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The SynCardia Total Artificial Heart, at left, and a human heart, at right.

1st Heart Transplant a Success after using Experimental 50cc Artificial Heart

July 2, 2015 9:07 am | by UCLA | News | Comments

A petite 44-year-old woman has received a successful heart transplant thanks to an experimental Total Artificial Heart designed for smaller patients. The UCLA patient is the first person in the world with the device to be bridged to a successful heart transplant — that is, to go from needing a transplant to receiving one. The 50cc SynCardia temporary Total Artificial Heart is a smaller investigational version of the larger 70cc SynCardia.

Survey: US Political and Generation Gaps on Science Issues

July 1, 2015 3:58 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Age divides Americans on science issues just as much as political ideology, a new analysis of...

Solar Superstorms show Highlights Extremely Powerful Computer Simulation, Visualization

July 1, 2015 3:35 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

A 24-minute, high-resolution science documentary narrated Benedict Cumberbatch about the...

Supercomputing the Vortex: Simulation improves Offshore Drill Rig Safety

June 29, 2015 2:00 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

LANL researchers’ efforts to solve the complex problem of how ocean currents affect the...

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A three-dimensional spatial structure of mixing in an idealized ocean simulation, computed using Lagrangian particle statistics.

Vast Eddies swirl across Open Ocean, pull Carbon Emissions into the Deep

June 25, 2015 9:11 am | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a computer model that clarifies the complex processes driving ocean mixing in the vast eddies that swirl across hundreds of miles of open ocean. The model is a first-of-its-kind tool because of its ability to exploit the power available from today’s supercomputers. Global climate simulations are beginning to be able to resolve the largest mesoscale eddies, which are considered the “weather” of the ocean.

Intelligent Operations Center for Emergency Management collects historical and sensor data from a variety of sources, and applies deep analytics, data visualization and real-time collaboration to help agencies coordinate and manage response efforts during

Intelligent Operations Center uses Real-time Weather Data to Help Predict and Prepare for Disasters

June 23, 2015 10:38 am | by IBM | News | Comments

As the Atlantic hurricane season gets underway, communities in severe weather-prone regions are anxiously tracking pending storms and working to create effective disaster response plans. IBM, through an alliance with The Weather Company, has announced a new emergency management solution featuring sophisticated analytics and use of real-time weather data to help communities predict and plan for natural disasters far more accurately.

Pope Francis waves as he leaves at the end of his weekly general audience, in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Wednesday, June 17, 2015. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini) Pope Challenges World to Clean Up its Filth

Pope Challenges World to Clean Up its Filth

June 20, 2015 9:34 am | by Nicole Winfield, Rachel Zoll and Seth Borenstein, Associated Press | News | Comments

Pope Francis' plea to make the state of the environment a central moral issue of our age has been greeted with applause from climate activists and a wide range of church, science and government leaders, but dismissive shrugs from those who doubt climate change. In "Laudato Si," Francis addressed "every living person on this planet," urging them to hear "both the cry of the Earth and the cry of the poor."

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Simulation apps can help organizations in every industry gain better R&D results, while saving both time and money.

It's Time to Revolutionize Simulation with Apps

June 18, 2015 3:40 pm | by Brianne Costa, COMSOL | Blogs | Comments

Throughout history, many revolutions have started with the desire for democracy, and the simulation revolution is no exception. Simulation is an effective way to test the design of a product virtually. It's now evolving into building simulation apps that can be shared across teams, departments and companies. Simulation apps can help organizations in every industry gain better R&D results, while saving both time and money. 

This year’s winning research poster

ISC Announces 2015 PRACE, GAUSS and Poster Winners

June 16, 2015 11:28 am | by ISC | News | Comments

ISC has announced that the 2015 PRACE ISC Award and Gauss Award will be given to two deserving European researchers reporting on their work focused on the development of energy-efficient supercomputers. These two research papers were selected by the respective award committees from the 37 submissions accepted for presentation at the 2015 ISC High Performance Research Paper Session. This year’s winning research poster...

The plight of Malaysia Airlines flight 370 (MH370) is one of the biggest mysteries in aviation history, but an interdisciplinary research team led by a Texas A&M University at Qatar math professor has theorized the ill-fated plane plunged vertically into

Applied Mathematician Theorizes what Happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370

June 15, 2015 4:35 pm | by Texas A&M at Qatar | News | Comments

The plight of Malaysia Airlines flight 370 (MH370) is one of the biggest mysteries in aviation history, but an interdisciplinary research team led by a Texas A&M University at Qatar math professor has theorized the ill-fated plane plunged vertically into the southern Indian Ocean in March 2014.

Intelligent Light, in collaboration with scalable solver developers at Georgia Tech and HPC experts at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has announced that it is achieving breakthrough CFD scalability running the AVF-Leslie combustion simulation code

Researchers Achieve Breakthrough CFD Scalability at 64,000 Cores

June 5, 2015 4:00 pm | by Intelligent Light | News | Comments

Intelligent Light, in collaboration with scalable solver developers at Georgia Tech and HPC experts at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has announced that it is achieving breakthrough CFD scalability running the AVF-Leslie combustion simulation code on up to 64,000 cores on supercomputers at the Department of Energy’s National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center.

Earthquakes Reveal Deep Secrets beneath East Asia

Stories You Shouldn’t Miss — May 29-June 4

June 5, 2015 3:23 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

Here they are — the top most-visited stories from the past week. A 10-engine battery-powered plane that can take off like a helicopter, fascinating facts about USB OTG, a flexible computing prototype for electronic skin, a detailed look at the "Prostate Cancer Jungle," free Windows 10 upgrades, and an experiment that proves reality does not exist — at least until it is measured — are all among the top hits.

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Three-dimensional high velocity structures beneath East Asia from 50 km to 1000 km depth viewed from the southeast. Surface topography with vertical exaggeration is superimposed for geographic references. Isosurfaces of high velocity anomalies in percent

Earthquakes Reveal Deep Secrets beneath East Asia

May 29, 2015 3:50 pm | by Jorge Salazar, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

A new work based on 3-D supercomputer simulations of earthquake data has found hidden rock structures deep under East Asia. Researchers used seismic data from 227 East Asia earthquakes during 2007-2011, which they used to image depths to about 900 kilometers, or about 560 miles below ground. Notable structures include a high velocity colossus beneath the Tibetan plateau, and a deep mantle upwelling beneath the Hangai Dome in Mongolia.

One of the robots introduced in the paper 'Robots that can adapt like animals.' Courtesy of Antoine Cully

Robots Automatically Recover from Damage in Minutes

May 28, 2015 3:37 pm | by University of Wyoming | News | Comments

Robots will one day provide tremendous benefits to society, such as in search and rescue — but not until they can learn to keep working when damaged. A paper shows robots automatically recover from injury in less than two minutes. A video of the work shows a six-legged robot adapt to keep walking even if two of its legs are broken. It also shows a robotic arm that learned how to correctly place an object even with several broken motors.

The software structure (subroutine) of CLM. Each circle represents an individual subroutine with the area of circle showing the time spent on the subroutine with linear representation. Courtesy of Wang, D. et al.

Global Climate Model Helps Untangle Complex Webs of Cause and Effect

May 28, 2015 3:26 pm | by Christie Thiessen, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Every few years, unusual weather brings torrential rainfall and warm, nutrient-poor water to the coasts of Peru and Ecuador, devastating the fishing economies. Although this might seem like a local storm, the system — known as the El Niño–Southern Oscillation — has global effects. Typically, the next winter is much warmer in western North America, wetter in the southeastern United States, and drier in the Pacific Northwest.

With that complicated history looming, Pope Francis, once a chemist, will soon issue an authoritative church document laying out the moral justification for fighting global warming, especially for the world's poorest billions.

Pope Francis, Once a Chemist, to Issue Document Laying out Moral Justification to Fight Global Warming

May 27, 2015 2:47 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

From Galileo to genetics, the Roman Catholic Church has danced with science, sometimes in a high-tension tango but more often in a supportive waltz. Pope Francis is about to introduce a new twist: global warming. Pope Francis, once a chemist, will soon issue an authoritative church document laying out the moral justification for fighting global warming, especially for the world's poorest billions.

