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MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory has released a data-visualization tool that lets users highlight aberrations and possible patterns in the graphical display; the tool then automatically determines which data sources are respon

Visual Control of Big Data: Recomputing Visualizations without Aberrant Results

August 20, 2014 10:44 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

In the age of big data, visualization tools are vital. With a single glance at a graphic display, a human being can recognize patterns that a computer might fail to find even after hours of analysis. But what if there are aberrations in the patterns? Or what if there’s just a suggestion of a visual pattern that’s not distinct enough to justify any strong inferences? Or what if the pattern is clear, but not what was to be expected?

Invisible Particles Provide First Indirect Evidence of Strange Baryons

August 20, 2014 10:17 am | by Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

New supercomputing calculations provide the first evidence that particles predicted by the...

Scientific Research: New Algorithm Gives Credit Where Credit Is Due

August 19, 2014 2:51 pm | by Joe O'Connell, Northeastern University | News | Comments

It makes sense that the credit for sci­ence papers with mul­tiple authors should go to the...

Realistic Computer Graphics Technology Vastly Speeds Process

August 18, 2014 2:15 pm | by University Saarland | News | Comments

Creating a realistic computer simulation of how light suffuses a room is crucial not just for...

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The Kilobots, a swarm of one thousand simple but collaborative robots. Courtesy of Mike Rubenstein and Science/AAAS

AI: Self-organizing Thousand-robot Swarm Forms Vast, Complex Shapes

August 18, 2014 12:03 pm | by Caroline Perry, Harvard SEAS | News | Comments

The first thousand-robot flash mob has assembled at Harvard University. Instead of one highly-complex robot, a “kilo” of robots collaborate, providing a simple platform for the enactment of complex behaviors. Called Kilobots, these extremely simple robots are each just a few centimeters across and stand on three pin-like legs.

Maryam Mirzakhani is the first woman to ever win the Fields Medal — known as the "Nobel Prize of Mathematics" — in recognition of her contributions to the understanding of the symmetry of curved surfaces. Courtesy of Maryam Mirzakhani

Maryam Mirzakhani is First Woman Fields Medalist

August 14, 2014 2:44 pm | by Bjorn Carey, Stanford University | News | Comments

Maryam Mirzakhani is the first woman to ever win the Fields Medal — known as the "Nobel Prize of Mathematics" — in recognition of her contributions to the understanding of the symmetry of curved surfaces. Officially known as the International Medal for Outstanding Discoveries in Mathematics, the Fields Medal will be presented by the International Mathematical Union ...

The Bloch sphere, a representation of a qubit, the fundamental building block of quantum computers. Courtesy of Glosser

Quantum Simulators Explained

August 12, 2014 12:36 pm | by Springer Science+Business Media | News | Comments

Just about everything you ever wanted to know about quantum simulators is summed up in a new review. As part of a Thematic Series on Quantum Simulations, the open access journal European Physical Journal Quantum Technology has published an overview of just what a quantum simulator is, namely a device that actively uses quantum effects to answer questions on model systems.

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Sandia National Laboratories researchers Steve Plimpton, left, and Michael Gallis look at a projection of a model of the Russian MIR space station, which fell out of orbit several years ago and disintegrated, with the remains ending up at the bottom of th

Sophisticated 3-D Codes Yield Unprecedented Physics, Engineering Insights

August 6, 2014 4:43 pm | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

When the space shuttle Columbia disintegrated on re-entry in 2002, sophisticated computer models were key to determining what happened. A piece of foam flew off at launch and hit a tile, damaging the leading edge of the shuttle wing and exposing the underlying structure. Temperatures soared to thousands of degrees as Columbia plunged toward Earth at 27 times the speed of sound, said Gallis, who used NASA codes and Icarus for simulations...

NSF's Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC) program will support more than 225 new projects in 39 states in 2014. The awards enable research from the theoretical to the experimental, and aim to minimize the misuses of cyber technology, bolster educatio

Frontier-scale Projects Expand Breadth and Impact of Cybersecurity, Privacy Research

August 6, 2014 3:35 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

As our lives and businesses become ever more intertwined with the Internet and networked technologies, it is crucial to continue to develop and improve cybersecurity measures to keep our data, devices and critical systems safe, secure, private and accessible. The NSF's Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace program has announced two new center-scale "Frontier" awards to support projects that address grand challenges in cybersecurity science

MIT researchers extracted audio from the vibrations of a plant, potato-chip bag and other objects. Courtesy of Christine Daniloff/MIT

Like James Bond, Algorithm Recovers Speech through Soundproof Glass

August 5, 2014 12:35 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers at MIT, Microsoft and Adobe have developed an algorithm that can reconstruct an audio signal by analyzing minute vibrations of objects depicted in video. In one set of experiments, they were able to recover intelligible speech from the vibrations of a potato-chip bag photographed from 15 feet away through soundproof glass.

