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As the United States pursues the next generation of computing (exascale), new software-centered partnerships could be the key to maximizing economic benefits for Americans

Supporting America’s Economic Competitiveness: A Look at Federal Supercomputing Leadership

October 28, 2014 11:18 am | by Council on Competitiveness | News | Comments

The Council on Competitiveness has released a new report that explores the value of government leadership in supercomputing for industrial competitiveness, titled Solve. The Exascale Effect: the Benefits of Supercomputing Investment for U.S. Industry. As the federal government pursues exascale computing to achieve national security and science missions, Solve examines how U.S.-based companies also benefit from leading-edge computation

Mathematical Model Solves Decades-old Question: How Brain Remains Stable during Learning

October 22, 2014 11:06 am | by RIKEN | News | Comments

Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the...

State-of-the-Art Visualization Lab to Display Streaming Data in Real-Time

October 20, 2014 10:00 am | by IBM | News | Comments

The Jefferson Project announced new milestones in a multimillion-dollar collaboration that seeks...

Time Machine Reveals Global Precipitation Role in Major Weather Events

October 16, 2014 2:53 pm | by Michael Price, San Diego State University | News | Comments

During the 1930s, North America endured the Dust Bowl, a prolonged era of dryness that withered...

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Phylogenetic tree constructed with the BEAST software and built on a subset of both contemporary and ancient samples. Courtesy of Oxford University Press

Treasure Trove of Ancient Genomes Helps Recalibrate Human Evolutionary Clock

October 14, 2014 4:18 pm | by Molecular Biology and Evolution, Oxford University Press | News | Comments

To improve the modeling and reading of the branches on the human tree of life, researchers compiled the most comprehensive DNA set to date, a new treasure trove of 146 ancient (including Neanderthal and Denisovian) and modern human full mitochondrial genomes (amongst a set of 320 available worldwide).

Alaskan tundra is showing the effects of melting permafrost.

Shocking Results: Few Data, Urgent Need for more Arctic Carbon Measurements

October 13, 2014 12:32 pm | by Carol Rasmussen, NASA | News | Comments

As climate change grips the Arctic, how much carbon is leaving its thawing soil and adding to Earth's greenhouse effect? The question has long been debated by scientists. A new study conducted as part of NASA's Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) shows just how much work still needs to be done to reach a conclusion on this and other basic questions about the region where global warming is hitting hardest.

Crops growing in an Egyptian oasis, with the Pyramids of Giza in the background. Courtesy of Purdue University

Powerful Web-based Geospatial Data Project puts Major Issues on the Map

October 9, 2014 2:02 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Technology is putting complex topics like severe weather and climate change on the map — literally. Mapping data associated with specific geographic locations is a powerful way to glean new and improved knowledge from data collections and to explain the results to policymakers and the public. Particularly useful is the ability to layer different kinds of geospatial data on top of one another and see how they interact.

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A comparison of two weather forecast models for the New Jersey area. At left shows the forecast that doesn't distinguish local hazardous weather. At right shows the High Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) model that clearly depicts where local thunderstorms,

Weather Service Storm Forecasts Get More Localized

October 8, 2014 11:53 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The next time some nasty storms are heading your way, the National Weather Service says it will have a better forecast of just how close they could come to you. The weather service started using a new high-resolution computer model that officials say will dramatically improve forecasts for storms up to 15 hours in advance. It should better pinpoint where and when tornadoes, thunderstorms and blizzards are expected.

NASA satellite data of the marine environment will be used in prototype marine biodiversity observation networks to be established in four U.S. locations, including the Florida Keys, pictured here. Courtesy of USF/WHOI/MBARI/NASA

U.S. Initiates Prototype System to Gauge National Marine Biodiversity

October 7, 2014 3:43 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and NASA are funding three demonstration projects that will lay the foundation for the first national network to monitor marine biodiversity at scales ranging from microbes to whales. The U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) also plans to contribute.

In popular culture, mathematics is often deemed inaccessible or esoteric. Yet in the modern world, it plays an ever more important role in our daily lives and a decisive role in the discovery and development of new ideas — often behind the scenes.

At the Interface of Math and Science

October 1, 2014 3:44 pm | by Julie Cohen, UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

In popular culture, mathematics is often deemed inaccessible or esoteric. Yet in the modern world, it plays an ever more important role in our daily lives and a decisive role in the discovery and development of new ideas — often behind the scenes.

Mathematicians have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might

Adding Natural Uncertainty Improves Mathematical Models

September 30, 2014 3:39 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

Mathematicians have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might ultimately lead to mathematical models that better reflect the inherent uncertainties of the natural world.

