Advertisement
Security
Subscribe to Security

The Lead

An atomic memory (glowing green), made at the Faculty of Physics at the University of Warsaw, can be used to store quantum information in telecomunication purposes. From left to right: Michał Dąbrowski, Radek Chrapkiewicz and Wojciech Wasilewski. Courtesy

Global Quantum Communications No Longer the Stuff of Fiction

November 26, 2014 1:40 pm | by University of Warsaw | News | Comments

Following years of tests in physics laboratories, the first quantum technologies are slowly emerging into wider applications. One example is quantum cryptography — an encryption method providing an almost full guarantee of secure data transmission, currently being introduced by military forces and banking institutions.

Mind-blowingly Sophisticated Hacking Program is Groundbreaking, Almost Peerless

November 26, 2014 12:15 pm | by Brandon Bailey, AP Technology Writer | News | Comments

Cyber-security researchers say they've identified a highly sophisticated computer hacking...

Self-Repairing Software Tackles Malware

November 14, 2014 3:54 pm | by University of Utah | News | Comments

Computer scientists have developed software that not only detects and eradicates never-before-...

Panasas SiteSync

November 13, 2014 2:43 pm | Product Releases | Comments

SiteSync is a high-speed, parallel replication and file transfer solution designed to solve the...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

Specific bits of a digital image file that have been replaced with the bits of a secret steganographic payload permit a covert agent to post top-secret documents on their Facebook wall by simply uploading what appear to be cute images of kittens on any ty

Leading the Eyewitness: Digital Image Forensics in a Megapixel World

November 12, 2014 3:42 pm | by William Weaver, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

Current research in the area of digital image forensics is developing better ways to convert image files into frequencies, such as using wavelet transforms in addition to more traditional cosine transforms and more sensitive methods for determining if each area of an image belongs to the whole.

Traditionally, a person might enter a password or pull out a driver's license or passport as proof of identity. But increasingly, identification and authentication can also require an eye scan or a well-placed hand. It's a science known as biometrics, rec

Cybersecurity: Computer Scientist Sees New Possibilities for Ocular Biometrics

November 4, 2014 12:37 pm | by Miles O'Brien, NSF | News | Comments

Researhers are developing a three-layered, multi-biometric approach that tracks the movement of the eye globe and its muscles, and monitors how and where a person's brain focuses visual attention, in addition to scanning patterns in the iris. The system essentially upgrades the security of existing iris recognition technology with nothing more than a software upgrade.

Products and services based on TIBCO's Fast Data platform are designed to enable businesses worldwide to turn big data into a differentiator.

TIBCO Announces New Ease-of-Use Enhancements to Fast Data Capabilities

November 3, 2014 11:37 am | by TIBCO Software | News | Comments

TIBCO Software has announced improvements to the company's Fast Data capabilities, enabling IT and business users to leverage today’s rapidly changing business environment. Products and services based on TIBCO's Fast Data platform are designed to enable businesses worldwide to turn big data into a differentiator.

Advertisement
When properly understood, privacy rules are essential, Neil M. Richards, JD, professor of law says.

Right to Privacy: Achieving Meaningful Protection in a Big Data World

October 24, 2014 8:42 pm | by Washington University in St. Louis | News | Comments

In the digital age in which we live, monitoring, security breaches and hacks of sensitive data are all too common. It has been argued that privacy has no place in this big data environment and anything we put online can, and probably will, be seen by prying eyes. In a new paper, a privacy law expert makes the case that, when properly understood, privacy rules will be an essential and valuable part of our digital future.

NIST Cloud Computing Roadmap Details Research Requirements, Action Plans  Courtesy of Irvine/NIST and ©magann/Fotolia

NIST Cloud Computing Roadmap Reflects Worldwide Input

October 23, 2014 3:23 pm | by National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) | News | Comments

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has published the final version of the US Government Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap, Volumes I and II. The roadmap focuses on strategic and tactical objectives to support the federal government’s accelerated adoption of cloud computing. This final document reflects the input from more than 200 comments on the initial draft received from around the world.

Companies can log on, cost-free, at http://cyberchain.rhsmith.umd.edu and track developing threats, plus map their IT supply chains and anonymously measure themselves against industry peers and NIST standards.

Counter-measure Offers Cyber Protection for Supply Chains

October 22, 2014 10:14 am | by University of Maryland | News | Comments

The supply chain is ground zero for several recent cyber breaches. Hackers, for example, prey on vendors that have remote access to a larger company's global IT systems, software and networks. In the 2013 Target breach, the attacker infiltrated a vulnerable link: a refrigeration system supplier connected to the retailer's IT system. A counter-measure, via a user-ready online portal, has been developed at the Supply Chain Management Center.

Caris Life Sciences is accelerating precision medicine for cancer treatment using IBM technical computing and software defined storage solutions.  Courtesy of Caris Life Science

Accelerating Use of Molecular Profiling in Cancer Treatment Selection

September 25, 2014 4:43 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM announced that Caris Life Sciences is using IBM technical computing and storage technology to accelerate the company’s molecular profiling services for cancer patients. The Caris tumor profiling database is one of the largest datasets in the application of advanced molecular profiling technologies to support clinicians in delivering personalized treatment recommendations — or precision oncology.

