Advertisement
Modeling
Subscribe to Modeling

The Lead

Network Map of Influenza Correlations between HHS Regions. Nodes and ties created using GEPHI social network visualization software. Courtesy of the researchers

Forecasting the Flu: Big and Traditional Data Combo Improves Prediction

January 30, 2015 11:06 am | by Inga Kiderra, University of California, San Diego | News | Comments

Researchers say they can predict the spread of flu a week into the future with as much accuracy as Google Flu Trends can display levels of infection right now. The study uses social network analysis and combines the power of Google Flu Trends’ big data with traditional flu monitoring data from the CDC.

Building a Better Weather Forecast? Fine-scale Soil Moisture Data will Soon Help

January 29, 2015 12:50 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

If you were trying to forecast tomorrow's weather, you would probably look up at the sky rather...

SciNet Search Engine Helps Find Relevant, Diverse Results Faster

January 28, 2015 2:52 pm | by Alto University | News | Comments

A new search engine outperforms current ones, and helps people to do searches more efficiently....

Game Theory Explains Social Interactions of Cancer Cells

January 28, 2015 2:33 pm | by University of Basel | News | Comments

Researchers were able to predict the interactions of cancer cells using a part of game theory...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

A combination of the day-night band and high resolution infrared imagery from the NASA-NOAA's Suomi NPP satellite showed the historic blizzard near peak intensity as it moves over the New York through Boston Metropolitan areas at 06:45Z (1:45 a.m. EST) on

NASA Nighttime and Daytime Views of the Blizzard of 2015

January 28, 2015 2:07 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA and NOAA have provided nighttime and daytime views of the Blizzard of 2015. A combination of the day-night band and high-resolution infrared imagery showed the historic blizzard near peak intensity as it moves over the New York through Boston Metropolitan areas at 1:45 a.m. EST on January 27, 2015. Nighttime lights of the region were blurred by high cloud tops associated with the most intense parts of the storm.

Researchers have developed 3-D maps of the age of the ice within the Greenland Ice Sheet. The new research will help scientists determine what may happen to the ice sheet as the climate changes.

3-D View of Greenland Ice Sheet Opens Window on History

January 26, 2015 3:53 pm | by Jackson School of Geosciences | News | Comments

Scientists using ice-penetrating radar data collected by NASA’s Operation IceBridge and earlier airborne campaigns have built the first comprehensive map of layers deep inside the Greenland Ice Sheet, opening a window on past climate conditions and the ice sheet’s potentially perilous future. This allows scientists to determine the age of large swaths of the second largest mass of ice on Earth.

The researchers determined the networks of the active genes and — like a dragnet — looked for the "main perpetrators" using a computer model. Courtesy of Atramos

Computer Model Creates Dragnet for Epilepsy Genes

January 26, 2015 3:07 pm | by University of Bonn | News | Comments

Scientists have taken a new path in the research into causes of epilepsy: They determined the networks of the active genes and — like a dragnet — looked for the "main perpetrators" using a computer model. In doing so, they discovered the molecule sestrin-3 as a central switch. In animal models, the scientists were able to demonstrate that inhibition of sestrin-3 leads to a reduction in seizures.

Advertisement
The top image shows an office building that is to be remodeled. Below, a virtual image based on 3-D BIM data is superimposed. © Fraunhofer FIT

Virtual Reality Enables On-Site Visualization of Architectural Plans

January 14, 2015 11:50 am | by Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft | News | Comments

A new virtual reality system allows architects to view 3-D models of buildings in their intended shape, precisely where the buildings will be constructed. This provides a much clearer, realistic impression of the design. Digitization is fundamentally changing the work processes in architectural design, planning and construction work. Increasingly, CAD drawings are transferred to a central 3-D Building Information Model...

Terence Tao, a professor of mathematics at UCLA, is very interested in solving the Navier-Stokes equations, which are among the most difficult tackled by mathematicians. Understanding them could help with modeling weather, ocean currents, the flow of wate

Can Wave Equations Explode? Computer Algorithms may Provide the Answer

January 13, 2015 1:43 pm | by Marlene Cimons, National Science Foundation | News | Comments

Wave equations help describe waves of light, sound and water as they occur in physics. Also known as partial differential equations, they have valuable potential for predicting weather or earthquakes, or certain types of natural disasters. Tao is interested in the theoretical side of these equations, seeking to discover with computer algorithms whether they can behave in a way that typically is the opposite of what occurs in the real world.

The results show that, by mining Facebook Likes, the computer model was able to predict a person's personality more accurately than most of their friends and family.

AI: Computers Know the Real You Better than Friends, Family

January 13, 2015 10:01 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Researchers have found that, based on enough Facebook Likes, computers can judge your personality traits better than your friends, family and even your partner. Using a new algorithm, researchers have calculated the average number of Likes artificial intelligence (AI) needs to draw personality inferences about you as accurately as your partner or parents.

