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ChemAxon and BSSN Software Partner to Offer Analytical Data Management in a Chemical Context

June 18, 2015 3:15 pm | by ChemAxon | News | Comments

ChemAxon, a provider of chemistry software solutions and consulting services for life science research, and BSSN Software GmbH, a specialist in vendor-independent analytical data management, are announcing a partnership that allows users to manage analytical data in ChemAxon's chemistry software solutions using open standards.

Next-gen Experiment will Create Largest 3-D Map of Universe, Help Test Dark Energy Theories

June 4, 2015 9:21 am | by Kate Greene, Berkeley Lab Computing Sciences | News | Comments

For the past several years, scientists at Berkeley Lab have been planning the construction of...

Telescope Array Captures Possible 'Screams' from Zombie Stars

April 30, 2015 9:57 am | by NASA | News | Comments

Peering into the heart of the Milky Way galaxy, NASA's Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (...

Unmasking the Secrets of Mercury

April 29, 2015 9:32 am | by NASA | News | Comments

MASCS has been diligently collecting single tracks of spectral surface measurements since...

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Image of a section of the brain shows the fusion of microscopy (pink area) and mass spectrometry (pixelated colors at bottom) to produce a detailed “map” of the distribution of proteins, lipids and other molecules within sharply delineated brain structure

Mass Spectrometry and Microscopy Blended with Regression Analysis

March 16, 2015 12:28 pm | by Bill Snyder, Vanderbilt University | News | Comments

Researchers have achieved the first “image fusion” of mass spectrometry and microscopy — a technical tour de force that could, among other things, dramatically improve the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Using a mathematical approach called regression analysis, they mapped each pixel of mass spectrometry data onto the corresponding spot on the microscopy image to produce a new, “predicted” image.

Seahorse Mobile Edition

Seahorse Mobile Edition

March 10, 2015 9:31 am | BSSN Software GmbH | Product Releases | Comments

Seahorse Scientific Workbench is a vendor-neutral software suite for capturing, analyzing and sharing analytical data. It consolidates raw and result data from multiple experimental techniques in a single tool, based on the emerging ASTM AnIML Data Standard. Seahorse Mobile delivers scientific data to mobile devices and supports chromatography (HPLC, GC), mass spectrometry, NMR, optical spectroscopy, microplate reader, bioreactor and fermenter, medical imaging and process chromatography data types.

ACD/Spectrus Portal

ACD/Spectrus Portal

March 10, 2015 9:07 am | Advanced Chemistry Development, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

The ACD/Spectrus Portal is a Web-based interface that provides vendor neutral, multi-technique results from analytical chemistry experiments to laboratory chemists. The portal extends the ACD/Spectrus analytical and chemical laboratory intelligence platform through a series of domain-specific market applications.

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An artist's impression of a quasar with a supermassive black hole in the distant universe. Courtesy of Zhaoyu Li/NASA/JPL-Caltech/Misti Mountain Observatory

Supermassive Black Hole Discovered with Mass of 12 Billion Suns

February 27, 2015 11:46 am | by Christian Veillet and Daniel Stolte, Large Binocular Telescope Observatory, University of Arizona | News | Comments

Scientists have discovered the brightest quasar in the early universe, powered by the most massive black hole yet known at that time. The discovery of this quasar, named SDSS J0100+2802, marks an important step in understanding how quasars, the most powerful objects in the universe, have evolved from the earliest epoch, only 900 million years after the Big Bang, which is thought to have happened 13.7 billion years ago.

A code hidden in the arrangement of the genetic information of single-stranded RNA viruses tells the virus how to pack itself within its outer shell of proteins.

Molecular Warfare: Researchers Discover Viral "Enigma Machine"

February 4, 2015 2:21 pm | by University of Leeds | News | Comments

Researchers have cracked a code that governs infections by a major group of viruses, including the common cold and polio. The unnoticed code had been hidden in plain sight in the sequence of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) that makes up this type of viral genome. But researchers have unlocked its meaning and demonstrated that jamming the code can disrupt virus assembly. Stopping a virus assembling can stop it functioning.

ACD/Labs 2015 Cheminformatics Software

ACD/Labs 2015 Cheminformatics Software

January 29, 2015 10:38 am | Advanced Chemistry Development, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

ACD/Labs 2015 cheminformatics software builds upon the capabilities of the ACD/Spectrus and ACD/Percepta platforms. The ACD/Spectrus Platform is designed to make it easier for organizations to handle unified analytical data from multiple techniques and instruments. The ACD/Percepta Platform features improvements in the speed of calculation of physicochemical and ADME-Tox properties and expanded capabilities to leverage organizational knowledge.

In this January 25, 1955, photo, Charles Hard Townes, Columbia University professor and Nobel laureate, explains his invention the maser during a news conference in New York City. Townes, who did most of the work that would make him one of three scientist

Laser Co-creator and Nobel Laureate Charles Townes dies at 99

January 29, 2015 8:37 am | by Lisa Leff, Associated Press | News | Comments

Charles H. Townes' inspiration for the predecessor of the laser came to him while sitting on a park bench, waiting for a restaurant to open for breakfast. On the tranquil morning of April 26, 1951, Townes scribbled a theory on scrap paper that would lead to the laser, the invention he's known for and which transformed everyday life and led to other scientific discoveries. The 99-year-old Nobel Prize-winning physicist died January 27, 2015.

Astronomers have found evidence that the “recipe” for creating Earth also applies to terrestrial exoplanets orbiting distant stars. Courtesy of David A. Aguilar (CfA)

How Do You Create an Earth-like Planet?

January 6, 2015 10:39 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

In the on-going search for habitable exoplanets, astronomers have been searching for evidence of how planets orbiting distant stars were created. Although planet Earth’s "test kitchen" has provided a detailed recipe, it hasn’t been clear whether other planetary systems followed the same formula. Now, researchers are reporting evidence that the formula for Earth also applies to terrestrial exoplanets orbiting distant stars.

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ONET FT-NIR Networking Software

ONET FT-NIR Networking Software

December 18, 2014 12:45 pm | Bruker Optics Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

ONET networking software is for the setup, administration and control of large FT-NIR spectrometer networks. It is a server application accessed via a browser-based Web interface (WebUI), allowing users to set up, administrate and control a network of FT-NIR instruments from a central remote location anywhere in the world.

Michael Boruta is Optical Spectroscopy Product Manager at ACD/Labs

Accessibility of Data and Application of Algorithms to Provide Insights in Predictive Analytics

December 15, 2014 11:56 am | by Michael Boruta, ACD/Labs | Blogs | Comments

Although there are a diverse range of applications for predictive analytics in R&D, two common basic requirements are data and insight. Data may be generated by running experiments/analyses, or re-applied from previous work when available. Insights come from application of knowledge — both explicitand tacit. There are a variety of roles for informatics in predictive analytics...

A time-lapse photograph of the CIBER rocket launch, taken from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia in 2013. This was the last of four launches of the Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER). Sub-orbital rockets are smaller than those that boo

Rocket Experiment Finds Surprising Cosmic Light

November 7, 2014 3:37 pm | by Kathy Svitil, Caltech | News | Comments

Using an experiment carried into space on a NASA suborbital rocket, astronomers have detected a diffuse cosmic glow that appears to represent more light than that produced by known galaxies in the universe. The researchers say the best explanation is that the cosmic light originates from stars that were stripped away from their parent galaxies and flung out into space as those galaxies collided and merged with other galaxies.

QT 2.5 Chemometrics Software

Symbion QT 2.5 Chemometrics Software

November 6, 2014 3:27 pm | Symbion Systems | Product Releases | Comments

Symbion QT 2.5. chemometrics software provides Parametric Data Cleaning, a technique that automates the handling of data compromised by excessive noise or other artifacts. Key cleaning parameters are under the control of the analyst, allowing chemometric optimization under a wide range of analytical situations.

Spectronaut Software

Spectronaut Software

October 24, 2014 4:35 pm | by Biognosys | Product Releases | Comments

Spectronaut is softwarefor analysis of hyper reaction monitoring, HRM-MS (SWATH, DIA) data. HRM-MS is a targeted proteomics technology based on data-independent acquisition (DIA) performed on new generation mass spectrometric systems. Spectral library generation capability based on MaxQuant search results is incorporated into the software.

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"Diamond nanothreads" promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymers. The core of the nanothreads is a long, thin strand of carbon atoms arranged just like the fundamental u

Smallest Possible Diamonds Form What may be World’s Strongest Material

September 24, 2014 2:36 pm | by Penn State University | News | Comments

For the first time, scientists have discovered how to produce ultra-thin "diamond nanothreads" that promise extraordinary properties, including strength and stiffness greater than that of today's strongest nanotubes and polymers. The core of the nanothreads is a long, thin strand of carbon atoms arranged just like the fundamental unit of a diamond's structure.

The flux of cosmic ray particles as a function of their energy. Courtesy of Sven Lafebre

Latest Measurements Unveil New Territories in Flux of Cosmic Rays

September 23, 2014 4:17 pm | by CERN | News | Comments

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer collaboration has presented its latest results based on analysis of 41 billion particles detected with the space-based AMS detector aboard the International Space Station. The results, presented during a seminar at CERN, provide new insights into the nature of the mysterious excess of positrons observed in the flux of cosmic rays. 

This July 2014 image provided by the Bureau of Land Management shows researchers in the interior of the Natural Trap Cave in north-central Wyoming. The cave holds the remains of tens of thousands of animals, including many now-extinct species, from the la

Dig This: Ancient Bones found in Wyoming Cave

August 8, 2014 4:36 pm | by Mead Gruver, Associated Press | News | Comments

North American lions, cheetahs and short-faced bears: Those are just a few fearsome critters from 25,000 years ago paleontologists already might have found in their first excavation of a bizarre northern Wyoming cave in 30 years. Good fossils also come in small packages: Exquisite rodent bones best examined by microscope, or even snippets of genetic material from long-extinct species, could be in their haul.

As aircraft climb or descend under certain atmospheric conditions, they can inadvertently seed mid-level clouds and cause narrow bands of snow or rain to develop and fall to the ground. Through this process, they leave behind odd-shaped holes or channels

Mysterious Clouds: When Aircraft Inadvertently Cause Rain or Snow

August 5, 2014 2:53 pm | by National Center for Atmospheric Research | News | Comments

As turboprop and jet aircraft climb or descend under certain atmospheric conditions, they can inadvertently seed mid-level clouds and cause narrow bands of snow or rain to develop and fall to the ground, new research finds. Through this seeding process, they leave behind odd-shaped holes or channels in the clouds, which have long fascinated the public.

Bottom-up Proteomics: Supercomputer helps Researchers Interpret Genomes

July 9, 2014 3:30 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

Tandem protein mass spectrometry is one of the most widely used methods in proteomics, the large-scale study of proteins, particularly their structures and functions. Researchers in the Marcotte group at the University of Texas at Austin are using the Stampede supercomputer to develop and test computer algorithms that let them more accurately and efficiently interpret proteomics mass spectrometry data.

Pittcon 2015 Technical Program Places Emphasis on Energy and Fuels

July 8, 2014 4:05 pm | by Pittcon | News | Comments

The Program Committee has announced a call for papers for the Pittcon 2015 Technical Program.  Abstracts are currently being accepted for contributed oral and poster presentations in areas such as, but not limited to, analytical chemistry, applied spectroscopy, life science, bioanalysis, food science, nanotechnology, environmental science and pharmaceutical. The 2015 committee is especially interested in topics relevant to energy and fuels.

Saturn’s Rainbow Rings -- Courtesy of NASA/JPL/University of Colorado

Saturn’s Rainbow Rings

May 8, 2014 2:16 pm | by ESA | News | Comments

This colorful cosmic rainbow portrays a section of Saturn’s beautiful rings, four centuries after they were discovered by Galileo Galilei. Saturn’s rings were first observed in 1610. Despite using his newly created telescope, Galileo was confounded by what he saw: he referred to the peculiar shapes surrounding the planet as “Saturn’s children.”

High Altitude View of Cloud Towers -- Courtesy of NASA/Jeff Schmaltz, LANCE/EOSDIS MODIS Rapid Response Team, NASA GSFC

High Altitude View: Cloud Towers

April 28, 2014 10:17 am | by Holli Riebeek, NASA | News | Comments

In a view from high altitude, height can be a difficult thing to gauge. The highest of clouds can appear to sit on a flat plane, as if they were at the same elevation as the ocean or land surface. In this image, however, texture, shape and shadows lend definition to mushrooming thunderheads over the Indonesian island of Flores. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Aqua satellite acquired this image

Clarity MS Extension

April 28, 2014 9:33 am | DataApex | Product Releases | Comments

The Clarity MS Extension control driver for Advion’s expression compact mass spectrometers (CMS) includes both digital control of the detector and digital data acquisition of the detector signal. It also allows performance of all service operations necessary for the detector from the Device Monitor software window.

Van Duyne recently identified the chemical components of paint, now partially faded, used by Renoir in his oil painting “Madame Léon Clapisson.”

Chemist Reveals Renoir Masterpiece's True Colors

April 23, 2014 12:36 pm | by Northwestern University | News | Comments

Scientists are using powerful analytical and imaging tools to study artworks from all ages, delving deep below the surface to reveal the process and materials used by some of the world’s greatest artists. Chemist Richard Van Duyne, in collaboration with conservation scientists at the Art Institute of Chicago, has been using a scientific method to investigate masterpieces by Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Winslow Homer and Mary Cassatt.

The author loses control of an interview with subject-matter experts Cheech and Chong.

Up In Smoke: Rocky Mountain High Redefined by Legalized Marijuana

April 21, 2014 3:38 pm | by Randy C. Hice | Blogs | Comments

Tens of thousands of pot smokers wheezed a sigh of relief when recreational marijuana use was made legal January 1, 2014. Gone is the cottage industry of gray-area physicians rubber-stamping medical prescriptions for a well-informed gaggle of would-be stoners who memorized popular conditions sure to garner approval.

Robotic Arm Probes Chemistry of 3-D Objects

April 11, 2014 9:53 am | by Brett Israel, Georgia Tech | News | Comments

When life on Earth was first getting started, simple molecules bonded together into the precursors of modern genetic material. A catalyst would have been needed, but enzymes had not yet evolved. One theory is that the catalytic minerals on a meteorite’s surface could have jump-started life’s first chemical reactions. But scientists need a way to directly analyze these rough, irregularly shaped surfaces.

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