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Hack Crash was identified as a computer-based event, initiated by sophisticated algorithms designed to identify and evaluate Internet content that could influence markets. Those algorithms launched what amounted, in human terms, to a panicked trading spre

With One False Tweet, Computer-based Hack Crash Led to Real Panic

May 21, 2015 9:30 am | by Bert Gambini, University at Buffalo | News | Comments

A false tweet from a hacked account owned by the Associated Press in 2013 sent financial markets into a tailspin. The Dow Jones Industrial Average dropped 143.5 points and the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index lost more than $136 billion of its value in the seconds that immediately followed the post. Once the nature of the tweet was discovered, markets corrected themselves, but the Hack Crash event demonstrates the need...

Smart Algorithms Secure Chip Cards against Hackers

May 21, 2015 8:47 am | by University of Twente | News | Comments

Scientists have succeeded in securing chip cards against leaking confidential information....

Tecplot 360 EX 2015 Release 2 Visual Data Analysis Software

May 15, 2015 10:07 am | Product Releases | Comments

Tecplot 360 EX 2015 Release 2 is 10 times faster than the legacy (2013) version of Tecplot 360...

Left-handed Cosmic Magnetic Field could Explain Missing Antimatter

May 14, 2015 12:20 pm | by The Royal Astronomical Society | News | Comments

The discovery of a 'left-handed' magnetic field that pervades the universe could help explain a...

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The Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU) has developed a novel computer-aided detection system for acute stroke using computer intelligence technology. Reading 80 to 100 computer images, the system is able to detect whether the patient was struck by i

Novel Computer Intelligence System Detects Acute Strokes

May 14, 2015 12:06 pm | by Hong Kong Polytechnic University | News | Comments

PolyU has developed a novel computer-aided detection system for acute stroke using computer intelligence technology. Reading 80 to 100 computer images, the system is able to detect whether the patient was struck by ischemic stroke or haemorrhagic stroke. The detection accuracy is 90 percent, which is as high as that conducted by specialists, but at a much reduced time from 10 to 15 minutes to just three minutes.

Researchers used methods from signal processing and text-mining to analyze the musical properties of songs. Their system automatically grouped the thousands of songs by patterns of chord changes and tone, allowing them to statistically identify trends wit

Big Data Analysis of Sounds Creates 50-year Evolutionary History of Music Charts

May 14, 2015 9:18 am | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Evolutionary biologists and computer scientists have come together study the evolution of pop music. Their analysis of 17,000 songs from the US Billboard Hot 100 charts, 1960 to 2010, is the most substantial scientific study of the history of popular music to date. They studied trends in style, the diversity of the charts, and the timing of musical revolutions.

The research team examined blood samples from 33 survivors of car or motorcycle accidents or falls for multiple markers of inflammation, including interleukin-6 (IL-6), and segregated the patients into one of three (low to high) categories of trauma sever

Computer Simulation Accurately Replicates Real-life Trauma Outcomes

May 13, 2015 2:03 pm | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

Computer simulation of the body’s inflammatory response to traumatic injury accurately replicated known individual outcomes and predicted population results. Researchers examined blood samples from 33 survivors of car or motorcycle accidents or falls for multiple markers of inflammation, including interleukin-6, and segregated the patients into categories of trauma severity. They were able to validate model predictions.

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Researchers have detected that the random changes in the direction of Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) follow mathematical patterns, which are a mixture of Gaussian and Pareto distributions. Courtesy of Lek Khauv

Ants’ Movements Hide Mathematical Patterns

May 13, 2015 12:41 pm | by SINC | News | Comments

When ants go exploring in search of food they end up choosing collective routes that fit statistical distributions of probability. This has been demonstrated by a team of mathematicians after analyzing the trails of a species of Argentine ant. Studies like this could be applied to coordinate the movement of micro-robots in cleaning contaminated areas for example.

