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The Gecko has good sticking power thanks to the van der Waals force.

Van der Waals Force Re-measured, may Help Improve Fundamental Simulation Methods

November 26, 2014 10:16 am | by Forschungszentrum Jülich | News | Comments

Van der Waals forces act like a sort of quantum glue on all types of matter. Using a new measuring technique, scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich experimentally determined for the first time all of the key details of how strongly the single molecules bind to a surface. With an atomic force microscope, they demonstrated that the forces do not just increase with molecular size, but that they even grow disproportionately fast.

HPC for All

November 21, 2014 4:32 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

In the latest issue of HPC Source, “A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to the Enterprise,” we...

Spooky Alignment of Quasars Crosses Billions of Light-years

November 20, 2014 3:39 pm | by ESO | News | Comments

New observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile have revealed alignments over the...

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Argonne National Laboratory, NRG (Netherlands), SCK-CEN (Belgium), TerraPower, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

November 17, 2014 6:49 pm | Award Winners

Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign...

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Researchers from NCSU conducted innovative research analyzing the turbulence anisotropy as a function of distance from the wall based on DNS data.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: North Carolina State University

November 17, 2014 6:28 pm | Award Winners

Researchers from NCSU conducted innovative research that will allow better prediction of thermal hydraulic behavior for current and future nuclear reactor designs.

Nexio simulation is a French SME located in Toulouse and specialized in electromagnetic simulation software for marine, space, defense and aeronautics domains applications.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Nexio

November 17, 2014 6:19 pm | Award Winners

Nexio simulation is a French SME located in Toulouse and specialized in electromagnetic simulation software for marine, space, defense and aeronautics domains applications.

Researchers used HPC resources were utilized to run and visualize a breakthrough simulation involving a long-track EF5 tornado embedded within a supercell.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Central Michigan University

November 17, 2014 6:06 pm | Award Winners

Researchers used HPC resources were utilized to run and visualize a breakthrough simulation involving a long-track EF5 tornado embedded within a supercell.

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Researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center are using detailed Monte Carlo computer simulations of radiation transport to determine how the response of ionization chambers is affected by the presence of a magnetic field.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Texas Advance Computing Center (TACC) and Elekta AB

November 17, 2014 5:46 pm | Award Winners

Researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center in collaboration with TACC and Elekta AB are using detailed Monte Carlo computer simulations of radiation transport to assist in the development of the next generation of radiation therapy cancer treatments, which use a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner integrated with a radiation therapy unit (MRI-linac unit).

To heat fusion plasmas to the millions of degrees Celsius needed for fusion reactions scientists inject megawatts of electromagnetic energy from carefully engineered radiofrequency antennas. The generated electromagnetic waves interact with the fusion pla

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Tech-X Corporation

November 17, 2014 5:23 pm | Award Winners

To heat magnetically confined plasmas to the millions of degrees needed for fusion reactions, scientists inject megawatts of electromagnetic energy from carefully engineered radiofrequency antennas. The generated electromagnetic waves interact with the plasma in complex ways.

A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to Smaller Manufacturers

HPC Source - A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to Smaller Manufacturers

November 13, 2014 3:43 pm | Digital Editions | Comments

Welcome to SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING's "Bringing HPC to Smaller Manufacturers" edition of HPC Source, an interactive publication devoted exclusively to coverage of high performance computing.

Top down view of the gmon qubit chip (0.6 cm x 0.6 cm) connected to microwave frequency control lines (copper) with thin wire bonds. Courtesy of Michael Fang, Martinis Lab

Piece of the Quantum Puzzle: Achieving Controllability to Explore Simulation

November 13, 2014 1:57 pm | by Julie Cohen, UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

While the Martinis Lab at UC Santa Barbara has been focusing on quantum computation, former postdoctoral fellow Pedram Roushan and several colleagues have been exploring qubits (quantum bits) for quantum simulation on a smaller scale. In conjunction with developing a general-purpose quantum computer, Martinis’ team worked on a new qubit architecture, which is an essential ingredient for quantum simulation.

John Kirkley, President of Kirkley Communications, is a writer and editor who specializes in HPC.

A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to Smaller Manufacturers

November 13, 2014 11:26 am | by John Kirkley | Articles | Comments

Folk wisdom can sometimes be right on target. For example, there’s that old bromide about leading a horse to water. In this case, the water is high performance computing, and the reluctant equine is the huge base of small- to medium-sized manufacturers in the U.S. According to the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, there are approximately 300,000 manufacturers in the U.S. Over 95 percent of them can be characterized as SMMs.