The research center’s first director, Jeff Moulton, will be charged with attracting major research contracts by leveraging the university’s unique strengths in such disciplines as supercomputing, cybersecurity and nanotechnology.

Cyber Research Center Announced at LSU

September 24, 2014 1:52 pm | by Louisiana Economic Development | News | Comments

Governor Jindal and LSU President and Chancellor Alexander announced creation of the LSU Transformational Technology and Cyber Research Center, which will pursue major federal and commercial research projects in applied technology fields, leveraging the university’s unique strengths in such disciplines as supercomputing, cybersecurity and nanotechnology.

Advertisement
This small device developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory uses the truly random spin of light particles as defined by laws of quantum mechanics to generate a random number for use in a cryptographic key that can be used to securely transmit informatio

Secure Computing for the Everyman: Quantum Computing goes to Market

September 17, 2014 1:40 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

The largest information technology agreement ever signed by Los Alamos National Laboratory brings the potential for truly secure data encryption to the marketplace after nearly 20 years of development at the nation's national-security science laboratory.

University of Alabama at Birmingham associate professor Nitesh Saxena, Ph.D. Courtesy of UAB News

Improved Method Lets Computers Know You Are Human

September 9, 2014 3:21 pm | by University of Alabama at Birmingham | News | Comments

CAPTCHA services that require users to recognize and type in static distorted characters may be a method of the past, according to studies published by researchers at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. Nitesh Saxena led a team that investigated the security and usability of the next generation of CAPTCHAs that are based on simple computer games.

So far, JOANA is the only software analysis tool worldwide that does not only find all security gaps but also minimizes the number of false alarms without affecting the functioning of programs.

For Secure Software: X-rays instead of Passport Control

August 27, 2014 3:13 pm | by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology | News | Comments

Trust is good, control is better. This also applies to the security of computer programs. Instead of trusting “identification documents” in the form of certificates, the JOANA software analysis tool examines the source text (code) of a program. In this way, it detects leaks, via which secret information may get out or strangers may enter the system from outside. At the same time, JOANA reduces the number of false alarms to a minimum.

Sandia National Laboratories managers Alex Roesler, left, and Luke Purvis, center, and systems analyst Jarret Lafleur shown inside a Bank of Italy vault in a historic Livermore, California, building, studied 23 high-value heists that occurred in the last

National Security: Lessons Learned Drawn from Perfect Heists

August 25, 2014 12:00 pm | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

The Antwerp Diamond Center theft and other sophisticated, high-value heists show that motivated criminals can find ways to overcome every obstacle between them and their targets. Can the Energy and Defense departments, responsible for analyzing, designing and implementing complex systems to protect vital national security assets, learn from security failures in the banking, art and jewelry worlds? Sandia Labs set out to answer that question

Ramasany Gowthami participated in the creation of an Android app by means of which users get together to crack a modern cryptographic code.

Smartphones Set Out to Decipher Cryptographic System

August 25, 2014 4:33 am | by Sébastien Corthésy, EPFL | News | Comments

An Android app has been created that allows users to get together to crack a modern cryptographic code. All encryption types, among which we can find the widely used RSA, can theoretically be broken. If so, how to ensure that our data remains protected? The answer lies in the time and effort required to break the code.

Advertisement
Rock Stars of Cybersecurity will take place in Austin, TX, on September 24, 2014

Top Cybersecurity Advice from the Rock Stars

August 22, 2014 10:57 am | by Amanda Sawyer, IEEE Computer Society | Blogs | Comments

High-profile security breaches, data thefts and cyberattacks are increasing in frequency, ferocity and stealth. They result in significant loss of revenue and reputation for organizations, destabilize governments, and hit everyone’s wallets. Cybersecurity is in the global spotlight and, now more than ever, organizations must understand how to identify weaknesses and protect company infrastructure from incursions.

TCP Stealth defense software can help to prevent cyberattacks. Courtesy of Artur Marciniec/Fotolia

TCP Stealth Offers Protection against Hacienda Intelligence Program

August 20, 2014 10:00 am | by Technische Universität München | News | Comments

According to a group of journalists, a spy program known as "Hacienda" is being used by five western intelligence agencies to identify vulnerable servers across the world in order to control them and use them for their own purposes. However, scientists at the Technische Universität München have developed free software that can help prevent this kind of identification and, thus, the subsequent capture of systems.

Florida Polytechnic University is the newest addition to the State University System of Florida and the only one dedicated exclusively to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

New Supercomputing Center to Support Big Data and Analytics, Cybersecurity and other STEM Skills

August 18, 2014 3:57 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

Florida Polytechnic University, Flagship Solutions Group and IBM have announced a new supercomputing center at the University composed of IBM high performance systems, software and cloud-based storage, to help educate students in emerging technology fields. Florida Polytechnic University is the newest addition to the State University System and the only one dedicated exclusively to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

In one brief lapse of concentration, I didn’t examine the URL on a “Windows update” and my venerable Dell Dimension 8300 was infected with a rootkit virus when I clicked “OK” to upgrade Internet Explorer.

The Root(kit) of all Evil: Software Criminals are Winning the Arms Race

August 12, 2014 11:40 am | by Randy C. Hice | Blogs | Comments

Ah, sad news in the Hice household. The patient is terminal, and I’m keeping it alive on life support. I keep wallowing in self-pity and ask myself, “Why me?” I feel as though I’m somehow responsible for the illness. Well, OK, I’m definitely responsible, why lie? I may as well have been sharing blood-soaked hypos with a drug addict, but what I did was equally careless. In one brief lapse of concentration, I didn’t examine the URL ...

Paul Denny-Gouldson is Vice President of Strategic Solutions at IDBS.

The ELN Command Center: Gateway to Better Knowledge Management and Re-Use

August 7, 2014 10:35 am | by Paul Denny-Gouldson, IDBS | Blogs | Comments

The command center: any place which provides centralized command, a source of leadership and guidance to the rest of the organization. That’s what I see the concept of ELN developing into in research and development (R&D) across all sectors. Furthermore, it won’t be just a notebook, but a ’workplace.’

NSF's Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace (SaTC) program will support more than 225 new projects in 39 states in 2014. The awards enable research from the theoretical to the experimental, and aim to minimize the misuses of cyber technology, bolster educatio

Frontier-scale Projects Expand Breadth and Impact of Cybersecurity, Privacy Research

August 6, 2014 3:35 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

As our lives and businesses become ever more intertwined with the Internet and networked technologies, it is crucial to continue to develop and improve cybersecurity measures to keep our data, devices and critical systems safe, secure, private and accessible. The NSF's Secure and Trustworthy Cyberspace program has announced two new center-scale "Frontier" awards to support projects that address grand challenges in cybersecurity science

The researchers traced 95 percent of canvas fingerprinting scripts back to share buttons provided by AddThis, the world’s largest content sharing platform.

Share Button, Web Site Plug-Ins can be used to Track You against Your Will

July 22, 2014 3:24 pm | by KU Leuven | News | Comments

One in 18 of the world’s top 100,000 Web sites track users without their consent using a previously undetected cookie-like tracking mechanism embedded in ‘share’ buttons. A new study by researchers at KU Leuven and Princeton University provides the first large-scale investigation of the mechanism and is the first to confirm its use on actual Web sites.

Digital Crime-Fighters Face Technical Challenges with Cloud Computing

July 16, 2014 10:26 am | by NIST | News | Comments

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has issued for public review and comment a draft report summarizing 65 challenges that cloud computing poses to forensics investigators who uncover, gather, examine and interpret digital evidence to help solve crimes.

Own Your Own Data: System allows you to Pick and Choose what Data to Share

July 11, 2014 3:00 pm | by Larry Hardesty | MIT News Office | News | Comments

Cellphone metadata has been in the news quite a bit lately, but the National Security Agency isn’t the only organization that collects information about people’s online behavior. Newly downloaded cellphone apps routinely ask to access your location information, your address book or other apps and, of course, Web sites like Amazon or Netflix track your browsing history in the interest of making personalized recommendations.

Transparent Two-Sided Touchable Display Wall Developed

July 8, 2014 4:18 pm | by The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) | News | Comments

At a busy shopping mall, shoppers walk by store windows to find attractive items to purchase. Through the windows, shoppers can see the products displayed, but may have a hard time imagining doing something beyond just looking, such as touching the displayed items or communicating with sales assistants inside the store. With TransWall, however, window shopping could become more fun and real than ever before.

New Web technology would let you track how private data is used online. (Left to right) Tim Berners-Lee, Oshani Seneviratne, and Lalana Kagal  Courtesy of Bryce Vickmark

Who’s Using your Data?

June 17, 2014 2:57 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

By now, most people feel comfortable conducting financial transactions on the Web. The cryptographic schemes that protect online banking and credit card purchases have proven their reliability over decades. As more of our data moves online, a more pressing concern may be its inadvertent misuse by people authorized to access it. Every month seems to bring another story of private information accidentally leaked

A Norwegian vessel passing through the Bosporus in Istanbul Turkey, on March 2, 2014. The mysterious ship the size of a large passenger ferry left a Romanian wharf, glided through the narrow Bosporus that separates Europe and Asia, and plotted a course to

Cold War-style Spy Games Re-join Cyber-attacks, Other Espionage Ops

June 12, 2014 12:45 pm | by Karl Ritter, Associated Press | News | Comments

In early March, a mysterious ship the size of a large passenger ferry left a Romanian wharf, glided through the narrow Bosporus that separates Europe and Asia, and plotted a course toward Scandinavia. About a month later, at the headquarters of Norway's military intelligence service, the country's spy chief disclosed its identity. It was a $250 million spy ship that will be equipped with sensors and other technology to snoop on Russia.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading