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Richard Lamb, right, discusses artificial neural networks with WSU College of Education colleague Andy Cavagnetto.

Video Games could Dramatically Streamline Education Research

September 19, 2014 4:59 pm | by C. Brandon Chapman, Washington State University | News | Comments

“Seeking educational curriculum researchers. Humans need not apply.” A Washington State University professor has figured out a dramatically easier and more cost-effective way to do research on science curriculum in the classroom — and it could include playing video games. Called “computational modeling,” it involves a computer “learning” student behavior and then “thinking” as students would.

Math Model Replaces Invasive Kidney Biopsy for Lupus Patients

September 18, 2014 2:11 pm | by Emily Caldwell, Ohio State University | News | Comments

Mathematics might be able to reduce the need for invasive biopsies in patients suffering kidney...

StarDrop 5.5 Software Suite

September 16, 2014 3:15 pm | Product Releases | Comments

StarDrop 5.5 is a suite of software for guiding decisions in drug discovery, helping project...

NeuroSolutions Infinity

September 11, 2014 3:58 pm | Product Releases | Comments

NeuroSolutions Infinity predictive data analytics and modeling software is designed to...

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Both whales and dolphins have pelvic (hip) bones, evolutionary remnants from when their ancestors walked on land more than 40 million years ago. Common wisdom has long held that those bones are simply vestigial, slowly withering away like tailbones on hum

Whale Hip Bones are Still Useful for Something

September 9, 2014 10:32 am | by Robert Perkins, University of Southern California | News | Comments

Both whales and dolphins have pelvic (hip) bones, evolutionary remnants from when their ancestors walked on land more than 40 million years ago. Common wisdom has long held that those bones are simply vestigial. But new research flies directly in the face of that assumption, finding that not only do those pelvic bones serve a purpose, but their size and possibly shape are influenced by the forces of sexual selection.

A laser-based instrument being developed for the International Space Station will provide a unique 3-D view of Earth’s forests, helping to fill in missing information about their role in the carbon cycle.

Probe Studies Earth’s Forests in 3-D

September 9, 2014 9:58 am | by Elizabeth Zubritsky, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

A laser-based instrument being developed for the International Space Station will provide a unique 3-D view of Earth’s forests, helping to fill in missing information about their role in the carbon cycle.             

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is an area of environmental concern between Hawaii and California where the ocean surface is marred by scattered pieces of plastic. Scientists believe the garbage patch is but one of at least five, each located in the cente

Giant Garbage Patches Help Redefine Ocean Boundaries

September 5, 2014 11:25 am | by Catherine Meyers, American institute of Physics | News | Comments

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is an area of environmental concern between Hawaii and California where the ocean surface is marred by scattered pieces of plastic. Scientists believe the garbage patch is but one of at least five, each located in the center of large, circular ocean currents called gyres that suck in and trap floating debris.

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The Dreadnought of Dinosaurs

September 5, 2014 11:03 am | by Rachel Ewing, Drexel University | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered and described a new supermassive dinosaur species with the most complete skeleton ever found of its type. At 85 feet (26 m) long and weighing about 65 tons (59,300 kg) in life, Dreadnoughtus schrani is the largest land animal for which a body mass can be accurately calculated.

In the unlikely event of a volcanic supereruption at Yellowstone National Park, the northern Rocky Mountains would be blanketed in meters of ash, and millimeters would be deposited as far away as New York City, Los Angeles and Miami. An improved computer

Yellowstone Supereruption Would Cover North America in Ash

September 2, 2014 10:51 am | by American Geophysical Union | News | Comments

In the unlikely event of a volcanic supereruption at Yellowstone National Park, the northern Rocky Mountains would be blanketed in meters of ash, and millimeters would be deposited as far away as New York City, Los Angeles and Miami. An improved computer model finds that the hypothetical, large eruption would create a distinctive kind of ash cloud known as an umbrella, which expands evenly in all directions.

Touchscreens and solar cells rely on special oxide layers. However, errors in the layers’ atomic structure impair not only their transparency, but also their conductivity. Using atomic models, Fraunhofer researchers have found ways of identifying and remo

Simulations for Better Transparent Oxide Layers

September 2, 2014 9:49 am | by Fraunhofer | News | Comments

Touchscreens and solar cells rely on special oxide layers. However, errors in the layers’ atomic structure impair not only their transparency, but also their conductivity. Using atomic models, Fraunhofer researchers have found ways of identifying and removing these errors.

Sheepdogs use just two simple rules to round up large herds of sheep, scientists have discovered. The findings could lead to the development of robots that can gather and herd livestock, crowd control techniques, or new methods to clean up the environment

Sheepdogs Use Simple Rules to Herd Sheep

August 28, 2014 12:55 pm | by Swansea University | News | Comments

Sheepdogs use just two simple rules to round up large herds of sheep, scientists have discovered. The findings could lead to the development of robots that can gather and herd livestock, crowd control techniques, or new methods to clean up the environment.

The climate dataset is the first fine-scale work to correct for artificial trends within weather station data caused by changes in equipment or weather station locations. It also is the first to provide direct estimates of uncertainty and to provide open-

Improving Temperature Modeling across Mountainous Landscapes

August 21, 2014 4:28 pm | by University of Montana | News | Comments

New research by University of Montana doctoral student Jared Oyler provides improved computer models for estimating temperature across mountainous landscapes. Oyler provided a new climate dataset for ecological and hydrological research and natural resource management.

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Bain de Japonais Spring, an intertidal hydrothermal vent on Prony Bay. Courtesy of Roy Price, NASA

Our Ancestor’s Leaky Membrane answers Big Biology Questions

August 13, 2014 2:34 pm | by University College London | News | Comments

All life on Earth came from one common ancestor — a single-celled organism — but what it looked like, how it lived, and how it evolved into today’s modern cells is a four-billion-year-old mystery being solved by researchers using mathematical modeling. Findings suggest for the first time that life’s Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) had a ‘leaky’ membrane, which helps scientists answer two of biology’s biggest questions...

SOLIDWORKS Education Edition 2014-2015

SOLIDWORKS Education Edition 2014-2015

August 12, 2014 3:51 pm | Dassault Systems | Product Releases | Comments

SOLIDWORKS Education Edition 2014-2015 is an integrated applications portfolio that includes tools and enhancements designed to improve teacher efficiency, shorten student design processes, increase team collaboration and enable educational productivity across numerous areas.

This 3-D map shows how HCN molecules (made of hydrogen, carbon and nitrogen) are released from the nucleus of comet Lemmon and then spread evenly throughout the atmosphere, or coma. Similar maps revealed that HNC and formaldehyde are produced in the coma,

3-D Comet Study Reveals Chemical Factory at Work

August 12, 2014 12:05 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A NASA-led team of scientists has created detailed 3-D maps of the atmospheres surrounding comets, identifying several gases and mapping their spread at the highest resolution ever achieved. Almost unheard of for comet studies, the 3-D perspective provides deeper insight into which materials are shed from the nucleus of the comet and which are produced within the atmosphere, or coma.

Dr. Horst Punzmann (left) and Professor Michael Shats test their wave-generated tractor beam. Courtesy of Stuart Hay

Physicists Create Water Tractor Beam

August 11, 2014 12:57 pm | by Australian National University | News | Comments

Physicists have created a tractor beam on water, providing a radical new technique that could confine oil spills, manipulate floating objects or explain rips at the beach. The group discovered they can control water flow patterns with simple wave generators, enabling them to move floating objects at will. The new technique gives scientists a way of controlling things adrift on water in a way that resembles sci-fi tractor beams.

Sandia National Laboratories researchers Steve Plimpton, left, and Michael Gallis look at a projection of a model of the Russian MIR space station, which fell out of orbit several years ago and disintegrated, with the remains ending up at the bottom of th

Sophisticated 3-D Codes Yield Unprecedented Physics, Engineering Insights

August 6, 2014 4:43 pm | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

When the space shuttle Columbia disintegrated on re-entry in 2002, sophisticated computer models were key to determining what happened. A piece of foam flew off at launch and hit a tile, damaging the leading edge of the shuttle wing and exposing the underlying structure. Temperatures soared to thousands of degrees as Columbia plunged toward Earth at 27 times the speed of sound, said Gallis, who used NASA codes and Icarus for simulations...

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SystemModeler 4 Modeling and Simulation Tool

SystemModeler 4 Modeling and Simulation Tool

July 30, 2014 2:22 pm | Wolfram Research, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

SystemModeler 4 is a physical modeling and simulation environment for cyber-physical systems. Using drag-and-drop from a large selection of built-in and expandable modeling libraries, users can build multi-domain models of their complete system.

VisSim is a visual language for mathematical modeling, simulation and model-based embedded system development used by scientists and engineers.

Altair to Acquire Visual Solutions, Adds VisSim to Portfolio

July 30, 2014 2:01 pm | by Altair | News | Comments

Altair has announced its intent to acquire Visual Solutions, makers of VisSim, a visual language for mathematical modeling, simulation and model-based embedded system development used by scientists and engineers. The transaction is expected to close by the end of July 2014.

Simulink Real-Time

July 30, 2014 10:30 am | The Mathworks, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Simulink Real-Time enables engineers to build, test, and run real-time applications from Simulink models on dedicated target computer hardware connected to their physical systems, providing a complete end-to-end real-time simulation and testing solution.

Genes that are active only in the testes have double the harmful mutation rate of those that are active in both sexes. Courtesy of Archaeogenetics

Mutations from Venus, Mutations from Mars: A Sex-difference Approach to Harmful Mutation

July 28, 2014 5:36 pm | by Weizmann Institute of Science | News | Comments

Some 15 percent of adults suffer from fertility problems, many of these due to genetic factors. This is something of a paradox: We might expect such genes, which reduce an individual's ability to reproduce, to disappear from the population. Recent research may have solved the riddle. Not only can it explain the high rates of male fertility problems, it may open new avenues in understanding the causes of genetic diseases and their treatment.

Computer Models Reveal Quantum Effects in Biological Oxygen Transport

July 18, 2014 3:41 pm | by Trinity College | News | Comments

Physicists have created a unique combination of computer models, based on the theory of quantum mechanics, and applied them to a previously well-characterized protein found in muscle to develop a new picture of how biomolecules transport and store oxygen (O2). In doing so, the team has shown how the process of respiration, which is fundamental in humans and other vertebrates, exploits quantum mechanical effects working on tiny scales.

NASA Finds Friction from Tides Could Help Distant Earths Survive

July 15, 2014 4:28 pm | by Elizabeth Zubritsky, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

As anybody who has started a campfire by rubbing sticks knows, friction generates heat. Now, computer modeling by NASA scientists shows that friction could be the key to survival for some distant Earth-sized planets traveling in dangerous orbits. The findings are consistent with observations that Earth-sized planets appear to be very common in other star systems.

Chemists Discover Boron Buckyball

July 15, 2014 11:55 am | by Brown University | News | Comments

The discovery 30 years ago of soccer-ball-shaped carbon molecules called buckyballs helped to spur an explosion of nanotechnology research. Now, there appears to be a new ball on the pitch. Researchers have shown that a cluster of 40 boron atoms forms a hollow molecular cage similar to a carbon buckyball. It’s the first experimental evidence that a boron cage structure — previously only a matter of speculation — does indeed exist.

Astronomers Bring Third Dimension to Doomed Star's Outburst

July 11, 2014 4:31 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

In the middle of the 19th century, the massive binary system Eta Carinae underwent an eruption that ejected at least 10 times the sun's mass and made it the second-brightest star in the sky. Now, a team of astronomers has used extensive new observations to create the first high-resolution 3-D model of the expanding cloud produced by this outburst.

Hunt for Extraterrestrial Life Gets Massive Boost

July 7, 2014 3:34 pm | by University College London | News | Comments

A powerful new model to detect life on planets outside of our solar system, more accurately than ever before, has been developed by UCL researchers. The new model focuses on methane, the simplest organic molecule, widely acknowledged to be a sign of potential life.

A new mathematical model could help engineers control the formation of wrinkle, crease, and fold structures in a wide variety of materials.

How a Wrinkle Becomes a Crease

June 26, 2014 4:07 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

A new mathematical model could help engineers control the formation of wrinkle, crease, and fold structures in a wide variety of materials. It may also help scientists understand how these structures form in nature.         

Integrated circuit for a quantum computer with five quantum bits

Quantum Computers Boot Up 72 Times Faster

June 24, 2014 9:39 am | by AlphaGalileo | News | Comments

Theoretical physicists at Saarland University have developed a method that enables quantum computers to be powered up and running stably in just five minutes – something that took six hours to achieve previously. This huge time reduction has been achieved by making use of mathematical models.

Researchers from CCFE, EPCC and the Universities of York and Lund have made substantial recent optimizations for the well-known plasma turbulence code, GS2.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, EPCC at the University of Edinburgh, York Plasma Institute at the University of York, and Lund University

June 23, 2014 5:36 pm | Award Winners

Researchers from CCFE, EPCC and the Universities of York and Lund have made substantial recent optimizations for the well-known plasma turbulence code, GS2. This included a total rewrite of the routines that calculate the response matrices required by the code's implicit algorithm, which has significantly accelerated GS2’s initialization, typically by a factor over 10. 

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