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The researchers traced 95 percent of canvas fingerprinting scripts back to share buttons provided by AddThis, the world’s largest content sharing platform.

Share Button, Web Site Plug-Ins can be used to Track You against Your Will

July 22, 2014 3:24 pm | by KU Leuven | News | Comments

One in 18 of the world’s top 100,000 Web sites track users without their consent using a previously undetected cookie-like tracking mechanism embedded in ‘share’ buttons. A new study by researchers at KU Leuven and Princeton University provides the first large-scale investigation of the mechanism and is the first to confirm its use on actual Web sites.

Digital Crime-Fighters Face Technical Challenges with Cloud Computing

July 16, 2014 10:26 am | by NIST | News | Comments

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has issued for public review and...

Own Your Own Data: System allows you to Pick and Choose what Data to Share

July 11, 2014 3:00 pm | by Larry Hardesty | MIT News Office | News | Comments

Cellphone metadata has been in the news quite a bit lately, but the National Security Agency isn...

Transparent Two-Sided Touchable Display Wall Developed

July 8, 2014 4:18 pm | by The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) | News | Comments

At a busy shopping mall, shoppers walk by store windows to find attractive items to purchase....

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New Web technology would let you track how private data is used online. (Left to right) Tim Berners-Lee, Oshani Seneviratne, and Lalana Kagal  Courtesy of Bryce Vickmark

Who’s Using your Data?

June 17, 2014 2:57 pm | by Larry Hardesty, MIT | News | Comments

By now, most people feel comfortable conducting financial transactions on the Web. The cryptographic schemes that protect online banking and credit card purchases have proven their reliability over decades. As more of our data moves online, a more pressing concern may be its inadvertent misuse by people authorized to access it. Every month seems to bring another story of private information accidentally leaked

A Norwegian vessel passing through the Bosporus in Istanbul Turkey, on March 2, 2014. The mysterious ship the size of a large passenger ferry left a Romanian wharf, glided through the narrow Bosporus that separates Europe and Asia, and plotted a course to

Cold War-style Spy Games Re-join Cyber-attacks, Other Espionage Ops

June 12, 2014 12:45 pm | by Karl Ritter, Associated Press | News | Comments

In early March, a mysterious ship the size of a large passenger ferry left a Romanian wharf, glided through the narrow Bosporus that separates Europe and Asia, and plotted a course toward Scandinavia. About a month later, at the headquarters of Norway's military intelligence service, the country's spy chief disclosed its identity. It was a $250 million spy ship that will be equipped with sensors and other technology to snoop on Russia.

The all-flash HP 3PAR StoreServ 7450 Storage array

Making Enterprise Architecture of the Future a Reality

June 10, 2014 4:29 pm | by HP | News | Comments

HP has announced new innovations and sustainable enterprise infrastructure solutions designed to deliver the simplicity, efficiency and investment protection organizations need to bridge the datacenter technologies of today and tomorrow. Big data, mobility, security and cloud computing are forcing organizations to rethink their approach to technology, causing them to invest heavily in IT infrastructure.

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Rutgers engineering researchers are exploring the security and memorability of free-form gestures as passwords

Are Squiggly Lines the Future of Password Security?

June 5, 2014 10:20 am | by Rutgers University | News | Comments

As more people use smart phones or tablets to pay bills, make purchases, store personal information and even control access to their houses, the need for robust password security has become more critical than ever. A new study shows that free-form gestures — sweeping fingers in shapes across the screen of a smart phone or tablet — can be used to unlock phones and grant access to apps.

Atos, an international information technology services company, and Bull, a partner for enterprise data, together announced the intended public offer in cash by Atos for all the issued and outstanding shares in the capital of Bull.

Atos to Acquire Bull, Create Global Cloud, Cybersecurity, Big Data Company

June 2, 2014 3:33 pm | by Bull | News | Comments

Atos, an international information technology services company, and Bull, a partner for enterprise data, together announced the intended public offer in cash by Atos for all the issued and outstanding shares in the capital of Bull. Atos offer is set at 4.90 euros per Bull's share in cash, representing a 22 percent premium over the Bull's closing price

Researchers developed a prototype automated system that is now running on the data analytics pipeline of Bing. It's the first time automated privacy compliance analysis has been applied to the production code of an Internet-scale system.

Carnegie Mellon, Microsoft Research Automate Privacy Compliance for Big Data Systems

May 22, 2014 3:19 pm | by Carnegie Mellon University | News | Comments

Web services companies, such as Facebook, Google and Microsoft, all make promises about how they will use personal information they gather. But ensuring that millions of lines of code in their systems operate in ways consistent with privacy promises is labor-intensive and difficult. A team from Carnegie Mellon University and Microsoft Research, however, has shown these compliance checks can be automated.

Press materials are displayed on a table of the Justice Department in Washington, May 19, 2014, before Attorney General Eric Holder was to speak at a news conference. Holder was announcing that a U.S. grand jury has charged five Chinese hackers with econo

US Charges Chinese Officials in Cyberspying Case

May 21, 2014 3:11 pm | by Eric Tucker, Associated Press | News | Comments

The United States announced on Monday unprecedented cyber espionage charges against five Chinese military officials accused of hacking into U.S. companies to gain trade secrets. The hackers targeted big-name makers of nuclear and solar technology, stealing confidential business information, sensitive trade secrets and internal communications for competitive advantage, according to a grand jury indictment.

Exterior view of the Europol headquarters in The Hague, Netherlands

FBI: BlackShades Infected Half Million Computers

May 19, 2014 4:37 pm | by Larry Neumeister and Toby Sterling, Associated Press | News | Comments

More than a half million computers in over 100 countries were infected by sophisticated malware that lets cybercriminals take over a computer and hijack its webcam, authorities said as charges were announced May 19, 2014, against more than 100 people worldwide.

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Researchers have solved one aspect of the discrete logarithm problem. This is considered to be one of the 'holy grails' of algorithmic number theory, on which the security of many cryptographic systems used today is based.

New Algorithm Shakes Up Cryptography

May 15, 2014 4:38 pm | by CNRS (Délégation Paris Michel-Ange) | News | Comments

Researchers have solved one aspect of the discrete logarithm problem. This is considered to be one of the 'holy grails' of algorithmic number theory, on which the security of many cryptographic systems used today is based. The team has devised a new algorithm that calls into question the security of one variant of this problem. The result discredits several cryptographic systems ...

The generative model can be used to tailor networks to the environments in which they are expected to operate.

Molecular, Neural, Bacterial Networks Provide Security Insights

May 8, 2014 3:02 pm | by Carnegie Mellon University | News | Comments

The robust defenses that yeast cells have evolved to protect themselves from environmental threats hold lessons that can be used to design computer networks and analyze how secure they are, say computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University.

Unbreakable Security Codes Inspired by Nature

April 10, 2014 2:10 pm | by Lancaster University | News | Comments

A revolutionary new method of encrypting confidential information has been patented by scientists who were inspired by discoveries from human biology, which model how the heart and lungs coordinate their rhythms by passing information between each other.

Conquering Computer Zombies in Real Time

April 4, 2014 4:01 pm | by American Friends of Tel Aviv University | News | Comments

Cyber attacks are the primary domestic security threat facing the United States, FBI Director James Comey told the Senate Homeland Security Committee last year. In our brave new world, traditional warfare is now inextricably linked to economic and cyber warfare. In just one example, cyber strikes have the potential to derail a nation's power grid, causing widespread damage, chaos and loss of life.

ACM Turing Award Goes to Leslie Lamport for Work Enabling Distributed Computing in Data Center, Security, Cloud Landscapes

March 19, 2014 9:33 am | by The Association for Computing Machinery | News | Comments

The Association for Computing Machinery has named Leslie Lamport, a Principal Researcher at Microsoft Research, as the recipient of the 2013 ACM A.M. Turing Award for imposing clear, well-defined coherence on the seemingly chaotic behavior of distributed computing systems, in which several autonomous computers communicate with each other by passing messages.

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Tim Berners-Lee, Inventor of Web, Calls for Digital Bill of Rights

March 12, 2014 12:22 pm | by AP | News | Comments

The British inventor of the World Wide Web wants a digital bill of rights to protect Internet users from surveillance. Speaking on the 25th anniversary of his creation, Tim Berners-Lee says he hopes to spark a global conversation about the need to defend principles that have made the Web successful.

Quantum Physics Secures New Cryptography Scheme

March 12, 2014 7:36 am | by National University of Singapore | News | Comments

The way we secure digital transactions could soon change. A team has demonstrated a form of quantum cryptography that can protect people doing business with others they may not know or trust — a situation encountered often on the internet and in everyday life. In cryptography, the problem of providing a secure way for two mutually distrustful parties to interact is known as two-party secure computation...

Agency-by-agency Summary of President Obama's Proposed 2015 Budget

March 4, 2014 12:26 pm | by The Associated Press | News | Comments

Here is an agency-by-agency summary of President Barack Obama's proposed budget for fiscal 2015, beginning next Oct. 1. The top-line figures do not include spending on automatic entitlement benefits like Medicare and Social Security. The top-line figures for each agency also omit the $55.4 billion "opportunity" initiative Obama would divide equally between domestic and military programs.

Livermore joins Oak Ridge, Argonne to Develop Next Supercomputers

February 27, 2014 3:26 pm | by Donald B Johnston, LLNL | News | Comments

Lawrence Livermore has joined forces with two other national labs to deliver next generation supercomputers able to perform up to 200 peak petaflops (quadrillions of floating point operations per second), about 10 times faster than today's most powerful high performance computing (HPC) systems.

AT&T and IBM Join Forces on Big Data Analytics, Cloud, Security Technologies

February 20, 2014 12:23 pm | by AT&T | News | Comments

AT&T and IBM have announced a new global alliance agreement to develop solutions that help support the "Internet of Things." The companies will combine their analytic platforms, cloud and security technologies with privacy in mind to gain more insights on data collected from machines in a variety of industries.

Computer Whizzes Brainstorm for Cash at Hackathons

February 18, 2014 4:29 pm | by Martha Mendoza, AP National Writer | News | Comments

It used to be that "hacking" was just a type of crime, a computer break-in. But today, the term is also part of a growing — and perfectly legal — mainstay of the tech sector. Computer programming competitions known as "hackathons" have spread like viruses in recent years as ways for geeks, nerds and designers to get together to eat pizza, lose sleep and create something new.

New Cybersecurity Framework Aims at Protecting Nation's Critical Infrastructure

February 18, 2014 12:01 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM announced a new service offering to help critical infrastructure organizations utilize a new Cybersecurity Framework announced by the Administration at the White House.  The new Cybersecurity Framework is the product of a year-long collaboration between the U.S. government and industry, coordinated and led by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). 

Alan Turing: His Work and Impact Wins Prestigious PROSE Award

February 7, 2014 11:01 am | by Association of American Publishers and Elsevier | News | Comments

Alan Turing: His Work and Impact, was selected for the top honor, R.R. Hawkins Award, at the 38th annual PROSE Awards. Celebrating the centenary of his birth, the bookwas praised as a fitting tribute to the life of the legendary mathematical and scientific genius, considered to be the father of theoretical computer science and artificial intelligence.

Internet Firms Release Data on NSA Requests

February 5, 2014 9:15 am | by Michael Liedtke and Stephen Braun, Associated Press | News | Comments

A flurry of new reports from major technology companies show that the government collects customer information on tens of thousands of Americans every six months as part of secret national security investigations. And the companies' top lawyers struck a combative stance, saying the Obama administrative needs to provide more transparency about its data collection.

Vietnam Cyber Troops Take Fight to US, France

January 23, 2014 2:41 pm | by Chris Brummitt, Associated Press | News | Comments

Working on her blog in California one day, Vietnamese democracy activist Ngoc Thu sensed something was wrong. It took a moment for a keystroke to register. Cut-and-paste wasn't working. She had "a feeling that somebody was there" inside her computer. Her hunch turned out to be right.

Simulations Show Buildings Vulnerable 20 Years after LA Earthquake

January 20, 2014 3:11 pm | by Alicia Chang, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

The earth lurched without warning before dawn, jolting Los Angeles from its sleep. In a flash, freeway overpasses collapsed. Buildings were leveled or ruined. Fires spread. Two decades after a magnitude-6.7 earthquake shattered Los Angeles and surrounding communities, buildings around the region remain vulnerable.

Peeking into Schrödinger's Box: Direct Quantum State Measurements

January 20, 2014 2:28 pm | by University of Rochester | News | Comments

Until recently, measuring a 27-dimensional quantum state would have been a time-consuming, multistage process using a technique called quantum tomography, which is similar to creating a 3-D image from many 2-D ones. Researchers at the University of Rochester have been able to apply a recently developed, alternative method called direct measurement to do this in a single experiment with no post-processing.

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