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Europe’s second POWER Acceleration and Design Center is located at the IBM Research & Development Lab in Montpellier, France, where developers can get hands-on, technical assistance for creating OpenPOWER-based high performance computing apps.

IBM, NVIDIA and Mellanox Launch Design Center for Big Data and HPC

July 2, 2015 2:21 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM in collaboration with NVIDIA and Mellanox announced the establishment of a POWER Acceleration and Design Center in Monpellier, France, to advance the development of data-intensive research, industrial and commercial applications. Born out of the collaborative of the OpenPOWER Foundation, the new Center provides commercial and open-source software developers with technical assistance to enable them to develop HPC applications.

Can Computers be Creative?

July 2, 2015 8:24 am | by European Commission | News | Comments

The EU-funded What-if Machine (WHIM) project not only generates fictional storylines, but also...

Speeding Up Genome Assembly, from Months to Minutes

June 30, 2015 12:23 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Computing Sciences | News | Comments

By applying some novel algorithms, computational techniques and the innovative programming...

Pentagon, Lockheed Martin Researchers create Math and Programming Learning Platform

June 30, 2015 8:17 am | by Aaron Dubrow, NSF | News | Comments

The Pentagon's Office of Force Readiness and Training recently teamed with Lockheed Martin and...

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The researchers tested CodePhage on seven common open-source programs in which DIODE had found bugs, importing repairs from between two and four donors for each. In all instances, CodePhage was able to patch up the vulnerable code, and it generally took b

Automatic Bug Repair without Source Code Access

June 29, 2015 2:13 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

At the ACM Programming Language Design and Implementation conference, MIT researchers presented a new system that repairs dangerous software bugs by automatically importing functionality from other, more secure applications. Remarkably, the system, dubbed CodePhage, doesn’t require access to the source code of the applications whose functionality it’s borrowing. Instead, it analyzes the applications’ execution...

The Homeland Security Department headquarters in northwest Washington. China-based hackers are suspected once again of breaking into U.S. government computer networks, and the entire federal workforce could be at risk this time. The Department of Homeland

Officials: Second Hack Exposed Military and Intel Data

June 12, 2015 5:11 pm | by Ken Dilanian and Ted Bridis, Associated Press | News | Comments

Hackers linked to China appear to have gained access to the sensitive background information submitted by intelligence and military personnel for security clearances, several U.S. officials said June 12, 2015, describing a second cyberbreach of federal records that could dramatically compound the potential damage.  

The Ubimet Weather Cockpit allows golf courses, race venues and other clients to access site specific weather information unique to their topography.

Weather Matters: Enabling Precise, Real-time Forecasts

June 11, 2015 3:47 pm | by Ken Strandberg | Articles | Comments

Much of the world’s industries are affected by weather. UBIMET is one of the world’s leading private weather service providers. The company offers a range of precise, real-time micro-climate forecasting and alerts, historical weather data, and other services to several million customers around the globe. UBIMET’s competitive advantage lies in the complex character of their solutions and depth of their science and technology.

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A still from a video of MIT's first DARPA Robotics Challenge run, where they scored seven points. Courtesy of the MITDRC team

Competition Generates Cutting-edge Robotics Control Algorithms

June 11, 2015 12:16 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Last weekend was the final round of DARPA's contest to design control systems for a humanoid robot that could climb a ladder, remove debris, drive a utility vehicle and perform several other tasks related to a hypothetical disaster. When a bipedal robot takes a step, its foot strikes the ground at a number of different points. MIT researchers found a way to generalize the approach to more complex motions in 3-D.

The Wilkinson Prize was established to honor the outstanding contributions of Dr. James Hardy Wilkinson to the field of numerical software. It is awarded every four years to the entry that best addresses all phases of the preparation of numerical software

Partial Differential Equations ‘Dolfin-adjoint’ wins 2015 Wilkinson Prize for Numerical Software

June 11, 2015 11:06 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

NAG, Argonne and the National Physical Laboratory have announced awarding of the 2015 Wilkinson Prize for “dolfin-adjoint,” which automatically derives and solves adjoint and tangent linear equations from high-level mathematical specifications of finite element discretizations of partial differential equations. The prize is awarded every four years to the entry that best addresses all phases of the preparation of numerical software.

Axel Tidemann, [self.] and Øyvind Brandtsegg. Courtesy of Ole Morten Melgård, NTNU

Robot learns Everything from Scratch

June 10, 2015 12:10 pm | by Steinar Brandslet, Norwegian University of Science and Technology | News | Comments

Imagine that everything in your mind had been erased, and you had to learn everything all over again. What would that process be like? Two researchers at NTNU have made a robot that learns like a young child. At least, that’s the idea. The machine starts with nothing — it has to learn everything from scratch. The machine is called [self.]. It analyzes sound through a system based on the human ear, and learns to recognize images.

So many choices: Choosing from a universe of possible actions is a daunting task for a robot. Humans do it effortlessly. Researchers have found that video games — particularly Minecraft — can help robots learn how to tell which objects and actions might b

Using Minecraft to Unboggle the Robot Mind

June 9, 2015 9:13 am | by Brown University | News | Comments

A human can make intuitive choices about what actions to take in order to achieve a goal. Robots have a far more difficult time choosing from of a universe of possible actions. Researchers at Brown University are developing a new algorithm that can learn that skill from a video game environment. They are developing the algorithm to help robots better plan their actions in complex environments.

In a breakthrough for computer vision and for bird-watching, researchers and bird enthusiasts have enabled computers to achieve a task that stumps most humans: identifying hundreds of bird species pictured in photos. The bird photo identifier, developed b

Computer Vision Breakthrough: Merlin taps Powerful AI to ID Birds from Photos

June 8, 2015 2:03 pm | by Miyoko Chu, Cornell Lab of Ornithology | News | Comments

In a breakthrough for computer vision and for bird-watching, researchers and bird enthusiasts have enabled computers to achieve a task that stumps most humans: identifying hundreds of bird species pictured in photos. The bird photo identifier, developed by the Visipedia research project in collaboration with the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, is available for free.

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The Los Angeles team Survey's robot is seen as it conducts a demonstration of the level two challenge during the 2014 NASA Centennial Challenges Sample Return Robot Challenge, June 12, 2014, at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) in Worcester, MA. C

Robotics Teams Prepare to Compete for $1.5 Million in NASA Challenge

June 5, 2015 4:36 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

Twenty robotics teams, ranging from university students to small businesses, are preparing to compete June 8 to 13 in the fourth running of the NASA Sample Return Robot Challenge for a prize purse of $1.5 million. At the autonomous robot competition held at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, teams must demonstrate their robot can locate and collect geologic samples from a large and varied landscape, without human control.

Decentralized partially observable Markov decision processes are a way to model autonomous robots’ behavior in circumstances where neither their communication with each other nor their judgments about the outside world are perfect. The problem with Dec-PO

Autonomous Multirobot Collaboration Algorithm makes Complex Models Practical

June 3, 2015 9:58 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Decentralized partially observable Markov decision processes are a way to model autonomous robots’ behavior in circumstances where neither their communication with each other nor their judgments about the outside world are perfect. The problem is that they’re as complicated as their name. They provide the most rigorous mathematical models of multiagent systems — not just robots, but any autonomous networked devices — under uncertainty.

Baxter, a versatile robot that is designed to work in industry alongside people, is one of about 40 robots featured in Robot Revolution.

Robot Revolution Explores Visionary World through Cutting-edge Robots

May 29, 2015 9:44 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

“They’re here … to help and improve our lives,” The Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago announces on its Web site. MSI is hosting a new national touring exhibit, Robot Revolution, which explores how robots, created by human ingenuity, will ultimately be our companions and colleagues, changing how we play, live and work together. It allows guests to step into a visionary world where robots are not just a curiosity, but a vital asset.

The software structure (subroutine) of CLM. Each circle represents an individual subroutine with the area of circle showing the time spent on the subroutine with linear representation. Courtesy of Wang, D. et al.

Global Climate Model Helps Untangle Complex Webs of Cause and Effect

May 28, 2015 3:26 pm | by Christie Thiessen, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Every few years, unusual weather brings torrential rainfall and warm, nutrient-poor water to the coasts of Peru and Ecuador, devastating the fishing economies. Although this might seem like a local storm, the system — known as the El Niño–Southern Oscillation — has global effects. Typically, the next winter is much warmer in western North America, wetter in the southeastern United States, and drier in the Pacific Northwest.

More than 100,000 taxpayers have had their personal tax information stolen from an IRS Web site as part of an elaborate scheme to claim fraudulent tax refunds.  The information was stolen from an online system called "Get Transcript," where taxpayers can

Extremely Sophisticated Criminals access Tremendous Amount of IRS Data

May 27, 2015 9:41 am | by Stephen Ohlemacher, Associated Press | News | Comments

More than 100,000 taxpayers have had their personal tax information stolen from an IRS Web site as part of an elaborate scheme to claim fraudulent tax refunds. The information was stolen from a system called "Get Transcript," where taxpayers can get tax returns and other tax filings from previous years. In order to access the information, the thieves cleared a security screen...

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Crucial to most designs for quantum computers is quantum error correction, which helps preserve the fragile quantum states on which quantum computation depends. Until now, codes that could make do with limited measurements could correct only a limited num

Code Advances Quantum Error Correction

May 26, 2015 3:15 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Crucial to most designs for quantum computers is quantum error correction, which helps preserve the fragile quantum states on which quantum computation depends. Until now, codes that could make do with limited measurements could correct only a limited number of errors. But now, researchers have presented a new code that can correct errors afflicting - almost - a specified fraction of a computer’s qubits. 

James Reinders is chief evangelist, Intel’s software products.

Software and Moore’s Drumbeat (Moore’s Law)

May 19, 2015 2:48 pm | by James Reinders, Intel | Blogs | Comments

Moore’s Law recently turned 50 years old, and many have used the milestone to tout its virtues, highlight positive results that stem from it, as well as advance suggestions on what the future dividends will be and boldly project the date for its inevitable demise. Moore’s Law is an observation that has undoubtedly inspired us to innovate to the pace it predicts. It has challenged us to do so. Therefore, I think of it as Moore’s drumbeat.

Siri Segalstad is Principal, Segalstad Consulting AS and the author of International IT Regulations and Compliance (Wiley-Blackwell, 2008).

Cost of LIMS: True Pricing includes more than Purchase, Implementation and Annual Licensing

May 18, 2015 3:02 pm | by Siri H. Segalstad | Articles | Comments

The real benefit of laboratory information management systems (LIMS) is difficult to calculate. Let’s take a look at some key considerations, starting with the question of whether to build the LIMS yourself or buy a commercial LIMS… Advocates for building a new LIMS themselves usually state that their lab is so unique, they cannot use a commercial LIMS. However, very few labs are truly unique ...

The first of The Planetary Society's two LightSail spacecraft will ride to space aboard an Atlas V rocket in May 2015. The mission is a shakedown cruise designed to test out the CubeSat's critical systems. In 2016, the second LightSail spacecraft will pig

Solar-powered Sail could Revolutionize Satellite Control and Movement

May 11, 2015 8:32 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

Last September, Cal Poly's CubeSat team and The Planetary Society unfurled a solar-powered sail that some believe could revolutionize satellite propulsion. This was a deployment test and key milestone for the LightSail project. Among those present was Bill Nye, CEO of The Planetary Society. Lightsail is a Planetary Society initiative with the goal of demonstrating effective use of solar sails for satellite control and movement.

Scientists have programmed DNA to calculate multiple GPS routes at the same time. Courtesy of the American Chemical Society

Next Step in DNA Computing: GPS Mapping?

May 6, 2015 12:23 pm | by American Chemical Society | News | Comments

Conventional silicon-based computing, which has advanced by leaps and bounds in recent decades, is pushing against its practical limits. DNA computing could help take the digital era to the next level. Scientists are now reporting progress toward that goal with the development of a novel DNA-based GPS.

