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The Living Heart Project’s goal is to enable creation of a customized 3-D heart.

Highly Realistic Human Heart Simulations Transforming Medical Care

March 26, 2015 5:03 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Articles | Comments

The World Health Organization reports that cardiovascular diseases are the number one cause of death globally. Working to address this imperative public health problem, researchers world-wide are seeking new ways to accelerate research, raise the accuracy of diagnoses and improve patient outcomes. Several initiatives have utilized ground-breaking new simulations to advance research into aspects such as rhythm disturbances and ...

Wolfram SystemModeler 4.1

March 26, 2015 9:27 am | Product Releases | Comments

Wolfram SystemModeler 4.1 is a modeling and simulation environment for cyber-physical systems...

Mathematicians Solve 60-year-old Fermi-Pasta-Ulam Problem

March 24, 2015 3:05 pm | by University of East Anglia | News | Comments

A 60-year-old math problem first put forward by Nobel laureate Enrico Fermi has been solved. In...

Numerical Simulations Improve Offshore Drill Rig Safety

March 24, 2015 2:33 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

Los Alamos National Laboratory mechanical and thermal engineering researchers’ efforts to solve...

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The simulations reveal insights into the physics of vortex shedding and VIM at different length and time scales. The immediate benefits include the improved process for design optimization for large floating structures, and possible strategies for vortex-

Numerical Simulations Improve Offshore Drill Rig Safety

March 24, 2015 2:33 pm | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

Los Alamos National Laboratory mechanical and thermal engineering researchers’ efforts to solve the complex problem of how ocean currents affect the infrastructure of floating oil rigs and their computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations received recognition from ANSYS, a company that provides computer-based engineering simulation capabilities.

, Dr. Jürgen Kohler, the head of NVH CAE and Vehicle Concepts at Daimler AG, will talk about “High-Performance Computing – Highly Efficient Development – Mercedes-Benz Cars” at the opening keynote at this year’s ISC High Performance conference.

ISC 2015 Keynotes will focus on Latest Innovation and Future Challenges

March 20, 2015 12:08 pm | by ISC | News | Comments

World-renowned for automotive quality and safety, Daimler’s Mercedes-Benz cars are also highly innovative. To share the inside story, Dr. Jürgen Kohler, the head of NVH CAE and Vehicle Concepts at Daimler AG, will talk about “High-Performance Computing – Highly Efficient Development – Mercedes-Benz Cars” at the opening keynote at this year’s ISC High Performance conference.

Researchers used a “pixon” image enhancement technique, originally designed to peer into the distant Universe, to sharpen the map and reveal the enormous size of the thorium deposit from the volcanic eruption.

Lunar Volcano’s Enormous Eruption Reached Hundreds of Miles

March 20, 2015 11:01 am | by Durham University | News | Comments

Scientists have produced a new map of the Moon’s most unusual volcano showing that its explosive eruption spread debris over an area much greater than previously thought. A team of astronomers and geologists studied an area of the lunar surface in the Compton-Belkovich Volcanic Complex. By mapping the radioactive element thorium, which spewed out during the eruption, they discovered debris was able to cover an area the size of Scotland.

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Like a Chinese Finger Puzzle Trap, the bond between scaffolding proteins in the cellulosome strengthens when force is exerted on it and becomes one of the strongest found in living systems.

Solving Puzzle-Like Bond for Biofuels: First Look at One of Nature's Strongest Biomolecular Interactions

March 17, 2015 3:02 pm | by Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

One of life's strongest bonds has been discovered by a science team researching biofuels with the help of supercomputers. Their find could boost efforts to develop catalysts for biofuel production from non-food waste plants. Renowned computational biologist Klaus Schulten of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign led the analysis and modeling of the bond, which behaves like a Chinese Finger Trap puzzle.