In what marks a significant step forward for artificial intelligence, researchers at UC Santa Barbara have demonstrated the functionality of a simple artificial neural circuit. For the first time, a circuit of about 100 artificial synapses was proved to p

Important Step in AI: Making Computer Brains More like our Own

May 12, 2015 2:06 pm | by Sonia Fernandez, UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

In what marks a significant step forward for artificial intelligence, researchers at UC Santa Barbara have demonstrated the functionality of a simple artificial neural circuit. For the first time, a circuit of about 100 artificial synapses was proved to perform a simple version of a typical human task: image classification.

Tablet and robot system: A person taps the tablet to control where the beam of light appears on a floor. The swarm robots then roll toward the illumination, constantly communicating with each other and deciding how to evenly cover the lit area.

Controlling Robot Swarms with the Swipe of a Finger

May 12, 2015 12:28 pm | by Georgia Tech | News | Comments

Using a smart tablet and a red beam of light, researchers have created a system that allows people to control a fleet of robots with the swipe of a finger. A person taps the tablet to control where the beam of light appears on a floor. The swarm robots then roll toward the illumination, constantly communicating with each other and deciding how to evenly cover the lit area.

Each horizontal line in this computer display represents a different line of evidence that could be used to argue for or against the presence of gene in a DNA sequence. The student, seeing a discrepancy, must drill down deeper to try to find its source. C

Massively Parallel Genomics Students: Publication has 940 Undergraduate Authors

May 11, 2015 12:04 pm | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

The list of authors for an article on comparative genomics of a fruit fly chromosome runs three single-spaced pages. Large author lists are the norm in high-energy physics, but a novelty in biology. What is going on? The 1,014 authors include 940 undergraduates from 63 institutions, all working in parallel to solve mysteries embedded in the DNA sequences of the unusual dot chromosome in fruit flies. A large collaboration is providing...

Michael Morris is General Manager at Appirio.

How Crowdsourcing can Solve Even Interstellar Problems

May 5, 2015 2:16 pm | by Michael Morris, Appirio | Blogs | Comments

Protecting the world from destruction by asteroids sounds like superhuman power, but NASA scientists work tirelessly to ensure that humans today are protected from this potential harm. Asteroids need to be hunted in order to identify which ones may endanger Earth, and analyzing the big data puzzle of asteroid detection has been an arduous process. That is, until the power of crowdsourcing was discovered.

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The surface of rendered objects in computer games often looks unrealistic. A new method creates much more realistic images, imitating the complex scattering processes under the surface. Left: the new method, top right: without subsurface scattering, botto

New Mathematical Method makes Computer Game Surface Rendering Much More Realistic

May 5, 2015 12:24 pm | by TU Wien (Vienna) | News | Comments

Overturning cars, flying missiles and airplanes speeding across the screen — on modern computers, 3-D objects can be calculated in a flash. However, many surfaces still look unnatural. Whether it is skin, stone or wax — on the computer screen, all materials look alike, as if the objects had all been cut out of the same opaque material. A new mathematical method takes into account light scattering that occurs below the surface...

NYU has installed a new computing system for next-generation deep learning research — called “ScaLeNet” — that will allow researchers to significantly increase the size of deep learning models that can be trained and number of models that can be tested.

NYU to Advance Deep Learning Research with Multi-GPU Cluster

May 5, 2015 11:37 am | by Kimberly Powell, NVIDIA | News | Comments

Self-driving cars. Computers that detect tumors. Real-time speech translation. Just a few years ago, deep learning — training computers to identify patterns and objects, much like the way humans do — was the domain of a few artificial intelligence and data science researchers. No longer. Today, top experts use it to do amazing things. And they continue to push the bounds of what’s possible.

Subjects in the study viewed images while wearing an EEG headset. Courtesy of Neuromatters

Computer Vision, Brain-computer Interface Speed Mine Detection

May 5, 2015 9:44 am | by University of California - San Diego | News | Comments

Computer scientists at the University of California, San Diego, have combined sophisticated computer vision algorithms and a brain-computer interface to find mines in sonar images of the ocean floor. The study shows that the new method speeds detection considerably, when compared to existing methods — mainly visual inspection by a mine detection expert.

