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COMSOL Server

COMSOL Server

December 18, 2014 4:41 pm | Comsol, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

COMSOL Server was developed specifically for running applications built with the Application Builder, which allows COMSOL Multiphysics software users to build an intuitive interface around their model that can be run by anyone — even those without prior simulation experience. Applications can be distributed throughout an organization using a Windows-native client or Web browser.

Optimized Algorithms Give Combustion Simulations a Boost

December 18, 2014 4:32 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Turbulent combustion simulations, which provide input to the design of more fuel-efficient...

Global High-resolution Models Fuel New Golden Age of Climate Science

December 18, 2014 4:14 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Not long ago, it would have taken several years to run a high-resolution simulation on a global...

NASA Software May Help Increase Flight Efficiency, Decrease Aircraft Noise

December 16, 2014 11:03 am | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA researchers began flight tests of computer software that shows promise in improving flight...

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Results of large-scale simulations showing the Alnico alloy separates into FeCo-rich and NiAl-rich phases at low temperatures and is a homogenized phase at high temperatures.

Solving the Shaky Future of Super-strong Rare Earth Magnets

December 11, 2014 4:15 pm | by Katie Elyce Jones, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

The US Department of Energy is mining for solutions to the rare earth problem — but with high-performance computing instead of bulldozers. Researchers are using the hybrid CPU-GPU, 27-petaflop Titan supercomputer managed by the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to discover alternative materials that can substitute for rare earths.

Galactic gas from the Feedback in Realistic Environments (FIRE) simulation. Represented here is a Milky Way mass halo, with colors denoting different densities.

Interstellar Mystery Solved by Supercomputer Simulations

December 10, 2014 4:25 pm | by Jorge Salazar, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

An interstellar mystery of why stars form has been solved thanks to the most realistic supercomputer simulations of galaxies yet made. Theoretical astrophysicist Philip Hopkins led research that found that stellar activity — like supernova explosions or even just starlight — plays a big part in the formation of other stars and the growth of galaxies.

Scientists have developed an ultrafast quantum chemical method, which allows rapid and accurate simulations of complex molecular systems consisting of thousands of molecules.

Cutting-up Molecules for Ultrafast Complex Molecular Simulations

December 8, 2014 5:38 pm | by Institute of Transformative Bio-Molecules (WPI-ITbM), Nagoya University | News | Comments

Scientists have developed an ultrafast quantum chemical method, which allows rapid and accurate simulations of complex molecular systems consisting of thousands of molecules.                     

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Biological engineers have created a new computer model that allows them to design the most complex three-dimensional DNA shapes ever produced, including rings, bowls, and geometric structures such as icosahedrons that resemble viral particles.

Computer Model Enables Design of Complex DNA Shapes

December 3, 2014 3:45 pm | by Anne Trafton, MIT | News | Comments

Biological engineers have created a new computer model that allows them to design the most complex three-dimensional DNA shapes ever produced, including rings, bowls, and geometric structures such as icosahedrons that resemble viral particles. 

Technology has changed rapidly over the last few years with touch feedback, known as haptics, being used in entertainment, rehabilitation and even surgical training. New research, using ultrasound, has developed an invisible 3D haptic shape that can be se

Touchable Holograms Developed for Medical Uses and More

December 2, 2014 3:49 pm | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Technology has changed rapidly over the last few years with touch feedback, known as haptics, being used in entertainment, rehabilitation and even surgical training. New research, using ultrasound, has developed an invisible 3D haptic shape that can be seen and felt.

For their calculations, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) will now, starting in 2015, have access to the World’s second-fastest computer. The Dresden scientists are hoping that the computations will yield new insights that may

Titan Calculates for HZDR Cancer Research

December 2, 2014 3:21 pm | by HZDR | News | Comments

For their calculations, researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) will now, starting in 2015, have access to the World’s second-fastest computer. The Dresden scientists are hoping that the computations will yield new insights that may prove useful in proton-based cancer therapy.

The Gecko has good sticking power thanks to the van der Waals force.

Van der Waals Force Re-measured, may Help Improve Fundamental Simulation Methods

November 26, 2014 10:16 am | by Forschungszentrum Jülich | News | Comments

Van der Waals forces act like a sort of quantum glue on all types of matter. Using a new measuring technique, scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich experimentally determined for the first time all of the key details of how strongly the single molecules bind to a surface. With an atomic force microscope, they demonstrated that the forces do not just increase with molecular size, but that they even grow disproportionately fast.

