Advertisement
Mathematics
Subscribe to Mathematics

The Lead

The University of Chicago’s Research Computing Center is helping linguists visualize the grammar of a given word in bodies of language containing millions or billions of words. Courtesy of Ricardo Aguilera/Research Computing Center

Billions of Words: Visualizing Natural Language

February 27, 2015 3:14 pm | by Benjamin Recchie, University of Chicago | News | Comments

Children don’t have to be told that “cat” and “cats” are variants of the same word — they pick it up just by listening. To a computer, though, they’re as different as, well, cats and dogs. Yet it’s computers that are assumed to be superior in detecting patterns and rules, not four-year-olds. Researchers are trying to, if not to solve that puzzle definitively, at least provide the tools to do so.

Artificial Intelligence Performs Real Magic Tricks

February 25, 2015 11:41 am | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Researchers gave a computer program the outline of how a magic jigsaw puzzle and a mind-reading...

Statistical Technique Traces Languages Back to Oldest Spoken Words

February 24, 2015 12:42 pm | by Current Biology | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a statistical technique that sorts out when changes to words’...

Algorithm Enables Simulation of Ultrafast Processes

February 20, 2015 12:07 pm | by Rachel Berkowitz, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new algorithm which increases the small time step required by...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Scientists at the University of Valencia have developed a research methodology called Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), based on network analysis mathematical tools for studying anatomy. Courtesy of Asociación RUVID

Modular Anatomical Structure of Human Head Described for First Time

February 18, 2015 10:03 am | by Asociación RUVID | News | Comments

A new mathematical analysis tool has allowed a deeper understanding of the anatomy of the human head, describing the skull as an extended network structured in 10 modules. Researchers have developed a research methodology called Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), based on network analysis mathematical tools for studying anatomy.

A message-carrying "golden record" that NASA's Voyager probe carries, a 12-inch gold-plated copper disk containing sounds and images selected to portray the diversity of life and culture on Earth. (AP Photo/NASA)

Should we call the Cosmos Seeking ET? Hawking, Brin think It's Crazy

February 17, 2015 3:19 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Astronomers have their own version of the single person's dilemma: Do you wait by the phone for a call? Or do you make the call yourself and risk getting shot down? Instead of love, of course, astronomers are looking for alien life and, for decades, they have sat by their telescopes waiting to hear from E.T. It didn't happen. Now, some want to beam messages out into the void and invite the closest few thousand worlds to chat or even visit.

A computer simulation explores the impact of measles outbreaks in cities across the U.S. Users can see how an outbreak would play out if their city had high or low vaccination rates.

Simulation Brings Facts to Measles Outbreak and Vaccination Debate

February 17, 2015 2:28 pm | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

To bring facts and clarity to the public debate about immunization in light of the recent measles outbreak, the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health unveiled a computer simulation that explores the impact of measles outbreaks in cities across the U.S. Users can see how an outbreak would play out if their city had high or low vaccination rates.

Advertisement
John Wass is a statistician based in Chicago, IL.

Explorations of Mathematical Models in Biology with Maple

February 10, 2015 9:29 am | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

The author of this wonderful text delivers a brief, easy-to-absorb, yet very comprehensive text on modeling real-world data with Maple. Maple is software for performing mathematics, with a none-too-steep learning curve. In the introduction, the author is quick to point out that this is neither a detailed textbook of mathematical modeling, nor Maple. It is, however, a very well-written manual of introductory modeling and use of Maple.

ENIGMA cipher machine  Rotor Set Courtesy of Andy L.

Similar Statistics Play Role in Decision Making and World War II Code Breaking

February 9, 2015 11:22 am | by Cell Press | News | Comments

Statistical decision making resembles a process Alan Turning's team did in Bletchley Park to work out the settings of German enigma machines. In order to make use of the large clicking machine, Turing's team analyzed pairs of randomly intercepted German messages, aligned them one above the other to accumulate evidence from letter pairs until they reach a threshold level of certainty that the messages were sent on identical enigma machine.

Brain Researcher Marianne Fyhn receives computation help from, among others, Gaute Einevoll and Anders Malthe-Sørenssen to acquire an understanding of how the brain Works.

Mathematics to Reveal Secrets of the Brain

February 5, 2015 4:33 pm | by Yngve Vogt, University of Oslo | News | Comments

Top researchers are using mathematical modelling and heavy computations to understand how the brain can both remember and learn. Ten years ago, when the team of Marianne Fyhn and Torkel Hafting Fyhn cooperated with the Nobel Prize winning team of May-Britt and Edvard Moser at NTNU, they discovered the sense of orientation in the brain.

Artist’s depiction of light traveling through a photonic crystal superlattice, where holes have been randomly patterned. The result is a more narrow beam of light. Courtesy of Nicoletta Barolini

More Precise Information Transfer in Computer Chips Using Disorder to Control Light

February 4, 2015 2:56 pm | by Matthew Chin, UCLA | News | Comments

A breakthrough could lead to the more precise transfer of information in computer chips, as well as new types of optical materials for light emission and lasers. Researchers were able to control light at tiny lengths around 500 nanometers — smaller than the light’s own wavelength — by using random crystal lattice structures to counteract light diffraction. The discovery could begin a new phase in laser collimation.

A code hidden in the arrangement of the genetic information of single-stranded RNA viruses tells the virus how to pack itself within its outer shell of proteins.

Molecular Warfare: Researchers Discover Viral "Enigma Machine"

February 4, 2015 2:21 pm | by University of Leeds | News | Comments

Researchers have cracked a code that governs infections by a major group of viruses, including the common cold and polio. The unnoticed code had been hidden in plain sight in the sequence of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) that makes up this type of viral genome. But researchers have unlocked its meaning and demonstrated that jamming the code can disrupt virus assembly. Stopping a virus assembling can stop it functioning.

Advertisement
For decades, researchers in artificial intelligence, or AI, worked on specialized problems, developing theoretical concepts and workable algorithms for various aspects of the field. However, in recent years, as the individual aspects of artificial intelli

AI Algorithms Programmed into Self-driving Cars

February 3, 2015 3:02 pm | by National Science Foundation | News | Comments

For decades, researchers in artificial intelligence, or AI, worked on specialized problems, developing theoretical concepts and workable algorithms for various aspects of the field. However, in recent years, as the individual aspects of artificial intelligence matured, researchers began bringing the pieces together, leading to amazing displays of high-level intelligence.

MIT researchers have developed a mathematical equation that predicts how surface patterns form on curved objects. Pictured is a sphere with a combination of hexagons and labyrinthine patterns, and a more complex, torus-shaped object with hexagonal dimples

Wrinkle Predictions: New Mathematical Theory may Explain Patterns in Fingerprints, Raisins, Microlenses

February 2, 2015 2:00 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

As a grape slowly dries and shrivels, its surface creases, ultimately taking on the wrinkled form of a raisin. Similar patterns can be found on the surfaces of other dried materials, as well as in human fingerprints. While these patterns have long been observed in nature, and more recently in experiments, scientists have not been able to come up with a way to predict how such patterns arise in curved systems, such as microlenses.

When Northwestern University professor Luis Amaral set out to test LDA, he found that it was neither as accurate nor reproducible as a leading topic modeling algorithm should be.

Taking a Network Approach to Building Trustworthy Big Data Algorithms

February 2, 2015 1:08 pm | by Emily Ayshford, Northwestern University | News | Comments

Much of our reams of data sits in large databases of unstructured text. Finding insights among e-mails, text documents and Web sites is extremely difficult, unless we can search, characterize and classify their text data in a meaningful way. A leading big data algorithm for finding related topics within unstructured text is LDA. But Luis Amaral found that it was neither as accurate nor reproducible as a leading topic modeling algorithm ...

