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Suresh Venkatasubramanian, left, and Matt Might, both associate professors of computer science at the University of Utah, have received a $3 million government grant to produce software that can sniff out the next generation of computer vulnerabilities. T

Algorithmic Attacks: Fighting Next-gen Cyber Threats

April 17, 2015 3:45 pm | by University of Utah | News | Comments

The next generation of cyberattacks will be more sophisticated, more difficult to detect and more capable of wreaking untold damage on the nation’s computer systems. So, the DoD has given a $3 million grant to a team of computer scientists to develop software that can hunt down a new kind of vulnerability nearly impossible to find with today’s technology. The team is tasked with creating an analyzer that can thwart algorithmic attacks.

Protecting Nature on the Fly: Computer Algorithms, Laser Technology Characterize Biodiversity

April 16, 2015 12:50 pm | by Technische Universität Wien | News | Comments

Simply declaring a region as a nature protection area is not enough, regular monitoring of its...

Alan Turing's Manuscript on Foundations of Mathematics and Computer Science Sold for $1,025,000

April 14, 2015 3:00 pm | by Bonhams | News | Comments

A key handwritten scientific document by Alan Turing in which he works on the foundations of...

Formulas Drive Activity in Organized Cybercrime Forums

April 13, 2015 4:53 pm | by Drexel University | News | Comments

Notorious gangsters Al Capone and Carlo Gambino were famously done in by tax evasion charges....

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Spiegelhalter unravels the web of exaggerations, misdirections and downright lies that surround sex in modern society.

Fifty Shades of Statistics: What they tell us about our intimate lives

April 9, 2015 11:55 am | by Wiley | News | Comments

As part of the 2015 Cambridge Science Festival, David Spiegelhalter, Winton Professor for the Understanding of of Risk at Cambridge University, has given an overview of the history of sex research using data going back to 1580, conducted by pioneering sexologists through to today’s ‘sexperts.’

Nurses practice taking blood pressure and collecting medical history with a traditional human patient simulator system. Its face is completely inexpressive, and its lips do not move when it "talks." Speech is either pre-recorded, or voiced by the clinical

Human Patient Simulators: How Robots can Help Build Better Doctors

April 9, 2015 9:53 am | by NSF | News | Comments

A young doctor leans over a patient who has been in a serious car accident and invariably must be experiencing pain. The doctor's trauma team examines the patient's pelvis and rolls her onto her side to check her spine. They scan the patient's abdomen with a rapid ultrasound machine, finding fluid. They insert a tube in her nose. Throughout the procedure, the patient's face remains rigid, showing no signs of pain.

The UCLA Biomechatronics Lab develops a language of touch that can be "felt" by computers and humans alike. Courtesy of the National Science Foundation

Artificial Haptic Intelligence: Giving Robots the Human Touch

April 7, 2015 4:56 pm | by Miles O'Brien, NSF | News | Comments

Researchers are designing artificial limbs to be more sensational, with the emphasis on sensation. They have developed a language of touch that can be "felt" by computers and humans alike. The engineers and students are constructing a language quantified with mechanical touch sensors that interact with objects of various shapes, sizes and textures.

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UNSW Professor Melissa Knothe Tate is leading the project, which is using semiconductor technology to explore osteoporosis and osteoarthritis. Courtesy of Grant Turner/Mediakoo.

Previously Top-secret Technology enables Whole-body “Google Maps”

April 7, 2015 11:00 am | by UNSW Australia | News | Comments

A world-first collaboration uses previously top-secret technology to zoom through the human body down to the level of a single cell and could be a game-changer for medicine. UNSW Australia's Professor Tate is first to use the system in humans. She has forged a pioneering partnership with the US-based Cleveland Clinic, Brown and Stanford Universities, as well as Zeiss and Google to help crunch terabytes of data gathered from human study.