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COMSOL Multiphysics 5.0

COMSOL Multiphysics 5.0

November 4, 2014 1:59 pm | Comsol, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

COMSOL Multiphysics 5.0 is an interactive environment for modeling and simulating scientific and engineering problems. Any COMSOL Multiphysics model can be turned into an application with its own interface using the tools provided with the Application Builder desktop environment.

The 15 boxes in this image show the simulated intensity of spin excitations in 15 iron-based materials, including iron compounds that are high-temperature superconductors (images d–h). The x axis shows the momentum of the spin excitation in selected locat

Spin Dynamics: Computational Model Predicts Superconductivity

November 4, 2014 1:52 pm | by Katie Elyce Jones, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers studying iron-based superconductors are combining novel electronic structure algorithms with the high-performance computing power of the Department of Energy’s Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to predict spin dynamics, or the ways electrons orient and correlate their spins in a material.

As the United States pursues the next generation of computing (exascale), new software-centered partnerships could be the key to maximizing economic benefits for Americans

Supporting America’s Economic Competitiveness: A Look at Federal Supercomputing Leadership

October 28, 2014 11:18 am | by Council on Competitiveness | News | Comments

The Council on Competitiveness has released a new report that explores the value of government leadership in supercomputing for industrial competitiveness, titled Solve. The Exascale Effect: the Benefits of Supercomputing Investment for U.S. Industry. As the federal government pursues exascale computing to achieve national security and science missions, Solve examines how U.S.-based companies also benefit from leading-edge computation

To carry out their work, the team was awarded resources on two world-class supercomputers — HeCTOR at the University of Edinburgh and Abel at the University of Oslo — which were made available through PRACE.

Imaging Extremely Distant Galaxies to Create New Window on Early Universe

October 23, 2014 3:18 pm | by University of Bonn | News | Comments

Scientists at the Universities of Bonn and Cardiff see good times approaching for astrophysicists after hatching a new observational strategy to distill detailed information from galaxies at the edge of the Universe. Using two world-class supercomputers, the researchers were able to demonstrate the effectiveness of their approach by simulating the formation of a massive galaxy at the dawn of cosmic time.

A carbapenem molecule, a last resort antibiotic, enters the carbapenemase enzyme (blue arrow), where the crucial beta-lactam structure gets broken down. The ineffective molecule then leaves (orange arrow)

Nobel Prize-winning Technique Helps Design Antibiotics of Future

October 17, 2014 11:52 am | by Bristol University | News | Comments

Scientists have used computer simulations to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics — a breakthrough that will help develop drugs which can effectively tackle infections in the future. Researchers at the University of Bristol focused on the role of enzymes in the bacteria, which split the structure of the antibiotic and stop it from working, making the bacteria resistant.

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Prescribed oceanic patterns are useful for predicting large weather anomalies. Prolonged dry or wet spells over certain regions can reliably tell you whether, for instance, North America will undergo an oceanic weather pattern such as the El Nino or La Ni

Time Machine Reveals Global Precipitation Role in Major Weather Events

October 16, 2014 2:53 pm | by Michael Price, San Diego State University | News | Comments

During the 1930s, North America endured the Dust Bowl, a prolonged era of dryness that withered crops and dramatically altered where the population settled. Land-based precipitation records from the years leading up to the Dust Bowl are consistent with the telltale drying-out period associated with a persistent dry weather pattern, but they can’t explain why the drought was so pronounced and long-lasting.

In popular culture, mathematics is often deemed inaccessible or esoteric. Yet in the modern world, it plays an ever more important role in our daily lives and a decisive role in the discovery and development of new ideas — often behind the scenes.

At the Interface of Math and Science

October 1, 2014 3:44 pm | by Julie Cohen, UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

In popular culture, mathematics is often deemed inaccessible or esoteric. Yet in the modern world, it plays an ever more important role in our daily lives and a decisive role in the discovery and development of new ideas — often behind the scenes.

Engineers have completed the first comprehensive numerical simulation of   skeletal muscle tissue using a method that uses the pixels in an image as   data points for the computer simulation — a method known as mesh-free   simulation.

Mesh-free Numerical Simulation of Skeletal Muscle Tissue Completed

October 1, 2014 3:03 pm | by UC San Diego | News | Comments

Engineers have completed the first comprehensive numerical simulation of skeletal muscle tissue using a method that uses the pixels in an image as data points for the computer simulation — a method known as mesh-free simulation.      

Mathematicians have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might

Adding Natural Uncertainty Improves Mathematical Models

September 30, 2014 3:39 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

Mathematicians have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might ultimately lead to mathematical models that better reflect the inherent uncertainties of the natural world.

