Advertisement
Mathematics
Subscribe to Mathematics

The Lead

This simulation illustrates the total mass density (left) and temperature (right) of a dimethyl ether jet fuel simulation. It is a snapshot of the solution that corresponds to a physical time of 0.00006 seconds. Courtesy of Matthew Emmett, Weiqun Zhang

Optimized Algorithms Give Combustion Simulations a Boost

December 18, 2014 4:32 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Turbulent combustion simulations, which provide input to the design of more fuel-efficient combustion systems, have gotten their own efficiency boost. Researchers developed new algorithmic features that streamline turbulent flame simulations, which play an important role in designing more efficient combustion systems. They tested the enhanced code on the Hopper supercomputer and achieved a dramatic decrease in simulation times.

Mathematicians prove Umbral Moonshine Conjecture

December 17, 2014 3:08 pm | by Carol Clark, Emory University | News | Comments

Monstrous moonshine, a quirky pattern of the monster group in theoretical math, has a shadow —...

New Algorithm Prints with Zero Material Waste

December 16, 2014 11:09 am | by Diane Luckow, Simon Fraser University | News | Comments

Just in time for Christmas, Richard Zhang reveals how to print a 3-D Christmas tree efficiently...

Big Data v. Cancer: Algorithm Identifies Genetic Changes across Cancers

December 15, 2014 4:00 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

Using a computer algorithm that can sift through mounds of genetic data, researchers from Brown...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

For the family of bee-eaters (on the photo Merops bullocki), the study revealed a close relationship to oscine birds, parrots, and birds of prey. Courtesy of Peter Houde

Bird Tree of Life Reproduced using Gene Analysis, Supercomputing

December 15, 2014 1:57 pm | by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology | News | Comments

About 95 percent of the more than 10,000 bird species known only evolved upon the extinction of dinosaurs about 66 million years ago. According to computer analyses of the genetic data, today's diversity developed from a few species at a virtually explosive rate after 15 million years. Scientists designed the algorithms for the comprehensive analysis of the evolution of birds; a computing capacity of 300 processor-years was required.

Michael Boruta is Optical Spectroscopy Product Manager at ACD/Labs

Accessibility of Data and Application of Algorithms to Provide Insights in Predictive Analytics

December 15, 2014 11:56 am | by Michael Boruta, ACD/Labs | Blogs | Comments

Although there are a diverse range of applications for predictive analytics in R&D, two common basic requirements are data and insight. Data may be generated by running experiments/analyses, or re-applied from previous work when available. Insights come from application of knowledge — both explicitand tacit. There are a variety of roles for informatics in predictive analytics...

Madhu Sudan and his colleagues have begun to describe theoretical limits on the degree of imprecision that communicating computers can tolerate, with very real implications for the design of communication protocols. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

New Theory could Yield More Reliable Communication Protocols

December 12, 2014 5:23 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Communication protocols for digital devices are very efficient but also very brittle: They require information to be specified in a precise order with a precise number of bits. If sender and receiver — say, a computer and a printer — are off by even a single bit relative to each other, communication between them breaks down entirely.

Advertisement
The ancient Antikythera relic was rescued from a shipwreck. Courtesy of Giovanni Dall Orto

World's Oldest Computer, Ancient Greek Antikythera Mechanism, 100 Years Older than Previously Believed

December 9, 2014 2:10 pm | by University of Puget Sound | News | Comments

An ancient Greek astronomical puzzle has one more piece in place. The new evidence results from research by James Evans, professor of physics at University of Puget Sound, and Christián Carman, history of science professor at University of Quilmes, Argentina. The two researchers published a paper advancing our understanding of the Antikythera Mechanism, an ancient Greek mechanism that modeled the known universe of 2,000 years ago. 