A high resolution image of the data transition region on a CD-ROM taken with an Olympus OLS 4000 LEXT 3-D digital laser confocal microscope. The sharp points are data on a compact disk. Courtesy of Greg Gogolin, Ph.D., Information Security & Intelligence,

Restoring Lost Data: 3-D Digital Laser Microscopy Creates Visual Roadmap

April 6, 2015 4:12 pm | by Marlene Cimons, National Science Foundation | News | Comments

It can be disheartening to learn that something precious, such as a one-of-a-kind family photo, has disappeared from a scratched or broken CD or DVD. It also can become serious, dangerous and potentially costly if it happens to a disc containing criminal forensic evidence, corporate records or scientific data. But there may be a way in the future to bring the material back.

New research has demonstrated that an amputee can grasp with a bionic hand, powered only by his thoughts.

Bionic Hand is Powered only by Thoughts

April 2, 2015 9:53 am | by Jeannie Kever, University of Houston | News | Comments

Researchers have created an algorithm that allowed a man to grasp a bottle with a prosthetic hand powered only by his thoughts. The technique, demonstrated with a man whose right hand had been amputated, uses non-invasive brain monitoring, capturing brain activity to determine what parts of the brain are involved in grasping an object. A computer program, or brain-machine interface (BMI), harnessed the subject’s intentions...

We can now use a very fast and biologically relevant computational model to study deforming structures of the clots growing in blood flow. The new model may be adapted to study clot formation in blood vessels, which can pose the risk of detaching and migr

Simulating Biofilm Mechanical Behavior Aids Blood Clotting Studies

April 1, 2015 11:47 am | by Gene Stowe, University of Notre Dame | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new computational model that effectively simulates the mechanical behavior of biofilms. Their model may lead to new strategies for studying a range of issues from blood clots to waste treatment systems. The new model may be adapted to study clot formation in blood vessels, which can pose the risk of detaching and migrating to the lungs, a fatal event.

Omics Explorer 3.1 for Mac

Omics Explorer 3.1 for Mac

April 1, 2015 11:18 am | Qlucore AB | Product Releases | Comments

Qlucore Omics Explorer 3.1 for Mac is data analysis software designed to maximize the outcome of research by making it easy to analyze experiment data from a biological point-of-view. Examples of this are the inbuilt Gene Ontology (GO) Browser, a Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) function, and freedom to explore data using any variable identifier: variable collapse.

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Tri-TON, an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) that U.S. and Japanese researchers will use for the real-time verification of their search olfactory algorithms. Courtesy of Tamer Zaki, Johns Hopkins University

U.S., Japan Bring Big Data and Data Analytics to Disaster Response

March 31, 2015 12:29 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

When disaster strikes, it is critical that experts, decision makers and emergency personnel have access to real-time information in order to assess the situation and respond appropriately. It is equally critical that individuals and organizations have the capacity to analyze the wealth of data generated in the midst of the disaster and its immediate aftermath in order to produce accurate, customized warnings.

“The things I do for my housemates' downloading habit…” Maths by Sergey Nivens

How a Long-dead Mathematician called Maxwell can Speed up your Internet

March 30, 2015 1:48 pm | by Jason Cole, Imperial College London | Articles | Comments

Electromagnetic radiation – it might sound like something that you’d be better off avoiding, but electromagnetic waves of various kinds underpin our senses and how we interact with the world – from the light emissions through which your eyes perceive these words, to the microwaves that carry the Wi-Fi signal to your laptop or phone on which you’re reading it.

Yin-yang haplotypes arise when a stretch of DNA evolves to present two divergent forms. A group of engineers at Washington University in St. Louis showed a massive yin-yang haplotype pair encompassing the gene gephyrin on human chromosome 14. This image s

Mining Public Big Data yields Genetic Clues in Complex Human Diseases

March 27, 2015 11:35 am | by Beth Miller, Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Big data: It’s a term we read and hear about often, but is hard to grasp. Computer scientists tackled some big data about an important protein and discovered its connection in human history as well as clues about its role in complex neurological diseases. Through a novel method of analyzing these big data, they discovered a region encompassing the gephyrin gene on chromosome 14 that underwent rapid evolution after splitting in two...

