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The massive damage caused by Typhoon Haiyan to Tacloban City in the Philippines inspired the development of an open-source mapping tool to expedite relief operations. © Tigeryan

Data Mining: Finding the Quickest Way to Disaster Sites

December 22, 2014 2:41 pm | by A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing | News | Comments

A new mapping tool makes preparing for natural disasters and responding to their aftermath easier than ever. Researchers from the A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing in Singapore have developed a computer model that analyzes networks of interconnected roads to predict the speediest routes for rescuers to take using real-time data uploaded by aid workers on the ground.

Deep Computer Neural Networks Catch Up to Primate Brain

December 18, 2014 4:53 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

For decades, neuroscientists have been trying to design computer networks that can mimic visual...

Optimized Algorithms Give Combustion Simulations a Boost

December 18, 2014 4:32 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Turbulent combustion simulations, which provide input to the design of more fuel-efficient...

Global High-resolution Models Fuel New Golden Age of Climate Science

December 18, 2014 4:14 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Not long ago, it would have taken several years to run a high-resolution simulation on a global...

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SFU computer scientist Richard Zhang holds a Christmas tree, left, that was 3D-printed in the traditional manner, and the same tree, right, printed with assistance from a new algorithm he developed with Ph.D. student Ruizhen Hu. The Christmas tree on the

New Algorithm Prints with Zero Material Waste

December 16, 2014 11:09 am | by Diane Luckow, Simon Fraser University | News | Comments

Just in time for Christmas, Richard Zhang reveals how to print a 3-D Christmas tree efficiently and with zero material waste, using the world’s first algorithm for automatically decomposing a 3-D object into what are called pyramidal parts. The algorithm promises to become a big deal in the world of 3-D printing, and also has applications for designing molds and for casting.

Scientists have developed an ultrafast quantum chemical method, which allows rapid and accurate simulations of complex molecular systems consisting of thousands of molecules.

Cutting-up Molecules for Ultrafast Complex Molecular Simulations

December 8, 2014 5:38 pm | by Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM), Nagoya University | News | Comments

Scientists have developed an ultrafast quantum chemical method, which allows rapid and accurate simulations of complex molecular systems consisting of thousands of molecules.                     

An international competition using the wisdom of crowds has developed computer algorithms to detect, predict, and ultimately prevent epileptic seizures. A total of five-hundred and four teams competed in two challenges, one for Seizure Detection and a sec

Crowdsourcing Advances Epileptic Seizure Detection, Prediction

December 8, 2014 5:21 pm | by American Epilepsy Society | News | Comments

An international competition using the wisdom of crowds has developed computer algorithms to detect, predict, and ultimately prevent epileptic seizures. A total of five-hundred and four teams competed in two challenges, one for Seizure Detection and a second for Seizure Prediction.

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Biological engineers have created a new computer model that allows them to design the most complex three-dimensional DNA shapes ever produced, including rings, bowls, and geometric structures such as icosahedrons that resemble viral particles.

Computer Model Enables Design of Complex DNA Shapes

December 3, 2014 3:45 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Biological engineers have created a new computer model that allows them to design the most complex three-dimensional DNA shapes ever produced, including rings, bowls, and geometric structures such as icosahedrons that resemble viral particles. 

El Niño is not a contemporary phenomenon; it’s long been the Earth’s dominant source of year-to-year climate fluctuation. But as the climate warms and the feedbacks that drive the cycle change, researchers want to know how El Niño will respond.

Modeling the Growing Strength of El Niño

December 1, 2014 4:27 pm | by Kelly April Tyrrell, University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

El Niño is not a contemporary phenomenon; it’s long been the Earth’s dominant source of year-to-year climate fluctuation. But as the climate warms and the feedbacks that drive the cycle change, researchers want to know how El Niño will respond.

In the latest issue of HPC Source, “A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to the Enterprise,” we look at how small- to-medium-sized manufacturers can realize major benefits from adoption of high performance computing in areas such as modeling, simulation and analysis.

HPC for All

November 21, 2014 4:32 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

In the latest issue of HPC Source, “A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to the Enterprise,” we look at how small- to-medium-sized manufacturers can realize major benefits from adoption of high performance computing in areas such as modeling, simulation and analysis.

Researchers have published the first research to use computational modeling to predict and identify the metabolic products of gastrointestinal (GI) tract microorganisms.

Computer Model Predicts Gut Metabolites to Better Understand GI Disease

November 20, 2014 3:30 pm | by Tufts University | News | Comments

Researchers have published the first research to use computational modeling to predict and identify the metabolic products of gastrointestinal (GI) tract microorganisms.                       

