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The EYR-Global program, sponsored by 12 leading national research and education networks representing the Americas, Asia-Pacific and Europe, was patterned after SURFnet’s successful national Enlighten Your Research competition in the Netherlands and repre

Enhancing Global Network Connectivity: EYR-Global International Data Project Submissions due June 7

May 27, 2015 12:28 pm | by SC15 | News | Comments

Scientists whose research projects would significantly benefit from enhanced global network connectivity are invited to submit a project proposal to 2015 Enlighten Your Research Program Global (EYR-Global). The deadline is June 7. The EYR-Global program represents an important step forward in helping researchers in all fields to incorporate advanced global research networks to significantly improve discoveries and collaboration.

Playing Graphics-intensive Fast-Action Games in the Cloud without Guzzling Gigabytes

May 21, 2015 9:50 am | by Duke University | News | Comments

Gamers might one day be able to enjoy the same graphics-intensive fast-action video games they...

Age of Wearable Computing Delivers BioStamp Electronic Skin

May 20, 2015 3:32 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

MC10  is developing a technology that will allow digital circuits to be embedded in bendable,...

New Technology could Fundamentally Change Future Wireless Communications

May 20, 2015 2:06 pm | by University of Bristo | News | Comments

Radio systems, such as mobile phones and wireless Internet connections, have become an integral...

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Optibit took home both grand prizes from the 2015 MIT Clean Energy Prize. Shown here are (from left) Optibit team members Mark Wade and Alex Wright; Penni McLean Conner of Eversource; and Optibit team member Chen Sun. Courtesy of Michael Fein

Optical-chips Team Develops Way to Integrate Fiber Optics into Computer Chips

May 14, 2015 2:09 pm | by Rob Matheson, MIT | News | Comments

A team that aims to drastically boost the efficiency of computing with silicon chips took home both grand prizes at MIT’s CEP competition. They developed a way to integrate fiber optics — glass or plastic components that can transmit data using light waves — into computer chips, replacing copper wires that rely on electricity. Using light can drop energy usage about 95 percent in chip-to-chip communications and increase bandwidth tenfold.

In future telerobotic procedures, the last communication link may be a wireless uplink (dotted lines) to a drone or satellite that is more easily hacked than pre-established network connections (solid lines.) Courtesy of University of Washington

Researchers hack Teleoperated Surgical Robot to Reveal Security Flaws

May 8, 2015 10:48 am | by Jennifer Langston, University of Washington | News | Comments

To make cars as safe as possible, we crash them into walls to pinpoint weaknesses and better protect people who use them. That’s the idea behind a series of experiments conducted by an engineering team who hacked a next-gen teleoperated surgical robot — one used only for research purposes — to test how easily a malicious attack could hijack remotely-controlled operations in the future and to make those systems more secure.

Innovation Boosts Wi-Fi Bandwidth Tenfold

Innovation Boosts Wi-Fi Bandwidth Tenfold

April 22, 2015 2:22 pm | by Oregon State University | News | Comments

Researchers have invented a new technology that can increase the bandwidth of WiFi systems by 10 times, using LED lights to transmit information. The technology could be integrated with existing WiFi systems to reduce bandwidth problems in crowded locations, such as airport terminals or coffee shops, and in homes where several people have multiple WiFi devices.

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Leo Reiter is a cloud computing pioneer who has been designing, developing, and evangelizing large scale, on demand systems and technologies since the mid-1990s. Currently, Leo serves as Chief Technology Officer of Nimbix, Inc., a global provider of High

Big Data is Driving HPC to the Cloud

April 21, 2015 2:09 pm | by Leo Reiter, CTO, Nimbix, Inc. | Blogs | Comments

For many computationally-intensive applications, such as simulation, seismic processing and rendering, overall speed is still the name of the game. However, new branch of HPC is gaining momentum. IDC calls it “High Performance Data Analysis” (HPDA for short). Essentially, it’s the union of big data and HPC. How will these architectures evolve? Let’s start by looking at the data.

New protocol a major step toward enabling international quantum communications networks over existing optical infrastructure.

