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COMSOL Server

COMSOL Server

December 18, 2014 4:41 pm | Comsol, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

COMSOL Server was developed specifically for running applications built with the Application Builder, which allows COMSOL Multiphysics software users to build an intuitive interface around their model that can be run by anyone — even those without prior simulation experience. Applications can be distributed throughout an organization using a Windows-native client or Web browser.

Mathematicians prove Umbral Moonshine Conjecture

December 17, 2014 3:08 pm | by Carol Clark, Emory University | News | Comments

Monstrous moonshine, a quirky pattern of the monster group in theoretical math, has a shadow —...

Is Higgs Boson a Piece of the Matter-Antimatter Puzzle?

December 17, 2014 3:00 pm | by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory | News | Comments

Several experiments, including the BaBar experiment at the Department of Energy's SLAC National...

Interstellar Space: NASA Voyager in Midst of Tsunami Wave

December 17, 2014 2:43 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

A "tsunami wave" that NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft began experiencing earlier this year is still...

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Illustration of the concept of Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations. Courtesy of Chris Blake & Sam Moorfield

Real Data used for First Time to Measure Cosmos

December 15, 2014 4:21 pm | by Francesca Davenport, Imperial College London | News | Comments

For the first time, researchers have measured large distances in the Universe using data, rather than calculations related to general relativity. The team used data from astronomical surveys to measure a standard distance that is central to our understanding of the expansion of the universe. Previously the size of this standard ruler has only been predicted from theoretical models that rely on general relativity to explain gravity.

Quantum computers could in principle communicate with each other by exchanging individual photons to create a quantum internet.

Controlling Light Particle Shape Opens Way to Quantum Internet

December 15, 2014 4:07 pm | by Eindhoven University of Technology | News | Comments

In the same way as we now connect computers in networks through optical signals, it could also be possible to connect future quantum computers in a quantum internet. The optical signals would then consist of individual light particles or photons. One prerequisite for a working quantum internet is control of the shape of these photons. Researchers have succeeded for the first time in getting this control within the required short time. 

EPFL scientists have picked up an atypical photon emission in X-rays coming from space, and say it could be evidence for the existence of a particle of dark matter.

Atypical Photon Emission a Possible Signal from Dark Matter

December 12, 2014 5:40 pm | by Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne | News | Comments

Could there finally be tangible evidence for the existence of dark matter in the Universe? After sifting through reams of X-ray data, scientists at EPFL and Leiden University believe they could have identified the signal of a particle of dark matter. This substance, which up to now has been purely hypothetical, is run by none of the standard models of physics other than through the gravitational force. 

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Comprised of four images taken with the navigation camera on Rosetta, this image shows comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko on November 17, 2014, from a distance of 26 miles from the center of the comet. (AP Photo/ESA)

Mystery Deepens: Where Did Earth's Water Come From?

December 11, 2014 4:32 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The mystery of where Earth's water came from got murkier on December 10, 2014, when some astronomers essentially eliminated one of the chief suspects: comets. Over the past few months, the European Space Agency's Rosetta space probe closely examined the type of comet that some scientists theorized could have brought water to our planet 4 billion years ago. It found water, but the wrong kind.

A black hole as depicted in the movie Interstellar -- Courtesy of Paramount Pictures

A Supermassive Black Hole Comes to the Big Screen

December 11, 2014 3:34 pm | by University of Arizona | News | Comments

What does a black hole look like up close? As the sci-fi movie Interstellar wows audiences with its computer-generated views of one of most enigmatic and fascinating phenomena in the universe, University of Arizona (UA) astrophysicists Chi-kwan Chan, Dimitrios Psaltis and Feryal Ozel are likely nodding appreciatively and saying something like, "Meh, that looks nice, but check out what we've got."

Galactic gas from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulation. Represented here is a Milky Way mass halo, with colors denoting different densities.

Interstellar Mystery Solved by Supercomputer Simulations

December 10, 2014 4:25 pm | by Jorge Salazar, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

An interstellar mystery of why stars form has been solved thanks to the most realistic supercomputer simulations of galaxies yet made. Theoretical astrophysicist Philip Hopkins led research that found that stellar activity — like supernova explosions or even just starlight — plays a big part in the formation of other stars and the growth of galaxies.

The ancient Antikythera relic was rescued from a shipwreck. Courtesy of Giovanni Dall Orto

World's Oldest Computer, Ancient Greek Antikythera Mechanism, 100 Years Older than Previously Believed

December 9, 2014 2:10 pm | by University of Puget Sound | News | Comments

An ancient Greek astronomical puzzle has one more piece in place. The new evidence results from research by James Evans, professor of physics at University of Puget Sound, and Christián Carman, history of science professor at University of Quilmes, Argentina. The two researchers published a paper advancing our understanding of the Antikythera Mechanism, an ancient Greek mechanism that modeled the known universe of 2,000 years ago. 

This tiny slice of silicon, etched in Jelena Vuckovic's lab at Stanford with a pattern that resembles a bar code, is one step on the way toward linking computer components with light instead of wires. Courtesy Vuckovic Lab

New Algorithm a Big Step toward Using Light to Transmit Data

December 9, 2014 1:38 pm | by Stanford University, Chris Cesare | News | Comments

Engineers have designed and built a prism-like device that can split a beam of light into different colors and bend the light at right angles, a development that could eventually lead to computers that use optics, rather than electricity, to carry data. The optical link is a tiny slice of silicon etched with a pattern that resembles a bar code. When a beam of light is shined at the link, two different wavelengths of light split off

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Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, is a peculiar place. Unlike any other moon, it has   a dense atmosphere. It has rivers and lakes made up of components of natural   gas, such as ethane and methane. It also has windswept dunes that are hundreds   of yards hig

Titan's Dune Mystery Solved

December 8, 2014 4:55 pm | by University of Tennessee | News | Comments

Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, is a peculiar place. Unlike any other moon, it has a dense atmosphere. It has rivers and lakes made up of components of natural gas, such as ethane and methane. It also has windswept dunes that are hundreds of yards high, more than a mile wide and hundreds of miles long — despite data suggesting the body to have only light breezes.

A team of scientists has discovered an unusual form of electronic order in a new family of unconventional superconductors. The finding establishes an unexpected connection between this new group of titanium-oxypnictide superconductors and the more familia

Unusual Electronic State Found in New Class of Unconventional Superconductors

December 8, 2014 4:34 pm | by Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

A team of scientists has discovered an unusual form of electronic order in a new family of unconventional superconductors. The finding establishes an unexpected connection between this new group of titanium-oxypnictide superconductors and the more familiar cuprates and iron-pnictides, providing scientists with a whole new family of materials from which they can gain deeper insights into the mysteries of high-temperature superconductivity.

This 20x image is a local equalization of silicon nanocrystals in silicon dioxide taken with widefield reflection. Jan Valenta and Benjamin Bruhn of Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics (MFF) in Prague 2, Czech Republic received an Image

Silicon on Silicon

December 5, 2014 3:31 pm | News | Comments

This 20x image is a local equalization of silicon nanocrystals in silicon dioxide taken with widefield reflection. Jan Valenta and Benjamin Bruhn of Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics (MFF) in Prague 2, Czech Republic received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope for their photo.

NASA's new Orion spacecraft made a "bull's-eye" Pacific splashdown following a dramatic journey 3,604 miles beyond Earth. The achievement opens a new era of human exploration to put people on Mars.

Orion Mission Flies Hightest in a Long Time

December 5, 2014 3:03 pm | by Marcia Dunn, Associated Press | News | Comments

NASA's new Orion spacecraft made a "bull's-eye" Pacific splashdown following a dramatic journey 3,604 miles beyond Earth. The achievement opens a new era of human exploration to put people on Mars.               

An experiment at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory provided the first fleeting glimpse of the atomic structure of a material as it entered a state resembling room-temperature superconductivity – a long-sought phenomenon in wh

Rattled Atoms Mimic High-temperature Superconductivity

December 5, 2014 2:40 pm | by SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory | News | Comments

An experiment at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory provided the first fleeting glimpse of the atomic structure of a material as it entered a state resembling room-temperature superconductivity – a long-sought phenomenon in which materials might conduct electricity with 100 percent efficiency under everyday conditions.

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A study of "MY Camelopardalis" binary system shows that the most massive stars are made up by merging with other smaller stars, as predicted by theoretical models.

Merger of Two Stars is Supermassive

December 5, 2014 2:22 pm | by AlphaGalileo | News | Comments

A study of "MY Camelopardalis" binary system shows that the most massive stars are made up by merging with other smaller stars, as predicted by theoretical models.                         

The results of four years of observations from the ESA's Planck satellite reveals relic radiation (the most ancient light in the Universe). This light has been measured precisely across the entire sky for the first time, in both intensity and polarization

New Revelations on Dark Matter and Relic Neutrinos

December 4, 2014 4:40 pm | News | Comments

The results of four years of observations from the ESA's Planck satellite reveals relic radiation (the most ancient light in the Universe). This light has been measured precisely across the entire sky for the first time, in both intensity and polarization, thereby producing the oldest image of the Universe. This primordial light lets us "see" some of the most elusive particles in the Universe: dark matter and relic neutrinos.

Engineers have invented a revolutionary coating material that can help cool buildings, even on sunny days, by radiating heat away from the buildings and sending it directly into space.

High-tech Mirror Beams Heat into Space

December 4, 2014 4:25 pm | by Chris Cesare, Stanford University | News | Comments

Engineers have invented a revolutionary coating material that can help cool buildings, even on sunny days, by radiating heat away from the buildings and sending it directly into space. The heart of the invention is an ultrathin, multilayered material that deals with light, both invisible and visible, in a new way.

