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Innovation Boosts Wi-Fi Bandwidth Tenfold

April 22, 2015 2:22 pm | by Oregon State University | News | Comments

Researchers have invented a new technology that can increase the bandwidth of WiFi systems by 10 times, using LED lights to transmit information. The technology could be integrated with existing WiFi systems to reduce bandwidth problems in crowded locations, such as airport terminals or coffee shops, and in homes where several people have multiple WiFi devices.

Biotic Processing Makes Biotech Interactive with Games, Remote-control Labs

April 22, 2015 2:10 pm | by Tom Abate, Stanford Engineering | News | Comments

Riedel-Kruse and his team are enabling people to interact with biological materials and perform...

COMSOL 5.1 Multiphysics Modeling Software

April 17, 2015 12:52 pm | Product Releases | Comments

COMSOL 5.1 is a major upgrade that delivers new and enhanced functionality across all products,...

Protecting Nature on the Fly

April 15, 2015 3:16 pm | by Vienna University of Technology | News | Comments

Simply declaring a region as a nature protection area is not enough, regular monitoring of its...

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The newly developed framework, IMPEx, allows scientists to better understand complex observational data, to fill gaps in observations with computer-simulated data and to compare observations and simulations.

Space Scientists Create Common Data Hub, Universal Language for Mission Data

April 10, 2015 9:40 am | by Austrian Academy of Science | News | Comments

A consortium of European space scientists has succeeded in establishing a common data hub that allows the comparison of data from numerous space missions. A task that until now was hampered by different data processing protocols of individual space missions. Furthermore, observational data can now easily be compared with theoretical numerical models — regardless of the protocols used.

Nurses practice taking blood pressure and collecting medical history with a traditional human patient simulator system. Its face is completely inexpressive, and its lips do not move when it "talks." Speech is either pre-recorded, or voiced by the clinical

Human Patient Simulators: How Robots can Help Build Better Doctors

April 9, 2015 9:53 am | by NSF | News | Comments

A young doctor leans over a patient who has been in a serious car accident and invariably must be experiencing pain. The doctor's trauma team examines the patient's pelvis and rolls her onto her side to check her spine. They scan the patient's abdomen with a rapid ultrasound machine, finding fluid. They insert a tube in her nose. Throughout the procedure, the patient's face remains rigid, showing no signs of pain.

The future of tropical rainforests in the Amazon and worldwide is the focus of a new research project that combines field experiments and predictive modeling.

Study Combines Field Experiments, Predictive Modeling to Look at How Forests Worldwide Respond to Climate Change

April 7, 2015 5:09 pm | by Oak Ridge National Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers from the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory will play key roles in an expansive new project that aims to bring the future of tropical forests and the climate system into much clearer focus by coupling field research with the development of a new ecosystem model.

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In New York City, Manju Malkani, IBM analytics consultant, and Paul Walsh, Vice President of Weather Analytics at The Weather Company, access real-time weather data through IBM Watson Analytics.

The Weather Company Migrates Data Services to IBM Cloud, Plans to Advance Internet of Things Solutions

March 31, 2015 1:43 pm | by IBM | News | Comments

IBM and The Weather Company have announced a global strategic alliance to integrate real-time weather insights into business to improve operational performance and decision-making. As part of the alliance, The Weather Company, including its global B2B division WSI, will shift its massive weather data services platform to the IBM Cloud and integrate its data with IBM analytics and cloud services.

Dr. Jurgen Kohler, Head of NVH CAE and Vehicle Concepts, Daimler AG

Dr. Jurgen Kohler

March 27, 2015 2:35 pm | Biographies

Jürgen Kohler studied Aerospace Engineering at the University of Stuttgart. In 1992 he started his career at the Mercedes Benz AG and became Manager of Crash-Simulation in 1997. From 2001 to 2005 he was Senior Manager for CAE Passive Safety, Durability and NVH, from 2006 to 2010 for CAE Passive Safety, Durability and Stiffness CAE and Test

The Living Heart Project’s goal is to enable creation of a customized 3-D heart.