Hamlin, left, and Webb with a book about breaking the Nazi Enigma code, which was also the subject of the recent film, The Imitation Game. Courtesy of Rebecca Phillips, WSU

Mathematicians adapt Knapsack Code to take on Quantum-level Cyber Attacks

March 27, 2015 11:24 am | by Rebecca Phillips, Washington State University | News | Comments

Mathematicians have designed an encryption code capable of fending off the phenomenal hacking power of a quantum computer. Using high-level number theory and cryptography, the researchers reworked an infamous old cipher called the knapsack code to create an online security system better prepared for future demands.

Integer overflows occur when a computer tries to store too large a number in the memory space reserved for it. The leading digits are discarded — much as they are when a car odometer turns over. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Better Debugger: Algorithm Automatically Finds Integer-overflow Bugs

March 26, 2015 9:52 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Integer overflows are one of the most common bugs in computer programs — not only causing programs to crash but, even worse, potentially offering points of attack for malicious hackers. A new algorithm for identifying integer-overflow bugs was tested on five common open-source programs, in which previous analyses had found three bugs. The new algorithm found all three known bugs — and 11 new ones.

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Nash and Nirenberg are two mathematical giants of the twentieth century. They are being recognized for their contributions to the field of partial differential equations (PDEs), which are equations involving rates of change that originally arose to descri

Two Mathematical Giants Share 2015 Abel Prize

March 26, 2015 9:03 am | by The Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters | News | Comments

The Norwegian Academy of Sciences and Letters has decided to award the Abel Prize for 2015 to the American mathematicians John F. Nash Jr. and Louis Nirenberg “for striking and seminal contributions to the theory of nonlinear partial differential equations and its applications to geometric analysis.” They will receive the Abel Prize from His Majesty King Harald on May 19, 2015. The Abel Prize carries a cash award of about 1 million USD.

Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi helped to outline the first-ever computer simulation for research purposes — of a one-dimensional vibrating nonlinear string. Courtesy of Department of Energy

Mathematicians Solve 60-year-old Fermi-Pasta-Ulam Problem

March 24, 2015 3:05 pm | by University of East Anglia | News | Comments

A 60-year-old math problem first put forward by Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi has been solved. In 1955, a team of scientists led by Fermi used a computer for the first time to try to solve a numerical experiment. The outcome wasn’t what they were expecting, and the complexity of the problem underpinned the then-new field of non-linear physics and paved the way for six decades of new thinking. Chaos theory is just one of the theories...  

President Barack Obama tries out a wheelchair with a design modification by Kaitlin Reed, 16, of Dover, MA, next to Mohammed Sayed, 16, of Cambridge, MA, who is originally from Afghanistan, during a tour of the White House Science Fair at the White House

Obama, Wowed by Young Scientists, Announces New STEM Pledges

March 24, 2015 2:43 pm | by Jim Kuhnhenn, Associated Press | News | Comments

The small Lego machine inside the White House whirred, and in a moment it was turning the pages of a story book. One page flipped, then another, ever faster as President Barack Obama marveled at its efficiency. The contraption's eventual aim would be to allow paralyzed or arthritic patients to read books despite their disabilities. "How did you figure this out?" Obama, impressed, asked its inventors.

The simulations reveal insights into the physics of vortex shedding and VIM at different length and time scales. The immediate benefits include the improved process for design optimization for large floating structures, and possible strategies for vortex-

Numerical Simulations Improve Offshore Drill Rig Safety

March 24, 2015 2:33 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

Los Alamos National Laboratory mechanical and thermal engineering researchers’ efforts to solve the complex problem of how ocean currents affect the infrastructure of floating oil rigs and their computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations received recognition from ANSYS, a company that provides computer-based engineering simulation capabilities.

The desktop software application is free and can be used on any basic desktop or laptop computer. Amateur astronomers may take images from their telescopes and analyze them with the application. The application will tell the user whether a matching astero

Help NASA Explore the Universe with Free Asteroid Data Hunter App

March 23, 2015 11:35 am | by NASA | News | Comments

During a panel at the South by Southwest Festival, NASA representatives discussed how citizen scientists have made a difference in asteroid hunting and announced the release of a desktop software application developed by NASA. The application is based on an Asteroid Data Hunter-derived algorithm that analyzes images for potential asteroids. It’s a tool that can be used by amateur astronomers and citizen scientists.

