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DESY's 1.7 mile-long PETRA III accelerator is a super microscope that speeds up electrically charged particles nearly to the speed of light.

20 GB Data per Second Shared with 2000+ Scientists Worldwide

August 22, 2014 12:02 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM announced it is collaborating with DESY, a national research center in Germany, to speed up management and storage of massive volumes of x-ray data. The planned Big Data and Analytics architecture can handle more than 20 gigabyte per second of data at peak performance and help scientists worldwide gain faster insights into the atomic structure of novel semiconductors, catalysts, biological cells and other samples.

Supernova Seen in Two Lights

August 22, 2014 11:49 am | by NASA | News | Comments

The destructive results of a mighty supernova explosion reveal themselves in a delicate blend of...

Dramatically Intricate 3-D Universes Tell Important Stories about the Cosmos

August 21, 2014 3:16 pm | by Kelen Tuttle, Kavli Foundation | Articles | Comments

Recently, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics unveiled an unprecedented simulation...

Invisible Particles Provide First Indirect Evidence of Strange Baryons

August 20, 2014 10:17 am | by Brookhaven National Laboratory | News | Comments

New supercomputing calculations provide the first evidence that particles predicted by the...

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A picokeystone extracted from an aerogel tile from the Stardust interstellar dust collector. Scientists said seven microscopic particles collected by NASA's comet-chasing spacecraft, Stardust, appear to have originated outside our solar system. The dust c

Specks Returned from Space may be Alien Visitors

August 15, 2014 2:28 pm | by Marcia Dunn, AP Aerospace Writer | News | Comments

There may be itsy-bitsy aliens among us. Scientists say seven microscopic particles collected by NASA's comet-chasing spacecraft, Stardust, appear to have originated outside our solar system. If confirmed, this would be the world's first sampling of contemporary interstellar dust.

An April memo from the EPA's chief of staff said that "unsolicited contacts" need to be "appropriately managed" and that committee members should refrain from directly responding to requests about committees' efforts to advise the agency.

Groups to EPA: Stop Muzzling Science Advisers

August 13, 2014 12:39 pm | by Dina Cappiello, Associated Press | News | Comments

Journalist and scientific organizations accused the EPA of attempting to muzzle its independent scientific advisers by directing them to funnel all outside requests for information through agency officials. In a letter on August 12, 2014, groups representing journalists and scientists urged the EPA to allow advisory board members to talk directly to news reporters, Congress and other outside groups without first asking for permission.

The Bloch sphere, a representation of a qubit, the fundamental building block of quantum computers. Courtesy of Glosser

Quantum Simulators Explained

August 12, 2014 12:36 pm | by Springer Science+Business Media | News | Comments

Just about everything you ever wanted to know about quantum simulators is summed up in a new review. As part of a Thematic Series on Quantum Simulations, the open access journal European Physical Journal Quantum Technology has published an overview of just what a quantum simulator is, namely a device that actively uses quantum effects to answer questions on model systems.

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Dr. Horst Punzmann (left) and Professor Michael Shats test their wave-generated tractor beam. Courtesy of Stuart Hay

Physicists Create Water Tractor Beam

August 11, 2014 12:57 pm | by Australian National University | News | Comments

Physicists have created a tractor beam on water, providing a radical new technique that could confine oil spills, manipulate floating objects or explain rips at the beach. The group discovered they can control water flow patterns with simple wave generators, enabling them to move floating objects at will. The new technique gives scientists a way of controlling things adrift on water in a way that resembles sci-fi tractor beams.

The two inset images show before-and-after images captured by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope of Supernova 2012Z in the spiral galaxy NGC 1309. The white X at the top of the main image marks the location of the supernova in the galaxy. Courtesy of NASA, ESA

Hubble Finds Supernova Star System Linked to Possible “Zombie Star”

August 6, 2014 8:38 pm | by Science Newsline | News | Comments

Using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, a team of astronomers has spotted a star system that could have left behind a "zombie star" after an unusually weak supernova explosion. A supernova typically obliterates the exploding white dwarf, or dying star. On this occasion, scientists believe this faint...

Sandia National Laboratories researchers Steve Plimpton, left, and Michael Gallis look at a projection of a model of the Russian MIR space station, which fell out of orbit several years ago and disintegrated, with the remains ending up at the bottom of th

Sophisticated 3-D Codes Yield Unprecedented Physics, Engineering Insights

August 6, 2014 4:43 pm | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

When the space shuttle Columbia disintegrated on re-entry in 2002, sophisticated computer models were key to determining what happened. A piece of foam flew off at launch and hit a tile, damaging the leading edge of the shuttle wing and exposing the underlying structure. Temperatures soared to thousands of degrees as Columbia plunged toward Earth at 27 times the speed of sound, said Gallis, who used NASA codes and Icarus for simulations...

Close-up detail of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The image was taken by Rosetta’s OSIRIS narrow-angle camera and downloaded Wednesday, August 6, 2014. The image shows the comet’s ‘head’ at the left of the frame, which is casting shadow onto the ‘neck’

Comet Joined by Space Probe after 10-Year Pursuit

August 6, 2014 4:34 pm | by Frank Jordans, Associated Press | News | Comments

Turning what seemed like a science fiction tale into reality, an unmanned probe swung alongside a comet on august 6, 2014, after a 4-billion mile (6.4-billion kilometer) chase through outer space over the course of a decade. Europe's Rosetta probe will orbit and study the giant ball of dust and ice as it hurtles toward the sun and, if all goes according to plan, drop a lander onto the comet in the coming months.

FLOW-3D 11

FLOW-3D 11 Multi-physics Computational Fluid Dynamics Software

August 6, 2014 3:19 pm | Flow Science, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

FLOW-3D 11 features FlowSight, an advanced visualization tool based on the EnSight post-processor, which offers powerful ways to analyze, visualize and communicate simulation data. Its capabilities include the ability to analyze and compare multiple simulation results simultaneously, volume rendering and a CFD calculator, as well as flipbooks.

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A section of the W7-X plasma vessel. Courtesy of Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics

Hot Plasma Partial to Bootstrap Current: New Calculations Could Lower Fusion Reactor Costs

August 5, 2014 2:41 pm | by Kathy Kincade, NERSC | News | Comments

Supercomputers at NERSC are helping plasma physicists “bootstrap” a potentially more affordable and sustainable fusion reaction. If successful, fusion reactors could provide almost limitless clean energy. To achieve high enough reaction rates to make fusion a useful energy source, hydrogen contained inside the reactor core must be heated to extremely high temperatures, which transforms it into hot plasma.

Students have shown that the superhero is able to use 6,560 times more energy than he would feasibly be able to absorb from the sun’s rays.

Superman’s Solar-powered Hijinks

July 30, 2014 4:38 pm | by University of Leicester | News | Comments

It goes without saying that Superman can accomplish some pretty spectacular feats. But, according to a group of physics students, the Man of Steel actually achieves the impossible — by breaking the fundamental physics law of conservation of energy. University of Leicester physics students discovered Superman would not be able to get all the energy he needs to fly from the Sun alone, as is suggested in the DC Comics.

A path of desire emerging from many trajectories between two points in quantum state space. Courtesy of Murch lab

Finding Quantum Lines of Desire: Wanderings Tracked through Quantum-state Space

July 30, 2014 4:31 pm | by Diana Lutz, WUSTL | News | Comments

Groundskeepers and landscapers hate them, but there is no fighting them. Called desire paths, social trails or goat tracks, they are the unofficial shortcuts people create between two locations when the purpose-built path doesn’t take them where they want to go. There’s a similar concept in classical physics called the “path of least action.”

The sea ice in July 2014 as it begins to retreat from the Alaskan coast. Courtesy of J. Thomson/UW

Huge Waves Measured for First Time in Arctic Ocean

July 29, 2014 4:43 pm | by University of Washington | News | Comments

As the climate warms and sea ice retreats, the North is changing. An ice-covered expanse now has a season of increasingly open water which is predicted to extend across the whole Arctic Ocean before the middle of this century. Storms thus have the potential to create Arctic swell – huge waves that...

This graphic shows a 3-D model of 98 geysers whose source locations and tilts were found in a Cassini imaging survey of Enceladus' south polar terrain by the method of triangulation. Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

101 Geysers and More found on Icy Saturn Moon

July 29, 2014 4:01 pm | by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists using mission data from NASA's Cassini spacecraft have identified 101 distinct geysers erupting on Saturn's icy moon Enceladus. Their analysis suggests it is possible for liquid water to reach from the moon's underground sea all the way to its surface.

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By preparing the neurons in a special initial state and then postselecting another state, we can achieve a situation in which both the possible paths in the interferometer are important for the experiment, but in very different ways. Drawing Leon Filter

The Quantum Cheshire Cat: A New Kind of Quantum Paradox

July 29, 2014 3:39 pm | by Technische Universität Wien | News | Comments

The Cheshire Cat featured in Lewis Caroll’s novel Alice in Wonderland is a remarkable creature: it disappears, leaving its grin behind. Can an object be separated from its properties? It is possible in the quantum world. In an experiment, neutrons travel along a different path than one of their properties — their magnetic moment. This “Quantum Cheshire Cat” could be used to make high-precision measurements less sensitive to external ...

Grammatikopoulos simulated two palladium nanoparticles colliding at different temperatures. The hotter the temperature, the more homogenous the resulting product, and the further the atoms in the particle crystallize.

Simulating the Invisible

July 29, 2014 2:07 pm | by Poncie Rutsch, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) | News | Comments

Every trillionth of a second, Panagiotis Grammatikopoulos calculates the location of each individual atom in a particle based on where it is and which forces apply. He uses a computer program to make the calculations, and then animates the motion of the atoms using visualization software. The resulting animation illuminates what happens, atom-by-atom, when two nanoparticles collide.

UIC physicist Dirk Morr, who worked with researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory, says the findings were the result of “the close collaboration of theory and experiment.” Courtesy of Roberta Dupuis-Devlin/UIC Photo Services

Physicists Unlock Nature of High-Temperature Superconductivity

July 29, 2014 2:02 pm | by Jeanne Galatzer-Levy, University of Illinois at Chicago | News | Comments

Physicists have identified the “quantum glue” that underlies a promising type of superconductivity — a crucial step towards the creation of energy superhighways that conduct electricity without current loss. The research is a collaboration between theoretical physicists and experimentalists.

In addition to the magnetic moments, magnons also conduct heat; from their equations, the MIT researchers found that when exposed to a magnetic field gradient, magnons may be driven to move from one end of a magnet to another, carrying heat with them and

New Theory Predicts Magnets may Act as Wireless Cooling Agents

July 29, 2014 12:42 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

The magnets cluttering the face of your refrigerator may one day be used as cooling agents, according to a new theory. The theory describes the motion of magnons — quasi-particles in magnets that are collective rotations of magnetic moments, or “spins.” In addition to the magnetic moments, magnons also conduct heat; researchers found that when exposed to a magnetic field gradient, magnons may be driven to move from one end of a magnet to...

An efficient route to manufacturing nanomaterials with light through plasmon-induced laser-threading of gold nanoparticle strings. Courtesy of Ventsislav Valev

Building Invisible Materials with Light

July 28, 2014 10:36 am | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

A new method of building materials using light could one day enable technologies that are often considered the realm of science fiction, such as invisibility cloaks and cloaking devices. Although cloaked starships won't be a reality for quite some time, the technique researchers have developed for constructing materials with building blocks a few billionths of a meter across can be used to control the way light flies through them.