“An impressively geeky debut…the technical details keep the story relentlessly precise and the suspense ramped up. And really, how can anyone not root for a regular dude to prove the U-S-A still has the Right Stuff?”

The Martian: From Self-Published Blog to Major Motion Picture

May 6, 2015 9:38 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

The Martian is Weir’s first novel. He started the book in 2009, researching it to be as realistic as possible based on existing technology, and posting it to his blog chapter by chapter. The story unfolded over the course of several years, but Weir has stated that he knows the exact date of each day in The Martian.

The surface of rendered objects in computer games often looks unrealistic. A new method creates much more realistic images, imitating the complex scattering processes under the surface. Left: the new method, top right: without subsurface scattering, botto

New Mathematical Method makes Computer Game Surface Rendering Much More Realistic

May 5, 2015 12:24 pm | by TU Wien (Vienna) | News | Comments

Overturning cars, flying missiles and airplanes speeding across the screen — on modern computers, 3-D objects can be calculated in a flash. However, many surfaces still look unnatural. Whether it is skin, stone or wax — on the computer screen, all materials look alike, as if the objects had all been cut out of the same opaque material. A new mathematical method takes into account light scattering that occurs below the surface...

Grow Your Own LIMS Code

May 5, 2015 9:05 am | by Helen Kelly | Articles | Comments

These days, using a LIMS seems to feature in every scientist's life, and for some small and medium-size labs, open source code is the way forward with a LIMS. In fact, businesses have grown up around helping labs implement open source LIMS and learn to make modifications in house. A bridge too far for a nonprofessional? Not according to Greg Wilson, who believes that most scientists can easily learn enough to slip into coding...

The ParaPhrase researchers have developed an approach that allows large parallel programs to be constructed out of standard building blocks called patterns. A refactoring tool allows these patterns to be reassembled in optimal ways without changing the fu

Supporting the Fastest, Most Powerful Computing Systems on the Planet

May 4, 2015 4:10 pm | by University of St Andrews | News | Comments

A world-leading team of academic researchers and industrial experts from across Europe are celebrating the conclusion of a four-year research collaboration tackling the challenges posed by the fastest and most powerful computing systems on the planet. The 4.2M Euro ParaPhrase project brought together academic and industrial experts from across Europe to improve the programmability and performance of modern parallel computing technologies.

An FPGA board along with a custom sensor box built by the GTRI team for research purposes. Courtesy of Georgia Tech/Rob Felt

Advancing Security and Trust in Reconfigurable Devices

May 4, 2015 2:24 pm | by Rick Robinson, Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A research team at the Georgia Tech Research Institute is studying a range of security challenges involving programmable logic devices — in particular, field programmable gate arrays. FPGAs combine hardware performance and software flexibility so well that they're increasingly used in aerospace, defense, consumer devices, HPC, vehicles, medical devices and other applications. But they come with potential vulnerabilities.

Amin Amini Maghsoud Bigy and Dr. Konstantinos Banitsas have turned Microsoft’s Kinect computer games controller into a system that can counter two of the most common and distressing symptoms of Parkinson’s.

Hacked Kinect Computer Games Controller a Game-changer for Parkinson’s

May 1, 2015 8:58 am | by Brunel University London | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a system for Parkinson’s sufferers to counter two of the most common and distressing symptoms of the degenerative disease.They have turned Microsoft’s Kinect computer games controller into a system that can be installed into a patient’s own home.

NAG Library Mark 25

NAG Library Mark 25

April 28, 2015 9:43 am | Nag Ltd | Product Releases | Comments

NAG Library Mark 25 includes 81 new mathematical and statistical routines. Features include least angle regression (LARS), least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) and forward stagewise regression, nearest correlation matrix updates, unscented Kalman filter, change point analysis, high dimensional quadrature using sparse grids, bandwidth reduction of sparse matrix by reverse Cuthill-McKee reordering ...

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