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Tri-TON, an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) that U.S. and Japanese researchers will use for the real-time verification of their search olfactory algorithms. Courtesy of Tamer Zaki, Johns Hopkins University

U.S., Japan Bring Big Data and Data Analytics to Disaster Response

March 31, 2015 12:29 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

When disaster strikes, it is critical that experts, decision makers and emergency personnel have access to real-time information in order to assess the situation and respond appropriately. It is equally critical that individuals and organizations have the capacity to analyze the wealth of data generated in the midst of the disaster and its immediate aftermath in order to produce accurate, customized warnings.

How a Long-dead Mathematician called Maxwell can Speed up your Internet

March 30, 2015 1:48 pm | by Jason Cole, Imperial College London | Articles | Comments

Electromagnetic radiation – it might sound like something that you’d be better off avoiding, but...

Mining Public Big Data yields Genetic Clues in Complex Human Diseases

March 27, 2015 11:35 am | by Beth Miller, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Big data: It’s a term we read and hear about often, but is hard to grasp. Computer scientists...

Mathematicians adapt Knapsack Code to take on Quantum-level Cyber Attacks

March 27, 2015 11:24 am | by Rebecca Phillips, Washington State University | News | Comments

Mathematicians have designed an encryption code capable of fending off the phenomenal hacking...

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Integer overflows occur when a computer tries to store too large a number in the memory space reserved for it. The leading digits are discarded — much as they are when a car odometer turns over. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Better Debugger: Algorithm Automatically Finds Integer-overflow Bugs

March 26, 2015 9:52 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Integer overflows are one of the most common bugs in computer programs — not only causing programs to crash but, even worse, potentially offering points of attack for malicious hackers. A new algorithm for identifying integer-overflow bugs was tested on five common open-source programs, in which previous analyses had found three bugs. The new algorithm found all three known bugs — and 11 new ones.

Nash and Nirenberg are two mathematical giants of the twentieth century. They are being recognized for their contributions to the field of partial differential equations (PDEs), which are equations involving rates of change that originally arose to descri

Two Mathematical Giants Share 2015 Abel Prize

March 26, 2015 9:03 am | by The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters | News | Comments

The Norwegian Academy of Sciences and Letters has decided to award the Abel Prize for 2015 to the American mathematicians John F. Nash Jr. and Louis Nirenberg “for striking and seminal contributions to the theory of nonlinear partial differential equations and its applications to geometric analysis.” They will receive the Abel Prize from His Majesty King Harald on May 19, 2015. The Abel Prize carries a cash award of about 1 million USD.

Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi helped to outline the first-ever computer simulation for research purposes — of a one-dimensional vibrating nonlinear string. Courtesy of Department of Energy

Mathematicians Solve 60-year-old Fermi-Pasta-Ulam Problem

March 24, 2015 3:05 pm | by University of East Anglia | News | Comments

A 60-year-old math problem first put forward by Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi has been solved. In 1955, a team of scientists led by Fermi used a computer for the first time to try to solve a numerical experiment. The outcome wasn’t what they were expecting, and the complexity of the problem underpinned the then-new field of non-linear physics and paved the way for six decades of new thinking. Chaos theory is just one of the theories...  

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President Barack Obama tries out a wheelchair with a design modification by Kaitlin Reed, 16, of Dover, MA, next to Mohammed Sayed, 16, of Cambridge, MA, who is originally from Afghanistan, during a tour of the White House Science Fair at the White House

Obama, Wowed by Young Scientists, Announces New STEM Pledges

March 24, 2015 2:43 pm | by Jim Kuhnhenn, Associated Press | News | Comments

The small Lego machine inside the White House whirred, and in a moment it was turning the pages of a story book. One page flipped, then another, ever faster as President Barack Obama marveled at its efficiency. The contraption's eventual aim would be to allow paralyzed or arthritic patients to read books despite their disabilities. "How did you figure this out?" Obama, impressed, asked its inventors.