In the latest issue of HPC Source, “A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to the Enterprise,” we look at how small- to-medium-sized manufacturers can realize major benefits from adoption of high performance computing in areas such as modeling, simulation and analysis.

HPC for All

November 21, 2014 4:32 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

In the latest issue of HPC Source, “A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to the Enterprise,” we look at how small- to-medium-sized manufacturers can realize major benefits from adoption of high performance computing in areas such as modeling, simulation and analysis.

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New observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile have revealed alignments over the largest structures ever discovered in the Universe. A European research team has found that the rotation axes of the central supermassive black holes in a sample o

Spooky Alignment of Quasars Crosses Billions of Light-years

November 20, 2014 3:39 pm | by ESO | News | Comments

New observations with ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile have revealed alignments over the largest structures ever discovered in the Universe. A European research team has found that the rotation axes of the central supermassive black holes in a sample of quasars are parallel to each other over distances of billions of light-years.

Safety, reliability and improvement of nuclear reactor efficiencies play a major role in the wide-spread use of nuclear energy and reducing cost/kW-h to the consumer.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Argonne National Laboratory, NRG (Netherlands), SCK-CEN (Belgium), TerraPower, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

November 17, 2014 6:49 pm | Award Winners

Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign teamed with nuclear reactor designers and research laboratories in the United States and Europe to enable high-fidelity, cost-saving simulations to design the next-generation of nuclear reactors using the computational fluid dynamics code Nek5000.

Researchers from NCSU conducted innovative research analyzing the turbulence anisotropy as a function of distance from the wall based on DNS data.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: North Carolina State University

November 17, 2014 6:28 pm | Award Winners

Researchers from NCSU conducted innovative research that will allow better prediction of thermal hydraulic behavior for current and future nuclear reactor designs.

Nexio simulation is a French SME located in Toulouse and specialized in electromagnetic simulation software for marine, space, defense and aeronautics domains applications.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Nexio

November 17, 2014 6:19 pm | Award Winners

Nexio simulation is a French SME located in Toulouse and specialized in electromagnetic simulation software for marine, space, defense and aeronautics domains applications.

Researchers used HPC resources were utilized to run and visualize a breakthrough simulation involving a long-track EF5 tornado embedded within a supercell.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Central Michigan University

November 17, 2014 6:06 pm | Award Winners

Researchers used HPC resources were utilized to run and visualize a breakthrough simulation involving a long-track EF5 tornado embedded within a supercell.

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Researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center are using detailed Monte Carlo computer simulations of radiation transport to determine how the response of ionization chambers is affected by the presence of a magnetic field.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Texas Advance Computing Center (TACC) and Elekta AB

November 17, 2014 5:46 pm | Award Winners

Researchers at MD Anderson Cancer Center in collaboration with TACC and Elekta AB are using detailed Monte Carlo computer simulations of radiation transport to assist in the development of the next generation of radiation therapy cancer treatments, which use a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner integrated with a radiation therapy unit (MRI-linac unit).

To heat fusion plasmas to the millions of degrees Celsius needed for fusion reactions scientists inject megawatts of electromagnetic energy from carefully engineered radiofrequency antennas. The generated electromagnetic waves interact with the fusion pla

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Tech-X Corporation

November 17, 2014 5:23 pm | Award Winners

To heat magnetically confined plasmas to the millions of degrees needed for fusion reactions, scientists inject megawatts of electromagnetic energy from carefully engineered radiofrequency antennas. The generated electromagnetic waves interact with the plasma in complex ways.

A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to Smaller Manufacturers

HPC Source - A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to Smaller Manufacturers

November 13, 2014 3:43 pm | Digital Editions | Comments

Welcome to SCIENTIFIC COMPUTING's "Bringing HPC to Smaller Manufacturers" edition of HPC Source, an interactive publication devoted exclusively to coverage of high performance computing.

Top down view of the gmon qubit chip (0.6 cm x 0.6 cm) connected to microwave frequency control lines (copper) with thin wire bonds. Courtesy of Michael Fang, Martinis Lab

Piece of the Quantum Puzzle: Achieving Controllability to Explore Simulation

November 13, 2014 1:57 pm | by Julie Cohen, UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

While the Martinis Lab at UC Santa Barbara has been focusing on quantum computation, former postdoctoral fellow Pedram Roushan and several colleagues have been exploring qubits (quantum bits) for quantum simulation on a smaller scale. In conjunction with developing a general-purpose quantum computer, Martinis’ team worked on a new qubit architecture, which is an essential ingredient for quantum simulation.

John Kirkley, President of Kirkley Communications, is a writer and editor who specializes in HPC.

A New Dawn: Bringing HPC to Smaller Manufacturers

November 13, 2014 11:26 am | by John Kirkley | Articles | Comments

Folk wisdom can sometimes be right on target. For example, there’s that old bromide about leading a horse to water. In this case, the water is high performance computing, and the reluctant equine is the huge base of small- to medium-sized manufacturers in the U.S. According to the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences, there are approximately 300,000 manufacturers in the U.S. Over 95 percent of them can be characterized as SMMs.

COMSOL Multiphysics 5.0

COMSOL Multiphysics 5.0

November 4, 2014 1:59 pm | Comsol, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

COMSOL Multiphysics 5.0 is an interactive environment for modeling and simulating scientific and engineering problems. Any COMSOL Multiphysics model can be turned into an application with its own interface using the tools provided with the Application Builder desktop environment.

The 15 boxes in this image show the simulated intensity of spin excitations in 15 iron-based materials, including iron compounds that are high-temperature superconductors (images d–h). The x axis shows the momentum of the spin excitation in selected locat

Spin Dynamics: Computational Model Predicts Superconductivity

November 4, 2014 1:52 pm | by Katie Elyce Jones, Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers studying iron-based superconductors are combining novel electronic structure algorithms with the high-performance computing power of the Department of Energy’s Titan supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to predict spin dynamics, or the ways electrons orient and correlate their spins in a material.

As the United States pursues the next generation of computing (exascale), new software-centered partnerships could be the key to maximizing economic benefits for Americans

Supporting America’s Economic Competitiveness: A Look at Federal Supercomputing Leadership

October 28, 2014 11:18 am | by Council on Competitiveness | News | Comments

The Council on Competitiveness has released a new report that explores the value of government leadership in supercomputing for industrial competitiveness, titled Solve. The Exascale Effect: the Benefits of Supercomputing Investment for U.S. Industry. As the federal government pursues exascale computing to achieve national security and science missions, Solve examines how U.S.-based companies also benefit from leading-edge computation

To carry out their work, the team was awarded resources on two world-class supercomputers — HeCTOR at the University of Edinburgh and Abel at the University of Oslo — which were made available through PRACE.

Imaging Extremely Distant Galaxies to Create New Window on Early Universe

October 23, 2014 3:18 pm | by University of Bonn | News | Comments

Scientists at the Universities of Bonn and Cardiff see good times approaching for astrophysicists after hatching a new observational strategy to distill detailed information from galaxies at the edge of the Universe. Using two world-class supercomputers, the researchers were able to demonstrate the effectiveness of their approach by simulating the formation of a massive galaxy at the dawn of cosmic time.

A carbapenem molecule, a last resort antibiotic, enters the carbapenemase enzyme (blue arrow), where the crucial beta-lactam structure gets broken down. The ineffective molecule then leaves (orange arrow)

Nobel Prize-winning Technique Helps Design Antibiotics of Future

October 17, 2014 11:52 am | by Bristol University | News | Comments

Scientists have used computer simulations to show how bacteria are able to destroy antibiotics — a breakthrough that will help develop drugs which can effectively tackle infections in the future. Researchers at the University of Bristol focused on the role of enzymes in the bacteria, which split the structure of the antibiotic and stop it from working, making the bacteria resistant.

Prescribed oceanic patterns are useful for predicting large weather anomalies. Prolonged dry or wet spells over certain regions can reliably tell you whether, for instance, North America will undergo an oceanic weather pattern such as the El Nino or La Ni

Time Machine Reveals Global Precipitation Role in Major Weather Events

October 16, 2014 2:53 pm | by Michael Price, San Diego State University | News | Comments

During the 1930s, North America endured the Dust Bowl, a prolonged era of dryness that withered crops and dramatically altered where the population settled. Land-based precipitation records from the years leading up to the Dust Bowl are consistent with the telltale drying-out period associated with a persistent dry weather pattern, but they can’t explain why the drought was so pronounced and long-lasting.

In popular culture, mathematics is often deemed inaccessible or esoteric. Yet in the modern world, it plays an ever more important role in our daily lives and a decisive role in the discovery and development of new ideas — often behind the scenes.

At the Interface of Math and Science

October 1, 2014 3:44 pm | by Julie Cohen, UC Santa Barbara | News | Comments

In popular culture, mathematics is often deemed inaccessible or esoteric. Yet in the modern world, it plays an ever more important role in our daily lives and a decisive role in the discovery and development of new ideas — often behind the scenes.

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