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NASA Images May Reveal Birth of New Saturn Moon

April 15, 2014 2:57 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has documented the formation of a small icy object within the rings of Saturn that may be a new moon, and may also provide clues to the formation of the planet's known moons. Images taken with Cassini's narrow angle camera on April 15, 2013 show disturbances at the very edge of Saturn's A ring  the outermost of the planet's large, bright rings.

Computational Record on SuperMUC: Earthquake Simulation Tops One Quadrillion Flops

April 15, 2014 2:50 pm | by Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) | News | Comments

A team of computer scientists, mathematicians and geophysicists have optimized the SeisSol...

Cosmic Slurp: Using Supercomputers to Predict Black Holes Swallowing Stars

April 14, 2014 2:33 pm | by Aaron Dubrow, NSF | News | Comments

Somewhere out in the cosmos an ordinary galaxy spins, seemingly at slumber. Then all of a sudden...

Hubble Extends Stellar Tape Measure 10X Farther into Space

April 14, 2014 2:25 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers now can precisely measure the distance of stars...

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Ad Emmen

April 15, 2014 6:07 pm | Biographies

Ad Emmen studied physics at the University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands. From 1980 until 1995, he worked in several positions at the foundation for Academic Computing Services Amsterdam (SARA). He has published papers on supercomputing and publishing technology and co-founded the journal "Supercomputer".

Dr. Frank Baetke

April 15, 2014 3:58 pm | Biographies

Dr. Baetke manages HP's Global HPC-Technology Program for academic and research institutions. Dr. Baetke is a director & board member of HP-CAST, the world-wide user group of HP-HPC; he is an advisory board member of the International Supercomputing Conference (ISC); a member of the Indian Supercomputing Conference (HiPC) steering committee; he also serves on the committees of several international High Performance Computing conferences.

Prof. Dr. Klaus Schulten

April 15, 2014 3:35 pm | Biographies

Klaus Schulten is the leader in the field of computational biophysics, having devoted over 40 years to establishing the physical mechanisms underlying processes and organization in living systems from the atomic to the organism scale. Schulten is a strong proponent of the use of simulations as a "computational microscope", to augment experimental research

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NASA Images May Reveal Birth of New Saturn Moon

April 15, 2014 2:57 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA's Cassini spacecraft has documented the formation of a small icy object within the rings of Saturn that may be a new moon, and may also provide clues to the formation of the planet's known moons. Images taken with Cassini's narrow angle camera on April 15, 2013 show disturbances at the very edge of Saturn's A ring  the outermost of the planet's large, bright rings.

Computational Record on SuperMUC: Earthquake Simulation Tops One Quadrillion Flops

April 15, 2014 2:50 pm | by Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM) | News | Comments

A team of computer scientists, mathematicians and geophysicists have optimized the SeisSol earthquake simulation software on the SuperMUC high performance computer to push its performance beyond the “magical” one petaflop/s mark — one quadrillion floating point operations per second.

Karlheinz Meier

April 15, 2014 11:17 am | Biographies

Cosmic Slurp: Using Supercomputers to Predict Black Holes Swallowing Stars

April 14, 2014 2:33 pm | by Aaron Dubrow, NSF | News | Comments

Somewhere out in the cosmos an ordinary galaxy spins, seemingly at slumber. Then all of a sudden, WHAM! A flash of light explodes from the galaxy's center. A star orbiting too close to the event horizon of the galaxy's central supermassive black hole has been torn apart by the force of gravity, heating up its gas and sending out a beacon to the far reaches of the universe.

Hubble Extends Stellar Tape Measure 10X Farther into Space

April 14, 2014 2:25 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, astronomers now can precisely measure the distance of stars up to 10,000 light-years away — 10 times farther than previously possible. Scientists have developed yet another novel way to use the 24-year-old space telescope by employing a technique called spatial scanning, which dramatically improves Hubble's accuracy for making angular measurements.

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NASA Looks to Go Beyond Batteries for Space Exploration

April 11, 2014 9:17 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA is seeking proposals for the development of new, more capable, energy storage technologies to replace the battery technology that has long powered America's space program. The core technologies solicited in the call for proposals will advance energy storage solutions for the space program and other government agencies  through ongoing collaboration with NASA and industry.

New Catalog Brings NASA Software Down to Earth

April 10, 2014 2:18 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA has made available to the public, at no cost, more than 1,000 codes with its release on April 10, 2014, of a new online software catalog. Organized into 15 broad categories, the new catalog offers a wide variety of applications for use by industry, academia, other government agencies and the general public.

Monster El Gordo Most Massive Galaxy Cluster Ever Seen

April 10, 2014 2:14 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has weighed the largest known galaxy cluster in the distant universe, catalogued as ACT-CL J0102-4915, and found it definitely lives up to its nickname — El Gordo (Spanish for "the fat one"). By measuring how much the cluster's gravity warps images of galaxies in the distant background, a team of astronomers has calculated the cluster's mass to be as much as 3 million billion times the mass of our sun.

Unbreakable Security Codes Inspired by Nature

April 10, 2014 2:10 pm | by Lancaster University | News | Comments

A revolutionary new method of encrypting confidential information has been patented by scientists who were inspired by discoveries from human biology, which model how the heart and lungs coordinate their rhythms by passing information between each other.

Fjord in East Greenland Seen by NASA's Operation IceBridge

April 9, 2014 10:03 am | by NASA | News | Comments

This view of the frozen fjord downstream of Violingletscher (Violin Glacier) in Østgrønland (East Greenland) was seen during an Operation IceBridge survey flight on April 5, 2014. NASA’s Operation IceBridge images Earth's polar ice in unprecedented detail to better understand processes that connect the polar regions with the global climate system. IceBridge utilizes a highly specialized fleet of research aircraft and ...

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Searching High and Low for Dark Matter

April 8, 2014 7:36 pm | by Bruce Lieberman, Kavli Foundation | News | Comments

Recently, dark matter hunters from around the world gathered at the University of California, Los Angeles for "Dark Matter 2014." The annual conference is one of the largest of its kind aimed at discussing the latest progress in the quest to identify dark matter, the unknown stuff that makes up more than a quarter of the universe yet remains a mystery.

Fermi Data Tantalize with New Clues to Dark Matter

April 4, 2014 4:30 pm | by Francis Reddy, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

A new study of gamma-ray light from the center of our galaxy makes the strongest case to date that some of this emission may arise from dark matter, an unknown substance making up most of the material universe. Using publicly available data from NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope, independent scientists have developed new maps showing that the galactic center produces more high-energy gamma rays than can be explained by known sources

Air and Space Museum adds Star Trek to Milestones of Flight

April 4, 2014 3:53 pm | by Brett Zongker, Associated Press | News | Comments

Some of the most iconic artifacts of aviation and space history will be getting an updated display for the 21st century, with the Apollo moon landing as the centerpiece. For the first time since its 1976 opening, the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum plans to overhaul its central exhibition showing the milestones of flight. The extensive renovation announced April 3, 2014, will be carried out over the next two years

Vast Ocean Found Beneath Ice of Saturn Moon

April 4, 2014 1:44 pm | by Marcia Dunn, AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

Scientists have uncovered a vast ocean beneath the icy surface of Saturn's little moon Enceladus. Italian and American researchers made the discovery using Cassini, a NASA-European spacecraft still exploring Saturn and its rings 17 years after its launch from Cape Canaveral. Their findings were announced April 3, 2014.

Exxon: Highly Unlikely World Limits Fossil Fuels

April 3, 2014 3:16 pm | by Jonathan Fahey, AP Energy Writer | News | Comments

On the same day the world's scientists issued their latest report on climate change and the risks it poses to society, the nation's biggest oil and gas company said the world's climate policies are "highly unlikely" to stop it from selling fossil fuels far into the future.

NASA Cuts Ties with Russia except on Space Station

April 3, 2014 2:17 pm | by Alicia Chang, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

After insisting that space relations wouldn't be altered by earthly politics, NASA on April 2, 2014, said it was severing ties with Russia except for the International Space Station. NASA employees can't travel to Russia or host visitors until further notice. They're also barred from e-mailing or holding teleconferences with their Russian counterparts because of Russia's actions in Ukraine, according to a memo sent to workers.

Usain Bolt’s Superhuman Speed Would Give Power of Flight on Titan

April 2, 2014 4:04 pm | by University of Leicester | News | Comments

We all know Usain Bolt is one of the fastest people on Earth. Now, students have shown his superhuman speeds would actually allow him to fly like a bird on one of Saturn’s moons while wearing a wingsuit. The world-record-holding sprinter has reached top speeds of 12.27 meters per second, which would be fast enough for him to take off on Titan while wearing a regular wingsuit.

CERN and ESA Sign Agreement for Future Cooperation on Research and Technology

April 1, 2014 3:34 pm | by CERN | News | Comments

CERN and ESA have signed a framework agreement for future cooperation on research and technology. Areas may include development of innovative materials for applications in extreme conditions and cutting-edge scientific performances, development of new micro-technologies to be applied in miniaturized distributed sensor systems and development and testing of high-performance detectors for high-energy physics experiments and space payloads.

Tough, but Clear

March 31, 2014 5:54 pm | by David L. Chandler, MIT | News | Comments

The shells of a sea creature, the mollusk Placuna placenta, are not only exceptionally tough, but also clear enough to read through.                                 

Record Quantum Entanglement of Multiple Dimensions

March 27, 2014 5:17 pm | by Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona | News | Comments

An international team of researchers, with participation from the UAB, has managed to create an entanglement of 103 dimensions with only two photons. The record had been established at 11 dimensions. The discovery could represent a great advance toward the construction of quantum computers with much higher processing speeds than current ones, and toward a better encryption of information. 

What's so hard about counting craters?

March 27, 2014 4:27 pm | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

Providing a rare glimpse of the trade secrets of planetary scientists, the journal Icarus published a study this month that compared lunar crater counts by eight professionals with crowdsourced counts by volunteers.         

NASA Spots Tropical Cyclone Gillian's Eye Closing

March 26, 2014 7:27 pm | by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

At 06:45 UTC on March 23, NASA's Aqua satellite flew overhead and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument captured a visible image of the storm. In the image, Gillian's eye had already started to fill in with clouds and was surrounded by a thick band of thunderstorms wrapping around the center of circulation.

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