In an unexpected mashup of financial and mechanical engineering, researchers have discovered that the same modeling used to forecast fluctuations in the stock market can be used to predict aspects of animal behavior.

Stock Market Models Help Predict Animal Behavior

November 18, 2014 4:17 pm | by NYU School of Engineering | News | Comments

In an unexpected mashup of financial and mechanical engineering, researchers have discovered that the same modeling used to forecast fluctuations in the stock market can be used to predict aspects of animal behavior.         

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Researchers from NCSU conducted innovative research analyzing the turbulence anisotropy as a function of distance from the wall based on DNS data.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: North Carolina State University

November 17, 2014 6:28 pm | Award Winners

Researchers from NCSU conducted innovative research that will allow better prediction of thermal hydraulic behavior for current and future nuclear reactor designs.

Researchers used HPC resources were utilized to run and visualize a breakthrough simulation involving a long-track EF5 tornado embedded within a supercell.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Central Michigan University

November 17, 2014 6:06 pm | Award Winners

Researchers used HPC resources were utilized to run and visualize a breakthrough simulation involving a long-track EF5 tornado embedded within a supercell.

To heat fusion plasmas to the millions of degrees Celsius needed for fusion reactions scientists inject megawatts of electromagnetic energy from carefully engineered radiofrequency antennas. The generated electromagnetic waves interact with the fusion pla

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Tech-X Corporation

November 17, 2014 5:23 pm | Award Winners

To heat magnetically confined plasmas to the millions of degrees needed for fusion reactions, scientists inject megawatts of electromagnetic energy from carefully engineered radiofrequency antennas. The generated electromagnetic waves interact with the plasma in complex ways.

Devavrat Shah’s group at MIT’s Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (LIDS) specializes in analyzing how social networks process information. Next month, at the Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems, they’ll present a paper that ap

Algorithms Recommend Trial and Error

November 17, 2014 4:47 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Devavrat Shah’s group at MIT’s Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (LIDS) specializes in analyzing how social networks process information. Next month, at the Conference on Neural Information Processing Systems, they’ll present a paper that applies their model to the recommendation engines that are familiar from websites like Amazon and Netflix — with surprising results.

Steve Conway is Research VP, HPC at IDC.

Small and Medium Enterprises Enter the Limelight

November 14, 2014 11:43 am | by Steve Conway | Articles | Comments

A decade of close scrutiny has shed much more light on the technical computing needs of small and medium enterprises (SMEs), but they are still shrouded in partial darkness. That’s hardly surprising for a diverse global group with millions of members ranging from automotive suppliers and shotgun genomics labs to corner newsstands and strip mall nail salons.

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Radhika Kulkarni, Ph.D. is SAS Vice President for Advanced Analytics R&D, and a 2014 INFORMS Fellow.

Predictive Analytics: Harnessing Insights from Text and Network Data

November 14, 2014 10:44 am | by Radhika Kulkarni, Ph.D., SAS | Blogs | Comments

The predictive analytics landscape covers a wide variety of techniques and methods designed to derive insights from data. These techniques have been used successfully for many years on structured data. In recent times, the volume and variety of data available for analysis has exploded, and most of this data is in non-traditional forms.

A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to Smaller Manufacturers

HPC Source - A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to Smaller Manufacturers

November 13, 2014 3:43 pm | Digital Editions | Comments

Welcome to SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING's "Bringing HPC to Smaller Manufacturers" edition of HPC Source, an interactive publication devoted exclusively to coverage of high performance computing.

This diagram shows how researchers compute average traffic flows through a wider system of highways. Courtesy of the researchers

New Model Provides Accurate Traffic Flow Predictions

November 7, 2014 2:46 pm | by David L. Chandler, MIT | News | Comments

A reliable way of predicting the flow of traffic could be a great convenience for commuters, as well as a significant energy-saver. During an emergency evacuation following a natural disaster, reliable predictions of the best routes could even be a lifesaver. Now a team of researchers from MIT, the University of Notre Dame, and elsewhere has devised what they say is an effective and relatively simple formula for making such predictions.

COMSOL Multiphysics 5.0

COMSOL Multiphysics 5.0

November 4, 2014 1:59 pm | Comsol, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

COMSOL Multiphysics 5.0 is an interactive environment for modeling and simulating scientific and engineering problems. Any COMSOL Multiphysics model can be turned into an application with its own interface using the tools provided with the Application Builder desktop environment.

