Advertisement
Simulation
Subscribe to Simulation

The Lead

Jeffrey Potoff is a professor of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, and Loren Schwiebert is an associate professor of Computer Science at Wayne State University.

Using Powerful GPU-Based Monte Carlo Simulation Engine to Model Larger Systems, Reduce Data Errors, Improve System Prototyping

July 22, 2014 8:33 am | by Jeffrey Potoff and Loren Schwiebert | Blogs | Comments

Recently, our research work got a shot in the arm because Wayne State University was the recipient of a complete high-performance compute cluster donated by Silicon Mechanics as part of its 3rd Annual Research Cluster Grant competition. The new HPC cluster gives us some state-of-the-art hardware, which will enhance the development of what we’ve been working on — a novel GPU-Optimized Monte Carlo simulation engine for molecular systems.

Dassault Systèmes Acquires Multi-body Simulation Technology Company SIMPACK

July 16, 2014 10:15 am | by Dassault Systèmes | News | Comments

Dassault Systèmes announced the acquisition of...

Michael Resch Keynotes at ISC Cloud

July 15, 2014 10:30 am | by ISC | News | Comments

Michael M. Resch, the Director of the Stuttgart High Performance Computing Center (HLRS) will be...

On the Trail of Paradigm-Shifting Methods for Solving Mathematical Models

July 15, 2014 10:11 am | by Hengguang Li | Blogs | Comments

How using CPU/GPU parallel computing is the next logical step - My work in...

View Sample

FREE Email Newsletter

LANL, Sandia, Cray Set to Build Next-gen NNSA Supercomputer

July 11, 2014 12:48 pm | by National Nuclear Security Administration | News | Comments

The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and Cray have entered into a contract agreement for a next-generation supercomputer, called Trinity, to advance the mission for the Stockpile Stewardship Program. Managed by NNSA, Trinity is a joint effort of the New Mexico Alliance for Computing at Extreme Scale between Los Alamos and Sandia national laboratories as part of the NNSA Advanced Simulation and Computing Program.

Speeding Up Old Math Method Makes It 200 Times More Useful

July 2, 2014 8:08 am | by Johns Hopkins University | News | Comments

A relic from long before the age of supercomputers, the 169-year-old math strategy called the Jacobi iterative method is widely dismissed today as too slow to be useful. But thanks to a curious, numbers-savvy engineering student and his professor, it may soon get a new lease on life.

NREL Supercomputer Tackles Grid Challenges

July 2, 2014 8:08 am | News | Comments

"Big data" is playing an increasingly big role in the renewable energy industry and the transformation of the nation's electrical grid, and no single entity provides a better tool for such data than the Energy Department's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) located on the campus of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL).

Advertisement
Supercomputer simulations have shown that clusters of a protein linked to cancer warp cell membranes

Cancer Chain in the Membrane

June 24, 2014 9:57 am | by Jorge Salazar, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

Supercomputer simulations have shown that clusters of a protein linked to cancer warp cell membranes. This research on these protein clusters, or aggregates as scientists call them, could help guide design of new anticancer drugs.     

Researchers from Westinghouse Electric Company and the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs (CASL), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Innovation Hub, performed core physics simulations of the AP1000® PWR startup core using CASL’s Virtual Environment

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, ORNL

June 23, 2014 5:46 pm | Award Winners

Researchers from Westinghouse Electric Company and the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs (CASL), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Innovation Hub, performed core physics simulations of the AP1000® PWR startup core using CASL’s Virtual Environment for Reactor Application (VERA).

Engineers from THESAN srl, an Italian SME active in the renewable energy sector, teamed up with the Italian supercomputing center CINECA to develop simulation driven engineering of hydroelectric turbines.

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: CINECA

June 23, 2014 5:08 pm | Award Winners

Engineers from THESAN srl, an Italian SME active in the renewable energy sector, teamed up with the Italian supercomputing center CINECA to develop simulation driven engineering of hydroelectric turbines. The engineers and researchers built an HPC based workflow to optimize the design of a new class of hydroelectric turbines. 

Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory conducted one of the largest internal combustion engine simulations. Predictive internal combustion engine simulations necessitate very fine spatial and temporal resolutions, high-fidelity and robust two-phase

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: Argonne National Laboratory, Caterpillar, Convergent Science

June 23, 2014 4:52 pm | Award Winners

Researchers from Argonne National Laboratory conducted one of the largest internal combustion engine simulations. Predictive internal combustion engine simulations necessitate very fine spatial and temporal resolutions, high-fidelity and robust two-phase flow, spray, turbulence, combustion, and emission models.

University of Wisconsin Researchers utilized HPC resources in combination with multiple advanced forms of protein structure prediction algorithms and deep sequence data mining to construct a highly plausible capsid model for Rhinovirus-C (~600,000 atoms).

HPC Innovation Excellence Award: University of Wisconsin-Madison

June 23, 2014 4:33 pm | Award Winners

University of Wisconsin Researchers utilized HPC resources in combination with multiple advanced forms of protein structure prediction algorithms and deep sequence data mining to construct a highly plausible capsid model for Rhinovirus-C (~600,000 atoms). The simulation model helps researchers in explaining why the existing pharmaceuticals don’t work on this virus.

Advertisement
Manipulating minute areas of gain and loss within individual lasers (shown as peaks and valleys in the image), researchers were able to create paradoxical interactions between two nearby lasers. Courtesy of Vienna University of Technology

Mathematical Anomalies: Strange Physics Turns off Laser

June 18, 2014 12:53 pm | by Princeton University, Engineering School | News | Comments

Inspired by anomalies that arise in certain mathematical equations, researchers have demonstrated a laser system that paradoxically turns off when more power is added rather than becoming continuously brighter. The finding could lead to new ways to manipulate the interaction of electronics and light, an important tool in modern communications networks and high-speed information processing.

IDC’s new in-depth forecasts are the first that track more than a dozen application and industry segments, including economically important new use cases for HPC.

IDC Announces First In-Depth Forecasts for Worldwide HPC Big Data Market

June 18, 2014 8:57 am | by IDC | News | Comments

IDC has announced the availability of the first in-depth forecasts for high performance data analysis (HPDA), the fast-growing worldwide market for big data workloads that use high performance computing resources. IDC forecasts that the server market for HPDA will grow rapidly at 23.5 percent compound annual growth rate (CAGR) to reach $2.7 billion in 2018 and the related storage market will expand to about $1.6 billion in the same year

Nerve agent sarin bound to bioscavenger enzyme

Chemical Weapons: Engineering Enzymes to Neutralize Nerve Agents

June 17, 2014 2:15 pm | by The University of Tennessee | News | Comments

Researchers at The University of Tennessee are a step closer to creating a prophylactic drug that would neutralize the deadly effects of the chemical weapons used in Syria and elsewhere. Jeremy Smith, UT-ORNL Governor’s Chair and an expert in computational biology, is part of the team that is trying to engineer enzymes — called bioscavengers — so they work more efficiently against chemical weapons. 

The tip clearance vortex between rotor tip and casing in a state of deterioration as “Stage 67” transonic compressor approaches stall. Courtesy of Ramgen Power Systems

Taking Turbomachine Designs for a Supersonic Spin on Titan

June 16, 2014 2:31 pm | by Katie Elyce Jones, Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility | News | Comments

Engineering turbomachines that routinely punch past the sound barrier will require more brain than brawn. In fact, it will take more than a thousand-trillion calculations per second on the nation’s most powerful supercomputer to simulate the precise design spaces and complex fluid dynamics that affect machine performance.

A lightweight Fusion sedan was unveiled June 3, 3014. The prototype is 800 pounds lighter than a regular Fusion thanks to more use of aluminum and other materials. (AP Photo/Ford Motor Co.)

Auto Industry Gets Serious about Lighter Materials

June 10, 2014 2:09 pm | by Dee-Ann Durbin, AP Auto Writer | News | Comments

While hybrids and electrics may grab the headlines, the real frontier in fuel economy is the switch to lighter materials. Automakers have been experimenting for decades with lightweighting, as the practice is known, but the effort is gaining urgency with the adoption of tougher fuel efficiency standards. To meet the U.S. government's goal of nearly doubling average fuel economy to 45 mpg by 2025, cars need to lose some serious pounds.

Advertisement
High-resolution CESM simulation run on Yellowstone. This featured CAM-5 spectral element at roughly 0.25deg grid spacing, and POP2 on a nominal 0.1deg grid.

Building Momentum for Code Modernization: The Intel Parallel Computing Centers

June 9, 2014 12:06 pm | by Doug Black | Articles | Comments

Like a Formula One race car stuck in a traffic jam, HPC hardware performance is frequently hampered by HPC software. This is because some of the most widely used application codes have not been updated for years, if ever, leaving them unable to leverage advances in parallel systems. As hardware power moves toward exascale, the imbalance between hardware and software will only get worse. The problem of updating essential scientific ...

PRACEdays14 Award Winners

PRACEdays14 Concludes with Three Awards

June 2, 2014 5:00 am | by PRACE | News | Comments

The PRACE Scientific and Industrial Conference 2014 – PRACEdays14 – was held from 20 to 22 May 2014 in Barcelona, Spain. Hosted by PRACE and supported by the Barcelona Supercomputing Centre, the conference attracted over 200 participants from academia and industry. Three Awards were presented to...

Sandberg concludes that there is a pressing need for ‘computational modelers to safeguard against software suffering’ as the field progresses. Courtesy of Shannan Muskopf

Can Software Suffer? The Complicated Ethics of Brain Emulation

May 30, 2014 12:24 pm | by Oxford | News | Comments

Scientists may be years away from successfully emulating a human or animal brain for research purposes, but the significant — and perhaps unexpected — ethical challenges such work presents have been outlined in a thought-provoking article in the Journal of Experimental & Theoretical Artificial Intelligence.

The fruit fly cells. Courtersy of Cell, Martin Baron et al.

Sophisticated Computer Modelling Helps Unravel the Science of Life

May 22, 2014 5:29 pm | by University of Manchester | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a sophisticated computer modelling simulation to explore how cells of the fruit fly react to changes in the environment. The research is part of an on-going study that is investigating how external environmental factors impact on health and disease. The model shows how cells of the fruit fly communicate with each other during its development.

A cross-section of an ant’s neck joint, part of a 3-D model created on OSC systems, helped Ohio State researchers to study the strength of the small insect. The cross-section shows the head (blue), neck membrane (purple), esophagus (teal), and thorax (ora

Studying the Biomechanics behind Amazing Ant Strength

May 21, 2014 3:20 pm | by Ohio State University | News | Comments

A recent study into the biomechanics of ants — a common insect that can amazingly lift objects many times heavier than its own body — might unlock one of nature’s little mysteries and, quite possibly, open the door to advancements in robotic engineering. Engineers combined laboratory testing and computational modeling conducted to determine the relationship between mechanical function, structural design and material properties ...

Seismic data processing and imaging, velocity modeling and seismic interpretation

Paradigm 14 Seismic Processing Software

May 14, 2014 3:16 pm | Paradigm | Product Releases | Comments

Paradigm 14 is designed to enable effective seismic data processing and imaging, velocity modeling and seismic interpretation. It includes features that cover the entire upstream workflow — from processing and imaging to interpretation and modeling, reservoir characterization, reservoir engineering and drilling, and data management.

The Third National Climate Assessment notes that the past seven years have marked the seven smallest Arctic sea ice minimums on record. Sea ice minimums are the point at which summer melting has reduced the ice cap to its smallest extent of the year. Cour

West Antarctic Glacier Loss Appears Unstoppable, Volume Enough to Raise Sea Level 4 Feet

May 12, 2014 2:39 pm | by UC Irvine | News | Comments

A rapidly melting section of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet appears to be in irreversible decline, with nothing to stop the entire glacial basin from disappearing into the sea, according to researchers at UC Irvine and NASA. The new study presents multiple lines of evidence — incorporating 40 years of observations — that six massive glaciers in the Amundsen Sea sector “have passed the point of no return,”

This composite image from the Illustris simulation is centered on the most massive galaxy cluster existing today. It morphs from concentrations of dark matter (at left in blue and purple) to normal matter made mostly of hydrogen and helium gas

Astronomers Create First Realistic Virtual Universe

May 9, 2014 1:59 pm | by MIT/Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics | News | Comments

Move over, Matrix — astronomers have done you one better. They have created the first realistic virtual universe using a computer simulation called "Illustris." Illustris can recreate 13 billion years of cosmic evolution in a cube 350 million light-years on a side with unprecedented resolution.

The Antarctic ice sheet. East Antarctica is much higher in elevation than West Antarctica.

Uncorking East Antarctica Yields Unstoppable Sea-level Rise

May 5, 2014 12:43 pm | by Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK) | News | Comments

The melting of a rather small ice volume on East Antarctica's shore could trigger a persistent ice discharge into the ocean, resulting in unstoppable sea-level rise for thousands of years to come. This is shown in a study published in Nature Climate Change. The findings are based on computer simulations of the Antarctic ice flow using improved data of the ground profile underneath the ice sheet.

Schematic of the stimulated annihilation process in the positronium gamma-ray laser. Time sequence of frames, running left to right, suggests how some "seed photons" from spontaneous annihilation of a few Ps atoms will stimulate subsequent Ps annihilation

Stimulated Mutual Annihilation: Gamma-Ray Laser Made from Bose-Einstein Condensate of Positronium

May 1, 2014 6:38 pm | by Joint Quantum Institute | News | Comments

Twenty years ago, Philip Platzman and Allen Mills, Jr. at Bell Laboratories proposed that a gamma-ray laser could be made from a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) of positronium, the simplest atom made of both matter and antimatter. That was a year before a BEC of any kind of atom was available in any laboratory. Today, BECs have been made of 13 different elements.

Modern Papuans have descended from beachcombers. cifor, CC BY

Mathematical Models Show that Modern Humans Left Home Continent in at Least Two Waves

May 1, 2014 4:01 pm | by Daniel Zadik, University of Leicester | News | Comments

It is well established that modern humans originated in Africa, before moving out to inhabit rest of the planet. They first spread into Asia and Europe via the Arabian Peninsula, and those in the Far East eventually reached America and the Pacific islands. However, this simple picture does not explain several groups found across Asia and Oceania. Now, by looking at genetic and archaeological data, researchers might have found the answer

The U.S. Geological Survey captured the upper parts of the landslide in Oso, WA, in an aerial survey taken five days after this natural disaster killed 41 people. Active search and rescue efforts were suspended as the community turned its attention to ...

Modeling Dynamics: Understanding Mudslides, Avalanches and Volcanic Flows

May 1, 2014 3:42 pm | by National Science Foundation | News | Comments

Mudslides. Landslides. Volcanic debris flows. Avalanches. Falling rocks... They can come along so suddenly that people, homes, roads and even towns are buried or destroyed without much warning. Recently, we've had dramatic reminders of this, such as the mudslide in Oso, WA, where 41 people died; an avalanche on Mt. Everest that killed 13 experienced Sherpas and another landslide event in Jackson, WY.

X
You may login with either your assigned username or your e-mail address.
The password field is case sensitive.
Loading