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Researchers have developed a math model that can predict the progression from nephritis — kidney inflammation — to interstitial fibrosis, scarring in the kidney that current treatments cannot reverse. Courtesy of Piotr Michał Jaworski

Math Model Replaces Invasive Kidney Biopsy for Lupus Patients

September 18, 2014 2:11 pm | by Emily Caldwell, Ohio State University | News | Comments

Mathematics might be able to reduce the need for invasive biopsies in patients suffering kidney damage related to the autoimmune disease lupus. Researchers have developed a math model that can predict the progression from kidney inflammation to scarring in the kidney that current treatments cannot reverse.

Emotion Detector: Software Accurately Classifies Facial Expressions

September 17, 2014 2:27 pm | by Inderscience Research | News | Comments

Face recognition software measures various parameters in a mug shot, such as the distance...

Mathematica Online

September 17, 2014 1:59 pm | Product Releases | Comments

Mathematica Online operates completely in the cloud and is accessible through any modern Web...

Algorithm Enables Untethered Cheetah Robot to Run and Jump

September 16, 2014 2:14 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

MIT researchers have developed an algorithm for bounding that they’ve successfully implemented...

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Close-ups of an experiment conducted by John Bush and his student Daniel Harris, in which a bouncing droplet of fluid was propelled across a fluid bath by waves it generated. Courtesy of Dan Harris

Fluid Mechanics: New Math Suggests Alternative to Quantum Orthodoxy

September 15, 2014 3:43 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

The central mystery of quantum mechanics is that small chunks of matter sometimes seem to behave like particles, sometimes like waves. For most of the past century, the prevailing explanation of this conundrum has been what’s called the “Copenhagen interpretation” — which holds that, in some sense, a single particle really is a wave, smeared out across the universe, which collapses into a determinate location only when observed.

The top image shows how the new algorithm is able to identify an area (in red) where stress has created a weak spot in a small piece of plastic wrap. The older method (shown in the bottom half of the picture) is unable to pinpoint the place where the plas

Identifying Tiny Strains in Body Tissues before Injuries Occur

September 9, 2014 3:14 pm | by Jim Dryden, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have developed algorithms to identify weak spots in tendons, muscles and bones prone to tearing or breaking. The technology one day may help pinpoint minor strains and tiny injuries in the body’s tissues long before bigger problems occur.

Cool Calculations for Cold Atoms

September 3, 2014 9:14 am | by The Joint Quantum Institute | News | Comments

Chemical reactions drive the mechanisms of life as well as a million other natural processes on earth. These reactions occur at a wide spectrum of temperatures, from those prevailing at the chilly polar icecaps to those at work churning near the earth’s core. At nanokelvin temperatures, by contrast, nothing was supposed to happen. Chemistry was expected to freeze up. Experiments and theoretical work have now show that this is not true.

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Eugenia Cheng, visiting senior lecturer in mathematics and a concert pianist, specializes in category theory, which she characterizes as 'the mathematics of mathematics.' Courtesy of Robert Kozloff

Power of Mathematics Opens New Possibilities in Music

August 27, 2014 3:34 pm | by Steve Koppes, University of Chicago | News | Comments

Anthony Cheung’s formal mathematical training essentially ended with high school calculus. But as a musician and composer, he has explored mathematical phenomena in new ways, especially through their influence on harmony and timbre. “Through technology and thinking about acoustics, we can change sounds on the computer in innumerable ways,” says Cheung, whose musical composition earned him a 2012 Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome.

The study combined two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Does your Computer Know How You’re Feeling?

August 25, 2014 11:16 am | by Taylor & Francis | News | Comments

Researchers in Bangladesh have designed a computer program that can accurately recognize users’ emotional states as much as 87 percent of the time, depending on the emotion. Writing in the journal Behaviour & Information Technology, A.F.M. Nazmul Haque Nahin and his colleagues describe how their study combined — for the first time — two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Researchers from Argonne, in collaboration with Caterpillar Inc. and Convergent Science, carried out large internal combustion engine simulations involving fine spatial and temporal resolutions; high fidelity; and robust two-phase flow, spray, turbulence,

Argonne wins HPC Innovation Excellence Award

August 25, 2014 10:47 am | by Argonne National Laboratory | News | Comments

Argonne National Laboratory was one of seven new winners of the HPC Innovation Excellence Award. Announced by International Data Corporation at the ISC '14 supercomputer industry conference in Leipzig, Germany, the award recognizes noteworthy achievements by users of high-performance computing (HPC) technologies.

Once installed, the sensors would provide information about the condition of bridges that cannot be obtained by visual inspection alone and would allow authorities to identify and focus on bridges that need immediate attention. Courtesy of USchick

Wireless Sensors and Flying Robots Monitor Deteriorating Bridges

August 22, 2014 12:45 pm | by Tufts School of Engineering | News | Comments

As a report from the Obama administration warns that one in four bridges in the United States needs significant repair or cannot handle automobile traffic, Tufts University engineers are employing wireless sensors and flying robots that could have the potential to help authorities monitor the condition of bridges in real time.

MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory has released a data-visualization tool that lets users highlight aberrations and possible patterns in the graphical display; the tool then automatically determines which data sources are respon

Visual Control of Big Data: Recomputing Visualizations without Aberrant Results

August 20, 2014 10:44 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

In the age of big data, visualization tools are vital. With a single glance at a graphic display, a human being can recognize patterns that a computer might fail to find even after hours of analysis. But what if there are aberrations in the patterns? Or what if there’s just a suggestion of a visual pattern that’s not distinct enough to justify any strong inferences? Or what if the pattern is clear, but not what was to be expected?

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Brookhaven theoretical physicist Swagato Mukherjee explains that 'invisible' hadrons are like salt molecules floating around in the hot gas of hadrons, making other particles freeze out at a lower temperature than they would if the 'salt' wasn't there.

Invisible Particles Provide First Indirect Evidence of Strange Baryons

August 20, 2014 10:17 am | by Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

New supercomputing calculations provide the first evidence that particles predicted by the theory of quark-gluon interactions, but never before observed, are being produced in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. These heavy strange baryons, containing at least one strange quark, still cannot be observed directly, but instead make their presence known by lowering the temperature at which other baryons "freeze out"

Albert-László Barabási, the Robert Gray Dodge Professor of Network Science and a Distinguished University Professor at Northeastern, co-authored a paper with visiting scholar Hua-Wei Shen that presented a new algorithm to determine how credit should be al

Scientific Research: New Algorithm Gives Credit Where Credit Is Due

August 19, 2014 2:51 pm | by Joe O'Connell, Northeastern University | News | Comments

It makes sense that the credit for sci­ence papers with mul­tiple authors should go to the authors who per­form the bulk of the research, yet that’s not always the case. Now, a new algo­rithm devel­oped at Northeastern’s Center for Com­plex Net­work Research helps sheds light on how to prop­erly allo­cate credit.

With their new method, computer scientists from Saarland University are able, for the first time, to compute all illumination effects in a simpler and more efficient way. Courtesy of AG Slusallek/Saar-Uni

Realistic Computer Graphics Technology Vastly Speeds Process

August 18, 2014 2:15 pm | by University Saarland | News | Comments

Creating a realistic computer simulation of how light suffuses a room is crucial not just for animated movies like Toy Story or Cars, but also in industry. Special computing methods should ensure this, but require great effort. Computer scientists from Saarbrücken have developed a novel approach that vastly simplifies and speeds up the whole calculating process.

The Kilobots, a swarm of one thousand simple but collaborative robots. Courtesy of Mike Rubenstein and Science/AAAS

AI: Self-organizing Thousand-robot Swarm Forms Vast, Complex Shapes

August 18, 2014 12:03 pm | by Caroline Perry, Harvard SEAS | News | Comments

The first thousand-robot flash mob has assembled at Harvard University. Instead of one highly-complex robot, a “kilo” of robots collaborate, providing a simple platform for the enactment of complex behaviors. Called Kilobots, these extremely simple robots are each just a few centimeters across and stand on three pin-like legs.

Maryam Mirzakhani is the first woman to ever win the Fields Medal — known as the "Nobel Prize of Mathematics" — in recognition of her contributions to the understanding of the symmetry of curved surfaces. Courtesy of Maryam Mirzakhani

Maryam Mirzakhani is First Woman Fields Medalist

August 14, 2014 2:44 pm | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford University | News | Comments

Maryam Mirzakhani is the first woman to ever win the Fields Medal — known as the "Nobel Prize of Mathematics" — in recognition of her contributions to the understanding of the symmetry of curved surfaces. Officially known as the International Medal for Outstanding Discoveries in Mathematics, the Fields Medal will be presented by the International Mathematical Union ...

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The Bloch sphere, a representation of a qubit, the fundamental building block of quantum computers. Courtesy of Glosser

Quantum Simulators Explained

August 12, 2014 12:36 pm | by Springer Science+Business Media | News | Comments

Just about everything you ever wanted to know about quantum simulators is summed up in a new review. As part of a Thematic Series on Quantum Simulations, the open access journal European Physical Journal Quantum Technology has published an overview of just what a quantum simulator is, namely a device that actively uses quantum effects to answer questions on model systems.

Sandia National Laboratories researchers Steve Plimpton, left, and Michael Gallis look at a projection of a model of the Russian MIR space station, which fell out of orbit several years ago and disintegrated, with the remains ending up at the bottom of th

Sophisticated 3-D Codes Yield Unprecedented Physics, Engineering Insights

August 6, 2014 4:43 pm | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

When the space shuttle Columbia disintegrated on re-entry in 2002, sophisticated computer models were key to determining what happened. A piece of foam flew off at launch and hit a tile, damaging the leading edge of the shuttle wing and exposing the underlying structure. Temperatures soared to thousands of degrees as Columbia plunged toward Earth at 27 times the speed of sound, said Gallis, who used NASA codes and Icarus for simulations...

NSF's Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC) program will support more than 225 new projects in 39 states in 2014. The awards enable research from the theoretical to the experimental, and aim to minimize the misuses of cyber technology, bolster educatio

Frontier-scale Projects Expand Breadth and Impact of Cybersecurity, Privacy Research

August 6, 2014 3:35 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

As our lives and businesses become ever more intertwined with the Internet and networked technologies, it is crucial to continue to develop and improve cybersecurity measures to keep our data, devices and critical systems safe, secure, private and accessible. The NSF's Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace program has announced two new center-scale "Frontier" awards to support projects that address grand challenges in cybersecurity science

MIT researchers extracted audio from the vibrations of a plant, potato-chip bag and other objects. Courtesy of Christine Daniloff/MIT

Like James Bond, Algorithm Recovers Speech through Soundproof Glass

August 5, 2014 12:35 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers at MIT, Microsoft and Adobe have developed an algorithm that can reconstruct an audio signal by analyzing minute vibrations of objects depicted in video. In one set of experiments, they were able to recover intelligible speech from the vibrations of a potato-chip bag photographed from 15 feet away through soundproof glass.

VisSim is a visual language for mathematical modeling, simulation and model-based embedded system development used by scientists and engineers.

Altair to Acquire Visual Solutions, Adds VisSim to Portfolio

July 30, 2014 2:01 pm | by Altair | News | Comments

Altair has announced its intent to acquire Visual Solutions, makers of VisSim, a visual language for mathematical modeling, simulation and model-based embedded system development used by scientists and engineers. The transaction is expected to close by the end of July 2014.

Grammatikopoulos simulated two palladium nanoparticles colliding at different temperatures. The hotter the temperature, the more homogenous the resulting product, and the further the atoms in the particle crystallize.

Simulating the Invisible

July 29, 2014 2:07 pm | by Poncie Rutsch, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) | News | Comments

Every trillionth of a second, Panagiotis Grammatikopoulos calculates the location of each individual atom in a particle based on where it is and which forces apply. He uses a computer program to make the calculations, and then animates the motion of the atoms using visualization software. The resulting animation illuminates what happens, atom-by-atom, when two nanoparticles collide.

UIC physicist Dirk Morr, who worked with researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, says the findings were the result of “the close collaboration of theory and experiment.” Courtesy of Roberta Dupuis-Devlin/UIC Photo Services

Physicists Unlock Nature of High-Temperature Superconductivity

July 29, 2014 2:02 pm | by Jeanne Galatzer-Levy, University of Illinois at Chicago | News | Comments

Physicists have identified the “quantum glue” that underlies a promising type of superconductivity — a crucial step towards the creation of energy superhighways that conduct electricity without current loss. The research is a collaboration between theoretical physicists and experimentalists.

Genes that are active only in the testes have double the harmful mutation rate of those that are active in both sexes. Courtesy of Archaeogenetics

Mutations from Venus, Mutations from Mars: A Sex-difference Approach to Harmful Mutation

July 28, 2014 5:36 pm | by Weizmann Institute of Science | News | Comments

Some 15 percent of adults suffer from fertility problems, many of these due to genetic factors. This is something of a paradox: We might expect such genes, which reduce an individual's ability to reproduce, to disappear from the population. Recent research may have solved the riddle. Not only can it explain the high rates of male fertility problems, it may open new avenues in understanding the causes of genetic diseases and their treatment.

Collecting Just the Right Data: When you can’t collect all you need, new algorithm tells you which to target

July 28, 2014 2:06 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Much artificial-intelligence research addresses the problem of making predictions based on large data sets. An obvious example is the recommendation engines at retail sites like Amazon. But some types of data are harder to collect than online click histories — information about geological formations thousands of feet underground, for instance. And in other applications there may just not be enough time to crunch all the available data.

The automatic placement of the albums by the algorithm was in agreement with the chronological order of the recording of each Beatles albums.

AI Reveals The Beatles’ Dramatic Musical Transformation

July 28, 2014 12:29 pm | by Lawrence Technological University | News | Comments

Music fans and critics know that the music of the Beatles underwent a dramatic transformation in just a few years. But, until now, there hasn’t been a scientific way to measure the progression. Computer scientists at Lawrence Technological University have developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that can analyze and compare musical styles, enabling research into their musical progression.

Dr Grimes derived equations describing how string bending, vibrato and whammy bars change the pitch of a note. He found that the properties of the strings had a big effect on the change in pitch – in particular the Young's modulus. Courtesy of Feliciano G

The Physics of Lead Guitar Playing

July 23, 2014 6:36 pm | by University of Oxford | News | Comments

String bends, tapping, vibrato and whammy bars are all techniques that add to the distinctiveness of a lead guitarist's sound, whether it's Clapton, Hendrix, or BB King. Now, guitarist and physicist Dr. David Robert Grimes has described the physics underlying these techniques.

Birdsongs Automatically Decoded by Computer Scientists

July 21, 2014 2:25 pm | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found a successful way of identifying bird sounds from large audio collections, which could be useful for expert and amateur bird-watchers alike. The analysis used recordings of individual birds and of dawn choruses to identify characteristics of bird sounds. It took advantage of large datasets of sound recordings provided by the British Library Sound Archive, and online sources.

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