Highly Realistic Human Heart Simulations Transforming Medical Care

March 26, 2015 5:03 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Articles | Comments

The World Health Organization reports that cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death globally. Working to address this imperative public health problem, researchers world-wide are seeking new ways to accelerate research, raise the accuracy of diagnoses and improve patient outcomes. Several initiatives have utilized ground-breaking new simulations to advance research into aspects such as rhythm disturbances and ...

Wolfram SystemModeler 4.1

Wolfram SystemModeler 4.1

March 26, 2015 9:27 am | Wolfram Research, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Wolfram SystemModeler 4.1 is a modeling and simulation environment for cyber-physical systems used in industries such as aerospace, automotive, pharmaceuticals, systems biology and electrical engineering. Key features include integration of Mathematica's complete suite for reliability analysis; import from tools such as Simulink, Flowmaster and IBM Rational Rhapsody enabled based on the FMI standard; and import of subsystems.

Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi helped to outline the first-ever computer simulation for research purposes — of a one-dimensional vibrating nonlinear string. Courtesy of Department of Energy

Mathematicians Solve 60-year-old Fermi-Pasta-Ulam Problem

March 24, 2015 3:05 pm | by University of East Anglia | News | Comments

A 60-year-old math problem first put forward by Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi has been solved. In 1955, a team of scientists led by Fermi used a computer for the first time to try to solve a numerical experiment. The outcome wasn’t what they were expecting, and the complexity of the problem underpinned the then-new field of non-linear physics and paved the way for six decades of new thinking. Chaos theory is just one of the theories...  

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The simulations reveal insights into the physics of vortex shedding and VIM at different length and time scales. The immediate benefits include the improved process for design optimization for large floating structures, and possible strategies for vortex-

Numerical Simulations Improve Offshore Drill Rig Safety

March 24, 2015 2:33 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

Los Alamos National Laboratory mechanical and thermal engineering researchers’ efforts to solve the complex problem of how ocean currents affect the infrastructure of floating oil rigs and their computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations received recognition from ANSYS, a company that provides computer-based engineering simulation capabilities.

, Dr. Jürgen Kohler, the head of NVH CAE and Vehicle Concepts at Daimler AG, will talk about “High-Performance Computing – Highly Efficient Development – Mercedes-Benz Cars” at the opening keynote at this year’s ISC High Performance conference.

ISC 2015 Keynotes will focus on Latest Innovation and Future Challenges

March 20, 2015 12:08 pm | by ISC | News | Comments

World-renowned for automotive quality and safety, Daimler’s Mercedes-Benz cars are also highly innovative. To share the inside story, Dr. Jürgen Kohler, the head of NVH CAE and Vehicle Concepts at Daimler AG, will talk about “High-Performance Computing – Highly Efficient Development – Mercedes-Benz Cars” at the opening keynote at this year’s ISC High Performance conference.

Researchers used a “pixon” image enhancement technique, originally designed to peer into the distant Universe, to sharpen the map and reveal the enormous size of the thorium deposit from the volcanic eruption.

Lunar Volcano’s Enormous Eruption Reached Hundreds of Miles

March 20, 2015 11:01 am | by Durham University | News | Comments

Scientists have produced a new map of the Moon’s most unusual volcano showing that its explosive eruption spread debris over an area much greater than previously thought. A team of astronomers and geologists studied an area of the lunar surface in the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex. By mapping the radioactive element thorium, which spewed out during the eruption, they discovered debris was able to cover an area the size of Scotland.

Like a Chinese Finger Puzzle Trap, the bond between scaffolding proteins in the cellulosome strengthens when force is exerted on it and becomes one of the strongest found in living systems.