Researchers have developed an algorithm for generating panoramic video from unstructured camera arrays. Courtesy of Disney Research

Algorithm Combines Videos from Unstructured Camera Arrays into Panoramas

May 4, 2015 4:14 pm | by Disney Research | News | Comments

Even non-professionals may someday be able to create high-quality video panoramas using multiple cameras with the help of an algorithm developed by a team of Disney researchers. Their method smooths out the blurring, ghosting and other distortions that routinely occur when video feeds from unstructured camera arrays are combined to create a single panoramic video.

Snapshots of representative hydrocarbon configurations inside zeolite frameworks and performance scores predicted for adsorption occurring from a liquid phase containing an equimolar hydrocarbon mixture. Views facing the main channel axis (a–c) and along

Predictive Modeling Helps Identify Materials to Improve Fuel Production

April 30, 2015 3:59 pm | by Jim Collins, Argonne Leadership Computing Facility | News | Comments

A research team has demonstrated a predictive modeling capability that can help accelerate the discovery of new materials to improve biofuel and petroleum production. The findings present a tool that could lead to more efficient processes in the biofuel and petrochemical industries, while reducing the time and cost of associated laboratory research and development efforts. The materials of interest are called zeolites.

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NAG Library Mark 25

April 28, 2015 9:43 am | Nag Ltd | Product Releases | Comments

NAG Library Mark 25 includes 81 new mathematical and statistical routines. Features include least angle regression (LARS), least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) and forward stagewise regression, nearest correlation matrix updates, unscented Kalman filter, change point analysis, high dimensional quadrature using sparse grids, bandwidth reduction of sparse matrix by reverse Cuthill-McKee reordering ...

Using 25 different computer models. Researchers simulated a world without human-caused greenhouse gas emissions and found those hot days happened once every three years. Then they calculated how many times they happen with the current level of heat-trappi

Study Blames Global Warming for 75 Percent of Very Hot Days

April 27, 2015 11:22 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

If you find yourself sweating out a day that is monstrously hot, chances are you can blame humanity. A new report links three out of four such days to man's effects on climate. And as climate change worsens around mid-century, that percentage of extremely hot days being caused by man-made greenhouse gases will push past 95 percent.

Describing the universe requires fewer dimensions than we might think. New calculations show that this may not just be a mathematical trick, but a fundamental feature of space itself.

Is the Universe a Hologram? New Calculations Suggest Holographic Principle Holds in Flat Spacetime

April 27, 2015 11:03 am | by TU Wien | News | Comments

At first glance, there is not the slightest doubt: to us, the universe looks three-dimensional. But one of the most fruitful theories of theoretical physics in the last two decades is challenging this assumption. The "holographic principle” asserts that a mathematical description of the universe actually requires one fewer dimension than it seems. What we perceive as 3-D may just be the image of 2-D processes on a huge cosmic horizon.

The new method reduces computing power needed to process large amounts of multidimensional relational data by providing a simple technique of cutting down redundant layers of information, reducing the amount of data to be processed.

Mathematicians Reduce Big Data Using Ideas from Quantum Theory

April 23, 2015 2:02 pm | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

A new technique of visualizing the complicated relationships between anything from Facebook users to proteins in a cell provides a simpler and cheaper method of making sense of large volumes of data.

Power networks and cancer treatment are two of the applications for the dynamic, scalable algorithms that Frank E. Curtis has developed. Courtesy of Ryan Hulvat

Algorithms: Finding Optimal Balance in the Face of Uncertainty

April 21, 2015 12:20 pm | by Kurt Pfitzer, Lehigh University | News | Comments

Curtis writes algorithms that enable computers to solve large-scale continuous optimization problems. He is collaborating with researchers at Argonne through a five-year Early Career Award from the U.S. Department of Energy. In a three-year single-investigator project for the NSF, Curtis has developed algorithms that solve large-scale continuous optimization problems in less than a quarter of the time required by conventional methods.