The 15 boxes in this image show the simulated intensity of spin excitations in 15 iron-based materials, including iron compounds that are high-temperature superconductors (images d–h). The x axis shows the momentum of the spin excitation in selected locat

Spin Dynamics: Computational Model Predicts Superconductivity

November 4, 2014 1:52 pm | by Katie Elyce Jones, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers studying iron-based superconductors are combining novel electronic structure algorithms with the high-performance computing power of the Department of Energy’s Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to predict spin dynamics, or the ways electrons orient and correlate their spins in a material.

Understanding cell transformation can help clinical researchers tackle medical problems. The images show how a growth factor caused cells to change forms and regroup from tight packs of epithelial cells to more mobile, loose arrays of mesenchymal cells —

Modeling Cancer: Researchers Prove Mathematical Models Can Predict Cellular Processes

October 30, 2014 5:08 pm | by Virginia Tech | News | Comments

How does a normal cellular process derail and become unhealthy? A multi-institutional, international team led by Virginia Tech researchers studied cells found in breast and other types of connective tissue and discovered new information about cell transitions that take place during wound healing and cancer.

As the United States pursues the next generation of computing (exascale), new software-centered partnerships could be the key to maximizing economic benefits for Americans

Supporting America’s Economic Competitiveness: A Look at Federal Supercomputing Leadership

October 28, 2014 11:18 am | by Council on Competitiveness | News | Comments

The Council on Competitiveness has released a new report that explores the value of government leadership in supercomputing for industrial competitiveness, titled Solve. The Exascale Effect: the Benefits of Supercomputing Investment for U.S. Industry. As the federal government pursues exascale computing to achieve national security and science missions, Solve examines how U.S.-based companies also benefit from leading-edge computation

Testing the new mathematical model in an animal during experimental ODP was necessary, so the teams decided to collaborate. The theory and experimental findings showed that fast Hebbian and slow homeostatic plasticity work together during learning, but on

Mathematical Model Solves Decades-old Question: How Brain Remains Stable during Learning

October 22, 2014 11:06 am | by RIKEN | News | Comments

Complex biochemical signals that coordinate fast and slow changes in neuronal networks keep the brain in balance during learning, according to scientists who report on a six-year quest by a collaborative team from the three institutions to solve a decades-old question and open the door to a more general understanding of how the brain learns and consolidates new experiences on dramatically different timescales.

Bathymetry image of Lake George: In 2014, a bathymetric and topographic survey conducted by boat and plane mapped the lake bed, shoreline and watershed. Now, within the data visualization center, scientists will be able to zoom in as close as half a meter

State-of-the-Art Visualization Lab to Display Streaming Data in Real-Time

October 20, 2014 10:00 am | by IBM | News | Comments

The Jefferson Project announced new milestones in a multimillion-dollar collaboration that seeks to understand and manage complex factors impacting Lake George. A new data visualization laboratory features advanced computing and graphics systems that allow researchers to visualize sophisticated models and incoming data on weather, runoff and circulation patterns. The lab will display streaming data from various sensors in real-time.

Prescribed oceanic patterns are useful for predicting large weather anomalies. Prolonged dry or wet spells over certain regions can reliably tell you whether, for instance, North America will undergo an oceanic weather pattern such as the El Nino or La Ni

Time Machine Reveals Global Precipitation Role in Major Weather Events

October 16, 2014 2:53 pm | by Michael Price, San Diego State University | News | Comments

During the 1930s, North America endured the Dust Bowl, a prolonged era of dryness that withered crops and dramatically altered where the population settled. Land-based precipitation records from the years leading up to the Dust Bowl are consistent with the telltale drying-out period associated with a persistent dry weather pattern, but they can’t explain why the drought was so pronounced and long-lasting.

Phylogenetic tree constructed with the BEAST software and built on a subset of both contemporary and ancient samples. Courtesy of Oxford University Press

Treasure Trove of Ancient Genomes Helps Recalibrate Human Evolutionary Clock

October 14, 2014 4:18 pm | by Molecular Biology and Evolution, Oxford University Press | News | Comments

To improve the modeling and reading of the branches on the human tree of life, researchers compiled the most comprehensive DNA set to date, a new treasure trove of 146 ancient (including Neanderthal and Denisovian) and modern human full mitochondrial genomes (amongst a set of 320 available worldwide).

Alaskan tundra is showing the effects of melting permafrost.

Shocking Results: Few Data, Urgent Need for more Arctic Carbon Measurements

October 13, 2014 12:32 pm | by Carol Rasmussen, NASA | News | Comments

As climate change grips the Arctic, how much carbon is leaving its thawing soil and adding to Earth's greenhouse effect? The question has long been debated by scientists. A new study conducted as part of NASA's Carbon in Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE) shows just how much work still needs to be done to reach a conclusion on this and other basic questions about the region where global warming is hitting hardest.

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