Solving Puzzle-Like Bond for Biofuels: First Look at One of Nature's Strongest Biomolecular Interactions

March 17, 2015 3:02 pm | by Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

One of life's strongest bonds has been discovered by a science team researching biofuels with the help of supercomputers. Their find could boost efforts to develop catalysts for biofuel production from non-food waste plants. Renowned computational biologist Klaus Schulten of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign led the analysis and modeling of the bond, which behaves like a Chinese Finger Trap puzzle.

Monocytes are immune cells present in the blood. They are consequently also found in tumors. In this setting, monocytes are known to promote the development of the tumoral blood vessels and to suppress the immune response directed at the tumor. Courtesy o

Mathematics Yields New Possibilities for Reprogramming Immune Response to Breast Cancer

March 17, 2015 2:55 pm | by Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics | News | Comments

A means of reprogramming a flawed immune response into an efficient anti-tumoral one was brought to light by the results of a translational trial relating to breast cancer. Thanks to the innovative combination of mathematical modeling and experimentation, only 20 tests were necessary, whereas traditional experimentation would have required 596 tests to obtain the same results.

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Simulink 8.5 (R2015a) Block Diagram Environment

Simulink 8.5 (R2015a) Block Diagram Environment

March 16, 2015 9:52 am | The Mathworks, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Simulink is a block diagram environment for multidomain simulation and model-based design. It supports simulation, automatic code generation, and continuous test and verification of embedded systems. The MATLAB add-on provides a graphical editor, customizable block libraries and solvers for modeling and simulating dynamic systems.

Smoke simulation -- Courtesy of T. Kim/ N. Thuerey/ M. Gross/ D. James, TUM

Simulating a Perfectly Animated Smoke Cloud

March 13, 2015 9:52 am | by Technische Universität München | News | Comments

The attack takes place at the climax of the blockbuster Avatar: Rockets slam into the Pandora inhabitants’ homeland tree. Explosions, flames and thick clouds of smoke appear on the screen. To keep the audience pinned to the edge of their seats, the images must be realistic. But the simulation of physical processes is especially tough to implement. This includes representation of liquids and gasses, which fall into the category of fluids. 

ANSYS 16.0's structural mechanics suite supports Xeon Phi with shared-memory and distributed-memory parallelism for both the Linux and Windows platforms.

ANSYS, Intel Collaborate to Spur Innovation

March 13, 2015 9:10 am | by ANSYS | News | Comments

Ansys has announced that engineers using ANSYS 16.0 in combination with Intel Xeon technology can realize a 300 percent decrease in solution time. The ANSYS and Intel partnership ensures that simulation engineers performing structural analysis can expect seamless high-performance computing (HPC) operations with multi-core Xeon E5 v3 processors and many-core Xeon Phi coprocessors.

This June 28, 2009 image provided by NASA, taken by the international Cassini spacecraft, shows Enceladus, one of Saturn’s moons. A new study suggests there are ongoing interactions between hot water and rocks beneath the surface of the icy moon. (AP Phot

Hunt for Alien Life: Do Hot Springs Bubble beneath the Ice of Saturn Moon?

March 12, 2015 2:44 pm | by Alicia Chang, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

New research suggests there are hot springs bubbling beneath the icy surface of a tiny Saturn moon. If confirmed, it would make the moon Enceladus (ehn-SEHL'-uh-duhs) the only other known body in the solar system besides Earth where hot water and rocks interact underground. That activity would make the moon an even more attractive place in the hunt for microbial life.

Researchers have used an advanced model to simulate in unprecedented detail the workings of "resistance-switching cells" that might replace conventional memory for electronics applications, with the potential to bring faster and higher capacity computer m

Simulations Provide Insight Into Emerging Nanoelectronic Device

March 6, 2015 4:23 pm | by Purdue University | News | Comments

Researchers have used an advanced model to simulate in unprecedented detail the workings of "resistance-switching cells" that might replace conventional memory for electronics applications, with the potential to bring faster and higher capacity computer memory while consuming less energy.

When it comes to boiling water—or the phenomenon of applying heat to a liquid until it transitions to a gas—is there anything left for today’s scientists to study? The surprising answer is, yes, quite a bit.

Mathematicians Model Fluids at Mesoscale

March 6, 2015 3:52 pm | by Julie Chao, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

When it comes to boiling water—or the phenomenon of applying heat to a liquid until it transitions to a gas—is there anything left for today’s scientists to study? The surprising answer is, yes, quite a bit. 

Researchers have gained new insights into dark energy and the theory of gravitation by analyzing data from the “Planck” satellite mission of the European Space Agency. Their results demonstrate that the standard model of cosmology remains an excellent des

Satellite Mission Puts Einstein to the Test

March 5, 2015 12:24 pm | by Heidelberg University | News | Comments

Researchers have gained new insights into dark energy and the theory of gravitation by analyzing data from the “Planck” satellite mission of the European Space Agency. Their results demonstrate that the standard model of cosmology remains an excellent description of the universe. Yet when the Planck data is combined with other astronomical observations, several deviations emerge.

An international team of researchers have developed a new way to measure the forces inside materials such as sand, soil or snow under pressure.

3D Imaging Exposes Clogs, Jams, Avalanches, Earthquakes

March 5, 2015 11:23 am | by Robin A. Smith, Duke University | News | Comments

An international team of researchers have developed a new way to measure the forces inside materials such as sand, soil or snow under pressure.

Analysis of data from the Kepler space telescope has shown that roughly half of the dayside of the exoplanet Kepler-7b is covered by a large cloud mass. Statistical comparison of more than 1,000 atmospheric models show that these clouds are most likely ma

Cloudy, with a High of 1,700 Kelvins: Analyzing Clouds around Exoplanets

March 3, 2015 4:25 pm | by Helen Knight, MIT | News | Comments

Meteorologists sometimes struggle to accurately predict the weather here on Earth, but now we can find out how cloudy it is on planets outside our solar system. MIT Researchers describe a technique that analyzes data from NASA’s Kepler space observatory to determine the types of clouds on planets that orbit other stars. Their models indicate that the clouds on Kepler-7b are most likely made from liquid rock.

Familiar crowd patterns emerged from the new simulations: people walking on an on-coming collision course veer well in advance, but people traveling in the same direction tend to walk close together. Courtesy of Yoshikazu Takada

Predicting Human Crowds with Statistical Physics

March 3, 2015 10:36 am | by American Physical Society | News | Comments

For the first time, researchers have directly measured a general law of how pedestrians interact in a crowd. This law can be used to create realistic crowds in virtual reality games and to make public spaces safer. People intuitively know how to navigate through crowds in a way that both minimizes distance traveled and avoids collisions. But the 'force' that governs human interactions has been previously unknown.

Colorized scanning electron micrograph of filamentous Ebola virus particles (green) attached to and budding from a chronically infected VERO E6 cell (blue) (25,000x magnification). Courtesy of NIAID

Combatting the World’s Deadliest Ebola Outbreak

March 2, 2015 4:37 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that the 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest in history, affecting multiple countries in West Africa. As of February 26, 2015, the CDC had tracked 23,816 cases, and Ebola had already claimed nearly 10,000 lives. 

At their heart, the simulations are akin to modeling chemical reactions taking place between different elements and, in this case, we have four states a person can be in — human, infected, zombie or dead zombie — with approximately 300 million people. Cou

Statistical Mechanics Reveal Ideal Hideout to Save your Brains from the Undead

March 2, 2015 2:26 pm | by American Physical Society | News | Comments

Researchers focusing on a fictional zombie outbreak as an approach to disease modeling suggest heading for the hills, in the Rockies, to save your brains from the undead. Reading World War Z: An Oral History of the First Zombie War, and taking a graduate statistical mechanics class inspired a group of Cornell University researchers to explore how an "actual" zombie outbreak might play out in the U.S.

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