In simulations, algorithms using the new data structure continued to demonstrate performance improvement with the addition of new cores, up to a total of 80 cores. Courtesy of Christine Daniloff/MIT

Parallelizing Common Algorithms: Priority Queue Implemention Keeps Pace with New Cores

January 30, 2015 3:49 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT News Office | News | Comments

Every undergraduate computer-science major takes a course on data structures, which describes different ways of organizing data in a computer’s memory. Every data structure has its own advantages: Some are good for fast retrieval, some for efficient search, some for quick insertions and deletions, and so on.

The Alan Turing Institute will promote the development and use of advanced mathematics, computer science, algorithms and big data for human benefit.

Alan Turing Institute Positioned to Break New Big Data, Online Security Boundaries

January 30, 2015 11:41 am | by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council | News | Comments

The five universities have been selected to lead the new Alan Turing Institute. The Institute will build on the UK's existing academic strengths and help position the country as a world leader in the analysis and application of big data and algorithm research. Its headquarters will be based at the British Library at the center of London’s Knowledge Quarter.

Advertisement
“In nanomedicine we need to understand physical phenomena on a nano scale, forming as correct a picture as possible of molecular phenomena. In this context, quantum chemical calculations are important,” says Michele Cascella. Courtesy of Hanne Utigard

Quantum Chemistry Closing in on Quantum Mechanics of Living Cells

January 30, 2015 11:19 am | by Yngve Vogt, University of Oslo | News | Comments

Quantum chemical calculations have been used to solve big mysteries in space. Soon the same calculations may be used to produce tomorrow’s cancer drugs. Quantum chemical calculations are needed to explain what happens to the electrons’ trajectories within a molecule, and the results of a quantum chemical calculation are often more accurate than what is achievable experimentally.

SMAP's soil moisture measurements will help with forecasts of precipitation and temperature. Courtesy of UCAR

Building a Better Weather Forecast? Fine-scale Soil Moisture Data will Soon Help

January 29, 2015 12:50 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

If you were trying to forecast tomorrow's weather, you would probably look up at the sky rather than down at the ground. But if you live in the U.S. Midwest or someplace with a similar climate, one key to a better weather forecast may lie beneath your feet. Better soil moisture observations lead to better land-atmosphere interaction in weather forecasting models and ultimately to a better prediction of temperature and precipitation.

Dr. Jan Camenisch, cryptographer and data privacy scientist at IBM Research holds a piece of the IBM identity Mixer algorithm.

Sophisticated Cryptographic Algorithm Prevents Unwanted Sharing of Personal Data

January 29, 2015 9:23 am | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM researchers have announced a cloud-based technology that holds potential to help consumers better protect online personal data, including date of birth, home address and credit card numbers. The technology, called Identity Mixer, uses a cryptographic algorithm to encrypt the certified identity attributes of a user in a way that allows the user to reveal only selected pieces to third parties.

Improving Data Mobility and Management for International Cosmology

Improving Data Mobility and Management for International Cosmology Workshop

January 28, 2015 3:06 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | Events

Registration is now open for a workshop on “Improving Data Mobility and Management for International Cosmology” to be held February 10-11, 2015, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. The workshop, one in a series of Cross-Connects workshops, is sponsored the by the Deptartment of Energy’s ESnet and Internet2. Early registration is encouraged, as attendance is limited.

A notebook by Alan Turing, the World War II code-breaking genius depicted by Benedict Cumberbatch in the Oscar-nominated "The Imitation Game," is shown in a special preview at Bonhams auctioneers. The 56-page manuscript, containing Turing's complex mathem

British Code Breaker Alan Turing's Notebook Goes to Auction

January 26, 2015 1:33 pm | by AP | News | Comments

A handwritten notebook by Alan Turing, the World War II code-breaking genius depicted by Benedict Cumberbatch in the Oscar-nominated The Imitation Game, is going on the auction block. The 56-page manuscript was written at the time the British mathematician and computer science pioneer was working to break the seemingly unbreakable Enigma codes used by the Germans throughout World War II. It is expected to bring at least $1 million.

This simulation, which models a rheometer with particles, can help determine how well a rheometer design works at characterizing a fluid. The NIST team is performing a number of simulations like this one, varying the shape and number of blades to better i

Predicting Concrete Flow Properties from Simple Measurements

January 23, 2015 2:44 pm | by NIST | News | Comments

Just because concrete is the most widely used building material in human history doesn’t mean it can’t be improved. A recent study using DOE Office of Science supercomputers has led to a new way to predict concrete’s flow properties from simple measurements. The results should help accelerate the design of a new generation of high-performance and eco-friendly cement-based materials by reducing time and costs associated with R&D.

This sequence of graphs illustrates the application of the researchers' technique to a real-world computer vision problem. The solution to each successive problem (red balls) is used to initialize (green arrows) the search for a solution to the next. Cour

Optimizing Optimization Algorithms: How to Get the Best Results

January 23, 2015 2:36 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Optimization algorithms, which try to find the minimum values of mathematical functions, are everywhere in engineering. Among other things, they’re used to evaluate design tradeoffs, to assess control systems, and to find patterns in data. One way to solve a difficult optimization problem is to first reduce it to a related but much simpler problem, then gradually add complexity back in ...

This puzzle of a material which seems solid to any observer while appearing fluid under the microscope is an old one. And, even with the help of today's supercomputers, it seems impossible to verify in simulations whether a glass ever stops flowing. Court

Puzzle: Does Glass Ever Stop Flowing?

January 22, 2015 2:15 pm | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Is glass a true solid? Researchers have combined computer simulation and information theory, originally invented for telephone communication and cryptography, to answer this puzzling question. This puzzle of a material which seems solid to any observer while appearing fluid under the microscope is an old one. And, even with the help of today's supercomputers, it seems impossible to verify in simulations whether a glass ever stops flowing.

One aspect of the user-assistance software that distinguishes it from previous planning systems is that it assesses risk. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Software that Knows the Risks: Planning Algorithms Evaluate Probability of Success, Suggest Low-risk Alternatives

January 16, 2015 1:57 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Imagine that you could tell your phone that you want to drive from your house in Boston to a hotel in upstate New York, that you want to stop for lunch at an Applebee’s around 12:30, and that you don’t want the trip to take more than four hours. Then imagine that your phone tells you that you have only a 66 percent chance of meeting those criteria — but that if you can wait until 1:00 for lunch, or if you’re willing to eat at TGI Friday...

Developing a more efficient vision system for household robots. Courtesy of Christine Daniloff and Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

MIT Algorithm Helps Household Robots Identify Items Concealed in Clutter

January 15, 2015 9:49 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

For household robots to be practical, they need to be able to recognize the objects they’re supposed to manipulate. While object recognition is one of the most widely studied topics in AI, even the best detectors still fail much of the time. Researchers believe the robots should take advantage of their mobility, imaging objects from multiple perspectives. Matching up objects in the different images, however, poses computational challenges.

Terence Tao, a professor of mathematics at UCLA, is very interested in solving the Navier-Stokes equations, which are among the most difficult tackled by mathematicians. Understanding them could help with modeling weather, ocean currents, the flow of wate

Can Wave Equations Explode? Computer Algorithms may Provide the Answer

January 13, 2015 1:43 pm | by Marlene Cimons, National Science Foundation | News | Comments

Wave equations help describe waves of light, sound and water as they occur in physics. Also known as partial differential equations, they have valuable potential for predicting weather or earthquakes, or certain types of natural disasters. Tao is interested in the theoretical side of these equations, seeking to discover with computer algorithms whether they can behave in a way that typically is the opposite of what occurs in the real world.

The Chern-number measurement using an external force

Magic Numbers of Quantum Matter Revealed by Cold Atoms

January 13, 2015 11:19 am | by Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics | News | Comments

Topology, a branch of mathematics classifying geometric objects, has been exploited by physicists to predict and describe unusual quantum phases: the topological states of matter. These intriguing phases, generally accessible at very low temperature, exhibit unique conductivity properties, which are particularly robust against external perturbations, suggesting promising technological applications.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading