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The Hans Meuer Award has been created in memory of the late Dr. Hans Meuer, general chair of the ISC conference from 1986 through 2014, and co-founder of the TOP500 project.

ISC Introduces the Hans Meuer Award

February 27, 2015 2:53 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

ISC is introducing the Hans Meuer Award to honor the most outstanding research paper submitted to the ISC High Performance conference’s research paper committee. This annual award has been created in memory of the late Dr. Hans Meuer, general chair of the ISC conference from 1986 through 2014, and co-founder of the TOP500 project.

Developing Simulation Software to Combat Humanity’s Biggest Issues

February 25, 2015 12:36 pm | by Queen’s University Belfast | News | Comments

Researchers are creating ground-breaking computer software, which has the potential to develop...

PNNL Shifts Computational Chemistry into Overdrive

February 25, 2015 8:29 am | by Karol Kowalski, Ph.D., and Edoardo Apra, Ph.D. | Articles | Comments

We computational chemists are an impatient lot. Despite the fact that we routinely deal with...

OpenPOWER Announces “Rethink the Data Center” Speaker Lineup

February 20, 2015 11:26 am | by OpenPOWER Foundation | News | Comments

The OpenPOWER Foundation has announced a solid lineup of speakers headlining its inaugural...

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The first in its series, ISC Cloud & Big Data will highlight the synergies between cloud and big data and present ways these technologies can build on each other’s strengths.

Inaugural ISC Cloud & Big Data Conference to be Held in Frankfurt

February 19, 2015 10:36 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | News | Comments

The inaugural international ISC Cloud & Big Data conference is a three-day multiple-track event that is replacing the ISC Cloud and ISC Big Data conferences, which were held separately over the past five years. Taking place from September 28 to 30, 2015, the conference will be held in Frankfurt, Germany, at the Frankfurt Marriott Hotel.

Tim Cutts is Head of Scientific Computing at Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

Modern DNA Sequencing Requires a Modern Day Approach

February 13, 2015 2:27 pm | by Tim Cutts, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute | Blogs | Comments

The sequencing machines that run today produce data several orders of magnitude faster than the machines used in the Human Genome Project. We at the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute currently produce more sequences in one hour than we did in our first 10 years of operation. A great deal of computational resource is then needed to process that data.

Qian and colleagues found that the topological phases in the TMDC materials can be turned on and off by simply applying a vertical electric field that is perpendicular to the atomic plane of the material. That's shown here in calculations by the red cross

Exotic States Materialize with Supercomputers

February 13, 2015 11:26 am | by Jorge Salazar, Texas Advanced Computing Center | News | Comments

Scientists used supercomputers to find a new class of materials that possess an exotic state of matter known as the quantum spin Hall effect. The researchers published their results in the journal Science in December 2014, where they propose a new type of transistor made from these materials.

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In this real-time, non-stop, 48-hour challenge, teams of undergraduate and/or high school students will assemble a small cluster on the SC15 exhibit floor and race to demonstrate the greatest sustained performance across a series of applications.

SC15 to Strengthen, Enhance Programs for Students, Early Career Researchers

February 13, 2015 10:32 am | by SC15 | News | Comments

For the past 15 years, the annual SC conference has welcomed hundreds of students to the week-long conference held every November, providing an entry into the community of high performance computing and networking. For SC15 in Austin, the student programs will be coordinated as a broader program to recruit a diverse group of students, ranging from undergrads to graduate students, as well as researchers in the early stages of their careers

Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source

Helping to Save Lives of Critically Ill Children

February 12, 2015 10:17 am | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Articles | Comments

For those on the front lines of treating cancer, speed and precision are key to patients’ survival. Pediatric cancer researchers have been making incredible strides in accelerating delivery of new diagnostic and treatment options. Supercomputer-powered genetic diagnosis is being used to harness the power of high throughput genomic and proteomic methods and is playing a key role in improving the outcome for children with genetic diseases.