This tiny slice of silicon, etched in Jelena Vuckovic's lab at Stanford with a pattern that resembles a bar code, is one step on the way toward linking computer components with light instead of wires. Courtesy Vuckovic Lab

New Algorithm a Big Step toward Using Light to Transmit Data

December 9, 2014 1:38 pm | by Stanford University, Chris Cesare | News | Comments

Engineers have designed and built a prism-like device that can split a beam of light into different colors and bend the light at right angles, a development that could eventually lead to computers that use optics, rather than electricity, to carry data. The optical link is a tiny slice of silicon etched with a pattern that resembles a bar code. When a beam of light is shined at the link, two different wavelengths of light split off

A mathematician has developed a new way to uncover simple patterns that might underlie apparently complex systems, such as clouds, cracks in materials or the movement of the stockmarket.

Finding Simple Patterns in a Complex World

December 3, 2014 3:26 pm | by Australian National University | News | Comments

A mathematician has developed a new way to uncover simple patterns that might underlie apparently complex systems, such as clouds, cracks in materials or the movement of the stockmarket.                  

Engineers have designed and built a prism-like device that can split a beam of light into different colors and bend the light at right angles, a development that could eventually lead to computers that use optics, rather than electricity, to carry data.

Using Light Instead of Wires Inside Computers

December 2, 2014 3:01 pm | by Chris Cesare, Stanford University | News | Comments

Engineers have designed and built a prism-like device that can split a beam of light into different colors and bend the light at right angles, a development that could eventually lead to computers that use optics, rather than electricity, to carry data.

The National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation medals ready to be presented to awardees. Courtesy of Sandy Schaeffer, NSF

National Medals of Science, Technology and Innovation Presented

November 25, 2014 12:00 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

At a White House ceremony on November 20, 2014, President Obama presented the National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation to individuals who have made outstanding contributions to science and engineering. The awards are the nation's highest honors for achievement and leadership in advancing the fields of science and technology.

Advertisement
John Wass is a statistician based in Chicago, IL.

Exploration and Analysis of DNA Microarray and Other High-Dimensional Data

November 18, 2014 3:10 pm | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

The introduction of newer sequencing methodologies, DNA microarrays and high-throughput technology has resulted in a deluge of large data sets that require new strategies to clean, normalize and analyze the data. All of these and more are covered in approximately 300 pages with extraordinary clarity and minimal mathematics.

Mark Anawis is a Principal Scientist and ASQ Six Sigma Black Belt at Abbott.

Applications for Randomness

November 17, 2014 8:49 am | by Mark Anawis | Blogs | Comments

The mathematician, Robert R. Coveyou, said: “The generation of random numbers is too important to be left to chance.” Random numbers are used in sampling, simulations, modeling, data encryption, gambling and even musical composition. A random number is one selected from a set of equally possible values. Any sequence of random numbers must be statistically independent of the others.

David Turek is Vice President, Technical Computing OpenPOWER at IBM Corporation

The World of Supercomputing Must Become Data Centric

November 17, 2014 8:37 am | by David Turek, IBM | Blogs | Comments

It has been a commonly held belief that supercomputing capability is a predictable phenomenon with the "fastest" system in the world increasing in power by three orders of magnitude about every 11 years. I put the term "fastest" in quotes, because very few ask the question: Fastest in what way? It turns out that this notion of "fastest" is limited to a narrow consideration of system performance that focuses on floating point capability.

A new algorithm can, with high accuracy, determine whether a patient is suffering from emphysema or heart failure based on readings from a capnograph — a machine that measures the concentration of carbon dioxide in a patient’s exhalations. Courtesy of Chr

Diagnostic Exhalations: Algorithm Analyzes CO2, could Help Determine Treatment

November 6, 2014 3:41 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Paramedics respond to a 911 call to find an elderly patient who’s having difficulty breathing. Anxious and disoriented, the patient has trouble remembering all the medications he’s taking, and with his shortness of breath, speaking is difficult. Is he suffering from acute emphysema or heart failure? The symptoms look the same, but initiating the wrong treatment regimen will increase the patient’s risk of severe complications.