Quantum Cryptography at the Speed of Light: First All-photonic Repeaters enable Quantum Teleportation

April 16, 2015 12:53 pm | by Marit Mitchell, University of Toronto | News | Comments

Imagine having your MRI results sent directly to your phone, with no concern over the security of your private health data. Or knowing your financial information was safe on a server halfway around the world. Or sending highly sensitive business correspondence, without worrying that it would fall into the wrong hands.

Tri-TON, an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) that U.S. and Japanese researchers will use for the real-time verification of their search olfactory algorithms. Courtesy of Tamer Zaki, Johns Hopkins University

U.S., Japan Bring Big Data and Data Analytics to Disaster Response

March 31, 2015 12:29 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

When disaster strikes, it is critical that experts, decision makers and emergency personnel have access to real-time information in order to assess the situation and respond appropriately. It is equally critical that individuals and organizations have the capacity to analyze the wealth of data generated in the midst of the disaster and its immediate aftermath in order to produce accurate, customized warnings.

“The things I do for my housemates' downloading habit…” Maths by Sergey Nivens

How a Long-dead Mathematician called Maxwell can Speed up your Internet

March 30, 2015 1:48 pm | by Jason Cole, Imperial College London | Articles | Comments

Electromagnetic radiation – it might sound like something that you’d be better off avoiding, but electromagnetic waves of various kinds underpin our senses and how we interact with the world – from the light emissions through which your eyes perceive these words, to the microwaves that carry the Wi-Fi signal to your laptop or phone on which you’re reading it.

Kettering University students participating in a community cleanup along University Avenue in front of Atwood Stadium in Flint, MI. Technologies made possible through US Ignite partnership will benefit many institutions along Flint's University Avenue Cor

Igniting Change in Vehicle City: High-speed Networking brings Game-changing Capabilities

March 27, 2015 11:09 am | by NSF | News | Comments

Flint, MI, the former home of General Motors, is on the rebound these days. Leaders there believe they have hit on a winning formula — connecting the city's institutions to high-speed networks that support new, game-changing capabilities. Through grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the U.S. Department of Justice (DoJ), Flint is beginning to lay the groundwork for an information technology-driven transformation.

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The 2015 Ethernet Roadmap provides practical guidance to the development of Ethernet, and offers an in-depth look at Ethernet’s accelerating evolution and expansion in four key areas: consumer and residential; enterprise and campus; hyperscale data center

Ethernet Alliance Unveils Detailed Roadmap

March 25, 2015 1:57 pm | by Ethernet Alliance | News | Comments

The Ethernet Alliance, a global consortium dedicated to the continued success and advancement of Ethernet technologies, has released the 2015 Ethernet Roadmap. The first-ever publicly available industry roadmap will outline the ongoing development and evolution of Ethernet through the end of the decade. Ethernet, the world’s most widely adopted networking technology, saw a period of rapid change and diversification in 2014.

Kuebler and his students used direct laser writing, a kind of nanoscale 3-D printing, to create the miniature lattices. The team then ran light beams through the lattices and confirmed that they could flow light without loss through turns that are twice a

New Light-bending Record Critical for Next-gen Supercomputing

March 24, 2015 1:32 pm | by University of Central Florida | News | Comments

A device resembling a plastic honeycomb yet much smaller than a bee’s stinger can steer light beams around tighter curves than ever before possible, while keeping the integrity and intensity of the beam intact. The work introduces a more effective way to transmit data rapidly on electronic circuit boards by using light.

