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Suresh Venkatasubramanian, left, and Matt Might, both associate professors of computer science at the University of Utah, have received a $3 million government grant to produce software that can sniff out the next generation of computer vulnerabilities. T

Algorithmic Attacks: Fighting Next-gen Cyber Threats

April 17, 2015 3:45 pm | by University of Utah | News | Comments

The next generation of cyberattacks will be more sophisticated, more difficult to detect and more capable of wreaking untold damage on the nation’s computer systems. So, the DoD has given a $3 million grant to a team of computer scientists to develop software that can hunt down a new kind of vulnerability nearly impossible to find with today’s technology. The team is tasked with creating an analyzer that can thwart algorithmic attacks.

GPU4EO Challenge 2015: Stimulating Adoption of GPUs in Remote Sensing

April 17, 2015 3:11 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

GPU4EO Challenge 2015 is an international initiative which involves students, researchers and...

COMSOL 5.1 Multiphysics Modeling Software

April 17, 2015 12:52 pm | Product Releases | Comments

COMSOL 5.1 is a major upgrade that delivers new and enhanced functionality across all products,...

Opening Up Performance with OpenSpeedShop an Open Source Profiler

April 17, 2015 12:12 pm | by Rob Farber | Articles | Comments

There are a number of excellent commercial performance analysis tools on the market. Their big...

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Most recent advances in artificial intelligence are the result of machine learning, in which computers are turned loose on huge data sets to look for patterns. To make machine-learning applications easier to build, computer scientists have begun developin

Probabilistic Programming Squeezes Code to Create Intuitive Modeling

April 13, 2015 3:03 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Most recent advances in artificial intelligence are the result of machine learning, in which computers are turned loose on huge data sets to look for patterns. To make machine-learning applications easier to build, computer scientists have begun developing so-called probabilistic programming languages, which let researchers mix and match machine-learning techniques that have worked well in other contexts.  

Nurses practice taking blood pressure and collecting medical history with a traditional human patient simulator system. Its face is completely inexpressive, and its lips do not move when it "talks." Speech is either pre-recorded, or voiced by the clinical

Human Patient Simulators: How Robots can Help Build Better Doctors

April 9, 2015 9:53 am | by NSF | News | Comments

A young doctor leans over a patient who has been in a serious car accident and invariably must be experiencing pain. The doctor's trauma team examines the patient's pelvis and rolls her onto her side to check her spine. They scan the patient's abdomen with a rapid ultrasound machine, finding fluid. They insert a tube in her nose. Throughout the procedure, the patient's face remains rigid, showing no signs of pain.

One of the new drones of the UZH research group Courtesy of UZH

New Technology Making Drones Safer and Smarter

April 8, 2015 3:27 pm | by University of Zurich | News | Comments

Researchers at the University of Zurich have unveiled new technology enabling drones to recover stable flight from any position and land autonomously in failure situations. It will even be possible to launch drones by simply tossing them into the air like a baseball or recover stable flight after a system failure. Drones will be safer and smarter, with the ability to identify safe landing sites and land automatically when necessary.

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The UCLA Biomechatronics Lab develops a language of touch that can be "felt" by computers and humans alike. Courtesy of the National Science Foundation

Artificial Haptic Intelligence: Giving Robots the Human Touch

April 7, 2015 4:56 pm | by Miles O'Brien, NSF | News | Comments

Researchers are designing artificial limbs to be more sensational, with the emphasis on sensation. They have developed a language of touch that can be "felt" by computers and humans alike. The engineers and students are constructing a language quantified with mechanical touch sensors that interact with objects of various shapes, sizes and textures.

A high resolution image of the data transition region on a CD-ROM taken with an Olympus OLS 4000 LEXT 3-D digital laser confocal microscope. The sharp points are data on a compact disk. Courtesy of Greg Gogolin, Ph.D., Information Security & Intelligence,

Restoring Lost Data: 3-D Digital Laser Microscopy Creates Visual Roadmap

April 6, 2015 4:12 pm | by Marlene Cimons, National Science Foundation | News | Comments

It can be disheartening to learn that something precious, such as a one-of-a-kind family photo, has disappeared from a scratched or broken CD or DVD. It also can become serious, dangerous and potentially costly if it happens to a disc containing criminal forensic evidence, corporate records or scientific data. But there may be a way in the future to bring the material back.

New research has demonstrated that an amputee can grasp with a bionic hand, powered only by his thoughts.

Bionic Hand is Powered only by Thoughts

April 2, 2015 9:53 am | by Jeannie Kever, University of Houston | News | Comments

Researchers have created an algorithm that allowed a man to grasp a bottle with a prosthetic hand powered only by his thoughts. The technique, demonstrated with a man whose right hand had been amputated, uses non-invasive brain monitoring, capturing brain activity to determine what parts of the brain are involved in grasping an object. A computer program, or brain-machine interface (BMI), harnessed the subject’s intentions...

Hubble telescope image of stars forming inside a cloud of cold hydrogen gas and dust in the Carina Nebula, 7,500 light-years away. Courtesy of Space Telescope Science Institute

Automation Provides Big Data Solution to Astronomy’s Data Deluge

April 2, 2015 9:40 am | by David Tenenbaum, University of Wisconsin-Madison | News | Comments

It’s almost a rite of passage in physics and astronomy. Scientists spend years scrounging up money to build a fantastic new instrument. Then, when the long-awaited device finally approaches completion, the panic begins: How will they handle the torrent of data? The Square Kilometer Array will have an unprecedented ability to deliver data on the location and properties of stars, galaxies and giant clouds of hydrogen gas.

With new industry-specific cloud data services and developer tools, IBM will help clients and partners integrate data from an unprecedented number of IoT and traditional sources. These resources will be made available on an open platform.

IBM Building Cloud-based Open Platform to Connect Internet of Things to Enterprise

April 2, 2015 9:21 am | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM announced that it will invest $3 billion over the next four years to establish a new Internet of Things (IoT) unit, and that it is building a cloud-based open platform designed to help clients and ecosystem partners build IoT solutions.

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Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using Mira to study the magnetic state of iron selenide, a known high-temperature superconductor, at varying levels of pressure. Courtesy of Lucas Wagner, University of Illinois at Urbana

Mira sheds Light on Mysterious Nature of High-temperature Superconductors

March 30, 2015 2:52 pm | by Jim Collins | News | Comments

Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign are using supercomputing resources at the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, a DOE Office of Science User Facility, to shed light on the mysterious nature of high-temperature superconductors. With critical temperatures ranging from 30 Kelvin to 130 Kelvin, this relatively new class of superconductors is high-temperature in name only.

Prof. Dr. Yutong Lu, Director, System Software Laboratory, School of Computer Science, National University of Defense Technology (NUDT), Changsha, China

Prof. Dr. Yutong Lu

March 27, 2015 2:47 pm | Biographies

Prof. Dr. Yutong Lu is the Director of the System Software Laboratory, School of Computer Science, National University of Defense Technology (NUDT), Changsha, China. She is also a professor in the State Key Laboratory of High Performance Computing, China. She got her B.S, M.S, and Ph.D. degrees from the NUDT

Hamlin, left, and Webb with a book about breaking the Nazi Enigma code, which was also the subject of the recent film, The Imitation Game. Courtesy of Rebecca Phillips, WSU

Mathematicians adapt Knapsack Code to take on Quantum-level Cyber Attacks

March 27, 2015 11:24 am | by Rebecca Phillips, Washington State University | News | Comments

Mathematicians have designed an encryption code capable of fending off the phenomenal hacking power of a quantum computer. Using high-level number theory and cryptography, the researchers reworked an infamous old cipher called the knapsack code to create an online security system better prepared for future demands.

Integer overflows occur when a computer tries to store too large a number in the memory space reserved for it. The leading digits are discarded — much as they are when a car odometer turns over. Courtesy of Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT

Better Debugger: Algorithm Automatically Finds Integer-overflow Bugs

March 26, 2015 9:52 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Integer overflows are one of the most common bugs in computer programs — not only causing programs to crash but, even worse, potentially offering points of attack for malicious hackers. A new algorithm for identifying integer-overflow bugs was tested on five common open-source programs, in which previous analyses had found three bugs. The new algorithm found all three known bugs — and 11 new ones.

Online negotiations can be improved if computer programs take social values, such as honesty and trust into account when bargaining with human counterparts. © tatniz

Solving the Trust Equation: Socially Intelligent Computers can turn Difficult Negotiations into Win-win Situations

March 25, 2015 12:19 pm | by A*STAR Institute of High Performance Computing | News | Comments

Programming fundamental social intelligence skills into software agents can make humans substantially more trusting of online negotiations, which can lead to superior outcomes in e-commerce transactions, finds a team of technology researchers, business experts and cognitive scientists. People are naturally skeptical of negotiations lacking face-to-face contact...

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The OpenPOWER Foundation which is a collaboration of technologists encouraging the adoption of an open server architecture for computer data centers has grown to more than 110 businesses, organizations and individuals across 22 countries.

10 New OpenPOWER Foundation Solutions Unveiled

March 19, 2015 3:19 pm | by OpenPOWER Foundation | News | Comments

The OpenPOWER Foundation has announced more than 10 hardware solutions — spanning systems, boards and cards, and a new microprocessor customized for China. Built collaboratively by OpenPOWER members, the new solutions exploit the POWER architecture to provide more choice, customization and performance to customers, including hyperscale data centers. 

Simulink 8.5 (R2015a) Block Diagram Environment

Simulink 8.5 (R2015a) Block Diagram Environment

March 16, 2015 9:52 am | The Mathworks, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Simulink is a block diagram environment for multidomain simulation and model-based design. It supports simulation, automatic code generation, and continuous test and verification of embedded systems. The MATLAB add-on provides a graphical editor, customizable block libraries and solvers for modeling and simulating dynamic systems.

MATLAB 8.5 (R2015a) Numerical Computing Environment

MATLAB 8.5 (R2015a) Numerical Computing Environment

March 12, 2015 10:36 am | The Mathworks, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

MATLAB 8.5 is a high-level language and interactive environment used by engineers and scientists to explore and visualize ideas and to collaborate across disciplines, including signal and image processing, communications, control systems and computational finance.

To qualify for the DRC Finals, the new teams had to submit videos showing successful completion of five sample tasks.

$3.5 Million in Prizes at Stake in DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals

March 11, 2015 11:40 am | by Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency | News | Comments

The international robotics community has turned out in force for the DARPA Robotics Challenge Finals, a competition of robots and their human supervisors to be held June 5 to 6 outside of Los Angeles. In the competition, human-robot teams will be tested on capabilities that could enable them to provide assistance in future natural and man-made disasters.

Micro-drones at Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt Courtesy of AAU/Lakeside Labs

Micro-drone Networks Present Unique Communications Challenges

March 4, 2015 10:39 am | by Alpen-Adria-Universität | News | Comments

Micro-drones are being put to use in a large number of areas, where these small aircraft face extensive requirements while performing aerial observation tasks or when deployed in the field of disaster management. A newly developed concept summarizes some of these challenges.

The University of Chicago’s Research Computing Center is helping linguists visualize the grammar of a given word in bodies of language containing millions or billions of words. Courtesy of Ricardo Aguilera/Research Computing Center

Billions of Words: Visualizing Natural Language

February 27, 2015 3:14 pm | by Benjamin Recchie, University of Chicago | News | Comments

Children don’t have to be told that “cat” and “cats” are variants of the same word — they pick it up just by listening. To a computer, though, they’re as different as, well, cats and dogs. Yet it’s computers that are assumed to be superior in detecting patterns and rules, not four-year-olds. Researchers are trying to, if not to solve that puzzle definitively, at least provide the tools to do so.

While a member of the audience might have seen a variation on this trick before, the AI can now use psychological and mathematical principles to create lots of different versions and keep audiences guessing. Courtesy of Steven Depolo

Artificial Intelligence Performs Real Magic Tricks

February 25, 2015 11:41 am | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Researchers gave a computer program the outline of how a magic jigsaw puzzle and a mind-reading card trick work, as well the results of experiments into how humans understand magic tricks. With this information, the system created completely new variants on those tricks which can be delivered by a magician.

Klocwork 10.2 static code analysis software

Klocwork 10.2 Static Code Analysis Software

February 25, 2015 10:55 am | Rogue Wave Software | Product Releases | Comments

Klocwork 10.2 static code analysis software is designed to help developers write higher-quality, more secure code, faster. It integrates into desktop IDEs and into a team's natural workflow. Mirroring how code is developed, the software runs as code is being written, checking line-by-line.

NWChem molecular modeling software takes full advantage of a wide range of parallel computing systems, including Cascade. Courtesy of PNNL

PNNL Shifts Computational Chemistry into Overdrive

February 25, 2015 8:29 am | by Karol Kowalski, Ph.D., and Edoardo Apra, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

We computational chemists are an impatient lot. Despite the fact that we routinely deal with highly complicated chemical processes running on our laboratory’s equally complex HPC clusters, we want answers in minutes or hours, not days, months or even years. In many instances, that’s just not feasible; in fact, there are times when the magnitude of the problem simply exceeds the capabilities of the HPC resources available to us.

The OpenPOWER Foundation has announced a solid lineup of speakers headlining its inaugural OpenPOWER Summit at NVIDIA’s GPU Technology Conference at the San Jose Convention Center, March 17-19, 2015. Drawing from the open development organization’s more t

OpenPOWER Announces “Rethink the Data Center” Speaker Lineup

February 20, 2015 11:26 am | by OpenPOWER Foundation | News | Comments

The OpenPOWER Foundation has announced a solid lineup of speakers headlining its inaugural OpenPOWER Summit at NVIDIA’s GPU Technology Conference at the San Jose Convention Center, March 17-19, 2015. Drawing from the open development organization’s more than 100 members worldwide, the Summit’s organizers have lined up over 35 member presentations tied to the event’s “Rethink the Data Center” theme.

Daniel Sanchez, Nathan Beckmann and Po-An Tsai have found that the ways in which a chip carves up computations can make a big difference to performance. -- Courtesy of Bryce Vickmark

Making Smarter, Much Faster Multicore Chips

February 19, 2015 2:02 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Computer chips’ clocks have stopped getting faster. To keep delivering performance improvements, chipmakers are instead giving chips more processing units, or cores, which can execute computations in parallel. But the ways in which a chip carves up computations can make a big difference to performance.

©Classical and Quantum Gravity, 2015. Reproduced by permission of IOP Publishing

Code from Interstellar Movie Leads to new Spinning Black Hole Discoveries

February 13, 2015 3:25 pm | by IOP Institute of Physics | News | Comments

The team responsible for the Oscar-nominated visual effects at the center of Christopher Nolan’s epic, Interstellar, have turned science fiction into science fact by providing new insights into the powerful effects of black holes. The team describes innovative computer code used to generate the film’s iconic images of the wormhole, black hole and various celestial objects, and explains how the code has led them to new science discoveries.

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