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A three-dimensional spatial structure of mixing in an idealized ocean simulation, computed using Lagrangian particle statistics.

Vast Eddies swirl across Open Ocean, pull Carbon Emissions into the Deep

June 25, 2015 9:11 am | by Los Alamos National Laboratory | News | Comments

Scientists have developed a computer model that clarifies the complex processes driving ocean mixing in the vast eddies that swirl across hundreds of miles of open ocean. The model is a first-of-its-kind tool because of its ability to exploit the power available from today’s supercomputers. Global climate simulations are beginning to be able to resolve the largest mesoscale eddies, which are considered the “weather” of the ocean.

MoMATH: Hands-on Mathematics Inspiring Young Minds

June 19, 2015 11:17 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

My first impression upon entering the National Museum of Mathematics could be described as...

Complex, Large-scale Genome Analysis made Easier

June 16, 2015 12:45 pm | by European Molecular Biology Laboratory | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new approach to studying the effect of multiple genetic variations...

May was Wettest Month in US Records

June 9, 2015 9:26 am | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Feeling soggy? Last month was the wettest on record for the contiguous United States, according...

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Global warming has not stopped or even slowed in the past 18 years, according to a new federal study that rebuts doubters who've claimed that that heating trends have paused.  Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration readjusted th

New Fed Data Shows No Stopping or Slowing of Global Warming

June 4, 2015 2:20 pm | by Seth Borenstein, AP Science Writer | News | Comments

Global warming has not stopped or even slowed in the past 18 years, according to a new federal study that rebuts doubters who've claimed that that heating trends have paused. Scientists at NOAA readjusted thousands of weather data points to account for different measuring techniques through the decades. Their calculations show that, since 1998, the rate of warming is about the same as it has been since 1950.

The mathematician John Nash, who died in a taxi accident at the weekend, is probably best known to the wider public through Russell Crowe’s portrayal of him in the 2001 movie A Beautiful Mind. Although his achievements spanned a huge number of fields in t

The Legacy of John Nash and His Equilibrium Theory

May 26, 2015 12:59 pm | by Stephen Woodcock, The Conversation | News | Comments

The mathematician John Nash, who died in a taxi accident at the weekend, is probably best known to the wider public through Russell Crowe’s portrayal of him in the 2001 movie A Beautiful Mind. Although his achievements spanned a huge number of fields in the mathematical sciences, he will likely be best remembered for his work in the development of game theory.

Researchers used methods from signal processing and text-mining to analyze the musical properties of songs. Their system automatically grouped the thousands of songs by patterns of chord changes and tone, allowing them to statistically identify trends wit

Big Data Analysis of Sounds Creates 50-year Evolutionary History of Music Charts

May 14, 2015 9:18 am | by Queen Mary University of London | News | Comments

Evolutionary biologists and computer scientists have come together study the evolution of pop music. Their analysis of 17,000 songs from the US Billboard Hot 100 charts, 1960 to 2010, is the most substantial scientific study of the history of popular music to date. They studied trends in style, the diversity of the charts, and the timing of musical revolutions.

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Researchers have detected that the random changes in the direction of Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) follow mathematical patterns, which are a mixture of Gaussian and Pareto distributions. Courtesy of Lek Khauv

Ants’ Movements Hide Mathematical Patterns

May 13, 2015 12:41 pm | by SINC | News | Comments

When ants go exploring in search of food they end up choosing collective routes that fit statistical distributions of probability. This has been demonstrated by a team of mathematicians after analyzing the trails of a species of Argentine ant. Studies like this could be applied to coordinate the movement of micro-robots in cleaning contaminated areas for example.

The search for life beyond our solar system requires unprecedented cooperation across scientific disciplines. NASA's NExSS collaboration includes those who study Earth as a life-bearing planet (lower right), those researching the diversity of solar system

NASA’s NExSS Coalition to Lead Search for Life on Distant Worlds

April 28, 2015 3:58 pm | by NASA | News | Comments

NASA is bringing together experts spanning a variety of scientific fields for an unprecedented initiative dedicated to the search for life on planets outside our solar system. The Nexus for Exoplanet System Science, or “NExSS,” hopes to better understand the various components of an exoplanet, as well as how the planet stars and neighbor planets interact to support life.

The functional genetic network shown is just one of the 144 such networks identified for a diverse set of human tissues and cell types. Courtesy of Simons Center for Data Analysis

Computer Science, Statistical Methods Combine to Analyze Stunningly Diverse Genomic Big Data Collections

April 28, 2015 3:36 pm | by Simons Foundation | News | Comments

A multi-year study led by researchers from the Simons Center for Data Analysis and major universities and medical schools has broken substantial new ground, establishing how genes work together within 144 different human tissues and cell types in carrying out those tissues’ functions. The paper also demonstrates how computer science and statistical methods may combine to analyze genomic ‘big-data’ collections.

Enterprise AI deployments will also drive additional spending on IT hardware and services including computing power, graphics processor units (GPUs), networking products, storage and cloud computing.