Future quantum technologies promise to deliver secure communications and superfast computing applications. Courtesy of NASA/Sonoma State University/Aurore Simonnet

Fastest-ever Quantum Switch achieved with Silicon

March 23, 2015 11:17 am | by University of Surrey | News | Comments

Research has demonstrated laser control of quantum states in an ordinary silicon wafer and observation via a conventional electrical measurement. The findings mark a crucial step toward future quantum technologies, which promise to deliver secure communications and superfast computing. The team demonstrated a quantum on/off switching time of about a millionth of a millionth of a second — over a thousand times faster than previous attempts

Smart grids — power grids that adapt to changes in demand and reconfigure as needed to avoid overloads and other problems — can reduce energy costs, help avoid blackouts and deter cyber attacks. They also pose new challenges. A team led by researchers at

Developing Smarter Smart Grids

March 20, 2015 11:11 am | by NSF | News | Comments

Smart grids help avoid blackouts and deter cyber attacks. They also pose new challenges. As power generation — and the communication and information processing associated with it — shifts from centralized power stations to distributed, heterogeneous systems, massive amounts of sensor data from stations must be transmitted efficiently and effectively analyzed in real time.

The OpenPOWER Foundation which is a collaboration of technologists encouraging the adoption of an open server architecture for computer data centers has grown to more than 110 businesses, organizations and individuals across 22 countries.

10 New OpenPOWER Foundation Solutions Unveiled

March 19, 2015 3:19 pm | by OpenPOWER Foundation | News | Comments

The OpenPOWER Foundation has announced more than 10 hardware solutions — spanning systems, boards and cards, and a new microprocessor customized for China. Built collaboratively by OpenPOWER members, the new solutions exploit the POWER architecture to provide more choice, customization and performance to customers, including hyperscale data centers. 

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Nonlinear metamaterials, which possess physical capabilities not found in nature, may be the building blocks that allow major companies like IBM and Intel to move from electronic to optical computing.

Novel Nanoscale Metamaterial is Breaking Digital Connectivity Barriers

March 19, 2015 2:26 pm | by American Friends of Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

From computers, tablets and smartphones to cars, homes and public transportation, our world is more digitally connected every day. The technology required to support the exchange of massive quantities of data is critical. That's why scientists are intent on developing faster computing units capable of supporting much larger amounts of data transfer and data processing. New optical materials could serve as the nuts and bolts of future ...

TeleGeography’s Submarine Cable Map has been updated for 2015. The latest edition depicts 299 cable systems that are currently active, under construction, or expected to be fully-funded by the end of 2015. Courtesy of TeleGeography

Whimsical Map Depicts All Undersea Telecommunication Cables Currently Crossing World’s Oceans

March 18, 2015 3:27 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

This year’s Submarine Cable Map pays tribute to pioneering mapmakers of the Age of Discovery, incorporating elements of medieval and renaissance cartography. In addition to serving as navigational aids, maps from this era were works of art, often adorned with fanciful illustrations of real and imagined dangers. TeleGeography’s 2015 map brings back the lost design aesthetic to provide a view of the network through the lens of a bygone era.

Mellanox Multi-Host

Mellanox Multi-Host

March 17, 2015 2:06 pm | Mellanox Technologies, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Mellanox Multi-Host is designed to provide flexibility and savings in building next-generation, scalable Cloud, Web 2.0 and high-performance data centers. The technology enables designing and building new scale-out heterogeneous compute and storage racks with direct connectivity between compute elements, storage elements and the network.

CoSMIC (Columbia high-Speed and Mm-wave IC) Lab full-duplex transceiver IC that can be implemented in nanoscale CMOS to enable simultaneous transmission and reception at the same frequency in a wireless radio. Courtesy of Jin Zhou and Harish Krishnaswamy,

New Technology May Double Radio Frequency Data Capacity

March 16, 2015 12:33 pm | by Columbia University | News | Comments

A team of Columbia Engineering researchers has invented a technology — full-duplex radio integrated circuits (ICs) — that can be implemented in nanoscale CMOS to enable simultaneous transmission and reception at the same frequency in a wireless radio. Up to now, this has been thought to be impossible: transmitters and receivers either work at different times, or at the same time but at different frequencies.

From April onward De-Mail, an e-mail service available to anyone in Germany, will feature end-to-end encryption based on the Pretty Good Privacy system. Courtesy of Safwat Sayed

German Government Backs End-to-End E-mail Encryption

March 10, 2015 10:29 am | by Frank Jordans, Associated Press | News | Comments

Users of an e-mail service backed by the German government will soon be able to rely on strong encryption of the kind that used to be the preserve of geeks and hackers, officials said on March 9, 2015. From April onward De-Mail, an e-mail service available to anyone in Germany, will feature end-to-end encryption based on the Pretty Good Privacy system.

