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Heat records in June broke on every continent but Antarctica, especially in New Zealand, northern South America, Greenland, central Africa and southern Asia.

World Breaks Monthly Heat Record Twice in a Row

July 22, 2014 3:30 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The globe is on a hot streak, setting a heat record in June. That's after the world broke a record in May. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced July 21, 2014, that last month's average global temperature was 61.2 degrees, which is 1.3 degrees higher than the 20th century average. It beat 2010's old record by one-twentieth of a degree.

New Spongelike Structure Converts Solar Energy into Steam

July 22, 2014 3:28 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

A new material structure developed at MIT generates steam by soaking up the sun. The structure...

Birdsongs Automatically Decoded by Computer Scientists

July 21, 2014 2:25 pm | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Scientists from Queen Mary University of London have found a successful way of identifying bird...

Peering into Giant Planets: Diamond vaporized in less than 10 billionths of a second

July 21, 2014 11:39 am | by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists for the first time have experimentally re-created the conditions that exist deep...

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Computer Models Reveal Quantum Effects in Biological Oxygen Transport

July 18, 2014 3:41 pm | by Trinity College | News | Comments

Physicists have created a unique combination of computer models, based on the theory of quantum mechanics, and applied them to a previously well-characterized protein found in muscle to develop a new picture of how biomolecules transport and store oxygen (O2). In doing so, the team has shown how the process of respiration, which is fundamental in humans and other vertebrates, exploits quantum mechanical effects working on tiny scales.

NASA's Van Allen Probes Show How to Accelerate Electrons

July 16, 2014 11:55 am | by Karen C. Fox, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

One of the great, unanswered questions for space weather scientists is just what creates two gigantic donuts of radiation surrounding Earth, called the Van Allen radiation belts. Recent data from the Van Allen Probes — two nearly identical spacecraft that launched in 2012 — address this question.

Fundamental Chemistry Findings Could Help Extend Moore’s Law

July 16, 2014 11:49 am | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Over the years, computer chips have gotten smaller, thanks to advances in materials science and manufacturing technologies. This march of progress, the doubling of transistors on a microprocessor roughly every two years, is called Moore’s Law. But there’s one component of the chip-making process in need of an overhaul if Moore’s law is to continue: the chemical mixture called photoresist.

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Dassault Systèmes Acquires Multi-body Simulation Technology Company SIMPACK

July 16, 2014 10:15 am | by Dassault Systèmes | News | Comments

Dassault Systèmes announced the acquisition of SIMPACK, a multi-body simulation technologies and solutions company. With the acquisition of SIMPACK, based near Munich, Germany, Dassault Systèmes is expanding its SIMULIA realistic multiphysics simulation technology portfolio to include multi-body mechatronic systems, from virtual concept validation to the real-time experience.

Cray Awarded Contract to Install India's First Cray XC30 Supercomputer

July 16, 2014 3:33 am | by Cray | News | Comments

The Cray XC30 system will be used by a nation-wide consortium of scientists called the Indian Lattice Gauge Theory Initiative (ILGTI). The group will research the properties of a phase of matter called the quark-gluon plasma, which existed when the universe was approximately a microsecond old. ILGTI also carries out research on exotic and heavy-flavor hadrons, which will be produced in hadron collider experiments.

Scientists Track Quantum Errors in Real Time, Step Toward Age of Quantum Computing

July 15, 2014 4:33 pm | by Holly Lauridsen, Yale University | News | Comments

Scientists have demonstrated the ability to track real quantum errors as they occur, a major step in the development of reliable quantum computers. Quantum computers could significantly improve the computational power of modern computers, but a major problem stands in the way: information loss, or quantum errors. To combat errors, physicists must be able to detect that an error has occurred and then correct it in real time.

NASA Finds Friction from Tides Could Help Distant Earths Survive

July 15, 2014 4:28 pm | by Elizabeth Zubritsky, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

As anybody who has started a campfire by rubbing sticks knows, friction generates heat. Now, computer modeling by NASA scientists shows that friction could be the key to survival for some distant Earth-sized planets traveling in dangerous orbits. The findings are consistent with observations that Earth-sized planets appear to be very common in other star systems.

Billionaire Elon Musk giving $1M to Tesla Museum

July 14, 2014 9:56 am | by AP | News | Comments

SHOREHAM, NY (AP) — The billionaire owner of Tesla Motors is giving $1 million to a New York museum dedicated to preserving the legacy of the inventor who inspired its name. The Tesla Science Center announced Elon Musk's donation on what would have been Nikola Tesla's 158th birthday.

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New Paths into the World of Quasiparticles

July 11, 2014 4:53 pm | by University of Innsbruck | News | Comments

Quasiparticles can be used to explain physical phenomena in solid bodies even though they are not actual physical particles. Physicists in Innsbruck have now realized quasiparticles in a quantum system and observed quantum mechanical entanglement propagation in a many-body system.

Nano-pixels Promise Thin, Flexible High-res Displays

July 11, 2014 4:44 pm | by Oxford University | News | Comments

A new discovery will make it possible to create pixels just a few hundred nanometers across that could pave the way for extremely high-resolution and low-energy thin, flexible displays for applications such as 'smart' glasses, synthetic retinas and foldable screens.

Astronomers Bring Third Dimension to Doomed Star's Outburst

July 11, 2014 4:31 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

In the middle of the 19th century, the massive binary system Eta Carinae underwent an eruption that ejected at least 10 times the sun's mass and made it the second-brightest star in the sky. Now, a team of astronomers has used extensive new observations to create the first high-resolution 3-D model of the expanding cloud produced by this outburst.

Making Quantum Connections: Speed of Information in a Spin Network

July 11, 2014 4:09 pm | by E. Edwards, Joint Quantum Institute | News | Comments

In quantum mechanics, interactions between particles can give rise to entanglement, which is a strange type of connection that could never be described by a non-quantum, classical theory. These connections, called quantum correlations, are present in entangled systems even if the objects are not physically linked. Entanglement is at the heart of what distinguishes purely quantum systems from classical ones — why they are potentially useful.

Speeding up Data Storage 1000x with Spin Current

July 11, 2014 3:52 pm | by Eindhoven University of Technology | News | Comments

The storage capacity of hard drives is increasing explosively, but the speed with which all that data can be written has reached its limits. Researchers presented a promising new technology which potentially allows data to be stored 1,000 times as fast in Nature Communications. The technology, in which ultra-short laser pulses generate a ‘spin current,’ also opens the way to future optical computer chips.

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Hi-ho! Astronomers Discover Seven Dwarf Galaxies

July 10, 2014 8:37 pm | by Jim Shelton, Yale University | News | Comments

Yale University astronomers, using a new type of telescope made by stitching together telephoto lenses, recently discovered seven celestial surprises while probing a nearby spiral galaxy. The previously unseen galaxies may yield important insights into dark matter and galaxy evolution, while possibly signaling the discovery of a new class of objects in space.

IBM Announces $3B Research Initiative to Tackle Chip Grand Challenges for Cloud and Big Data Systems

July 9, 2014 4:58 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM has announced it is investing $3 billion over the next five years in two broad research and early stage development programs to push the limits of chip technology needed to meet the emerging demands of cloud computing and Big Data systems. These investments are intended to push IBM's semiconductor innovations from today’s breakthroughs into the advanced technology leadership required for the future.

NSF Frontier Award to Improve Time in Networked Physical Systems

July 9, 2014 4:28 pm | by Doug Ramsey, University of California, San Diego | News | Comments

The National Science Foundation has announced a five-year, $4 million “Frontier” award to tackle the challenge of time in cyber-physical systems (CPS) — engineered systems that are built from and depend upon the seamless integration of computational algorithms and physical components. Frontier awards constitute NSF’s largest single investments in CPS

Imaging the Fukushima Daiichi Reactors with Cosmic-ray Muons

July 9, 2014 3:35 pm | by Amber Harmon | News | Comments

Los Alamos National Laboratory, in New Mexico, US, will team up with Toshiba Corporation to use muon tomography to safely peer inside the cores of the Fukushima Daiichi reactors. The initiative could reduce the time required to clean up the disabled complex by at least a decade, and greatly reduce plant personnel exposure to radiation.

Astronomers Find Supermassive Black Hole Blasting Molecular Gas at 1 Million KPH

July 8, 2014 3:47 pm | by ASTRON | News | Comments

New research has solved a long-standing mystery surrounding the evolution of galaxies, which deepens our understanding of the future of the Milky Way. The supermassive black holes in the cores of some galaxies drive massive outflows of molecular hydrogen gas. As a result, most of the cold gas is expelled from the galaxies. Since cold gas is required to form new stars, this directly affects the galaxies’ evolution.

Novel Nanoparticle Production Method Could Lead to Better Lights, Lenses, Solar Cells

July 7, 2014 3:57 pm | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

Sandia National Laboratories has come up with an inexpensive way to synthesize titanium-dioxide nanoparticles and is seeking partners who can demonstrate the process at industrial scale for everything from solar cells to light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Titanium-dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles show great promise as fillers to tune the refractive index of anti-reflective coatings ...

Hunt for Extraterrestrial Life Gets Massive Boost

July 7, 2014 3:34 pm | by University College London | News | Comments

A powerful new model to detect life on planets outside of our solar system, more accurately than ever before, has been developed by UCL researchers. The new model focuses on methane, the simplest organic molecule, widely acknowledged to be a sign of potential life.

Solid-state Physics: Consider the Anticrystal

July 7, 2014 1:35 pm | by University of Pennsylvania | News | Comments

For the last century, the concept of crystals has been a mainstay of solid-state physics. Crystals are paragons of order; crystalline materials are defined by the repeating patterns their constituent atoms and molecules make. Now, physicists have evidence that a new concept should undergird our understanding of most materials: the anticrystal, a theoretical solid that is completely disordered.

From Pencil Marks to Quantum Computers

July 7, 2014 10:39 am | by Erin Bow, Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics | News | Comments

Pick up a pencil. Make a mark on a piece of paper. Congratulations: you are doing cutting-edge condensed matter physics. You might even be making the first mark on the road to quantum computers, according to new Perimeter research. One of the hottest materials in condensed matter research today is graphene.

New Satellite Data Like an Ultrasound for Baby Stars

July 3, 2014 8:31 pm | by University of British Columbia | News | Comments

An international team of researchers have been monitoring the “heartbeats” of baby stars to test theories of how the Sun was born 4.5 billion years ago. In a paper published in Science magazine, the team describes how data from two space telescopes — the Canadian Space Agency’s MOST satellite and the French CoRoT mission — have unveiled the internal structures and ages of young stars before they’ve even emerged as full-fledged stars.

'Deep Learning' Makes Search for Exotic Particles Easier

July 2, 2014 4:10 pm | by UC Irvine | News | Comments

Fully automated “deep learning” by computers greatly improves the odds of discovering particles such as the Higgs boson, beating even veteran physicists’ abilities.                         

Liquid Water Exists in Extreme Cold

July 2, 2014 10:59 am | by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have made the first structural observations of liquid water at temperatures down to minus 51 degrees Fahrenheit, within an elusive “no man’s land” where water’s strange properties are super-amplified.

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