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This artist's rendering provided by the European Space Agency shows the Beagle-2 lander. The spacecraft went missing on Christmas Day, 2003, when it was supposed to land on Mars and start transmitting data back to Earth. On Friday, Jan. 16, 2015, more tha

Mystery Solved: Missing Beagle-2 Finally Located on Mars, Deployment Failed in Final Stage

January 20, 2015 2:47 pm | by Gregory Katz, Associated Press | News | Comments

It turns out the Beagle has landed after all — but it never called home. The gone-but-not-forgotten spacecraft Beagle-2 went AWOL on Christmas Day, 2003, when it was supposed to land on Mars and start transmitting data back to Earth. Instead, the British-built craft went dark. After several months, it was declared lost — presumed to have been destroyed during its approach or while trying to land on the red planet.

MIT Algorithm Helps Household Robots Identify Items Concealed in Clutter

January 15, 2015 9:49 am | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

For household robots to be practical, they need to be able to recognize the objects they’re...

Today’s Drone Market Resembles Silicon Valley's Early Days

January 9, 2015 10:51 am | by Scott Mayerowitz, AP Business Writer | News | Comments

To see the future of drones, head up the hill at the intersection of Industrial Drive and...

Intel’s CEO Outlines Future of Computing

January 7, 2015 3:54 pm | by Intel | News | Comments

Intel has announced a number of technology advancements and initiatives aimed at accelerating...

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Approximately 3,000 FRC teams are projected to compete for the chance to gain top honors at the FIRST Championship, which will take place April 22 to 25 in St. Louis, MO.

2015 FIRST Robotics Competition Kicks Off

January 7, 2015 2:45 pm | by Automation Federation | News | Comments

Nearly 75,000 high-school students on approximately 3,000 teams at 107 venues around the globe joined the kickoff event on January 3, 2015, of the 2015 FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC) via live Comcast NBCUniversal broadcast. FIRST is a not-for-profit organization devoted to helping young people discover and develop a passion for science, engineering, technology and math.

The 2.5-meter-long underwater drone is ready to be launched through the hole in the sea ice. Courtesy of Lars Chresten Lund Hansen

Underwater Drones lead Antarctic Exploration into New Epoch

January 5, 2015 1:12 pm | by Signe Høgslund & Peter Bondo Christensen, Aarhus University | News | Comments

Splash. A Weddell seal weighing almost 500 kilograms lands inside the tent and blocks the hole laboriously sawn out by researchers in the two-meter-thick ice to launch drones under the sea ice. The tent is lovely and warm. Outside, the thermometer shows -15 degrees. The seal finally glides back into the water, and the researchers have access to the open water. The advanced technology drone is carefully lowered into the icy cold sea.

Ozobot was selected for a Kids at Play Interactive (KAPi) Award for the Best Robot.

World's Smallest Programmable Robot wins KAPi Award

January 5, 2015 12:40 pm | by Evollve | News | Comments

Who's that tiny dancer in the aisles of the Consumer Electronics Show? It's Ozobot, the world's smallest programmable robot with an intuitive color-based language. Ozobot's capacity for fun and learning is designed to bridge the physical and digital divide, and the “smart game piece” glides seamlessly from paper to digital tablet. Playing with the robot introduces kids and young adults to simple coding basics...

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The prototype robotic turtle. Courtesy of NUS

Next-gen Thinking Biomimetic Robots Perform Surveillance, Energy Harvesting

January 2, 2015 4:26 pm | by National University of Singapore | News | Comments

Researchers are closer to creating underwater robotic creatures with a brain of their own — besides behaving like the real thing. In the near future, it would not be too tall an order for the National University of Singapore (NUS) team to produce a swarm of autonomous tiny robotic sea turtles and fishes, for example, to perform hazardous missions, such as detecting nuclear wastes underwater or other tasks too dangerous for humans.

A gecko foot. Researchers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory have developed a gripping system based on the way gecko feet are able to stick to surfaces. Just as a gecko's foot has tiny adhesive hairs, the JPL devices have small structures that work in si

Gecko Grippers Get a Microgravity Test Flight

January 2, 2015 2:16 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

There are no garbage trucks equipped to leave the atmosphere and pick up debris floating around the Earth. But what if we could send a robot to do the job? Scientists at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory are working on adhesive gripping tools that could grapple objects, such as orbital debris or defunct satellites, that would otherwise be hard to handle.

As the first humanoid robot to pay for a seat on a commercial flight, Athena travelled in style, dressed in a white T-shirt and fetching red shoes. © MPI for Intelligent Systems, Tübingen

Robotics in Disaster Response: Athena begins Autonomous Perception Training

December 18, 2014 12:23 pm | by Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems | News | Comments

Travelling from Los Angeles to Frankfurt onboard Lufthansa flight 457, the passenger arrived on December 16 with no signs of jet lag: this was no ordinary holidaymaker, but the first humanoid robot to take up a seat on a commercial flight. Athena made her way from LA to Tübingen in order to acquire many new skills: standing, balancing, walking — and various other meaningful activities, which she can use to assist people in daily life.

A team of researchers is embarking on a collaborative project to ensure that the autonomous robots we build in the future will be safer, making decisions that are ethical and follow legislation on robotics.

New Research Will Help Robots Know Their Limits

December 8, 2014 6:05 pm | by University of Sheffield | News | Comments

A team of researchers is embarking on a collaborative project to ensure that the autonomous robots we build in the future will be safer, making decisions that are ethical and follow legislation on robotics.             

A University of Texas at Dallas professor applied robot control theory to enable powered prosthetics to dynamically respond to the wearer’s environment and help amputees walk.

Engineer Applies Robot Control Theory to Improve Prosthetic Legs

December 4, 2014 3:47 pm | by The University of Texas at Dallas | News | Comments

A University of Texas at Dallas professor applied robot control theory to enable powered prosthetics to dynamically respond to the wearer’s environment and help amputees walk.                     

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It's a robot unlike any other: inspired by the world's fastest land animal, controlled by video game technology and packing nifty sensors — including one used to maneuver drones, satellites and ballistic missiles. The robot, called the cheetah, is the cre

MIT Engineers Have High Hopes for Cheetah Robot

December 2, 2014 3:27 pm | by Rodrique Ngowi, Associated Press | News | Comments

It's a robot unlike any other: inspired by the world's fastest land animal, controlled by video game technology and packing nifty sensors — including one used to maneuver drones, satellites and ballistic missiles. The robot, called the cheetah, is the creation of researchers at the Massachusetts of Technology, who had to design key elements from scratch because of a lack of or shortcomings in existing technology.

Ohio State's Adaptive Suspension Vehicle (AVS), nicknamed the "Walker." Developed by electrical engineer Robert McGhee and mechanical engineer Kenneth Waldron, along with a 60-member team of students and technical assistants, the 'Walker' was designed to

NSF Celebrates More than 40 Years Supporting US Robotics Research

November 24, 2014 4:14 pm | by Aaron Dubrow, NSF | News | Comments

The fundamental research in computing and engineering that enabled robotics to develop in the U.S. has been supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) since its inception. Yet despite these early investments in sensors, machine movement and computer vision, it wasn't until 1972 that the first grant with "robot" in the title was funded.

University of Waikato Master of Engineering student Pinwei Jin with his Snake Robot prototype at the Carter Holt Harvey Pulp & Paper Engineering Design Show.

Snake Robot to the Rescue

November 11, 2014 3:17 pm | by University of Waikato | News | Comments

Pinwei Jin has designed and built a remote control robotic snake, which he hopes will be used in the future for rescue operations. Differing from the existing mobile rescue robot systems currently in the market place, Jin says his Snake Robot provides the flexibility of movement needed in cluttered and irregular environments created by disasters.

The USS Macon inside Hangar One at Moffett Field on October 15, 1933 — following a transcontinental flight from Lakehurst, New Jersey.

Google Signs 60-year, $1 Billion NASA Lease

November 11, 2014 3:07 pm | by Brandon Bailey, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Google has signed a long-term lease for part of a historic Navy air base, where it plans to renovate three massive hangars and use them for projects involving aviation, space exploration and robotics. The giant Internet company will pay $1.16 billion in rent over 60 years for the property, which also includes a working air field, golf course and other buildings. The 1,000-acre site is part of the former Moffett Field Naval Air Station.

The world’s most advanced bionic hand was tested with the help of amputee Dennis Aabo Sørensen who was able to grasp objects intuitively and identify what he was touching, while blindfolded. © LifeHand2

Neural Interface allows Natural Control of World’s Most Advanced Bionic Hand

November 7, 2014 3:27 pm | by European Commission | News | Comments

A prosthetic hand, which provides a sense of touch acute enough to handle an egg, has been completed and is now exploited by the NEBIAS project after 10 years of EU-funded research. The world’s most advanced bionic hand was tested with the help of amputee Dennis Aabo Sørensen who was able to grasp objects intuitively and identify what he was touching, while blindfolded.

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A remote-controlled roving camera camouflaged as a penguin chick in Adelie Land, Antarctica. The device is so convincing that penguins don't scamper away and sometimes even sing to it with trumpet-like sounds. Emperor penguins are notoriously shy. When re

Roving Robotic Spy Keeps Tabs on Shy Penguins

November 4, 2014 12:42 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The newest tool for biologists is the baby penguin robotic spy. It's pretty darn cute, and so convincing that penguins essentially talk to it, as if it is a potential mate for their chicks. Emperor penguins are notoriously shy. When researchers approach, these penguins normally back away and their heart rate goes up. That's not what the scientists need when they want to check heart rate, health and other penguin parameters.

MIT researchers explain their new visualization system that can project a robot's "thoughts." Video screenshot courtesy of Melanie Gonick/MIT

Projecting a Robot’s Intentions: New Spin on Virtual Reality to Read Robots’ Minds

October 30, 2014 4:46 pm | by Jennifer Chu, MIT | News | Comments

In a darkened, hangar-like space inside MIT’s Building 41, a small, Roomba-like robot is trying to make up its mind. Standing in its path is an obstacle — a human pedestrian who’s pacing back and forth. To get to the other side of the room, the robot has to first determine where the pedestrian is, then choose the optimal route to avoid a close encounter.

A 3-D image of the researchers' study site in Malaysian Borneo using drone data and a photo of the Sensefly eBee drone up close. Courtesy of Trends in Parasitology, Fornace et al.

Drones Help Map Spread of Infectious Disease

October 24, 2014 5:07 pm | by Cell Press | News | Comments

Unmanned aerial vehicles, or drones, can collect detailed information in real time at relatively low cost for ecological research. In a new Opinion piece published in the Cell Press journal Trends in Parasitology, experts demonstrate that drones can be used to understand how environmental factors influence the spread of infectious diseases.

The robot has a friction crawler-based drive system (such as the one in war tanks), ideal for all types of terrain. It also has motion sensors, cameras, a laser and an infrared system, allowing it to rebuild the environment and, thereby, find paths or cre

Robot Scans Rubble, Recognizes Humans in Disaster Situations

October 21, 2014 9:35 am | by Investigación y Desarrollo | News | Comments

Through a computational algorithm, researchers have developed a neural network that allows a small robot to detect different patterns, such as images, fingerprints, handwriting, faces, bodies, voice frequencies and DNA sequences. Nancy Guadalupe Arana Daniel focused on the recognition of human silhouettes in disaster situations.

This image provided by Oculus shows a new prototype of its virtual reality headset. The hew headset features a higher resolution and refresh rate, 360-degree head tracking and integrated headphones. (AP Photo/Oculus)

Smithsonian Honors Founder of Virtual Reality Firm Oculus

October 17, 2014 11:03 am | by AP | News | Comments

The founder of virtual reality firm Oculus and singer Rosanne Cash and are among those who were honored with American Ingenuity Awards at the Smithsonian Institution, along with eight other scientists and scholars for their groundbreaking work. Washingtonian magazine has described the event as the “Golden Globes of Intellect.”

Patient mockup of surgical robot designed to treat epilepsy by entering the brain through the cheek. (Laboratory for the Design and Control of Energetic Systems / Vanderbilt)

Minimally Invasive Brain Surgery Performed by Pneumatic Robot

October 16, 2014 2:38 pm | by David Salisbury, Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

For those most severely affected, treating epilepsy means drilling through the skull deep into the brain to destroy the small area where the seizures originate — invasive, dangerous and with a long recovery period. Five years ago, a team of Vanderbilt engineers wondered: Is it possible to address epileptic seizures in a less invasive way?

An innovative piece of research looks into the matter of machine morality, and questions whether it is “evil” for robots to masquerade as humans.

How to Train your Robot: Can We Teach Robots Right from Wrong?

October 14, 2014 12:46 pm | by Taylor & Francis | News | Comments

From performing surgery to driving cars, today’s robots can do it all. With chatbots recently hailed as passing the Turing test, it appears robots are becoming increasingly adept at posing as humans. While machines are becoming ever more integrated into human lives, the need to imbue them with a sense of morality becomes increasingly urgent. But can we really teach robots how to be good? An innovative piece of research looks into the matter

The robot was rolled out October 9, 2014, with a staffer guiding it remotely around the baggage claim area greeting travelers and looking for anyone who needed assistance. Courtesy of Indianapolis International Airport

Indianapolis Airport Debuts Customer Service Robot

October 13, 2014 12:11 pm | by AP | News | Comments

A customer service robot has started roaming around the passenger terminal of Indianapolis International Airport. The robot was rolled out October 9, 2014, with a staffer guiding it remotely around the baggage claim area greeting travelers and looking for anyone who needed assistance. The robot looks like a miniature Segway, but with a blue customer service shirt and an interactive iPod on top showing the face of the employee piloting it.

The PLANTOID prototype was designed with two functional roots: one root demonstrates bending capabilities, responding to input from the sensors at the tip of the root. A second root demonstrates artificial growth. Courtesy of PLANTOID

Revolutionary Robotic Solutions are Inspired by Plants

October 10, 2014 12:42 pm | by European Commission | News | Comments

Researchers are demonstrating revolutionary robotic techniques inspired by plants, featuring a 3-D-printed ‘trunk,’ ‘leaves’ that sense the environment and ‘roots’ that grow and change direction. Humans naturally understand problems and solutions from an animal’s perspective, tending to see plants as passive organisms that don’t ‘do’ much of anything, but plants do move, and they sense, and they do so in extremely efficient ways.

Computer modelling of the human eye, the brain of a rat and a robot could revolutionize advances in neuroscience and new technology. A new study uses new computer algorithms to enable robots to navigate intelligently, unrestricted by high-density building

Robot Researcher Combines Nature to Nurture 'Superhuman' Navigation

October 1, 2014 3:27 pm | by Queensland University of Technology | News | Comments

Computer modelling of the human eye, the brain of a rat and a robot could revolutionize advances in neuroscience and new technology. A new study uses new computer algorithms to enable robots to navigate intelligently, unrestricted by high-density buildings or tunnels.

Researchers are developing a robotic fabric that moves and contracts and is embedded with sensors, an approach that could bring "active clothing" and a new class of "soft" robots.

Robotic Fabric Could Bring about Wearable Robots

September 30, 2014 3:20 pm | by Purdue University | News | Comments

Researchers are developing a robotic fabric that moves and contracts and is embedded with sensors, an approach that could bring "active clothing" and a new class of "soft" robots.                    

Recently, at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, researchers unveiled an oval-shaped submersible robot, a little smaller than a football, with a flattened panel on one side that it can slide along an underwater surface to perfo

Underwater Robot Secures Our Ports

September 29, 2014 3:13 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

Recently, at the International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems, researchers unveiled an oval-shaped submersible robot, a little smaller than a football, with a flattened panel on one side that it can slide along an underwater surface to perform ultrasound scans.

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