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A carbapenem molecule, a last resort antibiotic, enters the carbapenemase enzyme (blue arrow), where the crucial beta-lactam structure gets broken down. The ineffective molecule then leaves (orange arrow)

Nobel Prize-winning Technique Helps Design Antibiotics of Future

October 17, 2014 11:52 am | by Bristol University | News | Comments

Scientists have used computer simulations to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics — a breakthrough that will help develop drugs which can effectively tackle infections in the future. Researchers at the University of Bristol focused on the role of enzymes in the bacteria, which split the structure of the antibiotic and stop it from working, making the bacteria resistant.

Time Machine Reveals Global Precipitation Role in Major Weather Events

October 16, 2014 2:53 pm | by Michael Price, San Diego State University | News | Comments

During the 1930s, North America endured the Dust Bowl, a prolonged era of dryness that withered...

At the Interface of Math and Science

October 1, 2014 3:44 pm | by Julie Cohen, UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

In popular culture, mathematics is often deemed inaccessible or esoteric. Yet in the...

Mesh-free Numerical Simulation of Skeletal Muscle Tissue Completed

October 1, 2014 3:03 pm | by UC San Diego | News | Comments

Engineers have completed the first comprehensive numerical simulation of skeletal muscle tissue...

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Mathematicians have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might

Adding Natural Uncertainty Improves Mathematical Models

September 30, 2014 3:39 pm | by Brown University | News | Comments

Mathematicians have introduced a new element of uncertainty into an equation used to describe the behavior of fluid flows. While being as certain as possible is generally the stock and trade of mathematics, the researchers hope this new formulation might ultimately lead to mathematical models that better reflect the inherent uncertainties of the natural world.

Certain primordial stars—those between 55,000 and 56,000 times the mass of our Sun, or solar masses—may have died unusually. In death, these objects—among the Universe’s first-generation of stars—would have exploded as supernovae and burned completely, le

Simulations Reveal an Unusual Death for Ancient Stars

September 29, 2014 2:33 pm | by Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences | News | Comments

Certain primordial stars — those between 55,000 and 56,000 times the mass of our Sun, or solar masses — may have died unusually. In death, these objects — among the Universe’s first-generation of stars — would have exploded as supernovae and burned completely, leaving no remnant black hole behind.

Computer modeling provides policymakers with essential information on such data as global sea surface temperatures related to specific currents. Image courtesy Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Developing the Most Advanced Earth System Computer Model Yet Created

September 25, 2014 4:16 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

With President Obama announcing climate-support initiatives at the 2014 United Nations Climate Summit, the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories are teaming with academia and the private sector to develop the most advanced climate and Earth system computer model yet created. For Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers, it is a welcome advance for an already vibrant high-performance computing community.

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Dr. Silvestre Pinho is leading development of a computer model that accurately predicts how composite materials behave when damaged will make it easier to design lighter, more fuel-efficient aircraft.

New Computer Codes Aid Greener, Leaner Aircraft Design

September 24, 2014 4:31 pm | by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council | News | Comments

A computer model that accurately predicts how composite materials behave when damaged will make it easier to design lighter, more fuel-efficient aircraft. Innovative computer codes form the basis of a computer model that shows in unprecedented detail how an aircraft's composite wing, for instance, would behave if it suffered small-scale damage, such as a bird strike.

Initial research focused on optimization of the PMEMD classical molecular dynamics code, part of the widely used AMBER Molecular Dynamics software, on multi-core Intel Xeon processors and “manycore” Intel Xeon Phi processors.

SDSC Joins Intel Parallel Computing Centers Program with Focus on Molecular Dynamics, Neuroscience and Life Sciences

September 12, 2014 2:44 pm | by San Diego Supercomputer Center | News | Comments

The San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) at the University of California, San Diego, is working with semiconductor chipmaker Intel to further optimize research software to improve the parallelism, efficiency, and scalability of widely used molecular and neurological simulation technologies.

It may look like fresh blood and flow like fresh blood, but the longer blood   is stored, the less it can carry oxygen into the tiny microcapillaries of the   body. Using advanced optical techniques, the researchers measured the stiffness of the membran

Stored Blood Grows Stiffer over Time

September 8, 2014 10:36 am | by Liz Ahlberg, University of Illinois | News | Comments

It may look like fresh blood and flow like fresh blood, but the longer blood is stored, the less it can carry oxygen into the tiny microcapillaries of the body. Using advanced optical techniques, the researchers measured the stiffness of the membrane surrounding red blood cells over time. 

University of Hawaii at Manoa astronomer R. Brent Tully has led an   international team of astronomers in defining the contours of the immense   supercluster of galaxies containing our own Milky Way. They have named the supercluster “Laniakea,” meaning

Mapping Laniakea, Our Home Supercluster of Galaxies

September 4, 2014 9:08 am | by Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii | News | Comments

University of Hawaii at Manoa astronomer R. Brent Tully has led an international team of astronomers in defining the contours of the immense supercluster of galaxies containing our own Milky Way. They have named the supercluster “Laniakea,” meaning “immense heaven” in Hawaiian.

Ion channels are involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes throughout the human body. A young team of researchers investigated how ion flux through a voltage gated sodium ion channel works in detail. Since this process is incredibly

Computer Simulations Visualize Ion Flux

September 3, 2014 9:24 am | by University of Vienna | News | Comments

Ion channels are involved in many physiological and pathophysiological processes throughout the human body. A young team of researchers investigated how ion flux through a voltage gated sodium ion channel works in detail. Since this process is incredibly fast, computer simulations were performed to visualize sodium flux "in slow motion."

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Hummingbirds can hover so well they seem to float in mid-air. With the help of a supercomputer, Vanderbilt University mechanical engineer Haoxiang Luo has fleshed out some of the secrets of how hummingbirds hover, flight that's more similar to that of an

Supercomputer Hummingbird Hover

September 2, 2014 5:08 pm | by Jorge Salazar, The Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

Hummingbirds can hover so well they seem to float in mid-air. With the help of a supercomputer, Vanderbilt University mechanical engineer Haoxiang Luo has fleshed out some of the secrets of how hummingbirds hover, flight that's more similar to that of an insect than the typical bird.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM Satellite provided a look under the hood of Hurricane Cristobal as it continues moving north and paralleling the U.S. East Coast. NASA's HS3 hurricane mission also investigated the storm. Cristobal is now

On a Mission to Analyze Hurricane Cristobal

August 28, 2014 2:59 pm | by NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center | News | Comments

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission or TRMM Satellite provided a look under the hood of Hurricane Cristobal as it moved north and paralleling the U.S. East Coast. NASA's HS3 hurricane mission also investigated the storm. Cristobal is close enough to the coast to trigger high surf advisories.

Akselos' software running in a Web browser for 2.01x. This app shows the stresses in the landing gear for a solar-powered airplane. Courtesy of Akselos

Simulation Software Drastically Increases Speed of 3-D Engineering Simulations

August 25, 2014 12:40 pm | by Rob Matheson, MIT | News | Comments

MIT spinout Akselos has developed novel software, based on years of research at the Institute, which uses precalculated supercomputer data for structural components — like simulated “Legos” — to solve FEA models in seconds. Hundreds of engineers in the mining, power-generation, and oil and gas industries are now using Akselos software.

Researchers from Argonne, in collaboration with Caterpillar Inc. and Convergent Science, carried out large internal combustion engine simulations involving fine spatial and temporal resolutions; high fidelity; and robust two-phase flow, spray, turbulence,

Argonne wins HPC Innovation Excellence Award

August 25, 2014 10:47 am | by Argonne National Laboratory | News | Comments

Argonne National Laboratory was one of seven new winners of the HPC Innovation Excellence Award. Announced by International Data Corporation at the ISC '14 supercomputer industry conference in Leipzig, Germany, the award recognizes noteworthy achievements by users of high-performance computing (HPC) technologies.

The climate dataset is the first fine-scale work to correct for artificial trends within weather station data caused by changes in equipment or weather station locations. It also is the first to provide direct estimates of uncertainty and to provide open-

Improving Temperature Modeling across Mountainous Landscapes

August 21, 2014 4:28 pm | by University of Montana | News | Comments

New research by University of Montana doctoral student Jared Oyler provides improved computer models for estimating temperature across mountainous landscapes. Oyler provided a new climate dataset for ecological and hydrological research and natural resource management.

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This still from a KIPAC visualization shows a jet of energy and particles streaming from a black hole. (Visualization: Ralf Kaehler / Simulation: Jonathan McKinney, Alexander Tchekhovskoy, and Roger Blandford)

Dramatically Intricate 3-D Universes Tell Important Stories about the Cosmos

August 21, 2014 3:16 pm | by Kelen Tuttle, Kavli Foundation | Articles | Comments

Recently, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics unveiled an unprecedented simulation of the universe’s development. Called the Illustris project, the simulation depicts more than 13 billion years of cosmic evolution across a cube of the universe that’s 350-million-light-years on each side. But why was it important to conduct such a simulation?

With their new method, computer scientists from Saarland University are able, for the first time, to compute all illumination effects in a simpler and more efficient way. Courtesy of AG Slusallek/Saar-Uni

Realistic Computer Graphics Technology Vastly Speeds Process

August 18, 2014 2:15 pm | by University Saarland | News | Comments

Creating a realistic computer simulation of how light suffuses a room is crucial not just for animated movies like Toy Story or Cars, but also in industry. Special computing methods should ensure this, but require great effort. Computer scientists from Saarbrücken have developed a novel approach that vastly simplifies and speeds up the whole calculating process.

Dr. Horst Punzmann (left) and Professor Michael Shats test their wave-generated tractor beam. Courtesy of Stuart Hay

Physicists Create Water Tractor Beam

August 11, 2014 12:57 pm | by Australian National University | News | Comments

Physicists have created a tractor beam on water, providing a radical new technique that could confine oil spills, manipulate floating objects or explain rips at the beach. The group discovered they can control water flow patterns with simple wave generators, enabling them to move floating objects at will. The new technique gives scientists a way of controlling things adrift on water in a way that resembles sci-fi tractor beams.

The simulations, performed on Titan’s Cray XK7 system, produced 3D, high-fidelity power distributions representing conditions expected to occur during the AP1000 core startup and used up to 240,000 computational units in parallel.

Westinghouse-CASL Team Wins Major Computing Award for Reactor Core Simulations on Titan

August 7, 2014 3:35 pm | by Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

A team representing Westinghouse Electric Company and the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors, a DOE Innovation Hub led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has received an HPC Innovation Excellence Award for applied simulation on Titan, the nation’s most powerful supercomputer. The award recognizes achievements made by industry users of high-performance computing technologies.

The two inset images show before-and-after images captured by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope of Supernova 2012Z in the spiral galaxy NGC 1309. The white X at the top of the main image marks the location of the supernova in the galaxy. Courtesy of NASA, ESA

Hubble Finds Supernova Star System Linked to Possible “Zombie Star”

August 6, 2014 8:38 pm | by Science Newsline | News | Comments

Using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, a team of astronomers has spotted a star system that could have left behind a "zombie star" after an unusually weak supernova explosion. A supernova typically obliterates the exploding white dwarf, or dying star. On this occasion, scientists believe this faint...

Sandia National Laboratories researchers Steve Plimpton, left, and Michael Gallis look at a projection of a model of the Russian MIR space station, which fell out of orbit several years ago and disintegrated, with the remains ending up at the bottom of th

Sophisticated 3-D Codes Yield Unprecedented Physics, Engineering Insights

August 6, 2014 4:43 pm | by Sandia National Laboratories | News | Comments

When the space shuttle Columbia disintegrated on re-entry in 2002, sophisticated computer models were key to determining what happened. A piece of foam flew off at launch and hit a tile, damaging the leading edge of the shuttle wing and exposing the underlying structure. Temperatures soared to thousands of degrees as Columbia plunged toward Earth at 27 times the speed of sound, said Gallis, who used NASA codes and Icarus for simulations...

FLOW-3D 11

FLOW-3D 11 Multi-physics Computational Fluid Dynamics Software

August 6, 2014 3:19 pm | Flow Science, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

FLOW-3D 11 features FlowSight, an advanced visualization tool based on the EnSight post-processor, which offers powerful ways to analyze, visualize and communicate simulation data. Its capabilities include the ability to analyze and compare multiple simulation results simultaneously, volume rendering and a CFD calculator, as well as flipbooks.

SystemModeler 4 Modeling and Simulation Tool

SystemModeler 4 Modeling and Simulation Tool

July 30, 2014 2:22 pm | Wolfram Research, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

SystemModeler 4 is a physical modeling and simulation environment for cyber-physical systems. Using drag-and-drop from a large selection of built-in and expandable modeling libraries, users can build multi-domain models of their complete system.

VisSim is a visual language for mathematical modeling, simulation and model-based embedded system development used by scientists and engineers.

Altair to Acquire Visual Solutions, Adds VisSim to Portfolio

July 30, 2014 2:01 pm | by Altair | News | Comments

Altair has announced its intent to acquire Visual Solutions, makers of VisSim, a visual language for mathematical modeling, simulation and model-based embedded system development used by scientists and engineers. The transaction is expected to close by the end of July 2014.

The hydroelectric plants in the Columbia River basin in the Pacific Northwest generate 22,000 MW in output. In the photo: a dam wall in the many-branched dam system. Courtesy of Fraunhofer IOSB

Simulation Models Optimize Water Power from Extensive Dam System

July 30, 2014 5:39 am | by Fraunhofer | News | Comments

The Columbia River basin in the Pacific Northwest offers great potential for water power; hydroelectric power stations there generate over 20 000 megawatts already. Now a simulation model will help optimize the operation of the extensive dam system.

Grammatikopoulos simulated two palladium nanoparticles colliding at different temperatures. The hotter the temperature, the more homogenous the resulting product, and the further the atoms in the particle crystallize.

Simulating the Invisible

July 29, 2014 2:07 pm | by Poncie Rutsch, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) | News | Comments

Every trillionth of a second, Panagiotis Grammatikopoulos calculates the location of each individual atom in a particle based on where it is and which forces apply. He uses a computer program to make the calculations, and then animates the motion of the atoms using visualization software. The resulting animation illuminates what happens, atom-by-atom, when two nanoparticles collide.

K computer installed in the computer room. Each computer rack is equipped with about 100 CPUs. In the Computer Building, 800 or more computer racks are installed for the K computer.  Courtesy of Riken

K Computer Runs Largest Ever Ensemble Simulation of Global Weather

July 25, 2014 2:25 pm | by RIKEN | News | Comments

Ensemble forecasting is a key part of weather forecasting. Computers typically run multiple simulations using slightly different initial conditions or assumptions, and then analyze them together to try to improve forecasts. Using Japan’s K computer, researchers have succeeded in running 10,240 parallel simulations of global weather, the largest number ever performed, using data assimilation to reduce the range of uncertainties.

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