Monocytes are immune cells present in the blood. They are consequently also found in tumors. In this setting, monocytes are known to promote the development of the tumoral blood vessels and to suppress the immune response directed at the tumor. Courtesy o

Mathematics Yields New Possibilities for Reprogramming Immune Response to Breast Cancer

March 17, 2015 2:55 pm | by Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics | News | Comments

A means of reprogramming a flawed immune response into an efficient anti-tumoral one was brought to light by the results of a translational trial relating to breast cancer. Thanks to the innovative combination of mathematical modeling and experimentation, only 20 tests were necessary, whereas traditional experimentation would have required 596 tests to obtain the same results.

Simulink 8.5 (R2015a) Block Diagram Environment

Simulink 8.5 (R2015a) Block Diagram Environment

March 16, 2015 9:52 am | The Mathworks, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

Simulink is a block diagram environment for multidomain simulation and model-based design. It supports simulation, automatic code generation, and continuous test and verification of embedded systems. The MATLAB add-on provides a graphical editor, customizable block libraries and solvers for modeling and simulating dynamic systems.

Smoke simulation -- Courtesy of T. Kim/ N. Thuerey/ M. Gross/ D. James, TUM

Simulating a Perfectly Animated Smoke Cloud

March 13, 2015 9:52 am | by Technische Universität München | News | Comments

The attack takes place at the climax of the blockbuster Avatar: Rockets slam into the Pandora inhabitants’ homeland tree. Explosions, flames and thick clouds of smoke appear on the screen. To keep the audience pinned to the edge of their seats, the images must be realistic. But the simulation of physical processes is especially tough to implement. This includes representation of liquids and gasses, which fall into the category of fluids. 

ANSYS 16.0's structural mechanics suite supports Xeon Phi with shared-memory and distributed-memory parallelism for both the Linux and Windows platforms.

ANSYS, Intel Collaborate to Spur Innovation

March 13, 2015 9:10 am | by ANSYS | News | Comments

Ansys has announced that engineers using ANSYS 16.0 in combination with Intel Xeon technology can realize a 300 percent decrease in solution time. The ANSYS and Intel partnership ensures that simulation engineers performing structural analysis can expect seamless high-performance computing (HPC) operations with multi-core Xeon E5 v3 processors and many-core Xeon Phi coprocessors.

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This June 28, 2009 image provided by NASA, taken by the international Cassini spacecraft, shows Enceladus, one of Saturn’s moons. A new study suggests there are ongoing interactions between hot water and rocks beneath the surface of the icy moon. (AP Phot

Hunt for Alien Life: Do Hot Springs Bubble beneath the Ice of Saturn Moon?

March 12, 2015 2:44 pm | by Alicia Chang, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

New research suggests there are hot springs bubbling beneath the icy surface of a tiny Saturn moon. If confirmed, it would make the moon Enceladus (ehn-SEHL'-uh-duhs) the only other known body in the solar system besides Earth where hot water and rocks interact underground. That activity would make the moon an even more attractive place in the hunt for microbial life.

Researchers have used an advanced model to simulate in unprecedented detail the workings of "resistance-switching cells" that might replace conventional memory for electronics applications, with the potential to bring faster and higher capacity computer m

Simulations Provide Insight Into Emerging Nanoelectronic Device

March 6, 2015 4:23 pm | by Purdue University | News | Comments

Researchers have used an advanced model to simulate in unprecedented detail the workings of "resistance-switching cells" that might replace conventional memory for electronics applications, with the potential to bring faster and higher capacity computer memory while consuming less energy.

When it comes to boiling water—or the phenomenon of applying heat to a liquid until it transitions to a gas—is there anything left for today’s scientists to study? The surprising answer is, yes, quite a bit.

Mathematicians Model Fluids at Mesoscale

March 6, 2015 3:52 pm | by Julie Chao, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

When it comes to boiling water—or the phenomenon of applying heat to a liquid until it transitions to a gas—is there anything left for today’s scientists to study? The surprising answer is, yes, quite a bit. 

Researchers have gained new insights into dark energy and the theory of gravitation by analyzing data from the “Planck” satellite mission of the European Space Agency. Their results demonstrate that the standard model of cosmology remains an excellent des

Satellite Mission Puts Einstein to the Test

March 5, 2015 12:24 pm | by Heidelberg University | News | Comments

Researchers have gained new insights into dark energy and the theory of gravitation by analyzing data from the “Planck” satellite mission of the European Space Agency. Their results demonstrate that the standard model of cosmology remains an excellent description of the universe. Yet when the Planck data is combined with other astronomical observations, several deviations emerge.

An international team of researchers have developed a new way to measure the forces inside materials such as sand, soil or snow under pressure.

3D Imaging Exposes Clogs, Jams, Avalanches, Earthquakes

March 5, 2015 11:23 am | by Robin A. Smith, Duke University | News | Comments

An international team of researchers have developed a new way to measure the forces inside materials such as sand, soil or snow under pressure.

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Analysis of data from the Kepler space telescope has shown that roughly half of the dayside of the exoplanet Kepler-7b is covered by a large cloud mass. Statistical comparison of more than 1,000 atmospheric models show that these clouds are most likely ma

Cloudy, with a High of 1,700 Kelvins: Analyzing Clouds around Exoplanets

March 3, 2015 4:25 pm | by Helen Knight, MIT | News | Comments

Meteorologists sometimes struggle to accurately predict the weather here on Earth, but now we can find out how cloudy it is on planets outside our solar system. MIT Researchers describe a technique that analyzes data from NASA’s Kepler space observatory to determine the types of clouds on planets that orbit other stars. Their models indicate that the clouds on Kepler-7b are most likely made from liquid rock.

Familiar crowd patterns emerged from the new simulations: people walking on an on-coming collision course veer well in advance, but people traveling in the same direction tend to walk close together. Courtesy of Yoshikazu Takada

Predicting Human Crowds with Statistical Physics

March 3, 2015 10:36 am | by American Physical Society | News | Comments

For the first time, researchers have directly measured a general law of how pedestrians interact in a crowd. This law can be used to create realistic crowds in virtual reality games and to make public spaces safer. People intuitively know how to navigate through crowds in a way that both minimizes distance traveled and avoids collisions. But the 'force' that governs human interactions has been previously unknown.

Colorized scanning electron micrograph of filamentous Ebola virus particles (green) attached to and budding from a chronically infected VERO E6 cell (blue) (25,000x magnification). Courtesy of NIAID

Combatting the World’s Deadliest Ebola Outbreak

March 2, 2015 4:37 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that the 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest in history, affecting multiple countries in West Africa. As of February 26, 2015, the CDC had tracked 23,816 cases, and Ebola had already claimed nearly 10,000 lives. 

At their heart, the simulations are akin to modeling chemical reactions taking place between different elements and, in this case, we have four states a person can be in — human, infected, zombie or dead zombie — with approximately 300 million people. Cou

Statistical Mechanics Reveal Ideal Hideout to Save your Brains from the Undead

March 2, 2015 2:26 pm | by American Physical Society | News | Comments

Researchers focusing on a fictional zombie outbreak as an approach to disease modeling suggest heading for the hills, in the Rockies, to save your brains from the undead. Reading World War Z: An Oral History of the First Zombie War, and taking a graduate statistical mechanics class inspired a group of Cornell University researchers to explore how an "actual" zombie outbreak might play out in the U.S.

Professor Dimitrios Nikolopoulos from the School of Electronics, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Queen’s University Belfast, is principal investigator for The Scalable, Energy-Efficient, Resilient and Transparent Software Adaptation (SERT)

Developing Simulation Software to Combat Humanity’s Biggest Issues

February 25, 2015 12:36 pm | by Queen’s University Belfast | News | Comments

Researchers are creating ground-breaking computer software, which has the potential to develop some of the world’s fastest supercomputers by increasing their ability to process masses of data at higher speeds than ever before. The new software has the potential to combat major global issues, including climate change and life-threatening diseases, by simulating detailed models of natural events.

Tsunami impact map provides more precise estimates of the areas that might face tsunami-induced flooding.

Study Maps Major Tsunami Impact on Columbia River

February 24, 2015 12:19 pm | by Oregon State University | News | Comments

Engineers at Oregon State University have completed one of the most precise evaluations yet done about the impact of a major tsunami event on the Columbia River, what forces are most important in controlling water flow and what areas might be inundated.

A computer simulation explores the impact of measles outbreaks in cities across the U.S. Users can see how an outbreak would play out if their city had high or low vaccination rates.

Simulation Brings Facts to Measles Outbreak and Vaccination Debate

February 17, 2015 2:28 pm | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

To bring facts and clarity to the public debate about immunization in light of the recent measles outbreak, the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health unveiled a computer simulation that explores the impact of measles outbreaks in cities across the U.S. Users can see how an outbreak would play out if their city had high or low vaccination rates.

NASA scientists used tree rings to understand past droughts and climate models incorporating soil moisture data to estimate future drought risk in the 21st century.

Unprecedented Megadroughts Likely for Western US: Driest Period in 1,000 Years

February 13, 2015 3:47 pm | by Earth Institute at Columbia University | News | Comments

During the second half of the 21st century, the U.S. Southwest and Great Plains will face persistent drought worse than anything seen in times ancient or modern, with the drying conditions “driven primarily” by human-induced global warming, a new study predicts. The research says the drying would surpass in severity any of the decades-long “megadroughts” that occurred much earlier during the past 1,000 years.

Qian and colleagues found that the topological phases in the TMDC materials can be turned on and off by simply applying a vertical electric field that is perpendicular to the atomic plane of the material. That's shown here in calculations by the red cross

Exotic States Materialize with Supercomputers

February 13, 2015 11:26 am | by Jorge Salazar, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

Scientists used supercomputers to find a new class of materials that possess an exotic state of matter known as the quantum spin Hall effect. The researchers published their results in the journal Science in December 2014, where they propose a new type of transistor made from these materials.

Static example of the experimental Potential Storm Surge Inundation Map, here for the Texas Gulf Coast, outside of Houston. The final product will be interactive with pan and zoom capabilities. Courtesy of the National Hurricane Center (NHC)

Communicating Hurricanes’ Real Risks

February 11, 2015 12:08 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

A hurricane is heading toward the coast. Weather forecasters predict strong winds, massive waves and intense rainfall. But what does that mean for you? Will your neighborhood be flooded? Should you evacuate?

Hurricane Katrina Courtesy of NASA/Jeff Schmaltz, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team

Comprehensive Database of Detailed Storm Surge Data Available for Download

February 6, 2015 3:03 pm | by National Oceanography Centre | News | Comments

A new online resource will help coastguards, meteorological organizations and scientific communities predict future storm surge patterns. The freely-accessible database has been compiled through the multi-partner, international eSurge project, which was launched in 2011 with the aim of making available observational data to improve the modeling and forecasting of storm surges around the world using advanced techniques and instruments.

Brain Researcher Marianne Fyhn receives computation help from, among others, Gaute Einevoll and Anders Malthe-Sørenssen to acquire an understanding of how the brain Works.

Mathematics to Reveal Secrets of the Brain

February 5, 2015 4:33 pm | by Yngve Vogt, University of Oslo | News | Comments

Top researchers are using mathematical modelling and heavy computations to understand how the brain can both remember and learn. Ten years ago, when the team of Marianne Fyhn and Torkel Hafting Fyhn cooperated with the Nobel Prize winning team of May-Britt and Edvard Moser at NTNU, they discovered the sense of orientation in the brain.

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