Suresh Venkatasubramanian, left, and Matt Might, both associate professors of computer science at the University of Utah, have received a $3 million government grant to produce software that can sniff out the next generation of computer vulnerabilities. T

Algorithmic Attacks: Fighting Next-gen Cyber Threats

April 17, 2015 3:45 pm | by University of Utah | News | Comments

The next generation of cyberattacks will be more sophisticated, more difficult to detect and more capable of wreaking untold damage on the nation’s computer systems. So, the DoD has given a $3 million grant to a team of computer scientists to develop software that can hunt down a new kind of vulnerability nearly impossible to find with today’s technology. The team is tasked with creating an analyzer that can thwart algorithmic attacks.

With the laser data, a 3-D map of the surface vegetation can be obtained.

Protecting Nature on the Fly: Computer Algorithms, Laser Technology Characterize Biodiversity

April 16, 2015 12:50 pm | by Technische Universität Wien | News | Comments

Simply declaring a region as a nature protection area is not enough, regular monitoring of its ecological condition is also necessary. New methods are being developed to monitor Europe’s nature protection areas from the air. Short laser pulses are sent to the ground, and information on the status of the habitat can be deduced from the reflected light signals using elaborate computer algorithms.

A key handwritten scientific document by Alan Turing in which he works on the foundations of mathematical notation and computer science was sold for $1,025,000 in the Fine Books & Manuscripts Sale at Bonhams New York.

Alan Turing's Manuscript on Foundations of Mathematics and Computer Science Sold for $1,025,000

April 14, 2015 3:00 pm | by Bonhams | News | Comments

A key handwritten scientific document by Alan Turing in which he works on the foundations of mathematical notation and computer science was sold for $1,025,000 in the Fine Books & Manuscripts Sale at Bonhams New York.

Notorious gangsters Al Capone and Carlo Gambino were famously done in by tax evasion charges. John Gotti, the “Teflon Don” was given up by a confidant. While the criminal masterminds of today are conducting their nefarious business online, the key to taki

Formulas Drive Activity in Organized Cybercrime Forums

April 13, 2015 4:53 pm | by Drexel University | News | Comments

Notorious gangsters Al Capone and Carlo Gambino were famously done in by tax evasion charges. John Gotti, the “Teflon Don” was given up by a confidant. While the criminal masterminds of today are conducting their nefarious business online, the key to taking them down depends on understanding how they organize and where to squeeze them. Researchers are searching for that pressure point by studying the activity of cybercrime forums.

Spiegelhalter unravels the web of exaggerations, misdirections and downright lies that surround sex in modern society.

Fifty Shades of Statistics: What they tell us about our intimate lives

April 9, 2015 11:55 am | by Wiley | News | Comments

As part of the 2015 Cambridge Science Festival, David Spiegelhalter, Winton Professor for the Understanding of of Risk at Cambridge University, has given an overview of the history of sex research using data going back to 1580, conducted by pioneering sexologists through to today’s ‘sexperts.’

Nurses practice taking blood pressure and collecting medical history with a traditional human patient simulator system. Its face is completely inexpressive, and its lips do not move when it "talks." Speech is either pre-recorded, or voiced by the clinical

Human Patient Simulators: How Robots can Help Build Better Doctors

April 9, 2015 9:53 am | by NSF | News | Comments

A young doctor leans over a patient who has been in a serious car accident and invariably must be experiencing pain. The doctor's trauma team examines the patient's pelvis and rolls her onto her side to check her spine. They scan the patient's abdomen with a rapid ultrasound machine, finding fluid. They insert a tube in her nose. Throughout the procedure, the patient's face remains rigid, showing no signs of pain.

The UCLA Biomechatronics Lab develops a language of touch that can be "felt" by computers and humans alike. Courtesy of the National Science Foundation

Artificial Haptic Intelligence: Giving Robots the Human Touch

April 7, 2015 4:56 pm | by Miles O'Brien, NSF | News | Comments

Researchers are designing artificial limbs to be more sensational, with the emphasis on sensation. They have developed a language of touch that can be "felt" by computers and humans alike. The engineers and students are constructing a language quantified with mechanical touch sensors that interact with objects of various shapes, sizes and textures.

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