Geckos have fascinated people for hundreds of years. Scientists have been especially intrigued by these lizards, and have studied a variety of features such as the adhesive toe pads on the underside of gecko feet with which geckos attach to surfaces with

Geckos are Effortlessly Sticky

December 3, 2014 4:07 pm | by Iqbal Pittalwala, University of California, Riverside | News | Comments

Geckos have fascinated people for hundreds of years. Scientists have been especially intrigued by these lizards, and have studied a variety of features such as the adhesive toe pads on the underside of gecko feet with which geckos attach to surfaces with remarkable strength. One question that has captivated researchers is: Is the strength of this adhesion determined by the gecko or is it somehow intrinsic to the adhesive system?

Engineers have designed and built a prism-like device that can split a beam of light into different colors and bend the light at right angles, a development that could eventually lead to computers that use optics, rather than electricity, to carry data.

Using Light Instead of Wires Inside Computers

December 2, 2014 3:01 pm | by Chris Cesare, Stanford University | News | Comments

Engineers have designed and built a prism-like device that can split a beam of light into different colors and bend the light at right angles, a development that could eventually lead to computers that use optics, rather than electricity, to carry data.

El Niño is not a contemporary phenomenon; it’s long been the Earth’s dominant source of year-to-year climate fluctuation. But as the climate warms and the feedbacks that drive the cycle change, researchers want to know how El Niño will respond.

Modeling the Growing Strength of El Niño

December 1, 2014 4:27 pm | by Kelly April Tyrrell, University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

El Niño is not a contemporary phenomenon; it’s long been the Earth’s dominant source of year-to-year climate fluctuation. But as the climate warms and the feedbacks that drive the cycle change, researchers want to know how El Niño will respond.

Scientists have discovered an invisible shield roughly 7,200 miles above Earth that blocks so-called “killer electrons,” which can fry satellites and degrade space systems during intense solar storms. Illustration by Andy Kale, University of Alberta.

Star Trek-like Invisible Shield Discovered Thousands of Miles above Earth

November 26, 2014 2:47 pm | by University of Colorado Boulder | News | Comments

Researchers have discovered an invisible shield some 7,200 miles above Earth that blocks so-called killer electrons, which whip around the planet at near-light speed and have been known to threaten astronauts, fry satellites and degrade space systems during intense solar storms. The barrier to the particle motion was discovered in the Van Allen radiation belts, two doughnut-shaped rings above Earth filled with high-energy electrons and...

An atomic memory (glowing green), made at the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw, can be used to store quantum information in telecomunication purposes. From left to right: Michał Dąbrowski, Radek Chrapkiewicz and Wojciech Wasilewski. Courtesy

Global Quantum Communications No Longer the Stuff of Fiction

November 26, 2014 1:40 pm | by University of Warsaw | News | Comments

Following years of tests in physics laboratories, the first quantum technologies are slowly emerging into wider applications. One example is quantum cryptography — an encryption method providing an almost full guarantee of secure data transmission, currently being introduced by military forces and banking institutions.

The National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation medals ready to be presented to awardees. Courtesy of Sandy Schaeffer, NSF

National Medals of Science, Technology and Innovation Presented

November 25, 2014 12:00 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

At a White House ceremony on November 20, 2014, President Obama presented the National Medal of Science and National Medal of Technology and Innovation to individuals who have made outstanding contributions to science and engineering. The awards are the nation's highest honors for achievement and leadership in advancing the fields of science and technology.

Quantum physicist Andrei Derevianko, a professor in the College of Science, has contributed to the development of several novel classes of atomic clocks and now is proposing using networks of synchronized atomic clocks to detect dark matter. His paper on

Hiding in Plain Sight: Detecting Elusive Dark Matter with GPS

November 21, 2014 5:21 pm | by Mike Wolterbeek, University of Nevada, Reno | News | Comments

The everyday use of a GPS device might be to find your way around town or even navigate a hiking trail; but for two physicists, the Global Positioning System might be a tool in directly detecting and measuring dark matter, so far an elusive but ubiquitous form of matter responsible for the formation of galaxies.

This 100x image of Titanium Shavings received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photographer was Bert Siegel of

Shaved Titanium

November 20, 2014 2:56 pm | News | Comments

This 100x image of Titanium Shavings received an Image of Distinction designation in the 2013 Nikon Small World Photomicrophotography Competition, which recognizes excellence in photography with the optical microscope. The photographer was Bert Siegel of Zittau/Görlitz University of Applied Sciences.

Nexio simulation is a French SME located in Toulouse and specialized in electromagnetic simulation software for marine, space, defense and aeronautics domains applications.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Nexio

November 17, 2014 6:19 pm | Award Winners

Nexio simulation is a French SME located in Toulouse and specialized in electromagnetic simulation software for marine, space, defense and aeronautics domains applications.

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