John Wass is a statistician based in Chicago, IL.

Book Review: Applied Bayesian Modelling, 2nd Edition

January 13, 2015 8:59 am | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

This is not a text for the novice. However, for those math/statistics aficionados, there is much to be had. The book’s great strength lies in two areas: the first is Peter Congdon’s generation of an excellent bibliography of the most modern techniques available, and the other is his (slightly) more straightforward explanations of the strengths and weaknesses of these techniques and suggestions for optimizing the results.

Visual-Environment 10.0

Visual-Environment 10.0

January 9, 2015 11:15 am | Esi Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

Visual-Environment 10.0 is a comprehensive simulation platform designed to enable the swift integration of calculations using the open source CFD modules of OpenFOAM. It allows engineers to accelerate preparation of most common CFD calculations, including airflow for external aerodynamics, internal airflow for underhood and climate control, and investigation of flow around rotating bodies.

Advertisement
 Using a new algorithm ECG map can help diagnose the location of cardiac disorder in a way which is better for the patients and more cost effective for health services. Courtesy of Meul

Electrocardiogram Algorithm Pinpoints exact Location of Heart Defects

January 8, 2015 3:15 pm | by Manchester University | News | Comments

A new technique to help surgeons find the exact location of heart defects could save lives, help them to treat patients more effectively and save health service cash. The development will allow non-invasive detection of the origin of heart problems and allow more effective treatment.

NOAA's supercomputer upgrades will provide more timely, accurate weather forecasts.

Environmental Intelligence: Significant Investment in Next-Gen Supercomputers to Improve Weather Forecasts

January 6, 2015 12:26 pm | by NOAA | News | Comments

NOAA has announced the next phase in the agency’s efforts to increase supercomputing capacity to provide more timely, accurate, reliable and detailed forecasts. By October 2015, the capacity of each of NOAA’s two operational supercomputers will jump to 2.5 petaflops, for a total of 5 petaflops — a nearly tenfold increase from the current capacity.

Two-dimensional slice showing, for scale parameter q=1  fm-1, the Minkowski space-time evolution at y=z=0 of the shear stress π^ςς=τ4πςς, for η¯=1/(4π)

Exact Solution to Model Big Bang, Quark Gluon Plasma Published

December 24, 2014 10:07 am | by Kent State University | News | Comments

Unlike in mathematics, it is rare to have exact solutions to physics problems. The first exact solution that describes a system expanding at relativistic velocities radially and longitudinally has been presented by researchers. It applies to a wide array of physics contexts and will help to better model galactic structure, supernova explosions and high-energy particle collisions, such as those studied at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN.

The massive damage caused by Typhoon Haiyan to Tacloban City in the Philippines inspired the development of an open-source mapping tool to expedite relief operations. © Tigeryan

Data Mining: Finding the Quickest Way to Disaster Sites

December 22, 2014 2:41 pm | by A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing | News | Comments

A new mapping tool makes preparing for natural disasters and responding to their aftermath easier than ever. Researchers from the A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing in Singapore have developed a computer model that analyzes networks of interconnected roads to predict the speediest routes for rescuers to take using real-time data uploaded by aid workers on the ground.

A team of MIT neuroscientists has found that some computer programs can identify the objects in these images just as well as the primate brain. Courtesy of the researchers

Deep Computer Neural Networks Catch Up to Primate Brain

December 18, 2014 4:53 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

For decades, neuroscientists have been trying to design computer networks that can mimic visual skills such as recognizing objects. Until now, no computer model has been able to match the primate brain at visual object recognition during a brief glance. However, a new study from MIT neuroscientists has found that one of the latest generation of these so-called “deep neural networks” matches the primate brain.

Advertisement
This simulation illustrates the total mass density (left) and temperature (right) of a dimethyl ether jet fuel simulation. It is a snapshot of the solution that corresponds to a physical time of 0.00006 seconds. Courtesy of Matthew Emmett, Weiqun Zhang

Optimized Algorithms Give Combustion Simulations a Boost

December 18, 2014 4:32 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Turbulent combustion simulations, which provide input to the design of more fuel-efficient combustion systems, have gotten their own efficiency boost. Researchers developed new algorithmic features that streamline turbulent flame simulations, which play an important role in designing more efficient combustion systems. They tested the enhanced code on the Hopper supercomputer and achieved a dramatic decrease in simulation times.

Simulated and observed annual maximum five-day accumulated precipitation over land points, averaged. Observations are calculated from the period 1979 to 1999. Model results are calculated from the period 1979 to 2005.

Global High-resolution Models Fuel New Golden Age of Climate Science

December 18, 2014 4:14 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Not long ago, it would have taken several years to run a high-resolution simulation on a global climate model. But using supercomputing resources at NERSC, climate scientist Michael Wehner was able to complete a run in just three months. What he found was that not only were the simulations much closer to actual observations, but the high-resolution models were far better at reproducing intense storms, such as hurricanes and cyclones.