The simulations reveal insights into the physics of vortex shedding and VIM at different length and time scales. The immediate benefits include the improved process for design optimization for large floating structures, and possible strategies for vortex-

Numerical Simulations Improve Offshore Drill Rig Safety

March 24, 2015 2:33 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

Los Alamos National Laboratory mechanical and thermal engineering researchers’ efforts to solve the complex problem of how ocean currents affect the infrastructure of floating oil rigs and their computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations received recognition from ANSYS, a company that provides computer-based engineering simulation capabilities.

The desktop software application is free and can be used on any basic desktop or laptop computer. Amateur astronomers may take images from their telescopes and analyze them with the application. The application will tell the user whether a matching astero

Help NASA Explore the Universe with Free Asteroid Data Hunter App

March 23, 2015 11:35 am | by NASA | News | Comments

During a panel at the South by Southwest Festival, NASA representatives discussed how citizen scientists have made a difference in asteroid hunting and announced the release of a desktop software application developed by NASA. The application is based on an Asteroid Data Hunter-derived algorithm that analyzes images for potential asteroids. It’s a tool that can be used by amateur astronomers and citizen scientists.

The Einstein Papers Project is dedicated to collecting, editing, translating and publishing the tens of thousands of pages of speeches, letters and other documents Albert Einstein left behind. Those collected papers are available in a free digital edition

Albert Einstein, in his Own Words: Einstein Papers Project Publishes Free Digital Edition

March 23, 2015 11:09 am | by NSF | News | Comments

Albert Einstein is known in popular culture for his famous E = mc2 formula. Scientists know him for revolutionizing physics with his general theory of relativity. But is it possible to know the man behind the big ideas? Yes, thanks to the massive body of written work and correspondence he left behind, which the Einstein Papers Project is dedicated to collecting, editing, translating and publishing.

Researchers used a “pixon” image enhancement technique, originally designed to peer into the distant Universe, to sharpen the map and reveal the enormous size of the thorium deposit from the volcanic eruption.

Lunar Volcano’s Enormous Eruption Reached Hundreds of Miles

March 20, 2015 11:01 am | by Durham University | News | Comments

Scientists have produced a new map of the Moon’s most unusual volcano showing that its explosive eruption spread debris over an area much greater than previously thought. A team of astronomers and geologists studied an area of the lunar surface in the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex. By mapping the radioactive element thorium, which spewed out during the eruption, they discovered debris was able to cover an area the size of Scotland.

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Physicist Chien-Shiung Wu in 1963 at Columbia University, where she was a professor. Known as the First Lady of Physics, Wu worked on the Manhattan Project and helped disprove a widely-accepted law of theoretical physics. Later in her life, Wu researched

Paving the Way: 28 Amazing Women, Trailblazing Science

March 18, 2015 12:16 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Breakthrough science requires pioneers. People who combine brilliance with courage, even in the face of daunting opposition. The women who paved the way for modern scientific exploration exemplify this spirit; grappling not only with fundamental questions of the universe, but with discrimination and societal constraints that often stripped them of scientific credit.

Monocytes are immune cells present in the blood. They are consequently also found in tumors. In this setting, monocytes are known to promote the development of the tumoral blood vessels and to suppress the immune response directed at the tumor. Courtesy o

Mathematics Yields New Possibilities for Reprogramming Immune Response to Breast Cancer

March 17, 2015 2:55 pm | by Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics | News | Comments

A means of reprogramming a flawed immune response into an efficient anti-tumoral one was brought to light by the results of a translational trial relating to breast cancer. Thanks to the innovative combination of mathematical modeling and experimentation, only 20 tests were necessary, whereas traditional experimentation would have required 596 tests to obtain the same results.

Athens, Baltimore, Hong Kong, Miami: What are those people doing? A new evaluation method measures a computer’s ability to decipher movements, relationships, and implied intent from images by asking questions.

Visual Turing Test raises Bar on Computer Vision Benchmarks

March 16, 2015 12:39 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

Researchers from Brown and Johns Hopkins universities have come up with a new way to evaluate how well computers can divine information from images. The team describes its new system as a “visual Turing test,” after the legendary computer scientist Alan Turing’s test of the extent to which computers display human-like intelligence.

Simulink 8.5 (R2015a) Block Diagram Environment

Simulink 8.5 (R2015a) Block Diagram Environment

March 16, 2015 9:52 am | The Mathworks, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Simulink is a block diagram environment for multidomain simulation and model-based design. It supports simulation, automatic code generation, and continuous test and verification of embedded systems. The MATLAB add-on provides a graphical editor, customizable block libraries and solvers for modeling and simulating dynamic systems.

The Apollonian circle packing fractal is a quantification of the sandpile fractal’s ability to remember that it used to live on a square grid. Courtesy of Lionel Levine, Wesley Pegden and Charles Smart

Self-organized Criticality: One Fractal Quantifies Another

March 12, 2015 3:07 pm | by Anne Ju, Cornell University | News | Comments

To humor mathematicians, picture a pile of sand grains — say, a billion — in one square of a vast sheet of graph paper. If four or more grains occupy a single square, that square topples by sending one grain to each of its four neighboring squares. Keep zooming out so the squares become very small, and something strange happens — the sand still “remembers” that it used to live on a square lattice, and a distinctive pattern emerges.

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People celebrate Pi Day around the world with pie-eating, pie-throwing and even pi-recitation contests, where participants recite digits of this irrational number from memory. Courtesy of Medea Material

Once-in-a-Century: Celebrating 10 Digits of Pi on 3.14.15 at 9:26:53

March 12, 2015 9:42 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

An e-pi-c day is coming! On 3.14.15 at 9:26:53; the date/time will correspond to the first 10 digits of the mathematical constant pi (3.141592653). This happens only once per century — a truly once-in-a-lifetime event for most people.

Mark Anawis is a Principal Scientist and ASQ Six Sigma Black Belt at Abbott

Understanding Reliability Models

March 11, 2015 8:25 am | by Mark Anawis | Blogs | Comments

Cicero said: “The shifts of fortune test the reliability of friends.” Fortunately, the reliability of processes can be more easily understood than friends. It is defined as the probability of performing a specific function under certain conditions for a specific period of time without failure

The University of Chicago’s Research Computing Center is helping linguists visualize the grammar of a given word in bodies of language containing millions or billions of words. Courtesy of Ricardo Aguilera/Research Computing Center

Billions of Words: Visualizing Natural Language

February 27, 2015 3:14 pm | by Benjamin Recchie, University of Chicago | News | Comments

Children don’t have to be told that “cat” and “cats” are variants of the same word — they pick it up just by listening. To a computer, though, they’re as different as, well, cats and dogs. Yet it’s computers that are assumed to be superior in detecting patterns and rules, not four-year-olds. Researchers are trying to, if not to solve that puzzle definitively, at least provide the tools to do so.

While a member of the audience might have seen a variation on this trick before, the AI can now use psychological and mathematical principles to create lots of different versions and keep audiences guessing. Courtesy of Steven Depolo

Artificial Intelligence Performs Real Magic Tricks

February 25, 2015 11:41 am | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Researchers gave a computer program the outline of how a magic jigsaw puzzle and a mind-reading card trick work, as well the results of experiments into how humans understand magic tricks. With this information, the system created completely new variants on those tricks which can be delivered by a magician.

A mathematical will give researchers an opportunity to discover the earliest words and languages spoken to date, with the potential to go back thousands of years. Courtesy of woodleywonderworks

Statistical Technique Traces Languages Back to Oldest Spoken Words

February 24, 2015 12:42 pm | by Current Biology | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a statistical technique that sorts out when changes to words’ pronunciations most likely occurred in the evolutionary history of related languages. Their model gives researchers a renewed opportunity to trace words and languages back to their earliest common ancestor or ancestors — potentially thousands of years further into prehistory than previous techniques.

Model of ion (Cl) collision with atomically thin semiconductor (MoSe2). Collision region is shown in blue and zoomed in; red points show initial positions of Cl. The simulation calculates the energy loss of the ion based on the incident and emergent veloc

Algorithm Enables Simulation of Ultrafast Processes

February 20, 2015 12:07 pm | by Rachel Berkowitz, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new algorithm which increases the small time step required by ultrafast phenomena from about one attosecond to about half a femtosecond. This allows them to simulate ultrafast phenomena for systems of around 100 atoms.

Scientists at the University of Valencia have developed a research methodology called Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), based on network analysis mathematical tools for studying anatomy. Courtesy of Asociación RUVID

Modular Anatomical Structure of Human Head Described for First Time

February 18, 2015 10:03 am | by Asociación RUVID | News | Comments

A new mathematical analysis tool has allowed a deeper understanding of the anatomy of the human head, describing the skull as an extended network structured in 10 modules. Researchers have developed a research methodology called Anatomical Network Analysis (AnNA), based on network analysis mathematical tools for studying anatomy.

A message-carrying "golden record" that NASA's Voyager probe carries, a 12-inch gold-plated copper disk containing sounds and images selected to portray the diversity of life and culture on Earth. (AP Photo/NASA)

Should we call the Cosmos Seeking ET? Hawking, Brin think It's Crazy

February 17, 2015 3:19 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Astronomers have their own version of the single person's dilemma: Do you wait by the phone for a call? Or do you make the call yourself and risk getting shot down? Instead of love, of course, astronomers are looking for alien life and, for decades, they have sat by their telescopes waiting to hear from E.T. It didn't happen. Now, some want to beam messages out into the void and invite the closest few thousand worlds to chat or even visit.

A computer simulation explores the impact of measles outbreaks in cities across the U.S. Users can see how an outbreak would play out if their city had high or low vaccination rates.

Simulation Brings Facts to Measles Outbreak and Vaccination Debate

February 17, 2015 2:28 pm | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

To bring facts and clarity to the public debate about immunization in light of the recent measles outbreak, the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health unveiled a computer simulation that explores the impact of measles outbreaks in cities across the U.S. Users can see how an outbreak would play out if their city had high or low vaccination rates.

John Wass is a statistician based in Chicago, IL.

Explorations of Mathematical Models in Biology with Maple

February 10, 2015 9:29 am | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

The author of this wonderful text delivers a brief, easy-to-absorb, yet very comprehensive text on modeling real-world data with Maple. Maple is software for performing mathematics, with a none-too-steep learning curve. In the introduction, the author is quick to point out that this is neither a detailed textbook of mathematical modeling, nor Maple. It is, however, a very well-written manual of introductory modeling and use of Maple.

ENIGMA cipher machine  Rotor Set Courtesy of Andy L.

Similar Statistics Play Role in Decision Making and World War II Code Breaking

February 9, 2015 11:22 am | by Cell Press | News | Comments

Statistical decision making resembles a process Alan Turning's team did in Bletchley Park to work out the settings of German enigma machines. In order to make use of the large clicking machine, Turing's team analyzed pairs of randomly intercepted German messages, aligned them one above the other to accumulate evidence from letter pairs until they reach a threshold level of certainty that the messages were sent on identical enigma machine.

Brain Researcher Marianne Fyhn receives computation help from, among others, Gaute Einevoll and Anders Malthe-Sørenssen to acquire an understanding of how the brain Works.

Mathematics to Reveal Secrets of the Brain

February 5, 2015 4:33 pm | by Yngve Vogt, University of Oslo | News | Comments

Top researchers are using mathematical modelling and heavy computations to understand how the brain can both remember and learn. Ten years ago, when the team of Marianne Fyhn and Torkel Hafting Fyhn cooperated with the Nobel Prize winning team of May-Britt and Edvard Moser at NTNU, they discovered the sense of orientation in the brain.

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