VisSim is a visual language for mathematical modeling, simulation and model-based embedded system development used by scientists and engineers.

Altair to Acquire Visual Solutions, Adds VisSim to Portfolio

July 30, 2014 2:01 pm | by Altair | News | Comments

Altair has announced its intent to acquire Visual Solutions, makers of VisSim, a visual language for mathematical modeling, simulation and model-based embedded system development used by scientists and engineers. The transaction is expected to close by the end of July 2014.

Grammatikopoulos simulated two palladium nanoparticles colliding at different temperatures. The hotter the temperature, the more homogenous the resulting product, and the further the atoms in the particle crystallize.

Simulating the Invisible

July 29, 2014 2:07 pm | by Poncie Rutsch, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) | News | Comments

Every trillionth of a second, Panagiotis Grammatikopoulos calculates the location of each individual atom in a particle based on where it is and which forces apply. He uses a computer program to make the calculations, and then animates the motion of the atoms using visualization software. The resulting animation illuminates what happens, atom-by-atom, when two nanoparticles collide.

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UIC physicist Dirk Morr, who worked with researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, says the findings were the result of “the close collaboration of theory and experiment.” Courtesy of Roberta Dupuis-Devlin/UIC Photo Services

Physicists Unlock Nature of High-Temperature Superconductivity

July 29, 2014 2:02 pm | by Jeanne Galatzer-Levy, University of Illinois at Chicago | News | Comments

Physicists have identified the “quantum glue” that underlies a promising type of superconductivity — a crucial step towards the creation of energy superhighways that conduct electricity without current loss. The research is a collaboration between theoretical physicists and experimentalists.

Genes that are active only in the testes have double the harmful mutation rate of those that are active in both sexes. Courtesy of Archaeogenetics

Mutations from Venus, Mutations from Mars: A Sex-difference Approach to Harmful Mutation

July 28, 2014 5:36 pm | by Weizmann Institute of Science | News | Comments

Some 15 percent of adults suffer from fertility problems, many of these due to genetic factors. This is something of a paradox: We might expect such genes, which reduce an individual's ability to reproduce, to disappear from the population. Recent research may have solved the riddle. Not only can it explain the high rates of male fertility problems, it may open new avenues in understanding the causes of genetic diseases and their treatment.

Collecting Just the Right Data: When you can’t collect all you need, new algorithm tells you which to target

July 28, 2014 2:06 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Much artificial-intelligence research addresses the problem of making predictions based on large data sets. An obvious example is the recommendation engines at retail sites like Amazon. But some types of data are harder to collect than online click histories — information about geological formations thousands of feet underground, for instance. And in other applications there may just not be enough time to crunch all the available data.

The automatic placement of the albums by the algorithm was in agreement with the chronological order of the recording of each Beatles albums.

AI Reveals The Beatles’ Dramatic Musical Transformation

July 28, 2014 12:29 pm | by Lawrence Technological University | News | Comments

Music fans and critics know that the music of the Beatles underwent a dramatic transformation in just a few years. But, until now, there hasn’t been a scientific way to measure the progression. Computer scientists at Lawrence Technological University have developed an artificial intelligence algorithm that can analyze and compare musical styles, enabling research into their musical progression.

Dr Grimes derived equations describing how string bending, vibrato and whammy bars change the pitch of a note. He found that the properties of the strings had a big effect on the change in pitch – in particular the Young's modulus. Courtesy of Feliciano G

The Physics of Lead Guitar Playing

July 23, 2014 6:36 pm | by University of Oxford | News | Comments

String bends, tapping, vibrato and whammy bars are all techniques that add to the distinctiveness of a lead guitarist's sound, whether it's Clapton, Hendrix, or BB King. Now, guitarist and physicist Dr. David Robert Grimes has described the physics underlying these techniques.

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Birdsongs Automatically Decoded by Computer Scientists

July 21, 2014 2:25 pm | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found a successful way of identifying bird sounds from large audio collections, which could be useful for expert and amateur bird-watchers alike. The analysis used recordings of individual birds and of dawn choruses to identify characteristics of bird sounds. It took advantage of large datasets of sound recordings provided by the British Library Sound Archive, and online sources.

Math Can Make the Internet 5 to 10 Times Faster

July 18, 2014 3:52 pm | by Aalborg University | News | Comments

Mathematical equations can make Internet communication via computer, mobile phone or satellite many times faster and more secure than today. Results with software developed by researchers from Aalborg University in collaboration with the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and California Institute of Technology (Caltech) are attracting attention in the international technology media.