To celebrate Chandra's 15th anniversary, four new images of supernova remnants – the Crab Nebula, Tycho, G292.0+1.8, and 3C58 – are being released. These supernova remnants are very hot and energetic and glow brightly in X-ray light, which allows Chandra

NASA Chandra X-ray Observatory Celebrates 15th Anniversary

July 25, 2014 3:05 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Fifteen years ago, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory was launched into space aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia. Since its deployment, Chandra has helped revolutionize our understanding of the universe through its unrivaled X-ray vision. Chandra, one of NASA's current "Great Observatories," along with the Hubble Space Telescope and Spitzer Space Telescope, is specially designed to detect X-ray emission from hot and energetic regions.

Using data from NASA's Kepler and Spitzer Space Telescopes, scientists have made the most precise measurement ever of the size of a world outside our solar system, as illustrated in this artist's conception. Courtesy of NASA/JPL-Caltech

Weird Worlds: Precisely Measuring an Alien World's Size

July 25, 2014 2:56 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Thanks to NASA's Kepler and Spitzer Space Telescopes, scientists have made the most precise measurement ever of the radius of a planet outside our solar system. The size of the exoplanet, dubbed Kepler-93b, is now known to an uncertainty of just 74 miles (119 kilometers) on either side of the planetary body.

Dr. Julia Bryant, a research fellow with the ARC Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), in the School of Physics at the University of Sydney, installing SAMI.

Researchers Pioneer Google Street View of Galaxies

July 24, 2014 2:40 pm | by University of Sydney | News | Comments

A new home-grown instrument based on bundles of optical fibers is giving Australian astronomers the first 'Google street view' of the cosmos — incredibly detailed views of huge numbers of galaxies. Developed by researchers at the University of Sydney and the Australian Astronomical Observatory, the optical-fiber bundles can sample the light from up to 60 parts of a galaxy, for a dozen galaxies at a time.

Dr Grimes derived equations describing how string bending, vibrato and whammy bars change the pitch of a note. He found that the properties of the strings had a big effect on the change in pitch – in particular the Young's modulus. Courtesy of Feliciano G

The Physics of Lead Guitar Playing

July 23, 2014 6:36 pm | by University of Oxford | News | Comments

String bends, tapping, vibrato and whammy bars are all techniques that add to the distinctiveness of a lead guitarist's sound, whether it's Clapton, Hendrix, or BB King. Now, guitarist and physicist Dr. David Robert Grimes has described the physics underlying these techniques.

2014 marks the 75th anniversary of NASA Ames Research Center.

NASA Ames Research Center to host First Open House in 17 Years

July 23, 2014 3:24 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Maybe you’ve sat on the lawn, even hung out on the flightline. Now, for the first time since 1997, NASA Ames Research Center is opening their house. An announcement posted on NASA.gov states: “For our 75th anniversary, we're inviting all of the Bay Area and Silicon Valley to come inside the gates and get to know NASA's center in Silicon Valley. Take a two-mile walking tour through the center and visit with Ames engineers and scientists..."

Breakthrough Laser May Play Crucial Role in Development of Quantum Computers

July 23, 2014 3:09 pm | by Joseph Blumberg, Dartmouth College | News | Comments

A team of Dartmouth scientists and their colleagues have devised a breakthrough laser that uses a single artificial atom to generate and emit particles of light — and may play a crucial role in the development of quantum computers, which are predicted to eventually outperform even today’s most powerful supercomputers.

Heat records in June broke on every continent but Antarctica, especially in New Zealand, northern South America, Greenland, central Africa and southern Asia.

World Breaks Monthly Heat Record Twice in a Row

July 22, 2014 3:30 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The globe is on a hot streak, setting a heat record in June. That's after the world broke a record in May. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced July 21, 2014, that last month's average global temperature was 61.2 degrees, which is 1.3 degrees higher than the 20th century average. It beat 2010's old record by one-twentieth of a degree.

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