Seahorse Mobile Edition

Seahorse Mobile Edition

March 10, 2015 9:31 am | BSSN Software GmbH | Product Releases | Comments

Seahorse Scientific Workbench is a vendor-neutral software suite for capturing, analyzing and sharing analytical data. It consolidates raw and result data from multiple experimental techniques in a single tool, based on the emerging ASTM AnIML Data Standard. Seahorse Mobile delivers scientific data to mobile devices and supports chromatography (HPLC, GC), mass spectrometry, NMR, optical spectroscopy, microplate reader, bioreactor and fermenter, medical imaging and process chromatography data types.

Micro-drones at Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt Courtesy of AAU/Lakeside Labs

Micro-drone Networks Present Unique Communications Challenges

March 4, 2015 10:39 am | by Alpen-Adria-Universität | News | Comments

Micro-drones are being put to use in a large number of areas, where these small aircraft face extensive requirements while performing aerial observation tasks or when deployed in the field of disaster management. A newly developed concept summarizes some of these challenges.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg arrives for a press conference at the Mobile World Congress, the world's largest mobile phone trade show in Barcelona, Spain, March 2, 2015. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)

Google, Facebook Update Contrasting Plans to Connect World

March 3, 2015 9:25 am | by Joseph Wilson, Associated Press | News | Comments

Sci-fi solutions or making friends one at a time? Google and Facebook are taking different routes to expanding Internet use and access among the unconnected in developing countries. The two Internet giants gave updates on their efforts — and differing approaches — at the Mobile World Congress wireless show in Barcelona on March 2, 2015.

Rather than using clear text, HTTP/2 is now a binary protocol which is quicker to parse and more compact in transmission. Courtesy of Rock1997

Upgrade to Core HTTP Protocol Promises Speedier, Easier Web

February 23, 2015 4:13 pm | by Peter Maynard, Queen's University Belfast | News | Comments

Hypertext Transfer Protocol, HTTP, is a key component of the World Wide Web. It is the communications layer through which Web browsers request Web pages from Web servers and with which Web servers respond with the contents of the page. Like much of the internet it’s been around for decades, but a recent announcement reveals that HTTP/2, the first major update in 15 years, is about to arrive.

Apple CEO Tim Cook, right, watches as President Barack Obama speaks during a summit on cybersecurity and consumer protection at Stanford University in Palo Alto, CA. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Obama calls on Silicon Valley to help thwart Cyber Attacks

February 17, 2015 2:15 pm | by Darlene Superville and Martha Mendoza, Associated Press | News | Comments

Cyberspace is the new "Wild West," President Barack Obama said, with everyone looking to the government to be the sheriff. But he told the private sector it must do more to stop cyber attacks aimed at the U.S. every day. Obama signed an executive order aimed at making it easier for private firms to have access to classified information about cyber attacks.

The IoT concept is much broader today, with the possibility of networking national and even international infrastructure for improved transport, weather forecasting, earthquake prediction and response, disease tracking and control and many other applicati

Internet of Things Reality Check: Obstacles may limit a Connected World

February 13, 2015 11:31 am | by Inderscience | News | Comments

Connecting different kinds of devices, not just computers and communications devices, to the Internet could lead to new ways of working with a wide range of machinery, sensors, domestic and other appliances. Researchers suggest that we are on the verge of another technological revolution, but practicalities and legal obstacles may stymie the development of the so-called Internet of Things (IoT) if they are not addressed quickly.

Strand of optical fibers Courtesy of Groman123

Optical Fiber Communications Distance Doubles

February 4, 2015 3:23 pm | by University College London | News | Comments

A new way to process fiber optic signals has been demonstrated, which could double the distance at which data travels error-free through transatlantic sub-marine cables. The new method has the potential to reduce the costs of long-distance optical fiber communications, as signals wouldn’t need to be electronically boosted on their journey, which is important when the cables are buried underground or at the bottom of the ocean.

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