Microscopic image of senile plaques seen in the cerebral cortex of a person with Alzheimer's disease of presenile onset. Courtesy of KGH

Blue Waters Project helps Uncover Alzheimer's Complex Genetic Networks

February 5, 2015 4:06 pm | by NSF | News | Comments

The release of the film, Still Alice, in September 2014 placed a much-needed light on Alzheimer's disease, a debilitating neurological disease that affects a growing number of Americans each year. More than 5.2 million people in the U.S. are currently living with Alzheimer's. One out of nine Americans over 65 has Alzheimer's, and one out of three over 85 has the disease. For those over 65, it is the fifth leading cause of death.

ISC High Performance is open to engineers, IT specialists, systems developers, vendors, end users, scientists, researchers, students and other members of the HPC global community.

Submission Period Ending Soon for ISC High Performance 2015

February 4, 2015 9:29 am | by ISC | News | Comments

In less than two weeks, most of the ISC High Performance submission opportunities will come to an end, and thus the organizers urge you to act now. The workshops, tutorials, birds-of-a-feather (BoF) sessions, research posters sessions are still open for submission until February 15. The student volunteer program application ends April 10.

Customized Treatment: "Charting the versions of the genes that are only found in cancer cells may help tailor the treatment offered to each patient," says Rolf Skotheim. Courtesy of Yngve Vogt

Supercomputing Reveals Genetic Code of Cancer

February 2, 2015 12:46 pm | by Yngve Vogt, University of Oslo | News | Comments

Cancer researchers must use one of the world's fastest computers to detect which versions of genes are only found in cancer cells. Every form of cancer, even every tumor, has its own distinct variants. A research group is working to identify the genes that cause bowel and prostate cancer, which are both common diseases. There are 4,000 new cases of bowel cancer in Norway every year. Only six out of 10 patients survive the first five years.

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Improving Data Mobility and Management for International Cosmology

Improving Data Mobility and Management for International Cosmology Workshop

January 28, 2015 3:06 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | Events

Registration is now open for a workshop on “Improving Data Mobility and Management for International Cosmology” to be held February 10-11, 2015, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. The workshop, one in a series of Cross-Connects workshops, is sponsored the by the Deptartment of Energy’s ESnet and Internet2. Early registration is encouraged, as attendance is limited.

Arabidopsis thaliana, a model flowering plant studied by biologists, has climate-sensitive genes whose expression was found to evolve. Courtesy of Penn State

Needle in a Haystack: Finding the Right Genes in Tens of Thousands

January 28, 2015 2:45 pm | by TACC | News | Comments

Scientists using supercomputers found genes sensitive to cold and drought in a plant help it survive climate change. The computational challenges were daunting, involving thousands of individual strains of the plant with hundreds of thousands of markers across the genome and testing for a dozen environmental variables. Their findings increase basic understanding of plant adaptation and can be applied to improve crops.

This simulation, which models a rheometer with particles, can help determine how well a rheometer design works at characterizing a fluid. The NIST team is performing a number of simulations like this one, varying the shape and number of blades to better i

Predicting Concrete Flow Properties from Simple Measurements

January 23, 2015 2:44 pm | by NIST | News | Comments

Just because concrete is the most widely used building material in human history doesn’t mean it can’t be improved. A recent study using DOE Office of Science supercomputers has led to a new way to predict concrete’s flow properties from simple measurements. The results should help accelerate the design of a new generation of high-performance and eco-friendly cement-based materials by reducing time and costs associated with R&D.

This puzzle of a material which seems solid to any observer while appearing fluid under the microscope is an old one. And, even with the help of today's supercomputers, it seems impossible to verify in simulations whether a glass ever stops flowing. Court

Puzzle: Does Glass Ever Stop Flowing?

January 22, 2015 2:15 pm | by University of Bristol | News | Comments

Is glass a true solid? Researchers have combined computer simulation and information theory, originally invented for telephone communication and cryptography, to answer this puzzling question. This puzzle of a material which seems solid to any observer while appearing fluid under the microscope is an old one. And, even with the help of today's supercomputers, it seems impossible to verify in simulations whether a glass ever stops flowing.

The conference will focus on High-Performance Computing essentials, new developments and emerging technologies, best practices and hands-on training.

HPC Advisory Council Switzerland Conference 2015

January 20, 2015 10:10 am | by HPC Advisory Council | Events

The HPC Advisory Council and the Swiss Supercomputing Centre will host the HPC Advisory Council Switzerland Conference 2015 in the Lugano Convention Centre, Lugano, Switzerland, from March 23 - March 25, 2015. The conference will focus on High-Performance Computing essentials, new developments and emerging technologies, best practices and hands-on training.

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The aim of this conference is to bring together all stakeholders involved in solving the software challenges of the exascale – from application developers, through numerical library experts, programming model developers and integrators, to tools designers

EASC2015: Solving Software Challenges for Exascale

January 20, 2015 10:01 am | by University of Edinburg | Events

The aim of this conference is to bring together all of the stakeholders involved in solving the software challenges of the exascale — from application developers, through numerical library experts, programming model developers and integrators, to tools designers. EASC2015 is organised by EPCC at the University of Edinburgh.

Students who take part in these competitions jumpstart their careers in technology and research. They typically spend six months of their time preparing for this competition, all the while learning an incredible amount of skills in software, hardware and

Join us in Sponsoring the HPC Workforce of the Future

January 15, 2015 8:55 am | by Brian Sparks, HPC Advisory Council Media Relations and Events Director | Blogs | Comments

It’s no secret that finding good talent is hard. It’s even harder in the HPC and scientific community. To help bridge the gap between the next wave of HPC professionals and the commercial vendors that require their talent, the HPC Advisory Council has joined forces with ISC Events to host the fourth HPCAC-ISC Student Cluster Competition 2015.

Merle Giles, Director of NCSA Private Sector Programs and Economic Impact; Rob Rick, VP Sales Americas of Allinea Software

Supercomputing Creates Competitive Advantages in U.S. Industrial R&D

January 8, 2015 2:26 pm | by Allinea Software | News | Comments

The NCSA is enabling software heavily used in industry to run faster, and it’s creating competitive advantages for some of the nation’s largest companies. Industry is a heavy user of supercomputing: it is central to the business of companies within diverse sectors such as oil and gas, pharmaceutical, aerospace and automotive.

The top figure shows the progression of deflagration through the explosive cylinders (light blue) transitioning to detonation (0.710 msec). The dark blue region shows the position of the 2D pressure slice illustrated in the bottom figure. Courtesy of Jacq

Large-scale 3-D Simulations Aim at Safer Transport of Explosives

January 7, 2015 2:20 pm | by Jim Collins, Argonne Leadership Computing Facility | News | Comments

In 2005, a semi-truck hauling 35,000 pounds of explosives through the Spanish Fork Canyon in Utah crashed and caught fire, causing a dramatic explosion that left a 30-by-70-foot crater in the highway. Fortunately, there were no fatalities. Such accidents are extremely rare but can, obviously, have devastating results. So, understanding better exactly how such explosions occur can be an important step to learning how better to prevent them.

The 56th HPC User Forum will take place from April 13-15, 2015, at the Marriott Norfolk Waterside in Norfolk, Virginia.

IDC HPC User Forum, Norfolk, Virginia

January 6, 2015 4:28 pm | by IDC | Events

The 56th HPC User Forum will take place from April 13-15, 2015, at the Marriott Norfolk Waterside in Norfolk, Virginia.

NOAA's supercomputer upgrades will provide more timely, accurate weather forecasts.

Environmental Intelligence: Significant Investment in Next-Gen Supercomputers to Improve Weather Forecasts

January 6, 2015 12:26 pm | by NOAA | News | Comments

NOAA has announced the next phase in the agency’s efforts to increase supercomputing capacity to provide more timely, accurate, reliable and detailed forecasts. By October 2015, the capacity of each of NOAA’s two operational supercomputers will jump to 2.5 petaflops, for a total of 5 petaflops — a nearly tenfold increase from the current capacity.

This simulation illustrates the total mass density (left) and temperature (right) of a dimethyl ether jet fuel simulation. It is a snapshot of the solution that corresponds to a physical time of 0.00006 seconds. Courtesy of Matthew Emmett, Weiqun Zhang

Optimized Algorithms Give Combustion Simulations a Boost

December 18, 2014 4:32 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Turbulent combustion simulations, which provide input to the design of more fuel-efficient combustion systems, have gotten their own efficiency boost. Researchers developed new algorithmic features that streamline turbulent flame simulations, which play an important role in designing more efficient combustion systems. They tested the enhanced code on the Hopper supercomputer and achieved a dramatic decrease in simulation times.

Simulated and observed annual maximum five-day accumulated precipitation over land points, averaged. Observations are calculated from the period 1979 to 1999. Model results are calculated from the period 1979 to 2005.

Global High-resolution Models Fuel New Golden Age of Climate Science

December 18, 2014 4:14 pm | by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | News | Comments

Not long ago, it would have taken several years to run a high-resolution simulation on a global climate model. But using supercomputing resources at NERSC, climate scientist Michael Wehner was able to complete a run in just three months. What he found was that not only were the simulations much closer to actual observations, but the high-resolution models were far better at reproducing intense storms, such as hurricanes and cyclones.

The species used in a Rice University genetic study of mice were collected from 15 locations in Europe and Africa. The green region indicates the range of Mus spretus, the Algerian mouse, while the blue region indicates the range of Mus musculus domesticu

Big Data Analysis Reveals Shared Genetic Code between Species

December 18, 2014 11:32 am | by Mike Williams, Rice University | News | Comments

Researchers have detected at least three instances of cross-species mating that likely influenced the evolutionary paths of “old world” mice, two in recent times and one in the distant past. They think these instances of introgressive hybridization are only the first of many needles waiting to be found in a very large genetic haystack. The finding suggests that hybridization in mammals may not be an evolutionary dead end.

ISC has announced the ISC Cloud & Big Data conference, which has merged into a three-day event to take place in Frankfurt, Germany, on September 28 to 30, 2015.

ISC Cloud & Big Data Conferences to Merge in 2015

December 16, 2014 12:11 pm | by Suzanne Tracy, Editor-in-Chief, Scientific Computing and HPC Source | Blogs | Comments

ISC has announced the ISC Cloud & Big Data conference, which has merged into a three-day event to take place in Frankfurt, Germany, on September 28 to 30, 2015. The new format offers attendees two full days of multi-track sessions, highlighting current and future technologies, and applications most relevant in the cloud and big data fields. In addition, there will be one full day of workshops.

For the family of bee-eaters (on the photo Merops bullocki), the study revealed a close relationship to oscine birds, parrots, and birds of prey. Courtesy of Peter Houde

Bird Tree of Life Reproduced using Gene Analysis, Supercomputing

December 15, 2014 1:57 pm | by Karlsruhe Institute of Technology | News | Comments

About 95 percent of the more than 10,000 bird species known only evolved upon the extinction of dinosaurs about 66 million years ago. According to computer analyses of the genetic data, today's diversity developed from a few species at a virtually explosive rate after 15 million years. Scientists designed the algorithms for the comprehensive analysis of the evolution of birds; a computing capacity of 300 processor-years was required.

Duke researchers led by associate professor of neurobiology Erich Jarvis, left, did most of the DNA extraction from bird tissue samples used in the Avian Phylogenomics Consortium. (l-r: Carole Parent, Nisarg Dabhi, Jason Howard). Courtesy of Les Todd, Duk

Mapping the "Big Bang" of Bird Evolution

December 12, 2014 6:04 pm | by Kelly Rae Chi, Duke University | News | Comments

The genomes of modern birds tell a story of how they emerged and evolved after the mass extinction that wiped out dinosaurs and almost everything else 66 million years ago. That story is now coming to light, thanks to an ambitious international collaboration that has been underway for four years. The first findings of the Avian Phylogenomics Consortium are being reported nearly simultaneously in 28 papers.

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