QT 2.5 Chemometrics Software

Symbion QT 2.5 Chemometrics Software

November 6, 2014 3:27 pm | Symbion Systems | Product Releases | Comments

Symbion QT 2.5. chemometrics software provides Parametric Data Cleaning, a technique that automates the handling of data compromised by excessive noise or other artifacts. Key cleaning parameters are under the control of the analyst, allowing chemometric optimization under a wide range of analytical situations.

Advertisement
Professor Robert Sinclair illustrates one of his examples of a biological system (the fruit fly eye) which exhibits tendencies towards both deterministic and stochastic development, where the number of cells is uniform, but the way in which they determine

Back to Basics: Where Supercomputers Dominate Analysis, Classical Thinking Still Holds Relevance

November 5, 2014 4:25 pm | by Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology | News | Comments

Sinclair suggests that there still is a place in science in modern times for the interpretation of results using rational numbers or simple ratios. In a time where supercomputers dominate analysis, he argues that there is not enough attention being paid to the basic approaches to science of the past, which were able to profoundly illuminate our understanding of the natural world through the simplification of very complex topics and systems.

The 15 boxes in this image show the simulated intensity of spin excitations in 15 iron-based materials, including iron compounds that are high-temperature superconductors (images d–h). The x axis shows the momentum of the spin excitation in selected locat

Spin Dynamics: Computational Model Predicts Superconductivity

November 4, 2014 1:52 pm | by Katie Elyce Jones, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers studying iron-based superconductors are combining novel electronic structure algorithms with the high-performance computing power of the Department of Energy’s Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to predict spin dynamics, or the ways electrons orient and correlate their spins in a material.

Understanding cell transformation can help clinical researchers tackle medical problems. The images show how a growth factor caused cells to change forms and regroup from tight packs of epithelial cells to more mobile, loose arrays of mesenchymal cells —

Modeling Cancer: Researchers Prove Mathematical Models Can Predict Cellular Processes

October 30, 2014 5:08 pm | by Virginia Tech | News | Comments

How does a normal cellular process derail and become unhealthy? A multi-institutional, international team led by Virginia Tech researchers studied cells found in breast and other types of connective tissue and discovered new information about cell transitions that take place during wound healing and cancer.

Erik Demain is a computer scientist turned artist, whose scientific area of expertise lies in computational geometry — specifically, computational origami, that is, the mathematical study of bending and folding. Martin Demaine, Erik's father, is an artist

Ancient Art Form of Origami Launches into Space

October 29, 2014 9:57 am | by Miles O'Brien and Marsha Walton, NSF | News | Comments

Most people who know of origami think of it as the Japanese art of paper folding. Though it began centuries ago, origami became better known to the world in the 20th century when it evolved into a modern art form. In the 21st century, origami has caught the attention of engineers who are using it to create all sorts of new structures — from collapsible packaging to airbags for cars. Origami has even found its way into space.

New software algorithms reduce the time and material needed to produce objects with 3-D printers. Here, the wheel on the left was produced with conventional software and the one on the right with the new algorithms. Courtesy of Purdue University/Bedrich B

New Software Algorithms Speed 3-D Printing, Reduce Waste

October 22, 2014 12:40 pm | by Emil Venere, Purdue University | News | Comments

New software algorithms have been shown to significantly reduce the time and material needed to produce objects with 3-D printers. The algorithms have been created to address the problem. Researchers from Purdue University have demonstrated one approach that has been shown to reduce printing time by up to 30 percent and the quantity of support material by as much as 65 percent.

Testing the new mathematical model in an animal during experimental ODP was necessary, so the teams decided to collaborate. The theory and experimental findings showed that fast Hebbian and slow homeostatic plasticity work together during learning, but on

Mathematical Model Solves Decades-old Question: How Brain Remains Stable during Learning

October 22, 2014 11:06 am | by RIKEN | News | Comments

Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the brain in balance during learning, according to scientists who report on a six-year quest by a collaborative team from the three institutions to solve a decades-old question and open the door to a more general understanding of how the brain learns and consolidates new experiences on dramatically different timescales.

LLNL researcher Monte LaBute was part of a Lab team that recently published an article in PLOS ONE detailing the use of supercomputers to link proteins to drug side effects. Courtesy of Julie Russell/LLNL

Supercomputers Link Proteins to Adverse Drug Reactions

October 21, 2014 10:40 am | by Kenneth K Ma, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | News | Comments

The drug creation process often misses many side effects that kill at least 100,000 patients a year. LLNL researchers have discovered a high-tech method of using supercomputers to identify proteins that cause medications to have certain adverse drug reactions, using high-performance computers to process proteins and drug compounds in an algorithm that produces reliable data outside of a laboratory setting for drug discovery.

The robot has a friction crawler-based drive system (such as the one in war tanks), ideal for all types of terrain. It also has motion sensors, cameras, a laser and an infrared system, allowing it to rebuild the environment and, thereby, find paths or cre

Robot Scans Rubble, Recognizes Humans in Disaster Situations

October 21, 2014 9:35 am | by Investigación y Desarrollo | News | Comments

Through a computational algorithm, researchers have developed a neural network that allows a small robot to detect different patterns, such as images, fingerprints, handwriting, faces, bodies, voice frequencies and DNA sequences. Nancy Guadalupe Arana Daniel focused on the recognition of human silhouettes in disaster situations.

Prescribed oceanic patterns are useful for predicting large weather anomalies. Prolonged dry or wet spells over certain regions can reliably tell you whether, for instance, North America will undergo an oceanic weather pattern such as the El Nino or La Ni

Time Machine Reveals Global Precipitation Role in Major Weather Events

October 16, 2014 2:53 pm | by Michael Price, San Diego State University | News | Comments

During the 1930s, North America endured the Dust Bowl, a prolonged era of dryness that withered crops and dramatically altered where the population settled. Land-based precipitation records from the years leading up to the Dust Bowl are consistent with the telltale drying-out period associated with a persistent dry weather pattern, but they can’t explain why the drought was so pronounced and long-lasting.

While the upper part of the world’s oceans continue to absorb heat from global warming, ocean depths have not warmed measurably in the last decade. This image shows heat radiating from the Pacific Ocean as imaged by the NASA’s Clouds and the Earth's Radia

Unsolved Mystery: Earth’s Ocean Abyss has Not Warmed

October 14, 2014 2:47 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The cold waters of Earth’s deep ocean have not warmed measurably since 2005, according to a new NASA study, leaving unsolved the mystery of why global warming appears to have slowed in recent years. Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, analyzed satellite and direct ocean temperature data from 2005 to 2013 and found the ocean abyss below 1.24 miles (1,995 meters) has not warmed measurably.

Named Ds3*(2860)ˉ, the particle, a new type of meson, was discovered by analyzing data collected with the LHCb detector at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Courtesy of the Science and Technology Facilities Council

New Subatomic Particle Sheds Light on Fundamental Force of Nature

October 13, 2014 12:24 pm | by University of Warwick | News | Comments

The discovery of a new particle will “transform our understanding” of the fundamental force of nature that binds the nuclei of atoms, researchers argue. Led by scientists from the University of Warwick, the discovery of the new particle will help provide greater understanding of the strong interaction, the fundamental force of nature found within the protons of an atom’s nucleus.

NASA’s Traffic and Atmospheric Information for General Aviation (TAIGA) technology system is capable of showing pilots the altitude of nearby terrain via color. Yellow identifies terrain that is near the aircraft’s altitude and red shows the terrain that

New NASA Technology Brings Critical Data to Pilots over Remote Alaskan Territories

October 10, 2014 11:58 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA has formally delivered to Alaskan officials a new technology that could help pilots flying over the vast wilderness expanses of the northern-most state. The technology is designed to help pilots make better flight decisions, especially when disconnected from the Internet, telephone, flight services and other data sources normally used by pilots.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading