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Intel Selects Georgia Tech as Site for Next Parallel Computing Center

Intel Selects Georgia Tech as Site for Next Parallel Computing Center

April 22, 2014 12:25 pm | by Intel | News | Comments

As modern computer systems become more powerful, utilizing as many as millions of processor cores in parallel, Intel is looking for new ways to efficiently use these high performance computing (HPC) systems to accelerate scientific discovery. As part of this effort, Intel has selected Georgia Tech as the site of one of its Parallel Computing Centers.

Computational Record on SuperMUC: Earthquake Simulation Tops One Quadrillion Flops

April 15, 2014 2:50 pm | by Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) | News | Comments

A team of computer scientists, mathematicians and geophysicists have optimized the SeisSol...

Cosmic Slurp: Using Supercomputers to Predict Black Holes Swallowing Stars

April 14, 2014 2:33 pm | by Aaron Dubrow, NSF | News | Comments

Somewhere out in the cosmos an ordinary galaxy spins, seemingly at slumber. Then all of a sudden...

Math App Helps Whittle Away Jet Lag

April 11, 2014 9:43 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Michigan researchers say mathematical formulas suggest it's possible to adjust to new time zones...

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Dr. Franz-Josef Pfreundt

April 16, 2014 4:03 pm | Biographies

Dr. Franz-Josef Pfreundt studied Mathematics, Physics and Computer Science resulting in a Diploma in Mathematics and a Ph.D degree in Mathematical Physics (1986). From 1986-1995 he had a permanent position at the University of Kaiserslautern as Head of the Research Group for Industrial Mathematics. In 1995 he was cofounder of the Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Mathematics – ITWM .

Andreas Wierse, Managing Director, SICOS BW

Andreas Wierse

April 16, 2014 3:06 pm | Biographies

Mr. Wierse studied Mathematics at Bonn University and briefly worked at the Institute for Applied Mathematics, before he 1991 moved to Stuttgart, to work on his PhD in the visualization department at the Computing Centre of the University. In 1997 he founded together with his colleagues the start-up VirCinity (later Visenso) and co-ordinated as managing director the commercialization of the COVISE visualization software

Jed Brown, Assistant Computational Mathematician, Argonne National Laboratory

Jed Brown

April 16, 2014 9:42 am | Biographies

Jed Brown  received his doctor of science degree from ETH, Zurich, in 2011. He was a postdoctoral appointee at Argonne from 2011 to 2012 and was named an Argonne Scholar in 2012. The following year, he was promoted to assistant computational mathematician. He also is an assistant professor adjunct at the University of Colorado Boulder

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Thomas Poulet, Mathematical Geoscientist, CSIRO, Australia

Thomas Poulet

April 16, 2014 8:53 am | Biographies

Thimas Poulet is using his expertise in computer programming and algorithmics to improve tools used for the three-dimensional modelling of geological processes with the CSIRO Exploration & Mining Division.

Richard Kenway, Professor, University of Edinburgh

Richard Kenway

April 15, 2014 7:10 pm | Biographies

Professor Kenway was appointed to the Tait Chair of Mathematical Physics at the University of Edinburgh in 1994. His research explores non-perturbative aspects of theories of elementary particles using computer simulation of lattice gauge theories, particularly the strong interactions of quarks and gluons described by Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD).

Olivier Pironneau, Professor, University Paris VI

Olivier Pironneau

April 15, 2014 7:02 pm | Biographies

Prof. Olivier Pironneau's research interests include fluid mechanics, mathematical finance, optimal design, numerical analysis and partial differential equations. He is author of 8 books and 693 papers and advisor of more than 30 Ph. D. Students. He is a member of French Academy of Sciences since 2002.

Computational Record on SuperMUC: Earthquake Simulation Tops One Quadrillion Flops

April 15, 2014 2:50 pm | by Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) | News | Comments

A team of computer scientists, mathematicians and geophysicists have optimized the SeisSol earthquake simulation software on the SuperMUC high performance computer to push its performance beyond the “magical” one petaflop/s mark — one quadrillion floating point operations per second.

Cosmic Slurp: Using Supercomputers to Predict Black Holes Swallowing Stars

April 14, 2014 2:33 pm | by Aaron Dubrow, NSF | News | Comments

Somewhere out in the cosmos an ordinary galaxy spins, seemingly at slumber. Then all of a sudden, WHAM! A flash of light explodes from the galaxy's center. A star orbiting too close to the event horizon of the galaxy's central supermassive black hole has been torn apart by the force of gravity, heating up its gas and sending out a beacon to the far reaches of the universe.

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Math App Helps Whittle Away Jet Lag

April 11, 2014 9:43 am | by Lauran Neergaard, AP Medical Writer | News | Comments

Michigan researchers say mathematical formulas suggest it's possible to adjust to new time zones a bit faster than previously thought, and they created their own free app to help. In a study partly funded by the Air Force, the team used two equations proven to predict someone's circadian rhythm, and with computer modeling calculated different schedules of light exposure for more than 1,000 possible trips.

Orienteering for Robots: Algorithm Could Aid Navigation, Scene Understanding

April 10, 2014 2:22 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Suppose you’re trying to navigate an unfamiliar section of a big city, and you’re using a particular cluster of skyscrapers as a reference point. Traffic and one-way streets force you to take some odd turns and, for a while, you lose sight of your landmarks. When they reappear, in order to use them for navigation, you have to be able to identify them as the same buildings you were tracking before — as well as your orientation...

Unbreakable Security Codes Inspired by Nature

April 10, 2014 2:10 pm | by Lancaster University | News | Comments

A revolutionary new method of encrypting confidential information has been patented by scientists who were inspired by discoveries from human biology, which model how the heart and lungs coordinate their rhythms by passing information between each other.

Parallel Programming May Not be so Daunting

March 26, 2014 6:46 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

In theory, doubling the number of cores doubles the chip’s efficiency, but splitting up computations so that they run efficiently in parallel isn’t easy. On the other hand, say a trio of computer scientists from MIT, Israel’s Technion, and Microsoft Research, neither is it as hard as had been feared.

Einstein's Entanglement Produces a Quantum Encryption

March 25, 2014 5:40 pm | by Swinburne University of Technology | News | Comments

Einstein's scepticism about quantum mechanics may lead to an ultra-secure Internet. Entangled particles stay connected even when separated by large distances.                         

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ACM Turing Award Goes to Leslie Lamport for Work Enabling Distributed Computing in Data Center, Security, Cloud Landscapes

March 19, 2014 9:33 am | by The Association for Computing Machinery | News | Comments

The Association for Computing Machinery has named Leslie Lamport, a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research, as the recipient of the 2013 ACM A.M. Turing Award for imposing clear, well-defined coherence on the seemingly chaotic behavior of distributed computing systems, in which several autonomous computers communicate with each other by passing messages.

Simplifying Data Analysis and Making Sense of Big Data

March 14, 2014 2:25 pm | by Wallace Ravven, University of California, Berkeley | News | Comments

Ben Recht is looking for problems. He develops mathematical strategies to help researchers, from urban planners to online retailers, cut through blizzards of data to find what they’re after. He resists the “needle in the haystack” metaphor because, he says, the researchers, engineers and business people he has worked with usually don’t know enough about their data to reach their goal.

New Model Reduces Data Access Delay, Could increase Speed by up to 100x

March 11, 2014 11:45 am | by Illinois Institute of Technology | News | Comments

As the amount of data grows ever larger but memory speed continues to greatly lag CPU speed, Xian-He Sun has established a new mathematical model for reducing data access delay. Sun is creator of Sun-Ni’s law — one of three scalable computing laws along with Amdahl’s law and Gustafson’s law — and Distinguished Professor of Computer Science at Illinois Institute of Technology.

Be an Asteroid Hunter in NASA's First Asteroid Grand Challenge

March 11, 2014 11:18 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA’s Asteroid Data Hunter contest series will offer $35,000 in awards over the next six months to citizen scientists who develop improved algorithms that can be used to identify asteroids. This contest is being conducted in partnership with Planetary Resources of Bellevue, WA.

The Great Light Sources of Europe: Studying Approaches to Synchrotron Data Management and Analysis

February 28, 2014 4:09 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

The 10-day tour of Europe was not your typical itinerary — Garching, Karlsruhe, Villigen, Hamburg and Oxford. In January. But David Brown and Craig Tull of the Computational Research Division and Alex Hexemer of the Advanced Light Source weren’t touring to see the sights — they more interested in seeing the lights — powerful scientific instruments known as light sources that use intense X-rays to study materials

NERSC Announces Second Annual HPC Achievement Awards

February 28, 2014 4:04 pm | by NERSC | News | Comments

The Department of Energy’s National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) announced the winners of its second annual High Performance Computing (HPC) Achievement Awards on February 4, 2014, during the annual NERSC User Group meeting at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).

Systems Docking Simulation Algorithms Help Speed Drug Discovery

February 20, 2014 6:50 am | by Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology - OIST | News | Comments

A large number of neglected diseases exist in which each disease has only a small number of patients in the world, yet the number is still significant. Kun-Yi Hsin  is working on precisely this problem. In a recent article, he describes his work identifying potential drugs and targets for those drugs using a computational approach that has the potential to bring the cost of drug development down while increasing the speed of drug discovery.

Sci-Tech Oscars: Academy Honors Scientists and Engineers behind Special Effects

February 18, 2014 1:15 pm | by Sandy Cohen, AP Entertainment Writer | News | Comments

The scientists and inventors who make big-screen superheroes, spectacular explosions and other only-in-the-movies effects possible have their own Oscar ceremony. Kristen Bell and Michael B. Jordan hosted the film academy's Scientific and Technical Awards February 15, 2014, at the Beverly Hills Hotel, recognizing more than 50 of the most creative scientists and engineers in the movie business.

Mathematical Beauty Activates Same Brain Region as Great Art or Music

February 14, 2014 2:57 pm | by University College London - UCL | News | Comments

People who appreciate the beauty of mathematics activate the same part of their brain when they look at aesthetically pleasing formula as others do when appreciating art or music, suggesting that there is a neurobiological basis to beauty. There are many different sources of beauty — a beautiful face and a great symphony are examples of beauty derived from sensory experiences.  But there are other, highly intellectual sources of beauty.

Statistical Mechanics, Mathematical Modeling Shed Light on Biological Memories

February 10, 2014 5:04 pm | by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | News | Comments

A Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory physicist and his colleagues have found a new application for the tools and mathematics typically used in physics to help solve problems in biology. Specifically, the team used statistical mechanics and mathematical modeling to shed light on something known as epigenetic memory — how an organism can create a biological memory of some variable condition, such as quality of nutrition or temperature.

Alan Turing: His Work and Impact Wins Prestigious PROSE Award

February 7, 2014 11:01 am | by Association of American Publishers and Elsevier | News | Comments

Alan Turing: His Work and Impact, was selected for the top honor, R.R. Hawkins Award, at the 38th annual PROSE Awards. Celebrating the centenary of his birth, the bookwas praised as a fitting tribute to the life of the legendary mathematical and scientific genius, considered to be the father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence.

NAG Library for Java — Release 2

February 6, 2014 10:16 am | Nag Ltd | Product Releases | Comments

NAG Library for Java Release 2 enables the calling of precisely 1,784 mathematical and statistical routines to aid complex computation, and enhanced error reporting enables increased precision from computation results. It provides abstract classes for callback functions.

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