AI for Enterprise Applications to Reach $11.1 Billion, Deep Learning will be Breakout Technology

April 24, 2015 2:39 pm | by Tractica | News | Comments

After 60 years of false starts, the integration of artificial intelligence with probability and statistics has led to a marriage of machine learning, control theory and neuroscience that is yielding practical benefits. This shared theoretical foundation, combined with the exponential growth of processing power and the unprecedented increase in the amount of data available to analyze, has made AI systems attractive for businesses to adopt.

Research using cutting edge computer analysis reveals that despite mutating, Ebola hasn’t evolved to become deadlier since the first outbreak 40 years ago.

Ebola Analysis Finds Virus Hasn't Become Deadlier, Yet

April 14, 2015 4:21 pm | by University of Manchester | News | Comments

Research using cutting edge computer analysis reveals that despite mutating, Ebola hasn’t evolved to become deadlier since the first outbreak 40 years ago.

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Spiegelhalter unravels the web of exaggerations, misdirections and downright lies that surround sex in modern society.

Fifty Shades of Statistics: What they tell us about our intimate lives

April 9, 2015 11:55 am | by Wiley | News | Comments

As part of the 2015 Cambridge Science Festival, David Spiegelhalter, Winton Professor for the Understanding of of Risk at Cambridge University, has given an overview of the history of sex research using data going back to 1580, conducted by pioneering sexologists through to today’s ‘sexperts.’

The book assumes no formal statistical training on the part of the reader so the language is everyday plain. It seeks to clarify basic concepts and NOT teach the intricacies of the mathematics. Still, the book has much to recommend it.

Statistics Done Wrong: The Woefully Complete Guide

April 8, 2015 3:05 pm | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

This delightful and informative guide from my friends at No Starch Press comes with the following cover blurb: “Statistics Done Wrong is a pithy, essential guide to statistical blunders in modern Science that will show you how to keep your research blunder-free.” It is somewhat pithy, but as to blunder free, I will quote the old maxim that “nothing is foolproof, as fools are so very clever.” Still, the book has much to recommend it.

Omics Explorer 3.1 for Mac

Omics Explorer 3.1 for Mac

April 1, 2015 11:18 am | Qlucore AB | Product Releases | Comments

Qlucore Omics Explorer 3.1 for Mac is data analysis software designed to maximize the outcome of research by making it easy to analyze experiment data from a biological point-of-view. Examples of this are the inbuilt Gene Ontology (GO) Browser, a Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) function, and freedom to explore data using any variable identifier: variable collapse.

A view of South America's forest cover from the new hybrid global forest map, viewed via the Geo-Wiki platform. Courtesy of IIASA, Geo-Wiki, Google Earth

Citizen Scientists Map Global Forests with Unprecedented Accuracy

March 31, 2015 11:34 am | by International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) | News | Comments

New global forest maps combine citizen science with multiple data sources, for an unprecedented level of accuracy about the location and extent of forestland worldwide. The maps rely on a combination of recent multisensory remote sensing data, statistics and crowdsourcing. By combining different data sources, and incorporating the input of trained citizen scientists, researchers were able to produce maps more accurate than any existing...

MATLAB 8.5 (R2015a) Numerical Computing Environment

MATLAB 8.5 (R2015a) Numerical Computing Environment

March 12, 2015 10:36 am | The Mathworks, Inc. | Product Releases | Comments

MATLAB 8.5 is a high-level language and interactive environment used by engineers and scientists to explore and visualize ideas and to collaborate across disciplines, including signal and image processing, communications, control systems and computational finance.

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Mark Anawis is a Principal Scientist and ASQ Six Sigma Black Belt at Abbott

Understanding Reliability Models

March 11, 2015 8:25 am | by Mark Anawis | Blogs | Comments

Cicero said: “The shifts of fortune test the reliability of friends.” Fortunately, the reliability of processes can be more easily understood than friends. It is defined as the probability of performing a specific function under certain conditions for a specific period of time without failure

Familiar crowd patterns emerged from the new simulations: people walking on an on-coming collision course veer well in advance, but people traveling in the same direction tend to walk close together. Courtesy of Yoshikazu Takada

Predicting Human Crowds with Statistical Physics

March 3, 2015 10:36 am | by American Physical Society | News | Comments

For the first time, researchers have directly measured a general law of how pedestrians interact in a crowd. This law can be used to create realistic crowds in virtual reality games and to make public spaces safer. People intuitively know how to navigate through crowds in a way that both minimizes distance traveled and avoids collisions. But the 'force' that governs human interactions has been previously unknown.

A mathematical will give researchers an opportunity to discover the earliest words and languages spoken to date, with the potential to go back thousands of years. Courtesy of woodleywonderworks

Statistical Technique Traces Languages Back to Oldest Spoken Words

February 24, 2015 12:42 pm | by Current Biology | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a statistical technique that sorts out when changes to words’ pronunciations most likely occurred in the evolutionary history of related languages. Their model gives researchers a renewed opportunity to trace words and languages back to their earliest common ancestor or ancestors — potentially thousands of years further into prehistory than previous techniques.

A computer simulation explores the impact of measles outbreaks in cities across the U.S. Users can see how an outbreak would play out if their city had high or low vaccination rates.

Simulation Brings Facts to Measles Outbreak and Vaccination Debate

February 17, 2015 2:28 pm | by University of Pittsburgh | News | Comments

To bring facts and clarity to the public debate about immunization in light of the recent measles outbreak, the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health unveiled a computer simulation that explores the impact of measles outbreaks in cities across the U.S. Users can see how an outbreak would play out if their city had high or low vaccination rates.

3-D marine seascapes are zoned using statistical analysis to identify distinct geomorphological terrains.

Biodiversity Hotspots found by Mapping Seascapes in the Deep Ocean

February 17, 2015 2:05 pm | by National Oceanography Centre | News | Comments

Researchers have developed a new, automated method for classifying hundreds of kilometers of the deep sea floor, in a way that is more cost efficient, quicker and more objective than previously possible, estimating geographic distribution of life on the sea floor using a combination of submarine mapping technology, statistics and a landscape ecology technique called Niche Theory.

Omics Explorer 3.1 Advanced Data Analysis Software

Omics Explorer 3.1 Advanced Data Analysis Software

February 12, 2015 1:32 pm | Qlucore AB | Product Releases | Comments

Qlucore Omics Explorer 3.1 advanced data analysis software features a well-defined open interface to R. The interface allows users to utilize a broad range of statistical tests, to use existing tests in R, and to write new ones. The inbuilt statistical functions of the bioinformatics program are extended with the R interface to include the full suite of statistical methods available in R.

Origin Viewer 9.2

Origin Viewer 9.2

February 11, 2015 11:24 am | Originlab Corporation | Product Releases | Comments

Origin Viewer 9.2 is a standalone application that allows viewing, copying and sharing of graph or worksheet information from Origin Project (OPJ) files and Origin window (OGG, OGW, OGM) files on computers that do not have Origin installed. Features include extra-large icon view, mouseover graph preview, icon or details view of windows and the capability to show or hide columns of details view.

John Wass is a statistician based in Chicago, IL.

Explorations of Mathematical Models in Biology with Maple

February 10, 2015 9:29 am | by John A. Wass, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

The author of this wonderful text delivers a brief, easy-to-absorb, yet very comprehensive text on modeling real-world data with Maple. Maple is software for performing mathematics, with a none-too-steep learning curve. In the introduction, the author is quick to point out that this is neither a detailed textbook of mathematical modeling, nor Maple. It is, however, a very well-written manual of introductory modeling and use of Maple.

ENIGMA cipher machine  Rotor Set Courtesy of Andy L.

Similar Statistics Play Role in Decision Making and World War II Code Breaking

February 9, 2015 11:22 am | by Cell Press | News | Comments

Statistical decision making resembles a process Alan Turning's team did in Bletchley Park to work out the settings of German enigma machines. In order to make use of the large clicking machine, Turing's team analyzed pairs of randomly intercepted German messages, aligned them one above the other to accumulate evidence from letter pairs until they reach a threshold level of certainty that the messages were sent on identical enigma machine.

Eve, the Robot Scientist Courtesy of University of Manchester

AI Robot Scientist ‘Eve’ could Boost Search for New Drugs

February 4, 2015 2:46 pm | by University of Cambridge | News | Comments

Eve, an artificially-intelligent ‘robot scientist’ could make drug discovery faster and much cheaper, say researchers. The team has demonstrated the success of the approach, as Eve discovered that a compound shown to have anti-cancer properties might also be used in the fight against malaria.

Customized Treatment: "Charting the versions of the genes that are only found in cancer cells may help tailor the treatment offered to each patient," says Rolf Skotheim. Courtesy of Yngve Vogt

Supercomputing Reveals Genetic Code of Cancer

February 2, 2015 12:46 pm | by Yngve Vogt, University of Oslo | News | Comments

Cancer researchers must use one of the world's fastest computers to detect which versions of genes are only found in cancer cells. Every form of cancer, even every tumor, has its own distinct variants. A research group is working to identify the genes that cause bowel and prostate cancer, which are both common diseases. There are 4,000 new cases of bowel cancer in Norway every year. Only six out of 10 patients survive the first five years.

The Alan Turing Institute will promote the development and use of advanced mathematics, computer science, algorithms and big data for human benefit.

Alan Turing Institute Positioned to Break New Big Data, Online Security Boundaries

January 30, 2015 11:41 am | by Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council | News | Comments

The five universities have been selected to lead the new Alan Turing Institute. The Institute will build on the UK's existing academic strengths and help position the country as a world leader in the analysis and application of big data and algorithm research. Its headquarters will be based at the British Library at the center of London’s Knowledge Quarter.

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