Understanding how turbulence can alter the shape and course of a flock of birds, a swarm of insects or even an algal bloom could help us to better predict their impact on the environment. Now mathematicians have investigated for the first time how the sur

Model Sheds Light on 'Flocking' Behavior

May 26, 2015 1:23 pm | by Newcastle University | News | Comments

Understanding how turbulence can alter the shape and course of a flock of birds, a swarm of insects or even an algal bloom could help us to better predict their impact on the environment. Now mathematicians have investigated for the first time how the surrounding fluid environment – such as air and water - can affect the shape of a model flock.

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Computer simulations predict a liquid phase in atomically thin golden islands that patch small pores of graphene. According to the simulations, gold atoms flow and change places in the plane, while the surrounding graphene template retains the planarity o

Quantum-mechanical Models Predict New Phase of Matter

May 22, 2015 10:27 am | by Academy of Finland | News | Comments

Computer simulations have predicted a new phase of matter, an atomically thin two-dimensional liquid. This prediction pushes the boundaries of possible phases of materials further than ever before. Two-dimensional materials themselves were considered impossible until the discovery of graphene around 10 years ago. However, they have been observed only in the solid phase, because the thermal atomic motion required for molten materials...

President Barack Obama said May 20, 2015, the threat posed by climate change is evident all around and that those who deny the "indisputable" science that it is real are putting at risk the security of the United States and the military sworn to defend it

Obama: Climate Change Deniers Endanger National Security

May 20, 2015 2:26 pm | by Nancy Benac, Associated Press | News | Comments

President Barack Obama said May 20, 2015, the threat posed by climate change is evident all around and that those who deny the "indisputable" science that it is real are putting at risk the security of the United States and the military sworn to defend it. Obama said refusing to act to slow the effects of global warming, including rising seas, amounts to a "dereliction of duty" and undermines the readiness of U.S. forces.

Scientifically accurate 3-D heart model accelerates device testing and research for treatment of heart disease

Dassault Systèmes Announces Commercial Availability of Its First Simulated Human Heart

May 20, 2015 1:58 pm | by Dassault Systèmes | News | Comments

Dassault Systèmes announced that the first heart model from its “Living Heart Project” will be commercially available on May 29, 2015. Powered by Dassault Systèmes’ 3DEXPERIENCE platform’s realistic simulation applications, the commercial, high-fidelity scientifically validated 3-D simulator of a four-chamber human heart is the first product of its kind.

Satellite image of the South China Sea with colors added to indicate the calculated vertical displacement of ocean layers near 200 meters deep, based on simulated model data and calculations run by Harper Simmons at the University of Alaska at Fairbanks a

Researchers Unravel Secrets of Colossal, Invisible Waves in Earth’s Oceans

May 18, 2015 11:10 am | by David L. Chandler, MIT | News | Comments

Detailed new field studies, laboratory experiments and simulations of the largest known “internal waves” in the Earth’s oceans — phenomena that play a key role in mixing ocean waters, greatly affecting ocean temperatures — provide a comprehensive new view of how these colossal, invisible waves are born, spread and die off. The paper is co-authored by 42 researchers from 25 institutions in five countries.

Using Chombo-Crunch to study turbulent flow past a sphere could help aerospace engineers optimize takeoff and landing patterns through more accurate prediction of aircraft wakes. Simulation: David Trebotich; VisIt

High-performance CFD: Novel New Code for Energy, Aerospace, Oil and Gas

May 13, 2015 2:57 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

For more than a decade, mathematicians and computational scientists have been collaborating with earth scientists to break new ground in modeling complex flows in energy and oil and gas applications. Their work has yielded a high-performance computational fluid dynamics and reactive transport code dubbed Chombo-Crunch that could enhance efforts to develop carbon sequestration as a way to address Earth’s growing carbon dioxide challenges.

The research team examined blood samples from 33 survivors of car or motorcycle accidents or falls for multiple markers of inflammation, including interleukin-6 (IL-6), and segregated the patients into one of three (low to high) categories of trauma sever

Computer Simulation Accurately Replicates Real-life Trauma Outcomes

May 13, 2015 2:03 pm | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

Computer simulation of the body’s inflammatory response to traumatic injury accurately replicated known individual outcomes and predicted population results. Researchers examined blood samples from 33 survivors of car or motorcycle accidents or falls for multiple markers of inflammation, including interleukin-6, and segregated the patients into categories of trauma severity. They were able to validate model predictions.

The German Climate Computing Center is managing the world's largest climate simulation data archive, used by leading climate researchers worldwide. The archive currently consists of more than 40 petabytes of data and is projected to grow by roughly 75 pet

Managing the World's Largest Trove of Climate Data

May 8, 2015 9:10 am | by IBM | News | Comments

The German Climate Computing Center is managing the world's largest climate simulation data archive, used by climate researchers worldwide. The archive consists of more than 40 petabytes of data and is projected to grow by roughly 75 petabytes annually over the next five years. As climate simulations are carried out on increasingly powerful supercomputers, massive amounts of data are produced that must be effectively stored and analyzed.

The ParaPhrase researchers have developed an approach that allows large parallel programs to be constructed out of standard building blocks called patterns. A refactoring tool allows these patterns to be reassembled in optimal ways without changing the fu

Supporting the Fastest, Most Powerful Computing Systems on the Planet

May 4, 2015 4:10 pm | by University of St Andrews | News | Comments

A world-leading team of academic researchers and industrial experts from across Europe are celebrating the conclusion of a four-year research collaboration tackling the challenges posed by the fastest and most powerful computing systems on the planet. The 4.2M Euro ParaPhrase project brought together academic and industrial experts from across Europe to improve the programmability and performance of modern parallel computing technologies.

An FPGA board along with a custom sensor box built by the GTRI team for research purposes. Courtesy of Georgia Tech/Rob Felt

Advancing Security and Trust in Reconfigurable Devices

May 4, 2015 2:24 pm | by Rick Robinson, Georgia Institute of Technology | News | Comments

A research team at the Georgia Tech Research Institute is studying a range of security challenges involving programmable logic devices — in particular, field programmable gate arrays. FPGAs combine hardware performance and software flexibility so well that they're increasingly used in aerospace, defense, consumer devices, HPC, vehicles, medical devices and other applications. But they come with potential vulnerabilities.

Using 25 different computer models. Researchers simulated a world without human-caused greenhouse gas emissions and found those hot days happened once every three years. Then they calculated how many times they happen with the current level of heat-trappi

Study Blames Global Warming for 75 Percent of Very Hot Days

April 27, 2015 11:22 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

If you find yourself sweating out a day that is monstrously hot, chances are you can blame humanity. A new report links three out of four such days to man's effects on climate. And as climate change worsens around mid-century, that percentage of extremely hot days being caused by man-made greenhouse gases will push past 95 percent.

Innovation Boosts Wi-Fi Bandwidth Tenfold

Innovation Boosts Wi-Fi Bandwidth Tenfold

April 22, 2015 2:22 pm | by Oregon State University | News | Comments

Researchers have invented a new technology that can increase the bandwidth of WiFi systems by 10 times, using LED lights to transmit information. The technology could be integrated with existing WiFi systems to reduce bandwidth problems in crowded locations, such as airport terminals or coffee shops, and in homes where several people have multiple WiFi devices.

Through special environments called biotic processing units, bioengineers allow people to interact with cells like fish in an aquarium or even do simple experiments from afar.

Biotic Processing Makes Biotech Interactive with Games, Remote-control Labs

April 22, 2015 2:10 pm | by Tom Abate, Stanford Engineering | News | Comments

Riedel-Kruse and his team are enabling people to interact with biological materials and perform experiments the way they interact with computers today — called interactive biotechnology.  They have created three related projects that begin to define this new field. In the most far-reaching project, Riedel-Kruse created a robotic biology cloud lab capable of carrying out remote-control experiments.

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