Researchers have developed a scaling law that predicts a human’s risk of brain injury, based on previous studies of blasts’ effects on animal brains. The method may help the military develop more protective helmets, as well as aid clinicians in diagnosing

Modeling Shockwaves through the Brain

September 30, 2014 3:07 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a scaling law that predicts a human’s risk of brain injury, based on previous studies of blasts’ effects on animal brains. The method may help the military develop more protective helmets, as well as aid clinicians in diagnosing traumatic brain injury — often referred to as the “invisible wounds” of battle.

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This solar flare was shot with one of the cameras on the NASA SDO satellite on June 10, 2014. Courtesy of NASA/SDO

Solar Explosions inside a Computer: Predicting Solar Flares

September 25, 2014 4:30 pm | by Barbara Vonarburg, ETH | News | Comments

Strong solar flares can bring down communications and power grids on Earth. By demonstrating how these gigantic eruptions are caused, physicists are laying the foundations for future predictions. The shorter the interval between two explosions in the solar atmosphere, the more likely it is that the second flare will be stronger than the first one.

Computer modeling provides policymakers with essential information on such data as global sea surface temperatures related to specific currents. Image courtesy Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Developing the Most Advanced Earth System Computer Model Yet Created

September 25, 2014 4:16 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

With President Obama announcing climate-support initiatives at the 2014 United Nations Climate Summit, the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories are teaming with academia and the private sector to develop the most advanced climate and Earth system computer model yet created. For Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers, it is a welcome advance for an already vibrant high-performance computing community.

Dr. Silvestre Pinho is leading development of a computer model that accurately predicts how composite materials behave when damaged will make it easier to design lighter, more fuel-efficient aircraft.

New Computer Codes Aid Greener, Leaner Aircraft Design

September 24, 2014 4:31 pm | by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council | News | Comments

A computer model that accurately predicts how composite materials behave when damaged will make it easier to design lighter, more fuel-efficient aircraft. Innovative computer codes form the basis of a computer model that shows in unprecedented detail how an aircraft's composite wing, for instance, would behave if it suffered small-scale damage, such as a bird strike.

Richard Lamb, right, discusses artificial neural networks with WSU College of Education colleague Andy Cavagnetto.

Video Games could Dramatically Streamline Education Research

September 19, 2014 4:59 pm | by C. Brandon Chapman, Washington State University | News | Comments

“Seeking educational curriculum researchers. Humans need not apply.” A Washington State University professor has figured out a dramatically easier and more cost-effective way to do research on science curriculum in the classroom — and it could include playing video games. Called “computational modeling,” it involves a computer “learning” student behavior and then “thinking” as students would.

Researchers have developed a math model that can predict the progression from nephritis — kidney inflammation — to interstitial fibrosis, scarring in the kidney that current treatments cannot reverse. Courtesy of Piotr Michał Jaworski

Math Model Replaces Invasive Kidney Biopsy for Lupus Patients

September 18, 2014 2:11 pm | by Emily Caldwell, Ohio State University | News | Comments

Mathematics might be able to reduce the need for invasive biopsies in patients suffering kidney damage related to the autoimmune disease lupus. Researchers have developed a math model that can predict the progression from kidney inflammation to scarring in the kidney that current treatments cannot reverse.

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StarDrop 5.5 Software Suite

StarDrop 5.5 Software Suite

September 16, 2014 3:15 pm | Optibrium Ltd. | Product Releases | Comments

StarDrop 5.5 is a suite of software for guiding decisions in drug discovery, helping project teams quickly identify high-quality compounds. It works by evaluating complex data, which is often uncertain because of experimental variability or predictive error.

NeuroSolutions Infinity

NeuroSolutions Infinity

September 11, 2014 3:58 pm | Neurodimension, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

NeuroSolutions Infinity predictive data analytics and modeling software is designed to streamline data mining by automatically taking care of the entire data modeling process. It includes everything from accessing, cleaning and arranging data, to intelligently trying potential inputs, preprocessing and neural network architectures, to selecting the best neural network and verifying the results.

Both whales and dolphins have pelvic (hip) bones, evolutionary remnants from when their ancestors walked on land more than 40 million years ago. Common wisdom has long held that those bones are simply vestigial, slowly withering away like tailbones on hum

Whale Hip Bones are Still Useful for Something

September 9, 2014 10:32 am | by Robert Perkins, University of Southern California | News | Comments

Both whales and dolphins have pelvic (hip) bones, evolutionary remnants from when their ancestors walked on land more than 40 million years ago. Common wisdom has long held that those bones are simply vestigial. But new research flies directly in the face of that assumption, finding that not only do those pelvic bones serve a purpose, but their size and possibly shape are influenced by the forces of sexual selection.

A laser-based instrument being developed for the International Space Station will provide a unique 3-D view of Earth’s forests, helping to fill in missing information about their role in the carbon cycle.

Probe Studies Earth’s Forests in 3-D

September 9, 2014 9:58 am | by Elizabeth Zubritsky, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

A laser-based instrument being developed for the International Space Station will provide a unique 3-D view of Earth’s forests, helping to fill in missing information about their role in the carbon cycle.             

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is an area of environmental concern between Hawaii and California where the ocean surface is marred by scattered pieces of plastic. Scientists believe the garbage patch is but one of at least five, each located in the cente

Giant Garbage Patches Help Redefine Ocean Boundaries

September 5, 2014 11:25 am | by Catherine Meyers, American institute of Physics | News | Comments

The Great Pacific Garbage Patch is an area of environmental concern between Hawaii and California where the ocean surface is marred by scattered pieces of plastic. Scientists believe the garbage patch is but one of at least five, each located in the center of large, circular ocean currents called gyres that suck in and trap floating debris.

The Dreadnought of Dinosaurs

September 5, 2014 11:03 am | by Rachel Ewing, Drexel University | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered and described a new supermassive dinosaur species with the most complete skeleton ever found of its type. At 85 feet (26 m) long and weighing about 65 tons (59,300 kg) in life, Dreadnoughtus schrani is the largest land animal for which a body mass can be accurately calculated.

In the unlikely event of a volcanic supereruption at Yellowstone National Park, the northern Rocky Mountains would be blanketed in meters of ash, and millimeters would be deposited as far away as New York City, Los Angeles and Miami. An improved computer

Yellowstone Supereruption Would Cover North America in Ash

September 2, 2014 10:51 am | by American Geophysical Union | News | Comments

In the unlikely event of a volcanic supereruption at Yellowstone National Park, the northern Rocky Mountains would be blanketed in meters of ash, and millimeters would be deposited as far away as New York City, Los Angeles and Miami. An improved computer model finds that the hypothetical, large eruption would create a distinctive kind of ash cloud known as an umbrella, which expands evenly in all directions.

Touchscreens and solar cells rely on special oxide layers. However, errors in the layers’ atomic structure impair not only their transparency, but also their conductivity. Using atomic models, Fraunhofer researchers have found ways of identifying and remo

Simulations for Better Transparent Oxide Layers

September 2, 2014 9:49 am | by Fraunhofer | News | Comments

Touchscreens and solar cells rely on special oxide layers. However, errors in the layers’ atomic structure impair not only their transparency, but also their conductivity. Using atomic models, Fraunhofer researchers have found ways of identifying and removing these errors.

Sheepdogs use just two simple rules to round up large herds of sheep, scientists have discovered. The findings could lead to the development of robots that can gather and herd livestock, crowd control techniques, or new methods to clean up the environment

Sheepdogs Use Simple Rules to Herd Sheep

August 28, 2014 12:55 pm | by Swansea University | News | Comments

Sheepdogs use just two simple rules to round up large herds of sheep, scientists have discovered. The findings could lead to the development of robots that can gather and herd livestock, crowd control techniques, or new methods to clean up the environment.

The climate dataset is the first fine-scale work to correct for artificial trends within weather station data caused by changes in equipment or weather station locations. It also is the first to provide direct estimates of uncertainty and to provide open-

Improving Temperature Modeling across Mountainous Landscapes

August 21, 2014 4:28 pm | by University of Montana | News | Comments

New research by University of Montana doctoral student Jared Oyler provides improved computer models for estimating temperature across mountainous landscapes. Oyler provided a new climate dataset for ecological and hydrological research and natural resource management.

Bain de Japonais Spring, an intertidal hydrothermal vent on Prony Bay. Courtesy of Roy Price, NASA

Our Ancestor’s Leaky Membrane answers Big Biology Questions

August 13, 2014 2:34 pm | by University College London | News | Comments

All life on Earth came from one common ancestor — a single-celled organism — but what it looked like, how it lived, and how it evolved into today’s modern cells is a four-billion-year-old mystery being solved by researchers using mathematical modeling. Findings suggest for the first time that life’s Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) had a ‘leaky’ membrane, which helps scientists answer two of biology’s biggest questions...

SOLIDWORKS Education Edition 2014-2015

SOLIDWORKS Education Edition 2014-2015

August 12, 2014 3:51 pm | Dassault Systems | Product Releases | Comments

SOLIDWORKS Education Edition 2014-2015 is an integrated applications portfolio that includes tools and enhancements designed to improve teacher efficiency, shorten student design processes, increase team collaboration and enable educational productivity across numerous areas.

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