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New software algorithms reduce the time and material needed to produce objects with 3-D printers. Here, the wheel on the left was produced with conventional software and the one on the right with the new algorithms. Courtesy of Purdue University/Bedrich B

New Software Algorithms Speed 3-D Printing, Reduce Waste

October 22, 2014 12:40 pm | by Emil Venere, Purdue University | News | Comments

New software algorithms have been shown to significantly reduce the time and material needed to produce objects with 3-D printers. The algorithms have been created to address the problem. Researchers from Purdue University have demonstrated one approach that has been shown to reduce printing time by up to 30 percent and the quantity of support material by as much as 65 percent.

Mathematical Model Solves Decades-old Question: How Brain Remains Stable during Learning

October 22, 2014 11:06 am | by RIKEN | News | Comments

Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the...

Supercomputers Link Proteins to Adverse Drug Reactions

October 21, 2014 10:40 am | by Kenneth K Ma, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | News | Comments

The drug creation process often misses many side effects that kill at least 100,000 patients a...

Robot Scans Rubble, Recognizes Humans in Disaster Situations

October 21, 2014 9:35 am | by Investigación y Desarrollo | News | Comments

Through a computational algorithm, researchers have developed a neural network that allows a...

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Prescribed oceanic patterns are useful for predicting large weather anomalies. Prolonged dry or wet spells over certain regions can reliably tell you whether, for instance, North America will undergo an oceanic weather pattern such as the El Nino or La Ni

Time Machine Reveals Global Precipitation Role in Major Weather Events

October 16, 2014 2:53 pm | by Michael Price, San Diego State University | News | Comments

During the 1930s, North America endured the Dust Bowl, a prolonged era of dryness that withered crops and dramatically altered where the population settled. Land-based precipitation records from the years leading up to the Dust Bowl are consistent with the telltale drying-out period associated with a persistent dry weather pattern, but they can’t explain why the drought was so pronounced and long-lasting.

While the upper part of the world’s oceans continue to absorb heat from global warming, ocean depths have not warmed measurably in the last decade. This image shows heat radiating from the Pacific Ocean as imaged by the NASA’s Clouds and the Earth's Radia

Unsolved Mystery: Earth’s Ocean Abyss has Not Warmed

October 14, 2014 2:47 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The cold waters of Earth’s deep ocean have not warmed measurably since 2005, according to a new NASA study, leaving unsolved the mystery of why global warming appears to have slowed in recent years. Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, analyzed satellite and direct ocean temperature data from 2005 to 2013 and found the ocean abyss below 1.24 miles (1,995 meters) has not warmed measurably.

Named Ds3*(2860)ˉ, the particle, a new type of meson, was discovered by analyzing data collected with the LHCb detector at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Courtesy of the Science and Technology Facilities Council

New Subatomic Particle Sheds Light on Fundamental Force of Nature

October 13, 2014 12:24 pm | by University of Warwick | News | Comments

The discovery of a new particle will “transform our understanding” of the fundamental force of nature that binds the nuclei of atoms, researchers argue. Led by scientists from the University of Warwick, the discovery of the new particle will help provide greater understanding of the strong interaction, the fundamental force of nature found within the protons of an atom’s nucleus.

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NASA’s Traffic and Atmospheric Information for General Aviation (TAIGA) technology system is capable of showing pilots the altitude of nearby terrain via color. Yellow identifies terrain that is near the aircraft’s altitude and red shows the terrain that

New NASA Technology Brings Critical Data to Pilots over Remote Alaskan Territories

October 10, 2014 11:58 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA has formally delivered to Alaskan officials a new technology that could help pilots flying over the vast wilderness expanses of the northern-most state. The technology is designed to help pilots make better flight decisions, especially when disconnected from the Internet, telephone, flight services and other data sources normally used by pilots.

A new principle, called data smashing, estimates the similarities between streams of arbitrary data without human intervention, and without access to the data sources.

Data Smashing Could Unshackle Automated Discovery

October 8, 2014 11:45 am | by Cornell University | News | Comments

A little-known secret in data mining is that simply feeding raw data into a data analysis algorithm is unlikely to produce meaningful results. New discoveries often begin with comparison of data streams to find connections and spot outliers. But most data comparison algorithms today have one major weakness — somewhere, they rely on a human expert. But experts aren’t keeping pace with the complexities of big data.

Error-correcting codes are one of the glories of the information age: They’re   what guarantee the flawless transmission of digital information over the   airwaves or through copper wire, even in the presence of the corrupting   influences that engineers

Reaching the Limit of Error-Correcting Codes

October 2, 2014 3:44 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Error-correcting codes are one of the glories of the information age: They’re what guarantee the flawless transmission of digital information over the airwaves or through copper wire, even in the presence of the corrupting influences that engineers call “noise.”

In popular culture, mathematics is often deemed inaccessible or esoteric. Yet in the modern world, it plays an ever more important role in our daily lives and a decisive role in the discovery and development of new ideas — often behind the scenes.

At the Interface of Math and Science

October 1, 2014 3:44 pm | by Julie Cohen, UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

In popular culture, mathematics is often deemed inaccessible or esoteric. Yet in the modern world, it plays an ever more important role in our daily lives and a decisive role in the discovery and development of new ideas — often behind the scenes.

This solar flare was shot with one of the cameras on the NASA SDO satellite on June 10, 2014. Courtesy of NASA/SDO

Solar Explosions inside a Computer: Predicting Solar Flares

September 25, 2014 4:30 pm | by Barbara Vonarburg, ETH | News | Comments

Strong solar flares can bring down communications and power grids on Earth. By demonstrating how these gigantic eruptions are caused, physicists are laying the foundations for future predictions. The shorter the interval between two explosions in the solar atmosphere, the more likely it is that the second flare will be stronger than the first one.

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Described by The Washington Post as "the single best explainer of abstruse concepts in the world today," Brian Greene is one of the world's leading theoretical physicists and a brilliant, entertaining communicator of cutting-edge scientific concepts.

Physicist and Best-selling author Brian Greene to Keynote SC14

September 22, 2014 2:13 pm | by SC14 | News | Comments

Physicist, string theorist and best-selling author Brian Greene will talk about the intersection of science, computing and society as he delivers the keynote address at SC14 this November. Described by The Washington Post as "the single best explainer of abstruse concepts in the world today," Brian Greene is one of the world's leading theoretical physicists and a brilliant, entertaining communicator of cutting-edge scientific concepts.

Researchers have developed a math model that can predict the progression from nephritis — kidney inflammation — to interstitial fibrosis, scarring in the kidney that current treatments cannot reverse. Courtesy of Piotr Michał Jaworski

Math Model Replaces Invasive Kidney Biopsy for Lupus Patients

September 18, 2014 2:11 pm | by Emily Caldwell, Ohio State University | News | Comments

Mathematics might be able to reduce the need for invasive biopsies in patients suffering kidney damage related to the autoimmune disease lupus. Researchers have developed a math model that can predict the progression from kidney inflammation to scarring in the kidney that current treatments cannot reverse.

The team has taken a three-phase approach to a software emotion detector. Preliminary tests gave a 94 percent success rate. Courtesy of Steven Depolo

Emotion Detector: Software Accurately Classifies Facial Expressions

September 17, 2014 2:27 pm | by Inderscience Research | News | Comments

Face recognition software measures various parameters in a mug shot, such as the distance between the person’s eyes, the height from lip to top of their nose and various other metrics and then compares it with photos of people in the database that have been tagged with a given name. Now, research looks to take that one step further in recognizing the emotion portrayed by a face.

Mathematica Online

Mathematica Online

September 17, 2014 1:59 pm | Wolfram Research, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Mathematica Online operates completely in the cloud and is accessible through any modern Web browser, with no installation or configuration required, and is completely interoperable with Mathematicaon the desktop. Users can simply point a Web browser at Mathematica Online, then log in, and immediately start to use the Mathematica notebook interface

The team recently took the MIT cheetah-bot for a test run, where it bounded across the grass at a steady clip.  Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Algorithm Enables Untethered Cheetah Robot to Run and Jump

September 16, 2014 2:14 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

MIT researchers have developed an algorithm for bounding that they’ve successfully implemented in a robotic cheetah — a sleek, four-legged assemblage of gears, batteries and electric motors that weighs about as much as its feline counterpart. The team recently took the robot for a test run, where it bounded across the grass at a steady clip. The researchers estimate the robot may eventually reach speeds of up to 30 mph.

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Close-ups of an experiment conducted by John Bush and his student Daniel Harris, in which a bouncing droplet of fluid was propelled across a fluid bath by waves it generated. Courtesy of Dan Harris

Fluid Mechanics: New Math Suggests Alternative to Quantum Orthodoxy

September 15, 2014 3:43 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

The central mystery of quantum mechanics is that small chunks of matter sometimes seem to behave like particles, sometimes like waves. For most of the past century, the prevailing explanation of this conundrum has been what’s called the “Copenhagen interpretation” — which holds that, in some sense, a single particle really is a wave, smeared out across the universe, which collapses into a determinate location only when observed.

The top image shows how the new algorithm is able to identify an area (in red) where stress has created a weak spot in a small piece of plastic wrap. The older method (shown in the bottom half of the picture) is unable to pinpoint the place where the plas

Identifying Tiny Strains in Body Tissues before Injuries Occur

September 9, 2014 3:14 pm | by Jim Dryden, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have developed algorithms to identify weak spots in tendons, muscles and bones prone to tearing or breaking. The technology one day may help pinpoint minor strains and tiny injuries in the body’s tissues long before bigger problems occur.

Cool Calculations for Cold Atoms

September 3, 2014 9:14 am | by The Joint Quantum Institute | News | Comments

Chemical reactions drive the mechanisms of life as well as a million other natural processes on earth. These reactions occur at a wide spectrum of temperatures, from those prevailing at the chilly polar icecaps to those at work churning near the earth’s core. At nanokelvin temperatures, by contrast, nothing was supposed to happen. Chemistry was expected to freeze up. Experiments and theoretical work have now show that this is not true.

Eugenia Cheng, visiting senior lecturer in mathematics and a concert pianist, specializes in category theory, which she characterizes as 'the mathematics of mathematics.' Courtesy of Robert Kozloff

Power of Mathematics Opens New Possibilities in Music

August 27, 2014 3:34 pm | by Steve Koppes, University of Chicago | News | Comments

Anthony Cheung’s formal mathematical training essentially ended with high school calculus. But as a musician and composer, he has explored mathematical phenomena in new ways, especially through their influence on harmony and timbre. “Through technology and thinking about acoustics, we can change sounds on the computer in innumerable ways,” says Cheung, whose musical composition earned him a 2012 Rome Prize from the American Academy in Rome.

The study combined two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Does your Computer Know How You’re Feeling?

August 25, 2014 11:16 am | by Taylor & Francis | News | Comments

Researchers in Bangladesh have designed a computer program that can accurately recognize users’ emotional states as much as 87 percent of the time, depending on the emotion. Writing in the journal Behaviour & Information Technology, A.F.M. Nazmul Haque Nahin and his colleagues describe how their study combined — for the first time — two established ways of detecting user emotions: keystroke dynamics and text-pattern analysis.

Researchers from Argonne, in collaboration with Caterpillar Inc. and Convergent Science, carried out large internal combustion engine simulations involving fine spatial and temporal resolutions; high fidelity; and robust two-phase flow, spray, turbulence,

Argonne wins HPC Innovation Excellence Award

August 25, 2014 10:47 am | by Argonne National Laboratory | News | Comments

Argonne National Laboratory was one of seven new winners of the HPC Innovation Excellence Award. Announced by International Data Corporation at the ISC '14 supercomputer industry conference in Leipzig, Germany, the award recognizes noteworthy achievements by users of high-performance computing (HPC) technologies.

Once installed, the sensors would provide information about the condition of bridges that cannot be obtained by visual inspection alone and would allow authorities to identify and focus on bridges that need immediate attention. Courtesy of USchick

Wireless Sensors and Flying Robots Monitor Deteriorating Bridges

August 22, 2014 12:45 pm | by Tufts School of Engineering | News | Comments

As a report from the Obama administration warns that one in four bridges in the United States needs significant repair or cannot handle automobile traffic, Tufts University engineers are employing wireless sensors and flying robots that could have the potential to help authorities monitor the condition of bridges in real time.

MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory has released a data-visualization tool that lets users highlight aberrations and possible patterns in the graphical display; the tool then automatically determines which data sources are respon

Visual Control of Big Data: Recomputing Visualizations without Aberrant Results

August 20, 2014 10:44 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

In the age of big data, visualization tools are vital. With a single glance at a graphic display, a human being can recognize patterns that a computer might fail to find even after hours of analysis. But what if there are aberrations in the patterns? Or what if there’s just a suggestion of a visual pattern that’s not distinct enough to justify any strong inferences? Or what if the pattern is clear, but not what was to be expected?

Brookhaven theoretical physicist Swagato Mukherjee explains that 'invisible' hadrons are like salt molecules floating around in the hot gas of hadrons, making other particles freeze out at a lower temperature than they would if the 'salt' wasn't there.

Invisible Particles Provide First Indirect Evidence of Strange Baryons

August 20, 2014 10:17 am | by Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

New supercomputing calculations provide the first evidence that particles predicted by the theory of quark-gluon interactions, but never before observed, are being produced in heavy-ion collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. These heavy strange baryons, containing at least one strange quark, still cannot be observed directly, but instead make their presence known by lowering the temperature at which other baryons "freeze out"

Albert-László Barabási, the Robert Gray Dodge Professor of Network Science and a Distinguished University Professor at Northeastern, co-authored a paper with visiting scholar Hua-Wei Shen that presented a new algorithm to determine how credit should be al

Scientific Research: New Algorithm Gives Credit Where Credit Is Due

August 19, 2014 2:51 pm | by Joe O'Connell, Northeastern University | News | Comments

It makes sense that the credit for sci­ence papers with mul­tiple authors should go to the authors who per­form the bulk of the research, yet that’s not always the case. Now, a new algo­rithm devel­oped at Northeastern’s Center for Com­plex Net­work Research helps sheds light on how to prop­erly allo­cate credit.

With their new method, computer scientists from Saarland University are able, for the first time, to compute all illumination effects in a simpler and more efficient way. Courtesy of AG Slusallek/Saar-Uni

Realistic Computer Graphics Technology Vastly Speeds Process

August 18, 2014 2:15 pm | by University Saarland | News | Comments

Creating a realistic computer simulation of how light suffuses a room is crucial not just for animated movies like Toy Story or Cars, but also in industry. Special computing methods should ensure this, but require great effort. Computer scientists from Saarbrücken have developed a novel approach that vastly simplifies and speeds up the whole calculating process.

The Kilobots, a swarm of one thousand simple but collaborative robots. Courtesy of Mike Rubenstein and Science/AAAS

AI: Self-organizing Thousand-robot Swarm Forms Vast, Complex Shapes

August 18, 2014 12:03 pm | by Caroline Perry, Harvard SEAS | News | Comments

The first thousand-robot flash mob has assembled at Harvard University. Instead of one highly-complex robot, a “kilo” of robots collaborate, providing a simple platform for the enactment of complex behaviors. Called Kilobots, these extremely simple robots are each just a few centimeters across and stand on three pin-like legs.

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