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COMSOL 5.1 Multiphysics Modeling Software

COMSOL 5.1 Multiphysics Modeling Software

April 17, 2015 12:52 pm | Comsol, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

COMSOL 5.1 is a major upgrade that delivers new and enhanced functionality across all products, including COMSOL Multiphysics and the Application Builder and COMSOL Server, as well as the add-on modules. Among the significant updates are enhancements to numerous core modeling and simulation capabilities and an improved user experience for application design.

How Twitter Can Help Predict Emergency Room Visits

April 16, 2015 12:16 pm | by Alexis Blue, University of Arizona | News | Comments

A predictive model using machine learning algorithms is able to predict with 75 percent accuracy...

How Do 'Black' Auroras Do That

April 15, 2015 4:23 pm | by David Callahan, KTH The Royal Institute of Technology | News | Comments

While our understanding of how the aurora's shimmering curtains of color are formed, scientists...

Protecting Nature on the Fly

April 15, 2015 3:16 pm | by Vienna University of Technology | News | Comments

Simply declaring a region as a nature protection area is not enough, regular monitoring of its...

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Most recent advances in artificial intelligence are the result of machine learning, in which computers are turned loose on huge data sets to look for patterns. To make machine-learning applications easier to build, computer scientists have begun developin

Probabilistic Programming Squeezes Code to Create Intuitive Modeling

April 13, 2015 3:03 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Most recent advances in artificial intelligence are the result of machine learning, in which computers are turned loose on huge data sets to look for patterns. To make machine-learning applications easier to build, computer scientists have begun developing so-called probabilistic programming languages, which let researchers mix and match machine-learning techniques that have worked well in other contexts.  

One of the new drones of the UZH research group Courtesy of UZH

New Technology Making Drones Safer and Smarter

April 8, 2015 3:27 pm | by University of Zurich | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of Zurich have unveiled new technology enabling drones to recover stable flight from any position and land autonomously in failure situations. It will even be possible to launch drones by simply tossing them into the air like a baseball or recover stable flight after a system failure. Drones will be safer and smarter, with the ability to identify safe landing sites and land automatically when necessary.

The future of tropical rainforests in the Amazon and worldwide is the focus of a new research project that combines field experiments and predictive modeling.

Study Combines Field Experiments, Predictive Modeling to Look at How Forests Worldwide Respond to Climate Change

April 7, 2015 5:09 pm | by Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers from the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory will play key roles in an expansive new project that aims to bring the future of tropical forests and the climate system into much clearer focus by coupling field research with the development of a new ecosystem model.

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We can now use a very fast and biologically relevant computational model to study deforming structures of the clots growing in blood flow. The new model may be adapted to study clot formation in blood vessels, which can pose the risk of detaching and migr

Simulating Biofilm Mechanical Behavior Aids Blood Clotting Studies

April 1, 2015 11:47 am | by Gene Stowe, University of Notre Dame | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new computational model that effectively simulates the mechanical behavior of biofilms. Their model may lead to new strategies for studying a range of issues from blood clots to waste treatment systems. The new model may be adapted to study clot formation in blood vessels, which can pose the risk of detaching and migrating to the lungs, a fatal event.

In New York City, Manju Malkani, IBM analytics consultant, and Paul Walsh, Vice President of Weather Analytics at The Weather Company, access real-time weather data through IBM Watson Analytics.

The Weather Company Migrates Data Services to IBM Cloud, Plans to Advance Internet of Things Solutions

March 31, 2015 1:43 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM and The Weather Company have announced a global strategic alliance to integrate real-time weather insights into business to improve operational performance and decision-making. As part of the alliance, The Weather Company, including its global B2B division WSI, will shift its massive weather data services platform to the IBM Cloud and integrate its data with IBM analytics and cloud services.

A view of South America's forest cover from the new hybrid global forest map, viewed via the Geo-Wiki platform. Courtesy of IIASA, Geo-Wiki, Google Earth

Citizen Scientists Map Global Forests with Unprecedented Accuracy

March 31, 2015 11:34 am | by International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) | News | Comments

New global forest maps combine citizen science with multiple data sources, for an unprecedented level of accuracy about the location and extent of forestland worldwide. The maps rely on a combination of recent multisensory remote sensing data, statistics and crowdsourcing. By combining different data sources, and incorporating the input of trained citizen scientists, researchers were able to produce maps more accurate than any existing...

MOVIA Big Data Analytics Platform

MOVIA Big Data Analytics Platform

March 30, 2015 1:38 pm | by Modus Operandi, Inc. | Modus Operandi, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

MOVIA Big Data Analytics Platform is designed to help organizations watch for important patterns in their data and generate instant alerts to users or other systems. The software enables improved prediction of trends through advanced data modeling that captures situational context, so decisions are not ‘made in a vacuum.’