On the Trail of Paradigm-Shifting Methods for Solving Mathematical Models

July 15, 2014 10:11 am | by Hengguang Li | Blogs | Comments

How using CPU/GPU parallel computing is the next logical step - My work in computational mathematics is focused on developing new, paradigm-shifting ideas in numerical methods for solving mathematical models in various fields. This includes the Schrödinger equation in quantum mechanics, the elasticity model in mechanical engineering, the Navier-Stokes equation in fluid mechanics, Maxwell’s equations in electromagnetism...

Mathematica 10

July 9, 2014 4:41 pm | Wolfram Research, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

With over 700 new functions — the single biggest jump in new functionality in the software's history — Mathematica 10 is the first version of Mathematica based on the complete Wolfram Language. Integration with the Wolfram Cloud and access to the expanded Wolfram Knowledgebase open up new possibilities for intelligent computation and deployment.

Statistical Analysis Could Improve Understanding and Treatment of Different Brain Tumors

July 7, 2014 10:21 am | by Qlucore | News | Comments

Discovering a brain tumor is a very serious issue, but it is not the end of the story. There are many different types of brain tumor with different survival rates and different methods for treatment. However, today, many brain tumors are difficult to clearly diagnose, leading to poor prognoses for patients.

'Deep Learning' Makes Search for Exotic Particles Easier

July 2, 2014 4:10 pm | by UC Irvine | News | Comments

Fully automated “deep learning” by computers greatly improves the odds of discovering particles such as the Higgs boson, beating even veteran physicists’ abilities.                         

Formula Calculates Thickness of Bombproof Concrete

July 2, 2014 9:47 am | by Fraunhofer | News | Comments

A new type of steel-reinforced concrete protects buildings better from bomb attacks. Researchers have developed a formula to quickly calculate the concrete’s required thickness. The material will be used in the One World Trade Center at Ground Zero.

To be able to use these huge amounts of data, we have to understand them and before that we need to categorize them in an effective, fast and automatic manner.

A Simple Solution for Big Data

June 27, 2014 11:19 am | by SISSA | News | Comments

To be able to use huge amounts of data, we have to understand them and before that we need to categorize them in an effective, fast and automatic manner. Two researchers have devised a type of Cluster Analysis, the ability to group data sets according to their "similarity," based on simple and powerful principles, which proved to be very efficient and capable of solving some of the most typical problems encountered in this type of analysis.

Mechanical engineers at the Babol University of Technology in Mazandaran, Iran, have turned to nature to devise an algorithm based on the survival trials faced by salmon swimming upstream to the spawning grounds to help them fish out the optimal solution

The Great Salmon Run Algorithm

June 25, 2014 10:42 am | by Inderscience Publishers | News | Comments

Mechanical engineers at the Babol University of Technology in Mazandaran, Iran, have turned to nature to devise an algorithm based on the survival trials faced by salmon swimming upstream to the spawning grounds to help them fish out the optimal solution to a given problem.

Manipulating minute areas of gain and loss within individual lasers (shown as peaks and valleys in the image), researchers were able to create paradoxical interactions between two nearby lasers. Courtesy of Vienna University of Technology

Mathematical Anomalies: Strange Physics Turns off Laser

June 18, 2014 12:53 pm | by Princeton University, Engineering School | News | Comments

Inspired by anomalies that arise in certain mathematical equations, researchers have demonstrated a laser system that paradoxically turns off when more power is added rather than becoming continuously brighter. The finding could lead to new ways to manipulate the interaction of electronics and light, an important tool in modern communications networks and high-speed information processing.

Artistic rendering of Leptoceratops, a likely relative of Serendipaceratops arthurcclarkei. Courtesy of Peter Trusler

Of Dinosaurs and Mathematics: Providing Solid Evidence for Paleontological Theory

June 13, 2014 3:58 pm | by Kathleen Estes, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology | News | Comments

Dinosaurs and mathematics do not seem like an obvious pair, but for Robert Sinclair and his Mathematical Biology Unit, they are a logical match. Sinclair was part of a team that recently published a paper reexamining the classification of a dinosaur bone found. Using his expertise in mathematics, Sinclair was able to help reclassify a single arm bone as belonging to a dinosaur family previously believed not to have existed ...

A new computation method to examine planets orbiting other stars suggests the Milky Way galaxy may house 100 million other places that could support complex life. Courtesy of Planetary Habitability Laboratory, University of Puerto Rico at Arecibo

Milky Way may Bear 100 Million Life-giving Planets

June 11, 2014 1:48 pm | by Blaine Friedlander, Cornell University | News | Comments

There are some 100 million other places in the Milky Way galaxy that could support complex life, report a group of university astronomers in the journal Challenges. They have developed a new computation method to examine data from planets orbiting other stars in the universe. Their study provides the first quantitative estimate of the number of worlds in our galaxy that could harbor life above the microbial level.

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