Certain primordial stars—those between 55,000 and 56,000 times the mass of our Sun, or solar masses—may have died unusually. In death, these objects—among the Universe’s first-generation of stars—would have exploded as supernovae and burned completely, le

Simulations Reveal an Unusual Death for Ancient Stars

September 29, 2014 2:33 pm | by Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences | News | Comments

Certain primordial stars — those between 55,000 and 56,000 times the mass of our Sun, or solar masses — may have died unusually. In death, these objects — among the Universe’s first-generation of stars — would have exploded as supernovae and burned completely, leaving no remnant black hole behind.

Computer modeling provides policymakers with essential information on such data as global sea surface temperatures related to specific currents. Image courtesy Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Developing the Most Advanced Earth System Computer Model Yet Created

September 25, 2014 4:16 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

With President Obama announcing climate-support initiatives at the 2014 United Nations Climate Summit, the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories are teaming with academia and the private sector to develop the most advanced climate and Earth system computer model yet created. For Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers, it is a welcome advance for an already vibrant high-performance computing community.

Dr. Silvestre Pinho is leading development of a computer model that accurately predicts how composite materials behave when damaged will make it easier to design lighter, more fuel-efficient aircraft.

New Computer Codes Aid Greener, Leaner Aircraft Design

September 24, 2014 4:31 pm | by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council | News | Comments

A computer model that accurately predicts how composite materials behave when damaged will make it easier to design lighter, more fuel-efficient aircraft. Innovative computer codes form the basis of a computer model that shows in unprecedented detail how an aircraft's composite wing, for instance, would behave if it suffered small-scale damage, such as a bird strike.

Initial research focused on optimization of the PMEMD classical molecular dynamics code, part of the widely used AMBER Molecular Dynamics software, on multi-core Intel Xeon processors and “manycore” Intel Xeon Phi processors.

SDSC Joins Intel Parallel Computing Centers Program with Focus on Molecular Dynamics, Neuroscience and Life Sciences

September 12, 2014 2:44 pm | by San Diego Supercomputer Center | News | Comments

The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California, San Diego, is working with semiconductor chipmaker Intel to further optimize research software to improve the parallelism, efficiency, and scalability of widely used molecular and neurological simulation technologies.

It may look like fresh blood and flow like fresh blood, but the longer blood   is stored, the less it can carry oxygen into the tiny microcapillaries of the   body. Using advanced optical techniques, the researchers measured the stiffness of the membran

Stored Blood Grows Stiffer over Time

September 8, 2014 10:36 am | by Liz Ahlberg, University of Illinois | News | Comments

It may look like fresh blood and flow like fresh blood, but the longer blood is stored, the less it can carry oxygen into the tiny microcapillaries of the body. Using advanced optical techniques, the researchers measured the stiffness of the membrane surrounding red blood cells over time. 

University of Hawaii at Manoa astronomer R. Brent Tully has led an   international team of astronomers in defining the contours of the immense   supercluster of galaxies containing our own Milky Way. They have named the supercluster “Laniakea,” meaning

Mapping Laniakea, Our Home Supercluster of Galaxies

September 4, 2014 9:08 am | by Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii | News | Comments

University of Hawaii at Manoa astronomer R. Brent Tully has led an international team of astronomers in defining the contours of the immense supercluster of galaxies containing our own Milky Way. They have named the supercluster “Laniakea,” meaning “immense heaven” in Hawaiian.

Ion channels are involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes throughout the human body. A young team of researchers investigated how ion flux through a voltage gated sodium ion channel works in detail. Since this process is incredibly

Computer Simulations Visualize Ion Flux

September 3, 2014 9:24 am | by University of Vienna | News | Comments

Ion channels are involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes throughout the human body. A young team of researchers investigated how ion flux through a voltage gated sodium ion channel works in detail. Since this process is incredibly fast, computer simulations were performed to visualize sodium flux "in slow motion."

Hummingbirds can hover so well they seem to float in mid-air. With the help of a supercomputer, Vanderbilt University mechanical engineer Haoxiang Luo has fleshed out some of the secrets of how hummingbirds hover, flight that's more similar to that of an

Supercomputer Hummingbird Hover

September 2, 2014 5:08 pm | by Jorge Salazar, The Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

Hummingbirds can hover so well they seem to float in mid-air. With the help of a supercomputer, Vanderbilt University mechanical engineer Haoxiang Luo has fleshed out some of the secrets of how hummingbirds hover, flight that's more similar to that of an insect than the typical bird.

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