SFU computer scientist Richard Zhang holds a Christmas tree, left, that was 3D-printed in the traditional manner, and the same tree, right, printed with assistance from a new algorithm he developed with Ph.D. student Ruizhen Hu. The Christmas tree on the

New Algorithm Prints with Zero Material Waste

December 16, 2014 11:09 am | by Diane Luckow, Simon Fraser University | News | Comments

Just in time for Christmas, Richard Zhang reveals how to print a 3-D Christmas tree efficiently and with zero material waste, using the world’s first algorithm for automatically decomposing a 3-D object into what are called pyramidal parts. The algorithm promises to become a big deal in the world of 3-D printing, and also has applications for designing molds and for casting.

Scientists have developed an ultrafast quantum chemical method, which allows rapid and accurate simulations of complex molecular systems consisting of thousands of molecules.

Cutting-up Molecules for Ultrafast Complex Molecular Simulations

December 8, 2014 5:38 pm | by Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM), Nagoya University | News | Comments

Scientists have developed an ultrafast quantum chemical method, which allows rapid and accurate simulations of complex molecular systems consisting of thousands of molecules.                     

An international competition using the wisdom of crowds has developed computer algorithms to detect, predict, and ultimately prevent epileptic seizures. A total of five-hundred and four teams competed in two challenges, one for Seizure Detection and a sec

Crowdsourcing Advances Epileptic Seizure Detection, Prediction

December 8, 2014 5:21 pm | by American Epilepsy Society | News | Comments

An international competition using the wisdom of crowds has developed computer algorithms to detect, predict, and ultimately prevent epileptic seizures. A total of five-hundred and four teams competed in two challenges, one for Seizure Detection and a second for Seizure Prediction.

Biological engineers have created a new computer model that allows them to design the most complex three-dimensional DNA shapes ever produced, including rings, bowls, and geometric structures such as icosahedrons that resemble viral particles.

Computer Model Enables Design of Complex DNA Shapes

December 3, 2014 3:45 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Biological engineers have created a new computer model that allows them to design the most complex three-dimensional DNA shapes ever produced, including rings, bowls, and geometric structures such as icosahedrons that resemble viral particles. 

El Niño is not a contemporary phenomenon; it’s long been the Earth’s dominant source of year-to-year climate fluctuation. But as the climate warms and the feedbacks that drive the cycle change, researchers want to know how El Niño will respond.

Modeling the Growing Strength of El Niño

December 1, 2014 4:27 pm | by Kelly April Tyrrell, University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

El Niño is not a contemporary phenomenon; it’s long been the Earth’s dominant source of year-to-year climate fluctuation. But as the climate warms and the feedbacks that drive the cycle change, researchers want to know how El Niño will respond.

In the latest issue of HPC Source, “A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to the Enterprise,” we look at how small- to-medium-sized manufacturers can realize major benefits from adoption of high performance computing in areas such as modeling, simulation and analysis.

HPC for All

November 21, 2014 4:32 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

In the latest issue of HPC Source, “A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to the Enterprise,” we look at how small- to-medium-sized manufacturers can realize major benefits from adoption of high performance computing in areas such as modeling, simulation and analysis.

Researchers have published the first research to use computational modeling to predict and identify the metabolic products of gastrointestinal (GI) tract microorganisms.

Computer Model Predicts Gut Metabolites to Better Understand GI Disease

November 20, 2014 3:30 pm | by Tufts University | News | Comments

Researchers have published the first research to use computational modeling to predict and identify the metabolic products of gastrointestinal (GI) tract microorganisms.                       

In an unexpected mashup of financial and mechanical engineering, researchers have discovered that the same modeling used to forecast fluctuations in the stock market can be used to predict aspects of animal behavior.

Stock Market Models Help Predict Animal Behavior

November 18, 2014 4:17 pm | by NYU School of Engineering | News | Comments

In an unexpected mashup of financial and mechanical engineering, researchers have discovered that the same modeling used to forecast fluctuations in the stock market can be used to predict aspects of animal behavior.         

Researchers from NCSU conducted innovative research analyzing the turbulence anisotropy as a function of distance from the wall based on DNS data.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: North Carolina State University

November 17, 2014 6:28 pm | Award Winners

Researchers from NCSU conducted innovative research that will allow better prediction of thermal hydraulic behavior for current and future nuclear reactor designs.

Researchers used HPC resources were utilized to run and visualize a breakthrough simulation involving a long-track EF5 tornado embedded within a supercell.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Central Michigan University

November 17, 2014 6:06 pm | Award Winners

Researchers used HPC resources were utilized to run and visualize a breakthrough simulation involving a long-track EF5 tornado embedded within a supercell.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading