using fluorescence.

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Mosaic 6.0 sample management software is ideal for the management of compounds, biologicals and reagents. Developments include more intuitive interfaces for ordering and inventory searching, and additional functions all designed to further streamline labo

Mosaic 6.0

October 3, 2014 1:51 pm | Titian Software Us, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Mosaic 6.0 sample management software is ideal for the management of compounds, biologicals and reagents. Developments include more intuitive interfaces for ordering and inventory searching, and additional functions all designed to further streamline laboratory workflows.

The big-headed ant (Pheidole megacephala) is considered one of the world’s worst invasive ant species. Their giant, muscle-bound noggins power their biting parts, the mandibles, which they use to attack other ants and cut up prey. In a new study, research

Big-headed Ants Grow Bigger when Faced with Fierce Competitors

October 2, 2014 4:26 pm | by Diana Yates, University of Illinois | News | Comments

The big-headed ant (Pheidole megacephala) is considered one of the world’s worst invasive ant species. Their giant, muscle-bound noggins power their biting parts, the mandibles, which they use to attack other ants and cut up prey. In a new study, researchers report that big-headed ant colonies produce larger soldiers when they encounter other ants that know how to fight back.

Researchers have brought ultra-fast, nano-scale data storage within striking reach, using technology that mimics the human brain. They have built a novel nano-structure that offers a new platform for the development of highly stable and reliable nanoscale

Nano-scale Data Storage Mimics Brain Cells to Boost Memory Power

October 1, 2014 3:56 pm | by RMIT University | News | Comments

Researchers have brought ultra-fast, nano-scale data storage within striking reach, using technology that mimics the human brain. They have built a novel nano-structure that offers a new platform for the development of highly stable and reliable nanoscale memory devices.

Hunting from a distance of 27,000 light years, astronomers have discovered an unusual carbon-based molecule – one with a branched structure – contained within a giant gas cloud in interstellar space. Like finding a molecular needle in a cosmic haystack, a

Space Molecule Leads to Life's Interstellar Origins

September 30, 2014 4:08 pm | by Blaine Friedlander, Cornell university | News | Comments

Hunting from a distance of 27,000 light years, astronomers have discovered an unusual carbon-based molecule – one with a branched structure – contained within a giant gas cloud in interstellar space. Like finding a molecular needle in a cosmic haystack, astronomers have detected radio waves emitted by isopropyl cyanide. The discovery suggests that the complex molecules needed for life may have their origins in interstellar space.

This 5x photo of pipevine swallowtail butterfly (Battus philenor) eggs on stem of host plant, Aristolochia fimbriata, received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence

Butterfly Eggs Reclining

September 30, 2014 2:27 pm | News | Comments

This 5x photo of pipevine swallowtail butterfly (Battus philenor) eggs on stem of host plant, Aristolochia fimbriata, received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The image was taken using focus stacking by David Millard of Austin, Texas.

Fusion research simulated with supercomputers. Courtesy of KTH PDC

Computationally Intensive Research to get Boost, Break Petaflop Barrier

September 26, 2014 10:21 am | by KTH Royal Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Computationally intensive research in Sweden will soon get a boost from the fastest academic supercomputer in the Nordic countries, to be installed in October 2014 at KTH Royal Institute of Technology. KTH is due to begin using the fastest academic supercomputer of any university in Scandinavia. A Cray XC30 with 1,676 nodes and a memory of 104.7 terabytes will be installed at KTH’s PDC Center for High Performance Computing.

Caris Life Sciences is accelerating precision medicine for cancer treatment using IBM technical computing and software defined storage solutions.  Courtesy of Caris Life Science

Accelerating Use of Molecular Profiling in Cancer Treatment Selection

September 25, 2014 4:43 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM announced that Caris Life Sciences is using IBM technical computing and storage technology to accelerate the company’s molecular profiling services for cancer patients. The Caris tumor profiling database is one of the largest datasets in the application of advanced molecular profiling technologies to support clinicians in delivering personalized treatment recommendations — or precision oncology.

An illustration of water in our Solar System through time from before the Sun’s birth through the creation of the planets. Courtesy of Bill Saxton, NSF/AUI/NRAO

Earth’s Water is Older than the Sun

September 25, 2014 4:00 pm | by Carnegie Institution of Washington | News | Comments

Water was crucial to the rise of life on Earth and is also important to evaluating the possibility of life on other planets. Identifying the original source of Earth’s water is key to understanding how life-fostering environments come into being and how likely they are to be found elsewhere. New work has found that much of our Solar System’s water likely originated as ices that formed in interstellar space.

"Diamond nanothreads" promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymers. The core of the nanothreads is a long, thin strand of carbon atoms arranged just like the fundamental u

Smallest Possible Diamonds Form What may be World’s Strongest Material

September 24, 2014 2:36 pm | by Penn State University | News | Comments

For the first time, scientists have discovered how to produce ultra-thin "diamond nanothreads" that promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymers. The core of the nanothreads is a long, thin strand of carbon atoms arranged just like the fundamental unit of a diamond's structure.

Indian Space Research Organisation scientists watch screens display the graphics explaining Mars Orbiter Mission at their Telemetry, Tracking and Command Network complex in Bangalore, India, Wednesday, Sept. 24, 2014. India triumphed in its first interpla

Mars Mission Opens India for Space Business

September 24, 2014 2:22 pm | by Katy Daigle, Associated Press | News | Comments

India celebrated putting a spacecraft into orbit around Mars on September 24, 2014, hoping the rare feat will show the world it is open for business in space exploration and inspire a new generation of homegrown scientists to help drive growth. Those motivations help explain why India, a poor country of 1.2 billion, even invests in a space program when so many of its people lack access to proper toilets, electricity and health care.

Bernie Spang is Vice President of Software Defined Strategy at IBM.

Scientific Research and Big Data: It Starts with Storage

September 24, 2014 11:52 am | by Bernie Spang, IBM | Blogs | Comments

For centuries, scientific research has been about data, and as data in research continues to grow exponentially, so does the importance of how it’s stored. A key example of how the scientific field can tackle Big Data storage is DESY, a scientific research organization dedicated to providing scientists worldwide faster access to insights into samples, making optimal data management in a high-volume environment extremely critical.

The flux of cosmic ray particles as a function of their energy. Courtesy of Sven Lafebre

Latest Measurements Unveil New Territories in Flux of Cosmic Rays

September 23, 2014 4:17 pm | by CERN | News | Comments

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer collaboration has presented its latest results based on analysis of 41 billion particles detected with the space-based AMS detector aboard the International Space Station. The results, presented during a seminar at CERN, provide new insights into the nature of the mysterious excess of positrons observed in the flux of cosmic rays. 

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