Dr. Jurgen Kohler, Head of NVH CAE and Vehicle Concepts, Daimler AG

Dr. Jurgen Kohler

March 27, 2015 2:35 pm | Biographies

Jürgen Kohler studied Aerospace Engineering at the University of Stuttgart. In 1992 he started his career at the Mercedes Benz AG and became Manager of Crash-Simulation in 1997. From 2001 to 2005 he was Senior Manager for CAE Passive Safety, Durability and NVH, from 2006 to 2010 for CAE Passive Safety, Durability and Stiffness CAE and Test

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The Living Heart Project’s goal is to enable creation of a customized 3-D heart.

Highly Realistic Human Heart Simulations Transforming Medical Care

March 26, 2015 5:03 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Articles | Comments

The World Health Organization reports that cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death globally. Working to address this imperative public health problem, researchers world-wide are seeking new ways to accelerate research, raise the accuracy of diagnoses and improve patient outcomes. Several initiatives have utilized ground-breaking new simulations to advance research into aspects such as rhythm disturbances and ...

Wolfram SystemModeler 4.1

Wolfram SystemModeler 4.1

March 26, 2015 9:27 am | Wolfram Research, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Wolfram SystemModeler 4.1 is a modeling and simulation environment for cyber-physical systems used in industries such as aerospace, automotive, pharmaceuticals, systems biology and electrical engineering. Key features include integration of Mathematica's complete suite for reliability analysis; import from tools such as Simulink, Flowmaster and IBM Rational Rhapsody enabled based on the FMI standard; and import of subsystems.

The simulations reveal insights into the physics of vortex shedding and VIM at different length and time scales. The immediate benefits include the improved process for design optimization for large floating structures, and possible strategies for vortex-

Numerical Simulations Improve Offshore Drill Rig Safety

March 24, 2015 2:33 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

Los Alamos National Laboratory mechanical and thermal engineering researchers’ efforts to solve the complex problem of how ocean currents affect the infrastructure of floating oil rigs and their computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations received recognition from ANSYS, a company that provides computer-based engineering simulation capabilities.

, Dr. Jürgen Kohler, the head of NVH CAE and Vehicle Concepts at Daimler AG, will talk about “High-Performance Computing – Highly Efficient Development – Mercedes-Benz Cars” at the opening keynote at this year’s ISC High Performance conference.

ISC 2015 Keynotes will focus on Latest Innovation and Future Challenges

March 20, 2015 12:08 pm | by ISC | News | Comments

World-renowned for automotive quality and safety, Daimler’s Mercedes-Benz cars are also highly innovative. To share the inside story, Dr. Jürgen Kohler, the head of NVH CAE and Vehicle Concepts at Daimler AG, will talk about “High-Performance Computing – Highly Efficient Development – Mercedes-Benz Cars” at the opening keynote at this year’s ISC High Performance conference.

Life reconstruction of Carnufex carolinensis. Copyright Jorge Gonzales

Before Dinosaurs, Carolina Butcher was Top Beast of Prey

March 20, 2015 10:26 am | by North Carolina State University | News | Comments

A newly discovered crocodilian ancestor may have filled one of North America's top predator roles before dinosaurs arrived on the continent. The "Carolina Butcher" was a nine-foot-long, land-dwelling crocodylomorph that walked on its hind legs and likely preyed upon smaller inhabitants of North Carolina ecosystems, such as armored reptiles and early mammal relatives.

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TeleGeography’s Submarine Cable Map has been updated for 2015. The latest edition depicts 299 cable systems that are currently active, under construction, or expected to be fully-funded by the end of 2015. Courtesy of TeleGeography

Whimsical Map Depicts All Undersea Telecommunication Cables Currently Crossing World’s Oceans

March 18, 2015 3:27 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

This year’s Submarine Cable Map pays tribute to pioneering mapmakers of the Age of Discovery, incorporating elements of medieval and renaissance cartography. In addition to serving as navigational aids, maps from this era were works of art, often adorned with fanciful illustrations of real and imagined dangers. TeleGeography’s 2015 map brings back the lost design aesthetic to provide a view of the network through the lens of a bygone era.

Monocytes are immune cells present in the blood. They are consequently also found in tumors. In this setting, monocytes are known to promote the development of the tumoral blood vessels and to suppress the immune response directed at the tumor. Courtesy o

Mathematics Yields New Possibilities for Reprogramming Immune Response to Breast Cancer

March 17, 2015 2:55 pm | by Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics | News | Comments

A means of reprogramming a flawed immune response into an efficient anti-tumoral one was brought to light by the results of a translational trial relating to breast cancer. Thanks to the innovative combination of mathematical modeling and experimentation, only 20 tests were necessary, whereas traditional experimentation would have required 596 tests to obtain the same results.

Simulink 8.5 (R2015a) Block Diagram Environment

Simulink 8.5 (R2015a) Block Diagram Environment

March 16, 2015 9:52 am | The Mathworks, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Simulink is a block diagram environment for multidomain simulation and model-based design. It supports simulation, automatic code generation, and continuous test and verification of embedded systems. The MATLAB add-on provides a graphical editor, customizable block libraries and solvers for modeling and simulating dynamic systems.

Smoke simulation -- Courtesy of T. Kim/ N. Thuerey/ M. Gross/ D. James, TUM

Simulating a Perfectly Animated Smoke Cloud

March 13, 2015 9:52 am | by Technische Universität München | News | Comments

The attack takes place at the climax of the blockbuster Avatar: Rockets slam into the Pandora inhabitants’ homeland tree. Explosions, flames and thick clouds of smoke appear on the screen. To keep the audience pinned to the edge of their seats, the images must be realistic. But the simulation of physical processes is especially tough to implement. This includes representation of liquids and gasses, which fall into the category of fluids. 

This June 28, 2009 image provided by NASA, taken by the international Cassini spacecraft, shows Enceladus, one of Saturn’s moons. A new study suggests there are ongoing interactions between hot water and rocks beneath the surface of the icy moon. (AP Phot

Hunt for Alien Life: Do Hot Springs Bubble beneath the Ice of Saturn Moon?

March 12, 2015 2:44 pm | by Alicia Chang, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

New research suggests there are hot springs bubbling beneath the icy surface of a tiny Saturn moon. If confirmed, it would make the moon Enceladus (ehn-SEHL'-uh-duhs) the only other known body in the solar system besides Earth where hot water and rocks interact underground. That activity would make the moon an even more attractive place in the hunt for microbial life.

Researchers have been running large-scale experiments on the Internet, where people of any age can become research subjects. Their websites feature cognitive tests designed to be completed in just a few minutes. Shown here is a "pattern completion test" f

The Rise and Fall of Cognitive Skills: Different Parts of the Brain Work Best at Different Ages

March 9, 2015 3:59 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Scientists have long known that our ability to think quickly and recall information, also known as fluid intelligence, peaks around age 20 and then begins a slow decline. However, more recent findings, including a new study from neuroscientists at MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), suggest that the real picture is much more complex.

When it comes to boiling water—or the phenomenon of applying heat to a liquid until it transitions to a gas—is there anything left for today’s scientists to study? The surprising answer is, yes, quite a bit.

Mathematicians Model Fluids at Mesoscale

March 6, 2015 3:52 pm | by Julie Chao, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

When it comes to boiling water—or the phenomenon of applying heat to a liquid until it transitions to a gas—is there anything left for today’s scientists to study? The surprising answer is, yes, quite a bit. 

An international team of researchers have developed a new way to measure the forces inside materials such as sand, soil or snow under pressure.

3D Imaging Exposes Clogs, Jams, Avalanches, Earthquakes

March 5, 2015 11:23 am | by Robin A. Smith, Duke University | News | Comments

An international team of researchers have developed a new way to measure the forces inside materials such as sand, soil or snow under pressure.

Researchers have assembled the largest and most accurate tree of life calibrated to time. Surprisingly, it reveals that life has been expanding at a constant rate, not slowing down.

Tree of Life Shows Clocklike Emergence of New Species

March 5, 2015 10:04 am | by Joseph Caspermeyer, Temple University | News | Comments

Researchers have assembled the largest and most accurate tree of life calibrated to time. Surprisingly, it reveals that life has been expanding at a constant rate, not slowing down.

Analysis of data from the Kepler space telescope has shown that roughly half of the dayside of the exoplanet Kepler-7b is covered by a large cloud mass. Statistical comparison of more than 1,000 atmospheric models show that these clouds are most likely ma

Cloudy, with a High of 1,700 Kelvins: Analyzing Clouds around Exoplanets

March 3, 2015 4:25 pm | by Helen Knight, MIT | News | Comments

Meteorologists sometimes struggle to accurately predict the weather here on Earth, but now we can find out how cloudy it is on planets outside our solar system. MIT Researchers describe a technique that analyzes data from NASA’s Kepler space observatory to determine the types of clouds on planets that orbit other stars. Their models indicate that the clouds on Kepler-7b are most likely made from liquid rock.

Familiar crowd patterns emerged from the new simulations: people walking on an on-coming collision course veer well in advance, but people traveling in the same direction tend to walk close together. Courtesy of Yoshikazu Takada

Predicting Human Crowds with Statistical Physics

March 3, 2015 10:36 am | by American Physical Society | News | Comments

For the first time, researchers have directly measured a general law of how pedestrians interact in a crowd. This law can be used to create realistic crowds in virtual reality games and to make public spaces safer. People intuitively know how to navigate through crowds in a way that both minimizes distance traveled and avoids collisions. But the 'force' that governs human interactions has been previously unknown.

Colorized scanning electron micrograph of filamentous Ebola virus particles (green) attached to and budding from a chronically infected VERO E6 cell (blue) (25,000x magnification). Courtesy of NIAID

Combatting the World’s Deadliest Ebola Outbreak

March 2, 2015 4:37 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that the 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest in history, affecting multiple countries in West Africa. As of February 26, 2015, the CDC had tracked 23,816 cases, and Ebola had already claimed nearly 10,000 lives. 

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