The Einstein Papers Project is dedicated to collecting, editing, translating and publishing the tens of thousands of pages of speeches, letters and other documents Albert Einstein left behind. Those collected papers are available in a free digital edition

Albert Einstein, in his Own Words: Einstein Papers Project Publishes Free Digital Edition

March 23, 2015 11:09 am | by NSF | News | Comments

Albert Einstein is known in popular culture for his famous E = mc2 formula. Scientists know him for revolutionizing physics with his general theory of relativity. But is it possible to know the man behind the big ideas? Yes, thanks to the massive body of written work and correspondence he left behind, which the Einstein Papers Project is dedicated to collecting, editing, translating and publishing.

Researchers used a “pixon” image enhancement technique, originally designed to peer into the distant Universe, to sharpen the map and reveal the enormous size of the thorium deposit from the volcanic eruption.

Lunar Volcano’s Enormous Eruption Reached Hundreds of Miles

March 20, 2015 11:01 am | by Durham University | News | Comments

Scientists have produced a new map of the Moon’s most unusual volcano showing that its explosive eruption spread debris over an area much greater than previously thought. A team of astronomers and geologists studied an area of the lunar surface in the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex. By mapping the radioactive element thorium, which spewed out during the eruption, they discovered debris was able to cover an area the size of Scotland.

Physicist Chien-Shiung Wu in 1963 at Columbia University, where she was a professor. Known as the First Lady of Physics, Wu worked on the Manhattan Project and helped disprove a widely-accepted law of theoretical physics. Later in her life, Wu researched

Paving the Way: 28 Amazing Women, Trailblazing Science

March 18, 2015 12:16 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Breakthrough science requires pioneers. People who combine brilliance with courage, even in the face of daunting opposition. The women who paved the way for modern scientific exploration exemplify this spirit; grappling not only with fundamental questions of the universe, but with discrimination and societal constraints that often stripped them of scientific credit.

Monocytes are immune cells present in the blood. They are consequently also found in tumors. In this setting, monocytes are known to promote the development of the tumoral blood vessels and to suppress the immune response directed at the tumor. Courtesy o

Mathematics Yields New Possibilities for Reprogramming Immune Response to Breast Cancer

March 17, 2015 2:55 pm | by Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics | News | Comments

A means of reprogramming a flawed immune response into an efficient anti-tumoral one was brought to light by the results of a translational trial relating to breast cancer. Thanks to the innovative combination of mathematical modeling and experimentation, only 20 tests were necessary, whereas traditional experimentation would have required 596 tests to obtain the same results.

Athens, Baltimore, Hong Kong, Miami: What are those people doing? A new evaluation method measures a computer’s ability to decipher movements, relationships, and implied intent from images by asking questions.

Visual Turing Test raises Bar on Computer Vision Benchmarks

March 16, 2015 12:39 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

Researchers from Brown and Johns Hopkins universities have come up with a new way to evaluate how well computers can divine information from images. The team describes its new system as a “visual Turing test,” after the legendary computer scientist Alan Turing’s test of the extent to which computers display human-like intelligence.

Simulink 8.5 (R2015a) Block Diagram Environment

Simulink 8.5 (R2015a) Block Diagram Environment

March 16, 2015 9:52 am | The Mathworks, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Simulink is a block diagram environment for multidomain simulation and model-based design. It supports simulation, automatic code generation, and continuous test and verification of embedded systems. The MATLAB add-on provides a graphical editor, customizable block libraries and solvers for modeling and simulating dynamic systems.

The Apollonian circle packing fractal is a quantification of the sandpile fractal’s ability to remember that it used to live on a square grid. Courtesy of Lionel Levine, Wesley Pegden and Charles Smart

Self-organized Criticality: One Fractal Quantifies Another

March 12, 2015 3:07 pm | by Anne Ju, Cornell University | News | Comments

To humor mathematicians, picture a pile of sand grains — say, a billion — in one square of a vast sheet of graph paper. If four or more grains occupy a single square, that square topples by sending one grain to each of its four neighboring squares. Keep zooming out so the squares become very small, and something strange happens — the sand still “remembers” that it used to live on a square lattice, and a distinctive pattern emerges.

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